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Encyclopedia > Propane
Propane
IUPAC name Propane
Identifiers
CAS number [74-98-6]
PubChem 6634
RTECS number TX2275000
SMILES CCC
Properties
Molecular formula C3H8
Molar mass 44.096 g/mol
Appearance Colorless gas
Density 1.83 kg/m3, gas
0.5077 kg/L, liquid
Melting point

−187.6 °C (85.5 K) Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1100x811, 179 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Propane ... IUPAC nomenclature is a system of naming chemical compounds and of describing the science of chemistry in general. ... CAS registry numbers are unique numerical identifiers for chemical compounds, polymers, biological sequences, mixtures and alloys. ... PubChem is a database of chemical molecules. ... RTECS, also known as Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances, is a database of toxicity information compiled from the open scientific literature that is available for charge. ... The simplified molecular input line entry specification or SMILES is a specification for unambiguously describing the structure of chemical molecules using short ASCII strings. ... A chemical formula is an easy way of expressing information about the atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound. ... Molar mass is the mass of one mole of a chemical element or chemical compound. ... For other uses, see Density (disambiguation). ... The melting point of a solid is the temperature range at which it changes state from solid to liquid. ...

Boiling point

−42.09 °C (231.1 K) Italic text This article is about the boiling point of liquids. ...

Solubility in water 0.1 g/cm3 (37.8 °C)
Hazards
MSDS External MSDS
EU classification Highly flammable (F+)
NFPA 704
4
1
0
 
R-phrases R12
S-phrases (S2), S9, S16
Explosive limits 2.37–9.5%
Related compounds
Related alkanes Ethane
Butane
Supplementary data page
Structure and
properties
n, εr, etc.
Thermodynamic
data
Phase behaviour
Solid, liquid, gas
Spectral data UV, IR, NMR, MS
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for
materials in their standard state
(at 25 °C, 100 kPa)

Infobox disclaimer and references

Propane is a three-carbon alkane, normally a gas, but compressible to a liquid that is transportable. It is derived from other petroleum products during oil or natural gas processing. It is commonly used as a fuel for engines, barbecues, and home heating systems. Solubility is a chemical property referring to the ability for a given substance, the solute, to dissolve in a solvent. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... An example MSDS in a US format provides guidance for handling a hazardous substance and information on its composition and properties. ... This page provides supplementary chemical data on Propane. ... Council Directive 67/548/EEC of 27 June 1967 on the approximation of laws, regulations and administrative provisions relating to the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances (as amended) is the main European Union law concerning chemical safety. ... NFPA 704 is a standard maintained by the U.S. National Fire Protection Association. ... Image File history File links NFPA_704. ... R-phrases are defined in Annex III of European Union Directive 67/548/EEC: Nature of special risks attributed to dangerous substances and preparations. ... S-phrases are defined in Annex IV of European Union Directive 67/548/EEC: Safety advice concerning dangerous substances and preparations. ... The explosive limit of a gas or a vapour, is the limiting concentration (in air) that is needed for the gas to ignite and explode. ... An alkane in organic chemistry is a type of hydrocarbon in which the molecule has the maximum possible number of hydrogen atoms and so has no double bonds (they are saturated). ... This article is about a chemical compound. ... Butane, also called n-butane, is the unbranched alkane with four carbon atoms, CH3CH2CH2CH3. ... This page provides supplementary chemical data on Propane. ... This page provides supplementary chemical data on Propane. ... The refractive index (or index of refraction) of a medium is a measure for how much the speed of light (or other waves such as sound waves) is reduced inside the medium. ... The relative dielectric constant of a material under given conditions is a measure of the extent to which it concentrates electrostatic lines of flux. ... This page provides supplementary chemical data on Propane. ... This page provides supplementary chemical data on Propane. ... Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy or Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrophotometry (UV/ VIS) involves the spectroscopy of photons (spectrophotometry). ... Infrared spectroscopy (IR spectroscopy) is the subset of spectroscopy that deals with the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. ... 900MHz, 21. ... Mass spectrometry (previously called mass spectroscopy (deprecated) or informally, mass-spec and MS) is an analytical technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio of ions. ... The plimsoll symbol as used in shipping In chemistry, the standard state of a material is its state at 1 bar (100 kilopascals exactly). ... For other uses, see Carbon (disambiguation). ... Chemical structure of methane, the simplest alkane Alkanes, also known as paraffins, are chemical compounds that consist only of the elements carbon (C) and hydrogen (H) (i. ... Petro redirects here. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... An engine is something that produces some effect from a given input. ... A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City. ...


