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Encyclopedia > Prohibition Party
National Prohibition Convention, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1892.
National Prohibition Convention, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1892.

The Prohibition Party is a political party in the United States. As the name implies, the party advocates the prohibition of the use of beverages containing alcohol and was an integral part of the temperance movement. While never one of the nation's leading parties, it was an important force in US politics in the late 19th century and the early years of the 20th century. In 1887, Prohibition Party member Susanna M. Salter of Argonia, Kansas, became the first woman mayor in the United States. Image File history File links National_Prohibition_Convention_1892. ... Image File history File links National_Prohibition_Convention_1892. ... Ethanol, also known as ethyl alcohol or grain alcohol, is a flammable, colorless, mildly toxic chemical compound with a distinctive perfume-like odor, and is the alcohol found in alcoholic beverages. ... Between 1830 and 1840, most temperance organizations began to argue that the only way to prevent drunkenness was to eliminate the consumption of alcohol. ... Politics of the United States of America takes place in a framework of a federal presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President of the United States is both head of state and head of government, and of a two-party legislative and electoral system. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Susanna Madora Salter (March 2, 1860-1961), U.S. politician, She served as mayor of Argonia, Kansas, becoming the first woman elected as mayor in the United States. ... Argonia is a city located in Sumner County, Kansas. ...


The party was founded in 1867. Its first National Committee Chairman was John Russell of Michigan, who served from 1867-1872. The party succeeded in getting many communities and a number of states to outlaw the production and sale of intoxicating beverages. At the same time, the party's ideology broadened to included aspects of progressivism. The party contributed to the third-party discussions of the 1910s and sent Charles H. Randall to the 64th, 65th and 66th Congresses as the representative of California's 9th congressional district. Prohibitionist Sidney J. Catts was elected Governor of Florida in 1916, serving 1917-1921. 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Progressivism is a term that refers to a broad school of contemporary international social and political philosophies. ... Senators Henry Fountain Ashurst (D-AZ) John Hollis Bankhead (D-AL) John Crepps Beckham (D-KY) William Edgar Borah (R-ID) James Henry Brady (R-ID) Frank Bosworth Brandegee (R-CT) Robert Foligny Broussard (D-LA) Nathan Philemon Bryan (D-FL) Edwin Chick Burleigh (R-ME) Thomas Benton Catron (R... This article needs to be wikified. ... Dates of Sessions Major Political Events Officers Senate House of Representatives Speaker of the House - Frederick H. Gillett Members of the Sixty-sixth United States Congress Senate Henry F. Ashurst, Democrat, Arizona Lewis H. Ball, Republican, Delaware John H. Bankhead, Democrat, Alabama. ... The 9th Congressional District of California is a Congressional District that currently covers a significant portion of the East Bay portion of the San Francisco Bay Area, California. ... Sidney J. Catts gubernatorial portrait Sidney Johnston Catts (July 31, 1863—March 9, 1936) was an American politician. ... This is a list of Governors of Florida: Florida military governors (1)Andrew Jacksons official title was Commissioner of the United States. (2)Jackson left Florida on October 8, 1821. ...


The party's greatest success was in 1919, with the passage of the 18th Amendment to the United States Constitution, which outlawed the production, sale, transportation, import, and export of alcohol. The era of illegal alcohol in the USA is generally known as "Prohibition". The enactment of national prohibition took away the party's main issue, and the party declined in importance. The "Prohibition" era saw the rise of "Speakeasies", bootleggers, and a great growth of organized crime. By the start of the Great Depression, the cause of prohibition was considered discredited by much of the public. National prohibition was repealed by the 21st Amendment in 1933. While hardline prohibitionists objected, the US Prohibition Party declined into insignificance. 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Amendment XVIII (the Eighteenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution, along with the Volstead Act (which defined intoxicating liquors), established Prohibition in the United States. ... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Prohibition is any of several periods during which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A bootlegger is someone who sells an illegally manufactured product. ... Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ... The Great Depression was a worldwide economic downturn which started in 1929 (although its effects were not fully felt until late 1930) and lasted through most of the 1930s. ... Amendment XXI (the Twenty-first Amendment) to the United States Constitution repealed the Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which had mandated nationwide Prohibition. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


From 1977 to 1980, the party was called the National Statesman Party. The party still exists today, though its following is small, and since 2003, there has been a schism between supporters and opponents of longtime former party chairman Earl Dodge. It has nominated a candidate for president in every election since 1872, and is thus the longest-lived American political party after the Democrats and Republicans. For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Earl Farwell Dodge (b. ... 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


