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Encyclopedia > Proposals for amendments to the United States Constitution
It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Unsuccessful attempts to amend the U.S. Constitution. (Discuss)

This is an incomplete list of proposed amendments to the United States Constitution, in reverse chronological order. Many amendments are proposed every year. Most never get out of Congressional committees.
Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The United States Constitution has been amended on 18 occasions—with a total of 27 individual successful amendments—since the Constitution was completed in 1787. ... A Congressional committee in the parlance of the United States Congress and politics of the United States is a legislative sub-organization that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress, i. ...

Contents


2005

  • Several constitutional amendments simultaneously proposed by Representative Jesse Jackson Jr. on March 2, 2005, including, but not limited to, amendments concerning:
  1. The right of citizens of the United States to health care of equal high quality.
  2. The right of all citizens of the United States to a public education of equal high quality.
  3. The right to vote.
  4. The right to a clean, safe, and sustainable environment.
  5. The right to decent, safe, sanitary, and affordable housing.
  6. Equality of rights and reproductive rights. This amendment is essentially a modified version of the Equal Rights Amendment which would apparrently bolster Roe v. Wade.
  7. The right to full employment and balanced growth.
  8. Taxing the people of the United States progressively.
  • Twenty-second Amendment: Repeal proposed February 2005 by Maryland congressman Steny Hoyer. The amendment limits the president to two terms in office.
  • Abolishment of personal income, estate, and gift taxes and prohibition of the United States Government from engaging in business in competition with its citizens, proposed by Ron Paul on January 26, 2005.

Jesse Jackson, Jr. ... The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution which would have guaranteed equal rights under law for Americans regardless of sex. ... Holding Texas laws criminalizing abortion violated womens Fourteenth Amendment right to choose whether to continue a pregnancy. ... The Twenty-second Amendment of the United States Constitution sets a two-term limit for the President of the United States. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Official languages None Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich (R) Senators Paul Sarbanes (D) Barbara Mikulski (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 42nd 32,160 km² 21 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 19th 5,296,486 165/km² (5th) Admission into... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... Steny Hoyer Steny Hamilton Hoyer (born June 14, 1939) is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives, representing the 5th district of the State of Maryland (map) since 1981, and is the current House Minority Whip. ... Representative Ron Paul Ronald Ernest Paul, MD (born August 20, 1935), a physician and Texas politician, is a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Texass 14th Congressional District (map) and a former Presidential Candidate of the United States Libertarian Party. ...

2004

September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An electoral college is a set of electors who are empowered as a deliberative body to elect someone to a particular office. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Utah is one of the Four Corners states, and is bordered by: Idaho (at 42°N) and Wyoming (at 41°N and 111°W) in the north, by Colorado (at 109°W) in the east, at a single point by New Mexico to the southeast (at the Four Corners Monument... Orrin Grant Hatch (born March 22, 1934 in Pittsburgh) is a five-term Republican United States Senator, from Utah. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... The Equal Opportunity to Govern Amendment is a Constitutional Amendment proposed in July 2003 by US Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT) to repeal the nativist clause prohibiting foreign-born individuals from holding the office of President or Vice President of the United States. ... ▶ (help· info) (born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American actor, Republican politician, and bodybuilder, currently serving as the 38th Governor of California. ... Amendment XVII (the Seventeenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution ratified on April 8, 1913 and first in effect for the election of 1914, amends Article 1 Section 3 of the Constitution to provide for the direct election of Senators by the people of a state rather than their election... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Zell Bryan Miller (born February 24, 1932) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Article One of the United States Constitution Article One of the United States Constitution establishes the legislative branch of the United States government, known as the Congress, which includes the House of Representatives and the Senate. ... The Federal Marriage Amendment (FMA) is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution which would define marriage in the United States as a union of one man and one woman. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Marriage is a relationship between individuals which has formed the foundation of the family for most societies. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal or biological sex. ...

