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Encyclopedia > Prophecy

Prophecy, generally, describes the disclosing of information that is not known to the prophet by any ordinary means.[1] In religion, this is thought to be a divinely inspired revelation or interpretation. Although, found throughout the religions of the world, the term has found popular acceptance through the work and influence of the Hebrew prophets.[2] A prophecy is a prophets revelation from his or her deity. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... The ASCII codes for the word Wikipedia represented in binary, the numeral system most commonly used for encoding computer information. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... Revelation of the Last Judgment by Jacob de Backer Revelation is an uncovering or disclosure via communication from the divine of something that has been partially or wholly hidden or unknown, which could not be known apart from the unveiling (Goswiller 1987 p. ... Interpretation, or interpreting, is an activity that consists of establishing, either simultaneously or consecutively, oral or gestural communications between two or more speakers who are not speaking (or signing) the same language. ... Major world religions have been distinguished from minor religions using a variety of methods, though any such division naturally reflects a particular bias, since many adherent of a religion are likely to consider their own faith major. Two methods are mentioned in this article, number of adherents and the definitions... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ...

Contents

Definitions of Prophecy

Rabbinic scholar Maimonides, suggested that "prophecy is, in truth and reality, an emanation sent forth by the divine being through the medium of the active intellect, in the first instance to man's rational faculty, and then to his imaginative faculty."[3] This closely relates to the definition by Al-Fârâbî who developed the theory of prophecy in Islam.[4] The Catholic Encyclopedia defines prophecy as "understood in its strict sense, it means the foreknowledge of future events, though it may sometimes apply to past events of which there is no memory, and to present hidden things which cannot be known by the natural light of reason."[5] A Rabbi (Classical Hebrew רִבִּי ribbī; modern Ashkenazi and Israeli רַבִּי rabbī) is a religious Jewish scholar who is an expert in Jewish law. ... Commonly used image indicating one artists conception of Maimonidess appearance Maimonides (March 30, 1135 or 1138–December 13, 1204) was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher in Spain, Morocco and Egypt during the Middle Ages. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Active intellect is a term used in both psychology and philosophy. ... Rationality as a term is related to the idea of reason, a word which following Websters may be derived as much from older terms referring to thinking itself as from giving an account or an explanation. ... For other uses, see Imagination (disambiguation). ... Al Farabi (870-950) was born of a Turkish family and educated by a Christian physician in Baghdad, and was himself later considered a teacher on par with Aristotle. ... Not to be confused with New Catholic Encyclopedia. ...


Etymology

The English word 'prophecy' (noun) in the sense of "function of a prophet" appeared in Europe from about 1225, from Old French 'profecie' (12th century), and from Late Latin 'prophetia', Latin 'proficio' (advance)[6], from Greek 'prophetia', "gift of interpreting the will of the gods," from 'prophetes' (see prophet). The related meaning "thing spoken or written by a prophet" is from c.1300, while the verb 'prophesy' is recorded by 1377.[7] For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of modern Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Vulgar Latin (in Latin, sermo vulgaris) is a blanket term covering the vernacular dialects of the Latin language spoken mostly in the western provinces of the Roman Empire until those dialects, diverging still further, evolved into the early Romance languages — a distinction usually assigned to about the ninth century. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ...


One of the earliest recorded uses of the term, prophecy, is nevuah, and comes from Hebrew "divrei nevuah", (English - words of prophecy), and forms the name of a major subdivision of the Tanakh, the Nevi'im [נביאים], and means "a prediction", from the root "Nuv" meaning to bear fruit, or make flourish.[8] This may relate to the nature of prophecy from the Jewish perspective where, in Rabbinic traditions, Ezra is metaphorically referred to as the "flowers that appear on the earth" signifying the springtime in the national history of Judaism.[citation needed] For the musical collective, see Tanakh (band). ... Neviim [נביאים] (Heb: Prophets) is the second of the three major sections in the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible), following the Torah and preceding Ketuvim (writings). ... For other uses, see Ezra (disambiguation). ... Jewish history is the history of the Jewish people, faith, and culture. ...


