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Encyclopedia > Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
Location Salt Lake City, UT
Established 1971
Collection size Over 22,000
Director Michael Hart
Website http://www.gutenberg.org

Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. Founded in 1971 by Michael Hart, it is the oldest digital library.[1] Most of the items in its collection are the full texts of public domain books. The project tries to make these as free as possible, in long-lasting, open formats that can be used on almost any computer. As of August 2007, Project Gutenberg claimed over 22,000 items in its collection. Project Gutenberg is affiliated with many projects that are independent organizations which share the same ideals, and have been given permission to use the Project Gutenberg trademark. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Digitizing, or digitization, is the process of turning an analog signal into a digital representation of that signal. ... The word culture, from the Latin colo, -ere, with its root meaning to cultivate, generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Stern Hart (b. ... A digital library is a library in which collections are stored in digital formats (as opposed to print, microform, or other media) and accessible by computers. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... For other uses, see Book (disambiguation). ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

Project Gutenberg was started by Michael Hart in 1971. Hart, a student at the University of Illinois, obtained access to a Xerox Sigma V mainframe computer in the university's Materials Research Lab. Through friendly operators, he received an account with a virtually unlimited amount of computer time; its value at that time has since been variously estimated at $100,000 or $100,000,000.[2] Hart has said he wanted to "give back" this gift by doing something that could be considered to be of great value. His initial goal was to make the 10,000 most consulted books available to the public at little or no charge, and to do so by the end of the 20th century.[3] Michael Stern Hart (b. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest and largest campus in the University of Illinois system. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... For other uses, see Mainframe. ...


This particular computer was one of the 15 nodes on the computer network that would become the Internet. Hart believed that computers would one day be accessible to the general public and decided to make works of literature available in electronic form for free. He used a copy of the United States Declaration of Independence in his backpack, and this became the first Project Gutenberg e-text. He named the project after Johannes Gutenberg, the fifteenth century German printer who propelled the movable type printing press revolution. Network node (NN): A grouping of one or more network elements (at one or more sites) which provides network related functions, and is administered as a single entity. ... For the scientific and engineering discipline studying computer networks, see Computer networking. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies were independent of Great Britain. ... An e-text (from electronic text; sometimes written as etext) is, generally, any text-based information that is available in a digitally encoded human-readable format and read by electronic means, but more specifically it refers to files in the ASCII character encoding. ... This article is about the inventor of printing in Europe; for other uses, see Guttenberg (disambiguation) and Gutenberg. ... A case of cast metal type pieces and typeset matter in a composing stick Movable type is the system of printing and typography using movable pieces of metal type, made by casting from matrices struck by letterpunches. ... The printing press is a mechanical device for printing many copies of a text on rectangular sheets of paper. ...


By the mid-1990s, Hart was running Project Gutenberg from Illinois Benedictine College. More volunteers had joined the effort. All of the text was entered manually up until 1989 when image scanners and optical character recognition software improved and became more widely available, which made book scanning more feasible.[4] Hart later came to an arrangement with Carnegie Mellon University, which agreed to administer Project Gutenberg's finances. As the volume of e-texts increased, volunteers began to take over the project's day-to-day operations that Hart had run. Benedictine University is a private university located in Lisle, Illinois. ... In computing, a scanner is a device that analyzes images, printed text, or handwriting, or an object (such as an ornament) and converts it to a digital image. ... Optical character recognition, usually abbreviated to OCR, is a type of computer software designed to translate images of handwritten or typewritten text (usually captured by a scanner) into machine-editable text, or to translate pictures of characters into a standard encoding scheme representing them (e. ... Book scanning is the process of converting physical books into electronic books (e-books) via image scanning. ... Carnegie Mellon University is a private research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ...


