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Encyclopedia > Progressive rock
Progressive rock
Stylistic origins
Cultural origins
mid-late 1960s, United Kingdom, United States, Italy, and Germany
Typical instruments
GuitarBassKeyboardsPianoDrums – optionally vocals, and other acoustic and electronic instruments
Mainstream popularity Large in the 1970s, revival in the 1980s, moderate in the 1990s, and a resurgence in the 2000s.
Subgenres
Symphonic rock – Neo-Prog – New prog - Space rockKrautrockCanterbury sceneProgressive metalZeuhl
Progressive rock Portal

Progressive rock (often shortened to "progressive", "prog rock" or "prog", also called "art rock"[1]) is a form of rock music that evolved in the late-1960s and early 1970s as part of a "mostly British attempt to elevate rock music to new levels of artistic credibility."[1] Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Progg ,short for progresiv/progressive, was a left-wing political movement in Sweden that had its roots in the late 1960s, and its golden age in the 1970s. ... Progressive rock is a radio station programming format that prospered in the late 1960s and 1970s, in which the disc jockeys are given wide lattitude in what they may play, similar to the freeform format but with the proviso that some kind of rock music is almost always what is... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Jazz fusion (or jazz-rock fusion or fusion) is a musical genre that merges elements of jazz with other styles of music, particularly pop, rock, folk, reggae, funk, metal, country, R&B, hip hop, electronic music and world music. ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... For experimental rock music, see experimental rock. ... Electronic music has existed, in various forms, for more than a century. ... This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the present. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... Synth redirects here. ... Pianoforte redirects here. ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... Symphonic rock is a subgenre of rock music, and more specifically, progressive rock. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... New Prog (sometimes called Nu Prog or post-prog) is a term used to describe a number of recent alternative rock bands who incorporate elements from progressive rock. ... For space rocks, see asteroid. ... Krautrock, also known as Kosmische Musik, is a generic name for the experimental music scene that appeared in Germany in the late 1960s and gained popularity throughout the 1970s. ... The Canterbury Scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a term used to loosely describe the group of progressive rock musicians that were based around the city of Canterbury, Kent, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Progressive metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music which blends the powerful, guitar-driven sound of metal with the complex compositional structures, odd time signatures, and intricate instrumental playing of progressive rock. ... Zeuhl is a word meaning celestial in Kobaïan, the constructed language created by Christian Vander. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... Art rock is a term used to describe a subgenre of rock music with experimental or avant-garde influences that emphasizes novel sonic texture. ... This article is about the genre. ...


Progressive rock bands pushed "rock's technical and compositional boundaries"[1] by going beyond the standard rock or popular verse-chorus based song structures. Additionally, the arrangements often incorporate elements drawn from classical, jazz, and avant-garde music. Instrumental songs are more common, and songs with lyrics are sometimes conceptual, abstract, or based in fantasy. Progressive rock bands sometimes used "concept albums that made unified statements, usually telling an epic story or tackling a grand overarching theme".[1] A refrain (from the Old French refraindre to repeat, likely from Vulgar Latin refringere) is the line or lines that are repeated in music or in verse; the chorus of a song. ... The structures or musical forms of songs in popular music are typically sectional forms, such as strophic form. ... This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the present. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Experimental music is any music that challenges the commonly accepted notions of what music is. ...


Progressive rock developed from late-1960s psychedelic rock[1], as part of a wide-ranging tendency in rock music of this era to draw inspiration from ever more diverse influences. The term was applied to the music of bands such as King Crimson, Yes, Genesis, Pink Floyd, Jethro Tull, Gentle Giant, The Moody Blues, and Emerson, Lake and Palmer, and came into most widespread use around the mid-1970s. While progressive rock reached the peak of its popularity in the 1970s and early 1980s, neo-progressive bands have continued playing for faithful audiences in the subsequent decades.[1] Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... This article is about the musical group. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Genesis are an English rock band formed in 1967. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... Jethro Tull can refer to: Jethro Tull (1674-1741), an English agriculturist, inventor of the seed drill Jethro Tull, an English progressive rock band Category: ... Gentle Giant were a British progressive rock band, one of the most experimental of the 1970s. ... The Moody Blues are a British rock band originally from Birmingham, England. ... ELP can also stand for Extra Long Play, a format for the VCR tape. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