Components of prophecy

There are many religious systems where prophecy is the core principle of belief recorded orally or in written form. In the case of the written texts, usually called scriptures, the contents often include, though not exclusively, a record of prophecy that include the identification of the Source , the experience of the prophet or prophetess, and the record itself. For other uses, see Faith (disambiguation). ... Many religions and spiritual movements hold certain written texts (or series of spoken legends not traditionally written down) to be sacred. ...


Prophecy is itself a part of a process. Most commonly the sequence of changes of properties or attributes of an ordinary human being into a prophet can be describe with the following: Illustration of a physical process: a geyser in action. Process (lat. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Change For other uses, see Change (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up attribute in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ...

  • 1. There is an original condition stated by the Divine to a given individual, group or society[citation needed]
  • 2. There is a need for a prophecy predicated by some divergence from the original condition[citation needed]
  • 3. There is the selection of the messenger of the need to correct the divergence by the Source, the prophet[citation needed]
  • 4. There is the experience of the messenger's realisation of his/her new role and mission[citation needed]
  • 5. There is the delivery of the message...[citation needed]
  • 6. ...and its recording as a claim to acting on behalf of the Source (which may occur at a later time)[citation needed]
  • 7. There is the acceptance or rejection of the message by the intended addressee(s)[citation needed]
  • 8. The content of the prophecy becomes reality, or not, if the message is accepted[citation needed]
  • 9. If the prophecy becomes reality, the messenger is accepted as a prophet/prophetess based on the (point 8.) outcome[citation needed]
  • 10. Once the messenger is accepted as a prophet (i.e. true prophet), he/she may make further[citation needed]claims of prophecy that are likely to be accepted based on the precedent of the previous delivery[citation needed]
  • 11. Once the claims of prophecy are accepted, the prophet/prophetess become a part of the belief system, or faith[citation needed]

Nature of prophecy

In the earliest Jewish source, the Torah, prophecy often consisted of a warning by God of the consequences should the society, specific communities or their leaders not adhere to Torah;s instructions. Prophecies sometimes included promises of blessing for obeying God, and returning to behaviours and laws as written in the Torah. Warning prophecies feature in all Jewish works of the Tanakh. Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... For the musical collective, see Tanakh (band). ...


The rabbinic teachings, notably RaMBaM, suggest there were many levels of prophecy, from the highest such as that experienced by Moses, to the lowest where the individuals were able to apprehend the Divine Will, but not respond or even describe this experience to others, such as Noah. Commonly used image indicating one artists conception of Maimonidess appearance Maimonides (March 30, 1135 or 1138–December 13, 1204) was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher in Spain, Morocco and Egypt during the Middle Ages. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Noah in rabbinic literature. ...

Maimonides' theory of prophecy contains two elements 1) an explanation of what prophecy is, and 2) a ranking of the various types of prophecy and prophecy-like phenomena. I think we can use the ranking of prophecy implicate in Maimonides to substantiate our thesis that the rationalism of Maimonides is essentially a moral rationalism.[9]

Maimonides in his work, The Guide for the Perplexed, outlines twelve modes of prophecy[3] from lesser to greater degree of clarity:

  • 1. Inspired actions
  • 2. Inspired words
  • 3. Allegorical dream revelations
  • 4. Auditory dream revelations
  • 5. Audiovisual dream revelations/human speaker
  • 6. Audiovisual dream revelations/angelic speaker
  • 7. Audiovisual dream revelations/Divine speaker
  • 8. Allegorical waking vision
  • 9. Auditory waking revelation
  • 10. Audiovisual waking revelation/human speaker
  • 11. Audiovisual waking revelation/angelic speaker
  • 12. Audiovisual waking revelation/Divine speaker (that refers implicitly to Moses)

Of the twelfth mode Maimonides, focuses his attention on its "implicit superiority to the penultimate stage in the above series", and therefore above all other prophetic and semi-prophetic modes.[10] An allegory (from Greek αλλος, allos, other, and αγορευειν, agoreuein, to speak in public) is a figurative representation conveying a meaning other than and in addition to the literal. ... For other uses, see Dream (disambiguation). ... This article is about compression waves. ... This article is about modern humans. ... For other uses, see Angel (disambiguation). ... Look up vision in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Experience of prophecy in the Torah and the rest of Tanakh do not restrict it to Jews, or even to human beings if one episode is to be interpreted literally. Nor is the prophetic experience restricted to the Hebrew language, since much of the prophecies of Daniel are in Aramaic. Balaam (Hebrew בִּלְעָם, Standard Hebrew Bilʻam, Tiberian Hebrew Bilʻām; could mean glutton or foreigner, but this etymology is uncertain), is a prophet in the Bible, his story occurring in the Book of Numbers. ... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... For other uses, see Book of Daniel (disambiguation). ...