Pietro Di Miceli, an Italian volunteer, developed and administered the first Project Gutenberg website and started the development of the Project online Catalog. In his ten years in this role (1994–2004), the Project web pages won a number of awards, often being featured in "best of the Web" listings, and contributing to the Project popularity.[5]


Recent Developments

In 2000, a non-profit corporation, the Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation, Inc. was chartered in Mississippi to handle the project's legal needs. Donations to it are tax-deductible. Long-time Project Gutenberg volunteer Gregory Newby became the foundation's first CEO.[6] A non-profit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support an issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes, without concern for monetary profit. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A tax deduction or a tax-deductible expense represents an expense incurred by a taxpayer that is subtracted from gross income and results in a lower overall taxable income. ... “Chief executive” redirects here. ...


Charles Franks also founded Distributed Proofreaders (DP) in 2000, which allowed the proofreading of scanned texts to be distributed among many volunteers over the Internet. This effort greatly increased the number and variety of texts being added to Project Gutenberg, as well as making it easier for new volunteers to start contributing. DP became officially affiliated with Project Gutenberg in 2002.[7] As of 2007, the 10,000+ DP-contributed books comprised almost half of the nearly 22,000 books in Project Gutenberg. Distributed Proofreaders (DP) is a project to support the development of e_texts for Project Gutenberg. ... Distributed Proofreaders (commonly abbreviated as DP or PGDP) is a project to support the development of e-texts for Project Gutenberg. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Starting in 2004, an improved online catalog made Project Gutenberg content easier to browse, access and hyperlink. Project Gutenberg is now hosted by ibiblio at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. // A hyperlink (often referred to as simply a link), is a reference or navigation element in a document to another section of the same document, another document, or a specified section of another document, that automatically brings the referred information to the user when the navigation element is selected by... ibiblio (formerly SunSITE and MetaLab) is a collection of collections, and hosts a diverse range of publicly available information and open source software. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ...


Scope of collection

Growth of Project Gutenberg publications from 1993 until 2007.

As of August 2007, Project Gutenberg claimed over 22,000 items in its collection, with an average of over fifty new e-books being added each week.[8] These are primarily works of literature from the Western cultural tradition. In addition to literature such as novels, poetry, short stories and drama, Project Gutenberg also has cookbooks, reference works and issues of periodicals.[9] The Project Gutenberg collection also has a few non-text items such as audio files and music notation files. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 547 pixelsFull resolution (911 × 623 pixel, file size: 8 KB, MIME type: image/png) This graph shows the growth in publications made available at the Project Gutenberg site from 1993 until 2007. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 547 pixelsFull resolution (911 × 623 pixel, file size: 8 KB, MIME type: image/png) This graph shows the growth in publications made available at the Project Gutenberg site from 1993 until 2007. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A user viewing an electronic page on an eBook reading device In computing, an e-book (for electronic book: also eBook, ebook) is the digital media equivalent of a conventional printed book. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... For this articles equivalent regarding the East, see Eastern culture. ... A cookbook is a book that contains information on cooking, and a list of recipes. ... A reference work is a compendium of information, usually of a specific type, compiled for ease of reference. ...


Most releases are in English, but there are also significant numbers in many other languages. As of July 2007, the non-English languages most represented are (in order): French (1,053 files), German (451), Finnish (396), Dutch (279) and Spanish (155).[1]


Whenever possible, Gutenberg releases are available in plain text, mainly using US-ASCII character encoding but frequently extended to ISO-8859-1. Besides being copyright-free, the requirement for a Latin-text version of the release has been a ciriteria of Michael Hart's since the founding of Project Gutenberg, as he believes is the format most likely to be readable in the extended future. The text is wrapped at 65-70 characters and paragraphs are separated by a double-line break. Although this makes the release available to anybody with a text-reader, a drawback of this format is the lack of markup and the resulting relatively bland appearance.[10] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Plain text. ... There are 95 printable ASCII characters, numbered 32 to 126. ... A character encoding or character set (sometimes referred to as code page) consists of a code that pairs a sequence of characters from a given set with something else, such as a sequence of natural numbers, octets or electrical pulses, in order to facilitate the storage of text in computers... ISO 8859-1, more formally cited as ISO/IEC 8859-1 or less formally as Latin-1, is part 1 of ISO/IEC 8859, a standard character encoding defined by ISO. It encodes what it refers to as Latin alphabet no. ...