Characteristics

Musical characteristics

Form: Progressive rock songs either avoid common popular music song structures of verse-chorus-bridge, or blur the formal distinctions by extending sections or inserting musical interludes, often with exaggerated dynamics to heighten contrast between sections. Classical forms are often inserted or substituted, sometimes yielding entire suites, building on the traditional medleys of earlier rock bands. Progressive rock songs also often have extended instrumental passages, marrying the classical solo tradition with the improvisational traditions of jazz and psychedelic rock. All of these tend to add length to progressive rock songs, which may last longer than twenty minutes. Songs can also have irregular chorus-verse structures, like David Bowie's song Quicksand, which has two choruses. The term musical form refers to two related concepts: the type of composition (for example, a musical work can have the form of a symphony, a concerto, or other generic type -- see Multi-movement forms below) the structure of a particular piece (for example, a piece can be written in... In music, a suite is an organized set of instrumental or orchestral pieces normally performed at a single sitting, as a separate musical performance, not accompanying an opera, ballet, or theater-piece. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Musical improvisation is the spontaneous creative process of making music while it is being performed. ... David Bowie (pronounced ) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English musician, actor, producer, arranger, and audio engineer. ... Quicksand is a song written by David Bowie in 1971 for the album Hunky Dory. ...


Timbre (instrumentation and tone color): Early progressive rock groups expanded the timbral palette of the then-traditional rock instrumentation of guitar, organ, bass, and drums by adding less typical instruments, such as flute, saxophone and violin, and exploring the capabilities of new electronic keyboards, synthesizers, and electronic effects. Modern progressive rock artists continue the tradition of experimenting with new and different sounds and instruments. Some instruments – most notably, the Moog synthesizer and the Mellotron – have become closely associated with the genre. In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ... For other uses, see Flute (disambiguation). ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored musical instrument usually considered a member of the woodwind family. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... An electronic keyboard. ... Synth redirects here. ... Look up Electronic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The philosophical concept of causality or causation refers to the set of all particular causal or cause-and-effect relations. ... The term Moog(pronounced // as in moan) synthesizer can refer to any number of analog synthesizers designed by Dr. Robert Moog or manufactured by Moog Music, and is commonly used as a generic term for analog and digital music synthesisers. ... The Mellotron is an electro-mechanical, polyphonic keyboard originally developed and built in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. ...


Rhythm: Drawing on their classical, jazz, and experimental influences, progressive rock artists explore a variety of time signatures, syncopation, polyrhythms, and tempo changes uncommon to mainstream rock. The lack of a single, steady beat marks progressive rock as a genre less concerned with danceability than with listening. For other uses, see Rhythm (disambiguation). ... The time signature (also known as meter signature) is a notational convention used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats are in each measure and what note value constitutes one beat. ... In music, syncopation is when a stressing of a normally unstressed beat in a bar or failure to sound a tone on an accented beat occurs. ... Polyrhythm is the simultaneous sounding of two or more independent rhythms. ... For other uses, see Tempo (disambiguation). ...


Melody and Harmony: Music critic Piero Scaruffi argues that progressive rock has less of a melodic focus than other types of rock; he states that "progressive-rock is rock music that is not mainly melodic"[2] In prog rock, the blues inflections of mainstream rock are often supplanted by jazz and classical influences. Melodies are more likely to be modal than based on the pentatonic scale. Chords and chord progressions are also frequently modal, and augmented with 6ths, 7ths, 9ths, and compound intervals; and the I-IV-V progression is much less common. Allusions to, or even direct quotes from, well-known classical themes are common. Some bands have explored atonal or dissonant harmonies, and a few have even worked with rudimentary serialism. Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... This article is about modes as used in music. ... In music, a pentatonic scale is a scale with five notes per octave. ... A chord progression (also chord sequence and harmonic progression or sequence), as its name implies, is a series of chords played in order. ... Atonality in a general sense describes music that departs from the system of tonal hierarchies that are said to characterized the sound of classical European music from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries. ... In poetry, dissonance is the deliberate avoidance of patterns of repeated vowel sounds (see assonance). ... For other uses of serial or serialism, see Serial (disambiguation). ...


Texture and imagery: Ambient soundscapes and theatrical elements are often used to describe scenes, events or other aspects of the concept. A Wagner-style leitmotif is used to represent the various characters in Genesis' "Harold the Barrel" and "Robbery, Assault and Battery." The sounds of clocks and cash registers are used to represent time and money in Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon. Ambient music is a musical genre in which sound is more important than notes. ... A soundscape is an acoustic environment or an environment created by sound. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... This article is about the album by Pink Floyd. ...