Many of the Tanakh prophecies are accompanied by radical changes in the life of the prophets, and their experience is often accompanied by physiological change, including physical stress, experience of extrasensory perception (visions), physical collapse, and changes in their psychological state as a result of the encounter with the Divine.[citation needed] In religion, visions comprise inspirational renderings, generally of a future state and/or of a mythical being, and are believed (by followers of the religion) to come from a deity, directly or indirectly via prophets, and serve to inspire or prod believers as part of a revelation or an epiphany. ...


The prophetic experience is always bestowed on the individual, usually unprepared for the experience, by the Divine, and this often causes the prophet to undergo travel, and often privations and persecution due to the unwelcome contents of the message he or she bring to those for whom it is intended.[citation needed] For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ...


In the Christian New Testament prophecy is often referred as one of the fivefold ministries or spiritual gifts that accompany the indwelling of the Holy Spirit. From this many Christians believe that prophecy is the supernatural ability to receive and convey a message from God or the divine. The purpose of the message may be to "edify, exhort and comfort" the members of the church or an individual believer. In this context, not all prophecies contain predictions about the future. The Apostle Paul also teaches in Corinthians that prophecy is for the benefit of the whole Church and not just the individual exercising the gift.[11] The gifts of the Holy Spirit are found in the New Testament. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... For other uses, see Supernatural (disambiguation). ... Look up comfort in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Prediction of future events is an ancient human wish. ... A 19th century picture of Paul of Tarsus Paul of Tarsus (originally Saul of Tarsus) or Saint Paul the Apostle (fl. ... Corinthian can refer to: Corinth Corinthian order Corinthian league First Epistle to the Corinthians or Second Epistle to the Corinthians (books of the Bible) Sport Club Corinthians Paulista, a football club in Brazil Corinthians F.C., a former English football club, now part of Corinthian-Casuals F.C. The Corinthian...


Instances of prophecy

Tanakh

The Tanakh contains prophecies from various Hebrew prophets (55 in total) who communicated messages from God to the nation of Israel, and later the population of Judea and elsewhere. For the musical collective, see Tanakh (band). ... Hashem/השם, literally: The Name is a term used by Orthodox Jews to casually refer to God, Whose Name is only used in blessings and prayer. ... “The Twelve Tribes” redirects here. ... Map of the southern Levant, c. ...


Malachi, who's full name was Ezra Ha'Sofer (the scribe), is acknowledged to have been the last prophet of Israel if one accepts the opinion that Nechemyah died in Babylon before 9th Tevet 3448 (313 BCE). Babylonian Talmud, vol. San.11a, Yom.9a/Yuch.1.14/Kuz.3.39,65,67/Yuch.1/Mag.Av.O.C.580.6 


Christianity

The Book of Enoch, while not a part of the Canon of Scripture for most of the Christian Churches, was quoted[Quotation needed from source] as a prophetic text in the New Testament (Letter of Jude with also a probable reference in I Peter 3:19,20 to Enoch 6-36, especially 21, 6; 2 Enoch 7:1-5). To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Prophecy in the Gospels

There are instances in the Gospel writings where individuals are described as being prophets or prophesying, suggestive of a culture that was still open to the possibility of prophecy or hearing from the Divine despite Jewish beliefs to the contrary.[citation needed] Some examples include Simeon, Anna, and John the Baptist[12]. The Gospel of Matthew in particular also contains many claims that events in the life of Jesus were fulfillments of certain Hebrew prophecies. For other uses, see Gospel (disambiguation). ... Prophecy, in a broad sense, is the prediction of future events. ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... Simeon the Righteous by Alexey Yegorov. ... Anna at the presentation of Jesus (right), from Giotto, Chapel of Scrovegni. ... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ...


