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Encyclopedia > Prologue

A prologue (Greek πρόλογος, from προ~, pro~ - fore~, and lógos, word), or rarely prolog, is a prefatory piece of writing, usually composed to introduce a drama. The Greeks use a word ???, which included the modern meaning of the prologue, but was of wider significance, embracing any kind of preface, like the Latin praefatio. The Greek language (Greek Ελληνικά, IPA – Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of some 3,000 years. ... Writing is the process of inscribing characters on a medium, with the intention of forming words and other larger language constructs. ...


In Attic Greek drama, a character in the play, very often a deity, stood forward or appeared from a machine before the action of the play began, and made from the empty stage such statements as it was necessary that the audience should hear in order that they might appreciate the ensuing drama. It was the early Greek custom to dilate in great detail on everything that had led up to the play, the latter being itself, as a rule merely the catastrophe which had inevitably to ensue on the facts related in the prologue. The importance, therefore, of the prologue in Greek drama was very great; it sometimes almost took the place of a romance, to which, or to an episode in which, the play itself succeeded. Attic Greek is the ancient dialect of the Greek language that was spoken in Attica, which includes Athens. ... This article is about deities or gods from a non-monotheistic perspective. ...


It is believed that the prologue in this form was practically the invention of Euripides, and with him, as has been said, it takes the place of an explanatory first act. This may help to modify the objection which criticism has often brought against the Greek prologue, as an impertinence, a useless growth prefixed to the play, and standing as a barrier between us and our enjoyment of it. The point precisely is that, to an Athenian audience, it was useful and pertinent, as supplying just what they needed to make the succeeding scenes intelligible. But it is difficult to accept the view that Euripides invented the plan of producing a god out of a machine to justify the action of deity upon man, because it is plain that he himself disliked this interference of the supernatural and did not believe in it. He seems, in such a typical prologue as that to the Hippolytus, to be accepting a conventional formula, and employing it, almost perversely, as a medium for his ironic rationalism. Euripides (c. ... In Greek mythology, Hippolytus was a son of Theseus and either Antiope or Hippolyte. ...


Many of the existing Greek prologues may be later in date than the plays they illustrate, or may contain large interpolations. On the Latin stage the prologue was often more elaborate than it was in Athens, and in the careful composition of the poems which Plautus prefixes to his plays we see what importance he gave to this portion of the entertainment; sometimes, as in the preface to the Rudens, Plautus rises to the height of his genius in his adroit and romantic prologues, usually placed in the mouths of persons who make no appearance in the play itself. Titus Maccius Plautus was a comic playwright of the Roman Republic. ...


Moliere revived the Plautian prologue in the introduction to his Amphitryon. Racine introduced Piety as the speaker of a prologue which opened his choral tragedy of Esther. Molière, engraved frontispiece to his Works Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, better known as Molière (January 15, 1622 - February 17, 1673), was a French theatre writer, director and actor, one of the masters of comic satire. ... Amphitryon, or Amphitrion, in Greek mythology, was a son of Alcaeus, king of Tiryns in Argolis. ... Racine is the name of several communities in the United States of America: Racine, Minnesota Racine, Missouri Racine, Ohio Racine, West Virginia Racine, Wisconsin Racine County, Wisconsin It is also the name of dramatist Jean Racine. ... Esther (אֶסְתֵּר, Standard Hebrew Ester, Tiberian Hebrew ʾEstēr) was a woman in the Hebrew Bible, the queen of Ahasuerus (Xerxes I), and heroine of the Biblical Book of Esther which is named after her. ...