Other characteristics

Technology: To aid their timbral exploration, progressive rock bands are often early adopters of new electronic musical instruments and technologies. Emerson Lake and Palmer pioneered use of the Moog synthesizer and the mellotron was a signature sound of early progressive bands such as the Moody Blues, King Crimson, and Genesis. In the late 1970s, Robert Fripp, of King Crimson, and Brian Eno developed an analog tape loops effect (Frippertronics). In the 1980s, Frank Zappa used the Synclavier for composing and recording, and King Crimson utilized MIDI-enabled guitars, a Chapman Stick, and electronic percussion. ELP can also stand for Extra Long Play, a format for the VCR tape. ... The term Moog(pronounced // as in moan) synthesizer can refer to any number of analog synthesizers designed by Dr. Robert Moog or manufactured by Moog Music, and is commonly used as a generic term for analog and digital music synthesisers. ... The Mellotron is an electro-mechanical, polyphonic keyboard originally developed and built in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. ... The Moody Blues were originally a British rhythm and blues-based band; they later became best known for psychedelic music and early progressive rock. ... This article is about the musical group. ... Genesis are an English rock band formed in 1967. ... Robert Fripp (born 16 May 1946 in Wimborne Minster, Dorset, England) is a guitarist, record producer and a composer, perhaps best known for being the guitarist for, and only constant member of, the progressive rock band King Crimson. ... Brian Eno (pronounced IPA: ) born on 15 May 1948 in Woodbridge, Suffolk, England) is an English electronic musician, music theorist and record producer. ... An analog or analogue signal is any time continuous signal where some time varying feature of the signal is a representation of some other time varying quantity. ... Tape loops are loops of prerecorded magnetic tape used to create repetitive, rhythmic musical patterns. ... Frippertronics is a system of tape loops developed by composer Brian Eno with guitarist Robert Fripp. ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... Synclavier I The Synclavier System was an early digital synthesizer and sampler, manufactured by New England Digital. ... Musical Instrument Digital Interface, or MIDI, is a system designed to transmit information between electronic musical instruments. ... A 10 string Chapman Stick The Chapman Stick is an electric musical instrument devised by Emmett Chapman in the early 1970s. ...


Concept albums: Though not unique to progressive rock, collections of songs unified by an elaborate, overarching theme or story are common to the genre. As progressive rock songs are, themselves, quite long, such collections have frequently exceeded the maximum length of recorded media, resulting in packages that require multiple vinyl discs, cassettes, or even compact discs to present a single album. Concepts have included the historical, fantastical, and metaphysical, and even, in the case of Jethro Tull's Thick as a Brick, poking fun at concept albums. In popular music, a concept album is an album which is unified by a theme, which can be instrumental, compositional, narrative, or lyrical (Shuker 2002, p. ... History is often used as a generic term for information about the past, such as in geologic history of the Earth. When used as the name of a field of study, history refers to the study and interpretation of the record of human societies. ... For other uses, see Fantastic (disambiguation). ... Metaphysical may refer to: Metaphysics, a branch of philosophy dealing with the ultimate nature of reality; or The Metaphysical poets, a poetic school from seventeenth century England who correspond with baroque period in European literature. ... For the 18th-century agriculturist after whom the band was named, see Jethro Tull (agriculturist). ... Alternate cover The cover of the 1995 25th anniversary re-release. ...


Lyrical themes: Even outside of concept albums, progressive rock often has lyrical ambition similar to its musical ambition – avoiding typical rock/pop subjects such as love, dancing, etc. and focusing on the kinds of themes found in literature. Lyricists such as Ian Anderson (Jethro Tull), Peter Hammill (Van Der Graaf Generator), and Pete Sinfield (King Crimson and ELP) wrote elaborate lyrics combining introspection, social commentary, and poetic influences. Genesis often wrote surreal stories in their lyrics, while Roger Waters (Pink Floyd) combined social criticism with the personal struggles with greed, madness, and death. Literature, mythology, and folklore are also common themes and influences of progressive rock. Though fantasy and science-fiction themes are much less prevalent than some critics claim, they are part of the common stereotype of progressive rock.