Nothing is known of the prophetic experience of Jesus, though many Christians believe him to have experienced it based on the passage in John chapter four that whilst passing through Samaria, Jesus encountered a woman who had been married five times. In the story, Jesus relates to her details of her personal life. The woman states that "I can see you are a prophet."[13] However this can also be claimed to be a case of postdiction.[citation needed] In several places, Jesus predicted that he would die, and be raised from the dead three days later.[14] He also made numerous prophecies concerning the the last or final judgement, such as in Matthew 25. This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... “Shomron” redirects here. ... Postdiction, post-shadowing, retroactive clairvoyance, and prediction after the fact are terms used by critics to refer to those who use hindsight to claim to have predicted a significant event such as a plane crash or natural disaster. ...


Prophecy in other Christian literature

Throughout the book of Acts, there are numerous references to individuals prophesying in different ways and contexts, however nothing is known of the experience of prophecy based on this source.[citation needed] Similarly, although prophecies are claimed to have been recorded in the Pauline Epistles and the Book of Revelation, nothing can be said about the experience of the prophets in these sources either.[citation needed] This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ...


Prophecy in the Modern Church

Since the early 1900's, the number of Christians claiming to be endowed with prophecy has greatly increased[citation needed] with the growth of the Pentecostal movement.[citation needed] This article is about the decade starting in 1900 and ending in 1909. ... The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ...


The Charismatic movement, which started in the 1960's, started as an acceptance of the baptism of the Holy Spirit and the use of spiritual gifts by groups within mainline churches, one of the movement's beliefs being that one such "spiritual gift" is the modern manifestation of prophecy.[citation needed] Charismatic is an umbrella term used to describe those Christians who believe that the manifestations of the Holy Spirit seen in the first century Christian Church, such as healing, miracles and glossolalia, are available to contemporary Christians and ought to be experienced and practiced today. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1958 to the end of 1974. ... This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... The gifts of the Holy Spirit are found in the New Testament. ...


Instances of prophecy have also been witnessed in the Catholic Church. In 1917, three children were reported to have received visions and prophecies at Fatima, Portugal.[15][unreliable source?] The name Catholic Church can mean a visible organization that refers to itself as Catholic, or the invisible Christian Church, viz. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Vision can refer to: Visual perception is one of the senses. ... Fatima may refer to: Fatima (name) a female personal name (see that article for a list of other people with the name) Fatima Zahra, daughter of prophet Muhammad, and wife of Ali, the 1st Imam of Shia Islam. ...


Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

In the 1840s, Joseph Smith, is said to have translated golden plates through divine revelation by the spirit, thereby producing the Book of Mormon. While his followers believe that their founder was a "latter-day" prophet, there is no record of his experience of prophecy. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... // First use of general anesthesia in an operation, by Crawford Long The first electrical telegraph sent by Samuel Morse on May 24, 1844 from Baltimore to Washington, D.C.. First signing of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi, Northland New Zealand. ... Joseph Smith redirects here. ... // The Book of Mormon [1] is one of the sacred texts of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ...


Amerindian prophecy

Several cases of claimed prophecy exist among the Amerindian populations, notably the three Dogrib prophets who claimed to have been divinely inspired to bring the message of Christianity's God to their people.[16] For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... The Tli Cho (Tłįchǫ) First Nation, formerly known as the Dogrib, are an Aboriginal Canadian people living in the Northwest Territories (NWT). ...


Islam

Muslims maintain that Muhammad experienced a prophetic phenomena equated with interpretation of dreams, visions and remote viewing[citation needed], and who accepted him as a prophet. A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Dreaming is the subjective experience of imaginary images, sounds/voices, thoughts or sensations during sleep, usually involuntarily. ... In religion, visions comprise inspirational renderings, generally of a future state and/or of a mythical being, and are believed (by followers of the religion) to come from a deity, directly or indirectly via prophets, and serve to inspire or prod believers as part of a revelation or an epiphany. ... Remote viewing (RV) is a broad term for a variety of techniques or protocols employed to produce and control extra-sensory perception (ESP). ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ...