Other formats may be released as well when submitted by volunteers. The most common non-ASCII format is HTML, which allows markup and illustrations to be included. Some project members and users have requested more advanced formats, believing them to be much easier to read. But some formats that are not easily editable, such as PDF, are generally not considered to fit in with the goals of Project Gutenberg (although a few have been added to the collection). For years, there has been discussion of using some type of XML, although progress on that has been slow.[citation needed] HTML, short for Hypertext Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for the creation of web pages. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a general-purpose markup language. ...

Project Gutenberg e-texts have been distributed on CD-ROM.

Project Gutenberg has been in existance for over 20 years. ...

Ideals

Michael Hart said in 2004, "The mission of Project Gutenberg is simple: 'To encourage the creation and distribution of ebooks.'"[11][12] His goal is, "to provide as many e-books in as many formats as possible for the entire world to read in as many languages as possible."[1] Likewise, a project slogan is to "break down the bars of ignorance and illiteracy",[citation needed] because its volunteers aim to continue spreading public literacy and appreciation for the literary heritage just as public libraries began to do in the late 19th century.[13][14] This article is about the ability to read and write. ... Librarians and patrons in a typical larger urban public library. ...


Project Gutenberg is intentionally decentralized. For example, there is no selection policy dictating what texts to add. Instead, individual volunteers work on what they are interested in, or have available. The Project Gutenberg collection is intended to preserve items for the long term, so they cannot be lost by any one localized accident. In an effort to ensure this, the entire collection is backed-up regularly and mirrored on servers in many different locations.


Copyright issues

Project Gutenberg is careful to verify the status of its ebooks according to U.S. copyright law. Material is added to the Project Gutenberg archive only after it has received a copyright clearance, and records of these clearances are saved for future reference. Unlike some other digital library projects, Project Gutenberg does not claim new copyright on titles it publishes. Instead, it encourages their free reproduction and distribution.[1] United States copyright law governs the legally enforceable rights of creative and artistic works in the United States. ...


Most books in the Project Gutenberg collection are distributed as public domain under U.S. copyright law. The licensing included with each ebook puts some restrictions on what can be done with the texts (such as distributing them in modified form, or for commercial purposes) as long as the Project Gutenberg trademark is used. If the header is stripped and the trademark not used, then the public domain texts can be reused without any restrictions. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... How to obtain a amature radio licence differs from country to country. ... “(TM)” redirects here. ...


There are also a few copyrighted texts that Project Gutenberg distributes with permission. These are subject to further restrictions as specified by the copyright holder.


Criticism

Project Gutenberg has been criticized for lack of scholarly rigor in its e-texts: for example, there is usually inadequate information about the edition used and often omission of original prefaces. However, John Mark Ockerbloom of the University of Pennsylvania noted that PG is responsive about addressing errors once they are identified, and the texts now include specific source edition citations.[15] In many cases the editions also are not the most current scholarly editions, for these later editions are not usually in the public domain. John Mark Ockerbloom is a pioneer in library science. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ...


While the works in Project Gutenberg represent a valuable sample of publications that span several centuries, there are some issues of concern for linguistic analysis. Some content may have been modified by the transcriber because of editorial changes or corrections (such as to correct for obvious proofsetter or printing errors). The spelling may also have been modified to conform with current practices. This can mean that the works may be problematic when searching for older grammatical usage. Finally the collected works can be weighted heavily toward certain authors (such as Charles Dickens), while others are barely represented.[16] “Dickens” redirects here. ...