Presentation: Album art and packaging is often an important part of the artistic concept. This trend began with The Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and played a major part in the marketing of progressive rock. Some bands became as well-known for the art direction of their albums as for their sound, with the "look" integrated into the band's overall musical identity. This led to fame for particular artists and design studios, most notably Roger Dean for his work with Yes, and Storm Thorgerson and his studio Hipgnosis for their work with Pink Floyd and several other progressive rock groups. An album cover is a cover used to package commercial audio recordings such as the printed cardboard covers that were typically used to package 12 gramophone records from the 1960s through to the 1980s when the 12 record was the major format for distribution of popular music. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... For other uses, see Sgt. ... Freyjas Castle, 1987 Roger Dean (born August 31, 1944, in Ashford, Kent) is a contemporary English artist best known for his work on album covers, which he began painting in the late 1960s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The iconic cover of Pink Floyds album The Dark Side of the Moon. ... Hipgnosis was a British art design group that specialized in creating cover art for the albums of rock musicians and bands, most notably Pink Floyd, Genesis, Led Zeppelin, Def Leppard, Yes, Styx, and Black Sabbath. ...


Stage theatrics: Beginning in the early 1970s, some progressive rock bands began incorporating elaborate and sometimes flamboyant stage theatrics into their concerts. Genesis lead singer Peter Gabriel wore many different colourful and exotic costumes in one show, and the band used lasers and giant mirrors synchronized with the music. Yes incorporated futuristic stage sets designed by Roger Dean, including massive spaceship props and complex lighting. Yes also performed 'in-the-round', with the band on a round stage set up in the middle of the arena. Jethro Tull released rabbits onstage (see here). One of ELP's many stage antics include Emerson's "flying piano" at the California Jam concert, in which a Steinway grand piano would be spun from a hoist. Peter Brian Gabriel (born 13 February 1950, in Cobham,[1] Surrey, England) is an English musician. ... For the 18th-century agriculturist after whom the band was named, see Jethro Tull (agriculturist). ... Keith Noel Emerson (born 2 November 1944 in Todmorden, Yorkshire) is a British keyboard player and composer. ... California Jam was a rock music festival concert held at the Ontario Motor Speedway in Ontario, California on April 6, 1974. ... Steinway & Sons is a piano manufacturing firm, currently based in New York and Hamburg, Germany. ...


Pink Floyd used many stage effects, including crashing airplanes, a giant floating pig, massive projection screens, and, in 1980, an enormous mock brick wall for The Wall performances. Rush incorporated lasers and film backdrops into their stage show. Frank Zappa and The Mothers of Invention used a giant giraffe prop and did improvisational comedy skits. Marillion's former lead singer Fish wore a jester costume inspired by the band's first album, Script for a Jester's Tear. Rush is a Canadian rock band originally formed in August 1968, in the Willowdale neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario; presently comprised of bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... The Mothers of Invention were a rock and roll band active from the 1960s to the 1990s. ... Marillion is a British Rock group. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Script for a Jesters Tear is the first album by the progressive rock band Marillion. ...


History

Precursors

All Music Guide and ProgressiveRock.com have both cited the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band as a turning point or where progressive rock starts.[citation needed] Earlier albums such as Rubber Soul and Revolver had begun incorporating Eastern music and instruments not common in rock music. The Beatles popularized the mellotron in "Strawberry Fields Forever"[citation needed] which later became important in progressive rock. Phil Collins would later claim that the Beatles' "A Day in the Life" opened up the avenues for progressive rock.[citation needed] The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... For other uses, see Sgt. ... The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1965 U.S. LP, with a different colour saturation (see below) Back cover Back cover of the original 1965 UK LP Rubber Soul is the sixth studio album by the British rock band The Beatles. ... For other uses, see Revolver (disambiguation). ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... The Mellotron is an electro-mechanical, polyphonic keyboard originally developed and built in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. ... Music sample Strawberry Fields Forever Problems? See media help. ... For other uses, see Phil Collins (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see A Day in the Life (disambiguation). ...