When sold as fuel, it is commonly known as liquified petroleum gas (LPG or LP-gas) which can be a mixture of propane along with small amounts of propylene, butane, and butylene. The odorant ethanethiol is also added so that people can easily smell the gas in case of a leak. 45 kg LPG cylinders Spherical Gas Container typically found in Refineries. ... Propylene, also known by its IUPAC name propene, is an organic compound having the chemical formula C3H6. ... Butane, also called n-butane, is the unbranched alkane with four carbon atoms, CH3CH2CH2CH3. ... Butylene, also known as butene, is the name of the three isomeric hydrocarbon gases with chemical formula C4H8. ... An aroma compound, also known as odorant, aroma, fragrance, flavor, is a chemical compound that has a smell or odor. ... Ethanethiol, also known as ethyl mercaptan, is an organic compound used as an odorant in propane. ...

Contents

Properties and reactions

Propane undergoes combustion reactions in a similar fashion to other alkanes. In the presence of excess oxygen, propane burns to form water and carbon dioxide. This article is about the chemical reaction combustion. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Carbon dioxide (chemical formula: ) is a chemical compound composed of two oxygen atoms covalently bonded to a single carbon atom. ...

C3H8 + 5 O2 → 3 CO2 + 4 H2O + heat

When not enough oxygen is present for complete combustion, propane burns to form water and carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide, with the chemical formula CO, is a colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas. ...

2 C3H8 + 7 O2 → 6CO + 8 H2O + heat

Greenhouse gas emissions factors for propane are 62.7 kg CO2/ mBTU[1] or 1.55 kg of CO2 per litre[2] or 73.7 kg / gj[3].


Uses

Retail sale of propane cylinders.

Propane is used as fuel in cooking on many barbecues, portable stoves and in motor vehicles. The ubiquitous 4.73-gallon (20 Lb.) steel container is often dubbed a "barbecue tank". Propane remains a popular choice for barbecues and portable stoves because its low boiling point (-42 C) allows it to vaporize once it is released from its pressurized container. This results in a clean burning fuel that doesnt require a lot of equipment to vaporize. A simple nozzle will suffice. Propane powers some locomotives, buses, forklifts, and taxis and is used for heat and cooking in recreational vehicles and campers. In many rural areas of North America, propane is used in furnaces, cooking stoves, water heaters, laundry dryers, and other heat-producing appliances. As of 2000, 6.9 million American households use propane as their primary heating fuel.[4] Image File history File linksMetadata Propanecylinder. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Propanecylinder. ... A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City. ... A small portable stove and its container MSR WindPro with skillet, heat reflector, wind shield and isobutane/propane canister A portable stove is a stove specially designed to be portable and lightweight, as for camping. ... Great Western Railway No. ... Autobus redirects here. ... US airman operates forklift at a truck A forklift is a powered industrial truck used to hoist and transport materials by means of steel forks inserted under the load. ... For specific countries see Taxicabs around the world. ... “RV” redirects here. ... Camper can be one of several things: an automobile used for camping, see recreational vehicle. ...