2003 and earlier

Congressman Mark A. Foley Mark Adam Foley (born September 8, 1954), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1995, representing the 16th District of Florida (map). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Balanced Budget Amendment The Balanced Budget Amendment is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution which would require a balance in the projected revenues and expenditures of the United States government. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dorothea Lange photograph of Japanese-American students reciting the Pledge of Allegiance The Pledge of Allegiance is a promise or oath of allegiance to the United States, and to its national flag. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Oklahoma is a state of the United States, lying mostly in the southern Great Plains, and its U.S. postal abbreviation is OK; others abbreviate the states name Okla. ... The Flag Desecration Amendment (often referred to as the flag burning amendment) is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution that would allow the U.S. Congress to outlaw, by statute, the physical desecration of the flag of the United States. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution which would have guaranteed equal rights under law for Americans regardless of sex. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... The Human Life Amendment is the name for any amendment to the United States Constitution that would have the effect of overturning Roe v. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Holding Texas laws criminalizing abortion violated womens Fourteenth Amendment right to choose whether to continue a pregnancy. ... The Bricker Amendment was a proposal to amend the United States Constitution in the 1950s to limit the federal governments treaty-making powers. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Official languages None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George V. Voinovich (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 8. ... This article needs cleanup. ... The phrase Christian amendment refers to any of several attempts to insert Christian ideas and language into the United States Constitution. ... The term Blaine Amendment refers to amendments or provisions that exist in most state constitutions in the United States that forbid direct educational institutions that have any religous affiliation. ... The Corwin Amendment was, and remains, a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution offered by Ohio Republican Congressman Thomas Corwin during the closing days of the 2nd Session of the 36th Congress in the form of House (Joint) Resolution No. ... The Crittenden Compromise (December 18, 1860) was an unsuccessful proposal by Kentucky Senator John J. Crittenden to resolve the U.S. secession crisis of 1860–1861 by addressing the concerns that led the states in the Lower South of the United States to contemplate secession. ...

External links


Complete text at WikiSource United States Constitution edit

Original text: Preamble | Article 1 | Article 2 | Article 3 | Article 4 | Article 5 | Article 6 | Article 7 The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... The Preamble to the United States Constitution consists of a single sentence (a preamble) that introduces the document and its purpose. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Article One of the United States Constitution Article One of the United States Constitution establishes the legislative branch of the United States government, known as the Congress, which includes the House of Representatives and the Senate. ... Article Two of the United States Constitution creates the executive branch of the government, comprising the President and other executive officers. ... Article Three of the United States Constitution establishes the judicial branch of the federal (national) government. ... Article Four of the United States Constitution relates to the states. ... Article Five of the United States Constitution describes the process whereby the Constitution may be altered. ... Article Six establishes the United States Constitution and the laws and treaties of the United States made in accordance with it as the supreme law of the land, and fulfills other purposes. ... Article Seven of the United States Constitution describes the process by which the entire document is to be ratified and take effect. ...

Amendments: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27
 Formation  History of the Constitution | Articles of Confederation | Annapolis Convention | Philadelphia Convention | New Jersey Plan | Virginia Plan | Massachusetts Compromise | Connecticut Compromise | Federalist Papers | Signatories
 Amendments  Bill of Rights | Ratified | Proposed | Unsuccessful | Conventions to propose | State ratifying conventions
 Clauses  Commerce | Commerce (Dormant) | Contract | Copyright | Due Process | Equal Protection | Establishment | Full Faith and Credit | Impeachment | Natural–born citizen | Necessary and Proper | No Religious Test | Privileges or Immunities | Supremacy | Taxing and Spending | War Powers
 Interpretation  Congressional power of enforcement | Double jeopardy | Enumerated powers | Incorporation of the Bill of Rights | Nondelegation | Preemption | Separation of church and state | Separation of powers

  Results from FactBites:
 
United States Constitution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5531 words)
The U.S. Constitution styles itself the "supreme law of the land." Courts have interpreted this phrase to mean that when laws (including state constitutions) that have been passed by state legislatures, or by the (national) U.S. Congress, are found to conflict with the federal constitution, these laws are ultra vires and have no effect.
The United States is a common law country, and courts are obliged to follow the precedents established in prior cases.
The Constitution of the United States has also served as a model for the constitutions of numerous other nations, including the second oldest codified constitution, the May Constitution of Poland, which was written in 1791.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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