Ahmadiyya

The founder of the Ahmadiyya Islamic reform movement, Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, claimed to have fulfilled the prophecies concerning the Messiah, however nothing is known of his experience of prophecy. Mirza Ghulam Ahmad was the founder of the Ahmadiyya religious movement. ... Mirza Ghulam Ahmad Mirza Ghulam Ahmad of Qadian (مرزا غلام احمد) (February 13, 1835 - May 26, 1908 corresponding to Shawal 14, 1250 AH - Rabi al-thani 24 1326 AH). ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ... Mirza Ghulam Ahmad was the founder of the Ahmadiyya religious movement. ...


Bahá'í Faith

Main article: Bahá'í Prophecies

In 1863, Bahá'u'lláh, the founder of the Bahá'í Faith, claimed the he is the 'Promised One' of all religions, in other words a prophet. However nothing is known of his experience of prophecy. Shrine of Baháulláh Baháulláh (ba-haa-ol-laa Arabic: Glory of God) (November 12, 1817 – May 29, 1892), born Mírzá usayn-`Alí Nuri (Persian: ), was the founder of the Baháí Faith. ... This article is about the generally recognized global religious community. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ...


Other belief systems

Prophecy has been claimed for, but not by, Michel de Nostredame popularly referred to as Nostradamus who was a Christian. However, it is known that he had travelled widely, had suffered several tragedies in his life, and had been persecuted to some degree for his suggestions about the future, reportedly derived through a use of a crystal ball. For other uses, see Faith (disambiguation). ... Nostradamus: original portrait by his son Cesar Michel de Nostredame (December 14, 1503 – July 2, 1566), usually Latinized to Nostradamus, was a French apothecary and reputed seer who published collections of prophecies that have since become famous world-wide. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... This article is about the fortune telling object; for other uses, see Crystal ball (disambiguation). ...


Scepticism about prophecy

Sceptics believe many apparently fulfilled prophecies can be explained as coincidences (possibly aided by the prophecy's own vagueness), or that some prophecies were actually invented after the fact to match the circumstances of a past event ("postdiction"). Whitcomb in The Magician's Companion observes, Postdiction, post-shadowing, retroactive clairvoyance, and prediction after the fact are terms used by critics to refer to those who use hindsight to claim to have predicted a significant event such as a plane crash or natural disaster. ...

One point to remember is that the probability of an event changes as soon as a prophecy (or divination) exists. . . . The accuracy or outcome of any prophecy is altered by the desires and attachments of the seer and those who hear the prophecy.[17]

See also

False prophet is a label given to a person who is viewed as illegitimately claiming charismatic authority within a religious group. ...

References

  1. ^ http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/prophecy/
  2. ^ http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=554&letter=P
  3. ^ (Rambam, The Guide p.225) [1]
  4. ^ http://www.csulb.edu/~dsteiger/maimonides.htm The influence of Islamic Philosophy on Maimonides's Thought, Diana Steigerwald Religious Studies, California State University (Long Beach)
  5. ^ http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/12473a.htm Catholic Encyclopedia
  6. ^ p.195, Tucker
  7. ^ Online Etymology Dictionary
  8. ^ p.1596, The Complete Hebrew - English dictionary, Reuben Alcalay
  9. ^ http://www.meru.org/Advisors/Sunwall/RambamProphecy.html The Suprarational Grounds of Rationalism: Maimonides and The Criteria of Prophecy, Mark R. Sunwall
  10. ^ http://www.meru.org/Advisors/Sunwall/RambamProphecy.html The Suprarational Grounds of Rationalism: Maimonides and The Criteria of Prophecy, Mark R. Sunwall
  11. ^ Corinthians%2014:22;&version=31; 1 Corinthians 14:22
  12. ^ Matthew 21:26
  13. ^ John 4:19
  14. ^ Matthew 27:62-63
  15. ^ http://www.fatima.org/thirdsecret/knownfacts.asp
  16. ^ p.27, Helm
  17. ^ [2] The James Randi Educational Foundation
  • Online Etymological Dictionary [4]