Music critic Piero Scaruffi claims that "[t]echnically speaking ... progressive-rock began in 1967 with Cream and The Nice" which he describes as "groups that reacted to the simple, melodic, three-minute pop of the early Beatles. Though this contradicts that the Beatles using Eastern Instruments and Classical Music influenced future progressive rock acts like Yes and King Crimson." However, he notes that if "a more stringent definition, one that considers ambition" is used, this "would push the birth date [ahead] to the Pretty Things' S.F. Sorrow (1968) and the Who's Tommy (1969)."[2] Cream were a 1960s British rock band comprising guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker. ... Keith Emerson, Lee Jackson, Brian Davison, Davy OList, circa 1967-68. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... For other uses, see Yes (disambiguation). ... This article is about the musical group. ... The Pretty Things is a 1960s and 1970s rock and roll band from London. ... The Who are an English rock band that formed in 1964. ... Alternate cover Deluxe edition cover Tommy is the first of The Whos two full-scale rock operas (the second being Quadrophenia), and the first musical work explicitly billed as a rock opera. ...


In 1966, the band 1-2-3, later renamed Clouds, began experimenting with song structures, improvisation, and multi-layered arrangements.[3][4] In March of that year, The Byrds released "Eight Miles High", a pioneering psychedelic rock single with lead guitar heavily influenced by the jazz soloing style of John Coltrane. Later that year, The Who released "A Quick One While He's Away", the first example of the rock opera form and considered by some the first prog epic.[5] Clouds were a 1960s Progressive rock band that disbanded in October 1971. ... Not to be confused with The Birds (band). ... Eight Miles High is a song by Gene Clark, Jim McGuinn, and David Crosby, first appearing as a single from 1966 by the rock band The Byrds. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Coltrane redirects here. ... A Quick One While Hes Away is a 1966 medley written by Pete Townshend and recorded by The Who for their album A Quick One. ...


In 1967, Jeff Beck released the single "Beck's Bolero", inspired by Maurice Ravel's Bolero, and, later that year, Procol Harum released the Bach-influenced single "A Whiter Shade of Pale". Also in 1967, the Moody Blues released Days of Future Passed, combining classical-inspired orchestral music with traditional rock instrumentation and song structures. Pink Floyd's first album, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, contained the nearly ten-minute improvisational psychedelic instrumental "Interstellar Overdrive". In 1968, Big Brother and the Holding Company incorporated Bach's prelude from The Well Tempered Clavier into their cover of George Gershwin's "Summertime". Geoffrey Arnold (Jeff) Beck (born June 24, 1944 to Arnold and Ethel Beck in Wallington, Greater London) is an English rock guitarist. ... Becks Bolero is a short, rock-based instrumental piece heavily influenced by Maurice Ravels Bolero, recorded by Jeff Beck with Jimmy Page on guitar, John Paul Jones on bass, Nicky Hopkins on piano, and Keith Moon on drums. ... Maurice Ravel. ... The Boléro is one of Maurice Ravels (1875-1937) most famous pieces of music. ... Procol Harum is an English rock band, formed in the 1960s, who built a heavy foundation for what would become progressive rock. ... “Bach” redirects here. ... A Whiter Shade of Pale is a song by the British band Procol Harum. ... Alternate CD Cover Released in 1990 by Polydor as Deram 820 006-2. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is Pink Floyds debut album and the only one made under Syd Barretts leadership, although he made some contributions to the follow-up, A Saucerful of Secrets. ... Interstellar Overdrive is a psychedelic music composition by Pink Floyd, which appears on their 1967 debut album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn at almost ten minutes in length. ... Big Brother and the Holding Company is an American rock band that formed in San Francisco in 1965 as part of the psychedelic music scene that also produced the Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane. ... Gershwin redirects here. ... Summertime is the name of an aria composed by George Gershwin for the 1935 opera Porgy and Bess. ...


By the late 1960s many rock bands had begun incorporating instruments from classical and Eastern music, as well as experimenting with improvisation and lengthier compositions. Some, such as the UK's Soft Machine, began to experiment with blends of rock and jazz. By the end of the decade, other bands like Deep Purple and the Nice had also recorded classical-influenced albums with full orchestras: Concerto for Group and Orchestra and Five Bridges, respectively. Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... For the book by William S. Burroughs, see The Soft Machine. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Keith Emerson, Lee Jackson, Brian Davison, Davy OList, circa 1967-68. ... The Concerto for Group and Orchestra is a concerto performed by Deep Purple and The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in 1969, composed by Jon Lord. ... The Five Bridges Suite is a modern piece of music, written in the 1960s, combining classical music and jazz. ...