In March 2004, a new initiative was begun by Michael Hart and John S. Guagliardo[17] to provide low-cost intellectual properties. The initial name for this project was Project Gutenberg 2 (PG II), which created controversy among PG volunteers because of the re-use of the project's trademarked name for a commercial venture.[6]


Affiliated projects

All affiliated projects are independent organizations which share the same ideals, and have been given permission to use the Project Gutenberg trademark. They often have a particular national, or linguistic focus.[18]


List of Affiliated projects

  • Project Gutenberg Australia hosts many texts which are public domain according to Australian copyright law, but still under copyright (or of uncertain status) in the United States, with a focus on Australian writers and books about Australia.[19]
  • Projekt Gutenberg-DE claims copyright for its product and limits access to browsable web-versions of its texts.[20]
  • Project Gutenberg Consortia Center is an affiliate specializing in collections of collections. These do not have the editorial oversight or consistent formatting of the main Project Gutenberg. Thematic collections, as well as numerous languages, are featured.[21]
  • PG-EU is a sister project which operates under the copyright law of the European Union. One of its aims is to include as many languages as possible into Project Gutenberg. It operates in Unicode to ensure that all alphabets can be represented easily and correctly.[22]
  • Project Gutenberg of the Philippines aims to "make as many books available to as many people as possible, with a special focus on the Philippines and Philippine languages".[23]
  • Project Gutenberg Europe is a project run by Project Rastko in Serbia. It aims at being a Project Gutenberg for all of Europe, and has started to post its first projects in 2005. It is running the Distributed Proofreaders software to quickly produce etexts.[24]
  • Project Gutenberg Luxembourg publishes mostly, but not exclusively, books that are written in Luxembourgish.[25]
  • Projekti Lönnrot is a project started by Finnish Project Gutenberg volunteers which derives its name from Elias Lönnrot, who was a Finnish philologist.[26]
  • Project Gutenberg Canada.[27]

Project Gutenberg of Australia is an organisation related to Project Gutenberg. ... Australian copyright law is based on the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works and defines copyright in Australia. ... Projekt Gutenberg-DE is a collection of German language literary texts, distributed via the web and on CD-ROM. It is run by a small publishing company called [[Hille+Partner]], run by Gunter Hille, and its web presence is hosted by the weekly magazine Der Spiegel The name is based... The Unicode Standard, Version 5. ... Project Rastko - Internet Library of Serb Culture (Пројекат Растко - Електронска библиотека српске к&#1091... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... Distributed Proofreaders (commonly abbreviated as DP or PGDP) is a project to support the development of e-texts for Project Gutenberg. ... Luxembourgish (Luxembourgish: Lëtzebuergesch, French: , German: , Walloon: ), also spelled Luxemburgish, is a West Germanic language spoken in Luxembourg. ... Elias Lönnrot ( ) (April 9, 1802 – March 19, 1884) was a Finnish philologist and collector of traditional Finnish oral poetry. ... Philology is the study of ancient texts and languages. ... Project Gutenberg Canada began on Canada Day of 2007. ...