Sources

  • Alcalay, Reuben., The Complete Hebrew - English dictionary, Hemed Books, New York, 1996 ISBN 978-9654481793
  • Tucker, T.G., Etymological dictionary of Latin, Ares Publishers, Inc., Chicago, 1985 ISBN 978-0890051726
  • Helm, June., Prophecy and Power among the Dogrib Indians, University of Nebraska Press, 1994 [5]

Further reading

  • Marcus Tullius Cicero. 1997. De divinatione. (Trans. Arthur Stanley Pease), Darmstadt: Wissenschafltihce Buchgesellschaft.
  • David Edward Aune. 1963. Prophecy in early Christianity and the ancient Mediterranean world. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans. ISBN 0-8028-3584-8.
  • Christopher Forbes. 1997. Prophecy and inspired speech: In early Christianity and its Hellenistic environment. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, ISBN 1565632699.
  • Clifford S. Hill. 1991. Prophecy, past and present: An exploration of the prophetic ministry in the Bible and the church today. Ann Arbor, MI: Vine, ISBN 080280635X.
  • Jürgen Beyer. 2002. 'Prophezeiungen', Enzyklopädie des Märchens. Handwörterbuch zur historischen und vergleichenden Erzählforschung (English - Encyclopedia of the fairy tale. Handy dictionary for historical and comparative tale research), vol. 10. Berlin & New York: Walter de Gruyter, col. 1419-1432
  • Fabio R. Araujo. 2007. Selected Prophecies and Prophets. Charleston, SC: BookSurge, ISBN-10: 1419668455

For other uses see Cicero (disambiguation) Marcus Tullius Cicero (January 3, 106 BC - December 7, 43 BC) was an orator and statesman of Ancient Rome, and is generally considered the greatest Latin prose stylist. ...

External links

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For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... The month of October from a liturgical calendar for Abbotsbury Abbey. ... For other uses, see Sabbath. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... Computus (Latin for computation) is the calculation of the date of Easter in the Christian calendar. ... For the book by Ernest Hemingway, see A Moveable Feast. ... The Easter controversy is a series of controversies about the proper date to celebrate Easter. ... Quartodecimanism (derived from the Vulgate Latin: quarta decima[1], meaning fourteen) refers to the custom of Christians celebrating Passover on the 14th day of Nisan in the Old Testaments Hebrew Calendar (Lev 23:5). ... The current system for determining the date of Easter has two problems: (1) its date varies from year to year (not considered a problem by many Christians), and (2) Eastern and Western churches use different methods of determining its date, and hence in most years it is celebrated on a... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwÄ«m al-hijrÄ«; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwÄ«m-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... Muslim holidays generally celebrate the events of the life of Islams main prophet, Muhammad, especially the events surrounding the first hearing of the Kuran. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... opens chapter nine of The Dreaming Universe (1994) entitled The Dreamtime with a quote from The Last Wave, a film by Peter Weir: Aboriginals believe in two forms of time. ... This article is about Australian Aboriginal cosmogony, cosmology and spirituality. ... Replica of an oracle bone -- turtle shell Oracle bones (Chinese: 甲骨; pinyin: jiÇŽgÇ”piàn) are pieces of bone or turtle shell used in royal divination from the mid Shang to early Zhou dynasties in ancient China, and often bearing written inscriptions in what is called oracle bone script. ... The Maya calendar is a system of distinct calendars and almanacs used by the Maya civilization of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, and by some modern Maya communities in highland Guatemala. ... This article is about days of the week. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Prophets (2723 words)
Prophecy is a gift that God takes seriously.
Prophecy is one of the gifts of the Spirit and false prophecy is equivalent to blaspheming the Truth.
Prophecy has been playing a role throughout the Bible.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Prophecy (3477 words)
Writers on mystical theology consider prophecies with reference to the illumination of the mind, to the objects revealed, and to the means by which the knowledge is conveyed to the human mind.
Prophecy may take place even when the senses are suspended in ecstasy, but this in mystical terminology is called rapture.
The prophecy was quoted by Ambrose Lisle Philipps on the occasion of the reestablishment of the Catholic hierarchy in England by Pope Pius IX in 1850.
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