Early bands

Music critic Piero Scaruffi argues that the "bands that nurtured prog-rock through its early stages were Traffic, Jeff Beck, Family, Jethro Tull and Genesis; while King Crimson, Yes and Van Der Graaf Generator represent the genre at its apex".[2] Numerous key bands had formed by the end of the 1960s, including The Moody Blues (1964), Pink Floyd (1965), Soft Machine (1966), Gong (1967), Genesis (1967), Jethro Tull (1967), The Nice (1967), The United States of America (1967), Uriel (1967), Yes (1968), Caravan (1968), The Crazy World of Arthur Brown (1968), King Crimson (1969) and Gentle Giant (1969), although not all of these bands were then playing what might be considered progressive rock. Traffic was a rock band from Birmingham, England, formed in late 1966 by Steve Winwood with Jim Capaldi, Chris Wood and Dave Mason. ... Geoffrey Arnold (Jeff) Beck (born June 24, 1944 to Arnold and Ethel Beck in Wallington, Greater London) is an English rock guitarist. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Jethro Tull can refer to: Jethro Tull (1674-1741), an English agriculturist, inventor of the seed drill Jethro Tull, an English progressive rock band Category: ... Genesis are an English rock band formed in 1967. ... This article is about the musical group. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the band. ... The Moody Blues are a British rock band originally from Birmingham, England. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... For the book by William S. Burroughs, see The Soft Machine. ... Gong is a progressive/psychedelic rock band formed by Australian musician Daevid Allen. ... Genesis are an English rock band formed in 1967. ... For the 18th-century agriculturist after whom the band was named, see Jethro Tull (agriculturist). ... Keith Emerson, Lee Jackson, Brian Davison, Davy OList, circa 1967-68. ... This article is not about the 90s alternative group, The Presidents of the United States of America. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Caravan are an English rock/jazz band from the Canterbury area, founded by former Wilde Flowers members David Sinclair, Richard Sinclair, Pye Hastings and Richard Coughlan. ... This article is about the musical group. ... Gentle Giant were a British progressive rock band, one of the most experimental of the 1970s. ...


Although almost all of these bands were from the UK, the genre was growing popular elsewhere in continental Europe. Triumvirat led Germany's significant progressive rock movement, Flame Dream hailed from Switzerland, Focus formed in the Netherlands, France produced Ange, Gong and Magma, and Aphrodite's Child has its origin in Greece. Scandinavia was represented by Norwegian band Popol Vuh, Swedish band Kaipa and Finnish Wigwam. Italian progressive rock is sometimes considered a genre unto itself, highlighted by bands like Area, Banco del Mutuo Soccorso, Le Orme, Goblin, PFM, Museo Rosenbach, Il Balletto di Bronzo, and Locanda Delle Fate. Spain produced numerous groups including Canarios and Triana. Triumvirat was a German progressive rock trio that formed in 1969 in Cologne, Germany. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ange is a French progressive rock band formed in 1970 by the Décamps brothers, Francis (keyboards) and Christian (vocals). ... A gong is one of a wide variety of metal percussion instruments. ... Magma is a French progressive rock band founded in Paris in 1969 by classically-trained drummer Christian Vander, who claimed as his inspiration a vision of humanitys spiritual and ecological future that profoundly disturbed him. ... Aphrodites Child was a Greek rock band formed around the time of the student riots in 1968, by Vangelis Papathanassiou (keyboards and vocals); Demis Roussos (bass guitar and vocals); and Loukas Sideras (drums and vocals). ... Popol Vuh was a 1970s Norwegian progressive rock band, that became popular in the 1970s Norwegian rock scene with such songs as All we have is the past, Queen of all Queens and Music Box. The band later changed its name to Popol Ace to avoid confusion with the German... Kaipa is a Swedish progressive rock band led by Hans Lundin. ... Wigwam is a Finnish progressive rock band formed in 1968, after the split of the seminal Blues Section, with whom drummer Ronnie Österberg had played before. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Area was an Italian jazz fusion and progressive rock group formed in 1972. ... Banco del Mutuo Soccorso - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Le Orme Italian Rock band. ... Goblin are an Italian progressive rock band who are known for their soundtracks on Dario Argento films (e. ... Premiata Forneria Marconi (PFM) is an Italian progressive rock band that achieved a high level of popularity in the 1970s, with success in both the British and American charts. ... Museo Rosenbach in the 1970s. ... Il Balletto di Bronzo (translation: The Ballet of Bronze) was an Italian progressive rock band from Naples. ... Locanda delle Fate is an Italian progressive rock act of the late 70s. ... Triana are a Spanish progressive rock band heavily influenced by flamenco, hailing from Andalucia. ...