Commercially-available "propane" fuel, or LPG, is not pure. Typically in the USA and Canada, it is primarily propane (at least 90%), with the rest mostly butane and propylene (5% maximum), plus odorants. This is the HD-5 standard, (Heavy Duty-5%maximum allowable propylene content) written for internal combustion engines. LPG, when cracked from methane (natural gas) does not contain propylene, only when refined from crude oil. It should be noted that not all products labeled "propane" conform to this standard. In Mexico, for example, the butane content is much higher. 45 kg LPG cylinders Liquefied petroleum gas (also called LPG, LP Gas, or autogas) is a mixture of hydrocarbon gases used as a fuel in heating appliances and vehicles, and increasingly replacing chlorofluorocarbons as an aerosol propellant and a refrigerant to reduce damage to the ozone layer. ... Butane, also called n-butane, is the unbranched alkane with four carbon atoms, CH3CH2CH2CH3. ... Propylene, also known by its IUPAC name propene, is an organic compound having the chemical formula C3H6. ... Methane is a chemical compound with the molecular formula . ... View of Shell Oil Refinery in Martinez, California. ... Pumpjack pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario Petroleum (from Greek petra – rock and elaion – oil or Latin oleum – oil ) or crude oil is a thick, dark brown or greenish liquid. ...


Domestic and industrial fuel

In North America, local delivery trucks called "bobtails", with an average tank size of 3,000 gallons, fill up large tanks (sometimes called pigs) that are permanently installed on the property, or other service trucks exchange empty cylinders of propane with filled cylinders. Large tractor-trailer trucks called "cargo-liners", with an average tank size of 18,000 gallons, transport the propane from the pipeline/refinery to the local delivery plant. The bobtail and transport is not unique to the North American market, though the practice is not as common elsewhere, and the vehicles are generally referred to as tankers. In many countries, propane is delivered to consumers via small or medium-sized individual tanks.


Propane use is growing rapidly in non-industrialized areas of the world. Propane is replacing wood and other traditional fuel sources in such places, where it is now sometimes called "cooking gas".


As an aside, North American barbecue grills powered by propane cannot be used overseas. The "propane" sold overseas is actually a mixture of propane and butane. The warmer the country, the higher the butane content, commonly 50/50 and sometimes reaching 75% butane. Usage is calibrated to the different-sized nozzles found in non-U.S. grills. Americans who take their grills overseas — such as military personnel — can find U.S.-specification propane at AAFES military post exchanges. The Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES) mission is to provide quality merchandise and services of necessity and convenience to authorized customers at uniformly low prices; and generate reasonable earnings to supplement appropriated funds for the support of US Army and US Air Force Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Programs. ...

Retail sale of propane in Monmouth, Oregon

North American industries using propane include glass makers, brick kilns, poultry farms, and other industries that need portable heat. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2505x1849, 507 KB) Summary Propane Description: Retail sale of propane Viewpoint location: Service station on Pacific Ave. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2505x1849, 507 KB) Summary Propane Description: Retail sale of propane Viewpoint location: Service station on Pacific Ave. ... Monmouth (IPA: is a city in Polk County, Oregon, United States. ...


Propane risks and alternate gas fuels

Propane is heavier than air. If a leak in a propane fuel system occurs, the gas will have a tendency to sink into any enclosed area and thus poses a risk of explosion and fire.


Propane is bought and stored in a liquid form (LPG) and thus fuel energy can be stored in a relatively small space. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), largely methane, is another gas used as fuel but requires very high pressure to liquefy (which is dangerous) and therefore is much less efficient to store due to the large tank volume required. Thus propane is much more commonly used to fuel vehicles than natural gas and only requires about 5 atmospheres of pressure to keep it liquid at room temperature.


Refrigeration

Propane is also instrumental in providing off-the-grid refrigeration, also called gas absorption refrigerator.Refrigerators built in the 1930s are still in regular use, with little or no maintenance. However, certain Servel refrigerators are subject to a recall for carbon monoxide poisoning. [1] The term off the grid refers to a method of construction that relies on renewable energy sources rather than traditional public utility sources provided by the utility grid. ... The absorption refrigerator is a refrigerator that utilizes a heat source to provide the energy needed to drive the cooling system rather than being dependent on electricity to run a compressor. ...