See also

Project Runeberg is an initiative patterned after Project Gutenberg that publishes freely available electronic versions of books significant to the culture and history of the Nordic countries . ... At the Frankfurt Book Fair in October 2004, Google introduced its Google Print service, now known as Google Book Search. ... The Open Content Alliance is a consortium of non-profit and for-profit groups which is dedicated to building a free archive of digital text and multimedia. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... This is a list of projects related to digital libraries. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d Thomas, Jeffrey (July 20, 2007). Project Gutenberg Digital Library Seeks To Spur Literacy. U.S. Department of State, Bureau of International Information Programs. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  2. ^ Hart, Michael S. (August 1992). Gutenberg:The History and Philosophy of Project Gutenberg. Retrieved on 2006-12-05.
  3. ^ Day, B. H.; Wortman, W. A. (2000). Literature in English: A Guide for Librarians in the Digital Age. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries, p. 170. ISBN 0838980813. 
  4. ^ Vara, Vauhini. "Project Gutenberg Fears No Google", Wall Street Journal, December 5, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-08-15. 
  5. ^ Gutenberg:Credits. Project Gutenberg (June 8, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  6. ^ a b Hane, Paula (2004). "Project Gutenberg Progresses". Information Today 21 (5). Retrieved on 2007-08-20. 
  7. ^ Staff (August 2007). The Distributed Proofreaders Foundation. Distributed proofreaders. Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  8. ^ According to gutindex-2006, there were 1,653 new Project Gutenberg items posted in the first 33 weeks of 2006. This averages out to 50.09 per week. This does not include additions to affiliated projects.
  9. ^ For a listing of the categorized books, see: Staff (April 28, 2007). Category:Bookshelf. Project Gutenberg. Retrieved on 2007-08-18.
  10. ^ Boumphrey, Frank (July 2000). European Literature and Project Gutenberg. Cultivate Interactive. Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  11. ^ Hart, Michael S. (October 23, 2004). Gutenberg Mission Statement by Michael Hart. Project Gutenberg. Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  12. ^ Project Gutenberg calls its products "ebooks," and that term is used here. The corresponding Wikipedia term is e-texts.
  13. ^ Perry, Ruth (2007). Postscript about the Public Libraries. Modern Language Association. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  14. ^ Lorenzen, Michael (2002). Deconstructing the Philanthropic Library: The Sociological Reasons Behind Andrew Carnegie's Millions to Libraries. Modern Language Association. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  15. ^ Martha L. Brogan, Daphnée Rentfrow (2005). A Kaleidoscope of Digital American Literature. New York: Digital Library Federation. ISBN 1933645288. 
  16. ^ Hoffmann, Sebastian (2005). Grammaticalization And English Complex Prepositions: A Corpus-based Study, 1st Edition, Routledge. ISBN 0415360498. 
  17. ^ Executive director of the World eBook Library.
  18. ^ Staff (July 17, 2007). Gutenberg:Partners, Affiliates and Resources. Project Gutenberg. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  19. ^ Staff (January 24, 2007). Project Gutenberg of Australia. Retrieved on 2006-08-10.
  20. ^ Staff (1994). Projekt Gutenberg-DE. Spiegel Online. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  21. ^ Staff (2004). Project Gutenberg Consortia Center. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  22. ^ Staff. PG-EU. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  23. ^ Staff. Project Gutenberg of the Philippines. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  24. ^ Staff (2005). Project Gutenberg Europe. EUnet Yugoslavia. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  25. ^ Kirps, Jos (May 22, 2007). Project Gutenberg Luxembourg. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  26. ^ Riikonen, Tapio (February 28, 2005). Projekti Lönnrot. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  27. ^ Project Gutenberg Canada. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Stern Hart (b. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... An e-text (from electronic text; sometimes written as etext) is, generally, any textual information that is available in a digitally encoded human-readable format and read by electronic means, but more specifically it refers to files in the ASCII character encoding. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Image File history File links Project_Gutenberg. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ...

Affiliated

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Unaffiliated

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  • Text to iPod notes converter — Program used to transfer Gutenberg files onto an Ipod in their entirety.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Project Gutenberg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1384 words)
A slogan of the project is "break down the bars of ignorance and illiteracy", because its volunteers aim to continue spreading public literacy and appreciation for the literary heritage just as public libraries began to do in the early 20th century.
Project Gutenberg has been criticized for lack of scholarly rigor in its etexts: for example, in inadequate detailing of editions used and in the omission of original published prefaces and critical apparatus.
Project Gutenberg Australia hosts many texts which are public domain according to Australian copyright law, but still under copyright (or of uncertain status) in the United States, with a focus on Australian writers and books about Australia.
Project Gutenberg of Australia (411 words)
Project Gutenberg of Australia produces books in electronic form (ebooks) which are freely available to the public.
Some of the more than 16,000 ebooks available from Project Gutenberg of Australia and Project Gutenberg, by Australian writers or about Australia.
How Project Gutenberg was started by Michael S Hart.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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