The tradition of the ancients vividly affected our own early dramatists. Not only were the mystery plays and miracles of the middle ages begun by a homily, but when the drama in its modern sense was inaugurated in the reign of Elizabeth, the prologue came with it, directly adapted from the practice of Euripides and Terence. Sackville, Lord Buckhurst, prepared a sort of prologue in dumb show for his Gorboduc of 1562; and he also wrote a famous Induction, which is, practically, a prologue, to a miscellany of short romantic epics by diverse hands. Mystery plays are one of the earliest formally developed plays in medieval Europe. ... A sermon is an oration by a prophet or member of the clergy. ... Publius Terentius Afer, better known as Terence, was a comic playwright of the Roman Republic. ... Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset (1536 - 19 April 1608) was an English statesman and poet. ... Gorboduc, also titled Ferrex and Porrex, was a transitional English play from 1562. ... Events Earliest English slave-trading expedition under John Hawkins. ... An anthology is a collection of literary works, originally of poems, but in recent years its usage has broadened to be applied to collections of short stories and comic strips. ...


In the Elizabethan drama the prologue was very far from being universally employed. In the plays of William Shakespeare, for instance, it is an artifice which the poet very rarely introduced, although we find it in Henry V and Romeo and Juliet. Sometimes the Elizabethan prologue was a highly elaborated poem; in 1603 a harbinger recited a sonnet on the stage, to prepare the audience for Heywood's A Woman Killd 1eith Kindness. Often the prologue was a piece of blank verse, so obscure and complicated that it is difficult to know how its hearers contrived to follow it; such are the prologues of George Chapman. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... See Henry V of England Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor Henry V (play) for the Shakespeare play about King Henry V of England Henry V (1946 movie) for the 1944 movie adaptation of the Shakespeare play (for other movie adaptations see previous entry) Henry V (1989 movie) This is a... Romeo and Juliet is a famous play by William Shakespeare concerning the fate of two young star-crossed lovers. ... A harbinger is a sign of things to come. ... Heywood is the name of several places: Heywood, Greater Manchester, England Heywood, Wiltshire, England This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Blank verse is a type of poetry, distinguished by having a regular meter, but no rhyme. ... This article is about George Chapman the English literary figure; see George Chapman (murderer) for the Victorian poisoner of the same name. ...


Among Elizabethan prologues the most ingenious and interesting are those of Ben Jonson, who varied the form on every occasion. For instance, in The Poetaster (1602), Envy comes in as Prologue, and speaks a long copy of heroics, only to be turned off the stage by an armed figure, who states that he is the real prologue, and proceeds to spout more verses. Jonson's introductions were often recited by the stage-keeper, or manager. Beaumont and Fletcher seem to have almost wholly dispensed with prologues, and the form was far from being universal, until the Restoration, when it became de rigueur. Benjamin Jonson ( June 11, 1572 – August 6, 1637) was an English Renaissance dramatist, poet and actor. ... Beaumont can refer to: Beaumont, Belgian province of Hainaut. ... This is an article about the projectile; see Arrow (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... Restoration can be one of several things, depending on context: In criminal justice, restoration is another term for restorative justice. ...


The prologues of the last thirty years of the 17th century were always written in rhymed verse, and were generally spoken by a principal actor or actress in the ensuing piece. They were often, in the hands of competent poets, highly finished essays on social or literary topics. For instance, the famous prologue to Drydens Aurengzebe (1675) is really a brief treatise on fashions in versification. Throughout the 18th century the prologue continued to flourish, but went out of vogue in the early part of the 19th. (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


See also epilogue. Early 1990s progressive rock band from Stoke-on-Trent. ...


This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica ( 1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Prologue - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (846 words)
Sometimes the Elizabethan prologue was a highly elaborated poem; in 1603 a harbinger recited a sonnet on the stage, to prepare the audience for Heywood's A Woman Killd 1eith Kindness.
Often the prologue was a piece of blank verse, so obscure and complicated that it is difficult to know how its hearers contrived to follow it; such are the prologues of George Chapman.
The prologues of the last thirty years of the 17th century were always written in rhymed verse, and were generally spoken by a principal actor or actress in the ensuing piece.
Prologue (331 words)
Prologue is the University of Wisconsin-River Falls student literary and art publication.
Prologue is edited by graduating English and Art majors.
Prologue is distributed campus-wide, before the end of Spring semester, and is free to students and faculty.
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