In highly purified form, propane (R-290) can serve as a direct replacement in mechanical refrigeration systems designed to use R-12, R-22 or R-134a chloro- or fluorocarbon based refrigerants. Today, the Unilever Ice Cream company and others are exploring the use of environmentally friendly propane as a refrigerant. As an added benefit, users are finding that refrigerators converted to use propane are 9-15% more energy efficient. A refrigerant is a compound used in a heat cycle that undergoes a phase change from a gas to a liquid and back. ...


Vehicle fuel

Main article: Autogas

Propane is also being used increasingly for vehicle fuels. In the U.S., 190,000 on-road vehicles use propane, and 450,000 forklifts use it for power. It is the third most popular vehicle fuel in America, behind gasoline and diesel. In other parts of the world, propane used in vehicles is known as autogas. About 9 million vehicles worldwide use autogas. Autogas is the common name for liquified petroleum gas when it is used as a fuel in internal combustion engines in vehicles. ...


The advantage of propane is its liquid state at a moderate pressure. This allows fast refill times, affordable fuel tank construction, and ranges comparable to (though still less than) gasoline. Meanwhile it is noticeably cleaner (both in handling, and in combustion), results in less engine wear (due to carbon deposits) without diluting engine oil (often extending oil-change intervals), and until recently was a relative bargain in North America. Octane rating is a noticeably higher 110, which could result in more power, though exploiting this extra "octane" requires significant engine modification. However, public filling stations are still rare. Many converted vehicles have provisions for topping off from "barbecue bottles." Purpose-built vehicles are often in commercially-owned fleets, and have private fueling facilities. A gas station pump offering five different octane ratings. ...


Propane is generally stored and transported in steel cylinders as a liquid with a vapor space above the liquid. The vapor pressure in the cylinder is a function of temperature. When gaseous propane is drawn at a high rate the latent heat of vaporisation required to create the gas will cause the bottle to cool. (This is why water often condenses on the sides of the bottle and then freezes). In extreme cases this may cause such a large reduction in pressure that the process can no longer be supported. In addition, the lightweight, high-octane compounds vaporize before the heavier, low-octane ones. Thus the ignition properties change as the tank empties. For these reasons, the liquid is often withdrawn using a dip tube. A gas station pump offering five different octane ratings. ...


Other

  • Propane is used as a feedstock for the production of base petrochemicals in steam cracking.
  • Propane is used in some flamethrowers, as the fuel, or as the pressurizing gas.
  • Some propane becomes a feedstock for propyl alcohol, a common solvent.
  • Propane is the primary fuel for hot air balloons.
  • It is used in semiconductor manufacture to deposit silicon carbide
  • Propane is mixed with silicon to form a propellant (sold as green gas) which is used to power gas guns used in airsoft combat gaming.
  • Liquid Propane is commonly used in theme parks and in the movie industry as an inexpensive, high energy fuel for explosions and other special effects.

Petrochemicals are chemical products made from raw materials of petroleum (hydrocarbon) origin. ... In petroleum geology and chemistry, cracking is the process whereby complex organic molecules (e. ... Riverboat of the U.S. Brownwater Navy shooting ignited napalm from its mounted flamethrower during the Vietnam war. ... R-phrases , , S-phrases , , , , , Flash point 15 °C RTECS number UH8225000 Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... This article is about hot air balloons themselves. ... Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Silicon carbide (SiC) is a ceramic compound of silicon and carbon that is manufactured on a large scale for use mainly as an abrasive but also occurs in... A propellant is a material that is used to move an object by applying a motive force. ... Green Gas typically propane with silicone oil added is the propellent typically used to drive Gas Blow Back Airsoft Guns. ... Air guns are weapons that propel a bullet using compressed air or another gas, possibly liquefied. ... Four players laying down fire on an objective that they plan to attack. ...