Prog also had a presence in Latin America, producing bands such as Brazil's Arion, and Os Mutantes, who combined elements of traditional Brazilian music with psychedelic rock, classical, jazz and experimental sounds, Argentina's La Máquina de hacer pájaros,and later Seru Giran (the early albums), both formed by Charly Garcia, who use to combined classical music arrengements with jazz, Chile's Los Jaivas and Congreso, who combined the rock sound of electric guitars and keyboards with Latin American rhythms (especially from the Andes) such as Wayno, Joropo, Cotahiqui, Diablada, among others and Perú's Frágil who played a very melodic form of progressive rock. Os Mutantes (pronounced , Portuguese for The Mutants) are an influential Brazilian psychedelic rock band that were linked with the Tropicalia movement of the late 1960s. ... Serú Girán is one of the most important bands pf the Argentine rock. ... Los Jaivas is a Chilean folk/rock band consisting of: Eduardo Alquinta, Gato Juanita Parra (replacing Gabriel Parra) Mario Mutis Eduardo Parra and Claudio Parra They appeared in Chilean music in 1963 as a progressive-rock-andino group, mixing rock with South American ancestral music. ... Frágils first CD release. ...


A strong element of avant-garde and counter-culture has long been associated with a great deal of progressive rock. In the 1970s, Chris Cutler of Henry Cow helped to form a loose collective of artists referred to as Rock in Opposition, or RIO, to make a statement against the music industry. The original members included Henry Cow, Samla Mammas Manna, Univers Zero, and later Art Zoyd, Art Bears, and Aqsak Maboul. The RIO movement was short-lived, but the artists included some of the originators of Avant-progressive rock, which used dark melodies, angular progressions, dissonance, free-form playing and a disregard for conventional structure. A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... Chris Cutler (born January 4, 1947) is an English percussionist, composer, lyricist and music theorist. ... Henry Cow was an English avant-garde rock group, founded at Cambridge University in 1968 by multi-instrumentalists Fred Frith and Tim Hodgkinson. ... Flyer for the 1st RIO festival, 12 March 1978, The New London Theatre, London. ... Samla Mammas Manna was a Swedish progressive rock band, often characterized by its virtuoso musicianship, circus references and silly humour. ... Univers Zéro are an instrumental Belgian band known for playing dark music heavily influenced by 20th century chamber music. ... Art Zoyd is a French band formed in 1968, mixing free jazz, progressive rock and avant-garde electronica. ... The Art Bears formed out of what was left of the disassembly of the Progressive Rock group Henry Cow in 1978. ... Aksak Maboul (originally spelt Aqsak Maboul) were a Belgium avant-garde rock band founded in 1977 by Marc Hollander and Vincent Kenis. ... Avant-progressive rock is a style of art music based on rock music that explores unconventional territory, often incorporating non-standard chord progressions, tempo changes within a piece, odd time signatures, avant garde passages and complex horn and orchestral arrangements. ...


Peak in popularity and decline

Music historians used a variety of terms to sub-categorize 1970s progressive rock. Though some Miles Davis-inspired artists like Mahavishnu Orchestra, Weather Report, and Return to Forever were considered jazz fusion, others who incorporated the same influence formed the jazz-rock oriented Canterbury scene sub-genre of progressive rock. Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician, widely considered to be one of the most influential of the 20th century. ... The original lineup in 1972, featuring Billy Cobham, John McLaughlin, Jerry Goodman, Jan Hammer and Rick Laird. ... For the song Weather Report by The American Analog Set, see The Golden Band. ... For the album, see Return to Forever (album). ... The Canterbury Scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a term used to loosely describe the group of progressive rock musicians that were based around the city of Canterbury, Kent, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. ...