Presidential tickets

James Black (1823-1893) became a leader of the temperance movement in the United States after having a bad experience with alcohol intoxication, if not alcohol poisoning. ... Green Clay Smith (1826-1895), a Major General in the United States Army, received his law degree from the Lexington Law School and became a member of the state legislature of Kentucky. ... Lawyer and newspaper owner-editor Gideon T. Stewart (1824-1909) was very active in promoting the temperance movement. ... Neal S. Dow (1804-1897) was a prohibitionist mayor of Portland, Maine. ... John Pierce St. ... William Daniel (1826-1897) was a politician who graduated from Dickinson College, studied law, and began practicing it in Maryland in 1851. ... General Clinton Bowen Fisk (1828-1890), for whom Fisk University is named, was a senior officer in the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands. ... John Bidwell John Bidwell (August 5, 1819- April 4, 1900) was known throughout California and across the nation as an important pioneer, farmer, soldier, statesman, politician and philanthropist. ... Joshua Levering (born 1845) was a prominent Baptist leader . ... Attorney Hale Johnson (1847-1902) left the Republican Party because it did not support an amendment to the United States Constitution mandating national prohibition of alcoholic beverages. ... Silas Comfort Swallow (1839 - 1930) was a United States Methodist preacher and prohibitionist politician. ... Eugene Wilder Chafin (November 1, 1852 - November 30, 1920) was an United States politician from the Prohibition Party. ... Aaron S. Watkins (1863-1941) was president of Absury College in Wilmore, Kentucky. ... Eugene Wilder Chafin (November 1, 1852 - November 30, 1920) was an United States politician from the Prohibition Party. ... Aaron S. Watkins (1863-1941) was president of Absury College in Wilmore, Kentucky. ... James Franklin Hanly (April 4, 1863 – August 1, 1920) was an United States politician who served as the 26th Governor of Indiana from 1905 to 1909. ... Aaron S. Watkins (1863-1941), born in Ohio in 1863, was president of Asbury College in Kentucky. ... David Leigh Colvin, usually known as D. Leigh Colvin, was born in 1880. ... Herman P. Faris was born in 1858 and became a banker in Missouri. ... Suffragette Marie C. Brehm was the first legally qualified candidate to run for the vice-presidency of the United States, which she did in 1924 on the ticket of the Prohibition Party. ... William D. Upshaw (1866-1952) served eight years in Congress (1919-1927), where he was such a strong proponent of the temperance movement that he became known as the driest of the dry. ... David Leigh Colvin, usually known as D. Leigh Colvin, was born in 1880. ... Claude A. Watson was a lawyer, businessman, and minister from Hermon ( a neighborhood in Los Angeles, California ), who was nationally active in the temperance movement. ... Roger Ward Babson (July 6, 1875 - March 5, 1967), was a fucking asshole. ... Claude A. Watson was a lawyer, businessman, and minister from Hermon ( a neighborhood in Los Angeles, California ), who was nationally active in the temperance movement. ... Claude A. Watson was a lawyer, businessman, and minister from Hermon ( a neighborhood in Los Angeles, California ), who was nationally active in the temperance movement. ... Carl Stuart Hamblen (1908-1989), often called Stuart Hamblen, became radios firt singing cowboy in 1926. ... Enoch A. Holtwick was an educator with a long record of actively supporting the temperance movement. ... Enoch A. Holtwick was an educator with a long record of actively supporting the temperance movement. ... Earl Harold Munn (1903-1992), Academic Dean of Hillsdale College in Michigan, was an educationalist and temperance campaigner. ... Earl Harold Munn (1903-1992), Academic Dean of Hillsdale College in Michigan, was an educationalist and temperance campaigner. ... Mark R. Shaw, also known as Mark Shaw, was the Prohibition Party candidate for U.S. Senator from Massachusetts in 1946, 1952, 1958, 1969, 1962, 1966 and 1970. ... Earl Harold Munn (1903-1992), Academic Dean of Hillsdale College in Michigan, was an educationalist and temperance campaigner. ... Earl Harold Munn (1903-1992), Academic Dean of Hillsdale College in Michigan, was an educationalist and temperance campaigner. ... Benjamin Calvin Bubar, Jr. ... Earl Farwell Dodge (b. ... Benjamin Calvin Bubar, Jr. ... Earl Farwell Dodge (b. ... Earl Farwell Dodge (b. ... Earl Farwell Dodge (b. ... Earl Farwell Dodge (b. ... Earl Farwell Dodge (b. ... Rachel Bubar Kelly (November 22, 1922 — January 14, 2002) was the Prohibition Party candidate for United States Vice President in the 1996 presidential election as the running mate of Earl F. Dodge. ... Earl Farwell Dodge (b. ... Dean Watkins, a retired aeronautical engineer, was the Prohibition Party candidate for vice-president of the United States in 2000. ... Gene Amondson (b. ... Earl Farwell Dodge (b. ...

See also

The Prohibition Party candidate who received the highest vote in any election in U.S. history was Rev. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Minor parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal • • This list of political parties in the United States contains past and present political parties in... There was consumption of alcohol during and after prohibition. ... Temperance organizations (that is, organizations in the temperance movement) of the United States played an essential role in bringing about ratification of the Eighteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution establishing national prohibition of alcohol. ... The U.S. Prohibition Party presidential election results are listed chronologically below. ... The Scottish Prohibition Party was a minor Scottish political party, represented in the House of Commons by Edwin Scrymgeour from 1922-1931. ...

External links

  • Web site on the Prohibition Party
  • National Prohibition of Alcohol in the U.S.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Prohibition Party - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (616 words)
As the name implies, the party advocates the prohibition of the use of beverages containing alcohol and was an integral part of the temperance movement.
The party contributed to the third-party discussions of the 1910s and sent Charles H. Randall to the 64th, 65th and 66th Congresses as the representative of California's 9th congressional district.
National prohibition was repealed by the 21st Amendment in 1933.
AllRefer.com - Prohibition party (U.S. History) - Encyclopedia (546 words)
The result was the organization (Sept., 1869) of the Prohibition party at a convention in Chicago attended by delegates from 20 states.
The failure of the temperance cause to gain active support from the major political parties, the failure of public officials to enforce existing local prohibition laws in several states, and the nationwide founding of the United States Brewers' Association were factors contributing to the creation of the Prohibition party.
Although the central issue of the party was prohibition, typical party platforms included woman suffrage, free public education, prohibition of gambling, and prison reform.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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