Propane Tank Remainder Measurement

The only accurate way to measure the propane left in a propane tank is to weigh it. Engraved on the side of the tank should be the letters TW then a number. This number is the empty tank weight. For example, the typical 5 gallon propane tank might say TW 17.2. The weight of the empty tank in the example is 17.2 lbs. Next, weigh the tank on a bathroom scale to find the total current weight. Let's say that the current weight of the tank is 24.2 lbs. To find the weight of propane simply subtract the tank weight from the total weight.


24.2 lbs - 17.2 lbs = 7 lbs


Each gallon of liquid propane weighs 4.23 lbs. Divide 7 by 4.23 to get the number of gallons currently in the tank.


7 ÷ 4.23 ≈ 1.66 gallons of propane


We can go a step further and find out how long 1.66 gallons of propane will take to burn. Each gallon of propane contains 91,690 BTUs. In the example above we were left with approximately 1.66 gallons of propane in the tank. Simply multiply the number of gallons by the number of BTUs contained in each.


1.66 × 91,690 = 152,205.4 BTUs


Next, find the BTU output of the appliance in question. These can usually be found on the manufactures website. Let's use 12,000 BTUs for our example. Divide the number of BTUs left in the tank by the number of BTUs that your appliance consumes per hour to get the total running time left for propane in the tank.


152,205 ÷ 12,000 ≈ 12.68 hours of burn time.


Sources

Home-storage propane tanks being transported through Nevada.

Propane is produced as a byproduct of two other processes: natural gas processing and petroleum refining. This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... Petro redirects here. ...


The processing of natural gas involves removal of butane, propane, and large amounts of ethane from the raw gas, to prevent condensation of these volatiles in natural gas pipelines. Additionally, oil refineries produce some propane as a by-product of production of cracking petroleum into gasoline or heating oil. Butane, also called n-butane, is the unbranched alkane with four carbon atoms, CH3CH2CH2CH3. ... This article is about a chemical compound. ... Factory of Shukhov cracking process, Baku, USSR, 1934 In petroleum geology and chemistry, cracking is the process whereby complex organic molecules such as kerogens or heavy hydrocarbons are broken down into simpler molecules (e. ...


The supply of propane cannot be easily adjusted to account for increased demand because of the by-product nature of propane production. About 90% of U.S. propane is domestically produced.


The United States imports about 10% of the propane consumed each year with about 7% of that coming from Canada via pipeline and rail. The remaining 3% of imported propane comes to the United States from other sources via ocean transport.


After it is produced, North American propane is stored in huge salt caverns located in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta, Canada, Mont Belvieu, Texas, and Conway, Kansas. These salt caverns were hollowed out in the 1940s[5] and can store up to 80 million barrels of propane, if not more. When the propane is needed, most of it is shipped by pipelines to other areas of the Midwest, the North, and the South, for use by customers. Propane is also shipped by barge and rail car to selected U.S. areas.[citation needed] For Halite Bittorrent client , see Halite Client. ... Alternate meanings: Cave (disambiguation) This article is about natural caves; for artificial caves used as dwellings, such as those in north China, see yaodong. ... Fort Saskatchewan is a tiny city just northeast of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; population roughly 13,000. ... Mont Belvieu is a city in Chambers County, Texas, United States. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... “bbl” redirects here. ...


History

Propane was first identified as a volatile component in gasoline by Dr. Walter O. Snelling of the U.S. Bureau of Mines in 1910. The volatility of these lighter hydrocarbons caused them to be known as "wild" because of the high vapor pressures of unrefined gasoline. On March 31, the New York Times reported on Dr. Walter's work with liquefied gas and that "...a steel bottle will carry enough [gas] to light an ordinary home for three weeks."[6] Petrol redirects here. ... For most of the 20th century, the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) was the primary United States Government agency conducting scientific research and disseminating information on the extraction, processing, use, and conservation of mineral resources. ...


It was during this time that Dr. Snelling, in cooperation with Frank P. Peterson, Chester Kerr and Arthur Kerr created ways to liquefy the LP Gases during the refining of natural gasoline. Together they established American Gasol Co., the first commercial marketer of propane. Dr. Snelling had produced relatively pure propane by 1911 and on March 25, 1913 his method of processing and producing LP Gases was issued patent #1,056,845.[7] A separate method of producing LP Gas through compression was created by Frank Peterson and patented in 1912.


The 1920's saw increased production of LP Gas with the first year of recorded production totaling 223,000 gallons in 1922. In 1927, annual marketed LP Gas production reached one million gallons and by 1935, the annual sales of LP Gas had reached 56 million gallons. Major industry developments in the 1930's included the introduction of railroad tank car transport, gas odorization and the construction of local bottle filling plants. The year 1945 marked the first year that annual LP Gas sales reached a billion gallons. By 1947, 62% of all U.S. homes had been equipped with either natural gas or propane for cooking.


In 1950 1,000 propane-fueled buses were ordered by the Chicago Transit Authority and by 1958 sales in the U.S. had reached 7 billion gallons annually. In 2004 was reported to be a growing $8 billion to $10 billion industry with over 15 billion gallons of propane being used annually in the U.S.[8] For other uses, see Chicago Transit Authority (disambiguation). ...


See also

-1... Chemical structure of methane, the simplest alkane Alkanes, also known as paraffins, are chemical compounds that consist only of the elements carbon (C) and hydrogen (H) (i. ... Petrol redirects here. ... A 3-dimensional rendered Ball-and-stick model of the methane molecule. ... Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG or LP Gas) is a mixture of hydrocarbon gases used as a fuel in heating appliances and vehicles, and increasingly replacing fluorocarbons as an aerosol propellant and a refrigerant to reduce damage to the ozone layer. ...

References

  1. ^ http://members.propanecouncil.org/assets/propane-reduces-greenhouse-gas-emmissions-fact-sheet/asset-direct/propane-reduces-greenhouse-gas-emmissions-fact-sheet.pdf
  2. ^ http://www.earthfuture.com/climate/carbonactivism.asp
  3. ^ http://www.cns-snc.ca/events/CCEO/graphics/2a_jannasch_paper.pdf
  4. ^ U. S. Census Bureau, U.S. Departments of Energy and Transportation statistics (2000). General U.S. Industry Statistics and Characteristics of Propane. Retrieved on 2007-09-06.
  5. ^ Argonne National Laborator (1999). Salt Cavern Information Center. Retrieved on 2007-12-22.
  6. ^ The New York Times April 1, 1912, Page 9. GAS PLANT IN STEEL BOTTLE.; Dr. Snelling's Process Gives Month's Supply in Liquid Form.. Retrieved on 2007-12-22.
  7. ^ National Propane Gas Association. The History of Propane. Retrieved on 2007-12-22.
  8. ^ Propane Education and Research Council. Fact Sheet - The History of Propane. Retrieved on 2007-12-22.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Propane (386 words)
Propane is a simple hydrocarbon and is often referred to as liquefied petroleum gas or LPG.
Propane is the third most-used common fuel in the world behind gasoline and diesel and is the dominant alternative motor fuel in more than 38 countries.
Propane is very stable at a large range of temperatures, making it appropriate for use in varying climates, and eliminating cold-start problems.
ASME Propane Dispenser & Bulk Storage Tanks (320 words)
Propane is the most common form of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) that can be used as a fuel in areas where no gas mains are installed.
In cold climates, the ambient temperature is sometimes too low for the propane to vaporize fast enough, in which case a heat source, known as a vaporizer must be used.
The propane industry uses many different types and sizes of tanks, from 30,000 or more gallons at the distributor, to a 2 gallon backyard barbecue cylinder.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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