Yes brought in former Refugee keyboardist Patrick Moraz for their Relayer album, and his style and ARP synthesizers lent a much more jazz-inflected sound than Wakeman's Moog. Genesis drummer Phil Collins formed a group called Brand X, and former Yes/King Crimson drummer Bill Bruford started a solo band, Bruford; both bands had a strong jazz/fusion edge. Patrick Moraz Patrick Moraz (born June 24, 1948 in Morges, Switzerland) is a progressive rock keyboard player. ... Relayer is the seventh studio album by the progressive rock band Yes. ... ARP Instruments, Inc. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The term Moog(pronounced // as in moan) synthesizer can refer to any number of analog synthesizers designed by Dr. Robert Moog or manufactured by Moog Music, and is commonly used as a generic term for analog and digital music synthesisers. ... For other uses, see Phil Collins (disambiguation). ... Brand X is a classic jazz fusion band, noted for including Phil Collins in its ranks. ... William Scott Bruford (born May 17, 1949 in Sevenoaks, Kent, England), better known as Bill Bruford, is an influential British drummer who is recognised for his forceful, highly precise, polyrhythmic style. ... Bruford was a band that former Yes, King Crimson, and Genesis drummer Bill Bruford formed and led in the late 1970s. ...


Progressive rock's popularity peaked in the mid-1970s, when prog artists regularly topped readers' votes in mainstream popular music magazines in England and America, and albums like Mike Oldfield's Tubular Bells topped the charts. By this time, several North American progressive rock bands had been formed. Kansas, which had actually existed in one form or another since 1971, became one of the most commercially successful of all progressive rock bands. Michael Gordon Oldfield (born May 15, 1953 in Reading, England) is a multi-instrumentalist musician and composer, working a style that blends progressive rock, folk, ethnic or world music, classical music, electronic music and more recently dance. ... This article is about the Mike Oldfield album. ... For other uses, see Kansas (disambiguation). ...


Likewise, Electric Light Orchestra, who formed in 1970 as a progressive offshoot of "The Beatles sound," saw their greatest success during the mid-1970s. Pop star Todd Rundgren moved into prog with his new band, Utopia. Toronto's Rush became a major band, with a string of hit albums extending from the mid-1970s to the present. Also influential, but less commercially successful, were the Dixie Dregs, from Georgia, and Happy The Man, of Washington D.C. ELO redirects here. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Todd Harry Rundgren (born June 22, 1948 in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, United States), is an American musician, singer, songwriter and record producer. ... Utopia was a progressive rock band led by Todd Rundgren that was together roughly from 1973 to 1987. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength Image:Toronto, Ontario Location. ... Rush is a Canadian rock band originally formed in August 1968, in the Willowdale neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario; presently comprised of bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart. ... Dixie Dregs is a progressive rock band formed in the 1970s. ... Happy The Man are an American progressive rock band primarily from the 1970s specializing in instrumental tracks with odd time signatures. ...


Music critic Piero Scaruffi opines that Emerson Lake & Palmer "pushed progressive-rock towards technical excesses that, basically, obliterated whatever merit their jazz-classical fusion had." Scaruffi claims that ELP's music, which became "ever more pretentious and magniloquent, was founded on a fundamental misunderstanding of what "virtuoso" means."[2] Bruce Eder claims that "[t]he rot" [in progressive rock "started to set in during 1976, the year ELP released their live album Welcome Back My Friends."[6] Eder claims that this album was "[s]uffering from poor sound and uninspired playing" which "stretched the devotion of fans and critics even thinner." He claims that "[t]he end [of progressive rock] came quickly: by 1977, the new generation of listeners was even more interested in a good time than the audiences of the early 1970s, and they had no patience for 30 minute prog-rock suites or concept albums based on Tolkien-esque stories." He asserts that by the late 1970s and early 1980s, "ELP was barely functioning as a unit, and not producing music with any energy; Genesis was redefining themselves ... as a pop-rock band; and Yes was back to doing songs running four minutes ... and even releasing singles." [7]


In 1974, four of progressive rock's biggest bands – Yes, Emerson Lake and Palmer, Genesis and King Crimson – all went on indefinite hiatus or experienced personnel changes. Members of Yes and ELP left to pursue solo work, as did Genesis lead singer Peter Gabriel (though Genesis would continue with Phil Collins as lead vocalist), and Robert Fripp announced the end of King Crimson after the release of their Red album. When, in 1977, Yes and ELP reformed, they had some success, but were unable to capture the dominance they previously had. The final King Crimson studio album released in the 1970s, Red (1974) serves as a conclusion of one era in the groups musical development and exploration through its fusion of the heavy metal sound from the previous two albums, whilst blending the jazz rock moods of the Lizard era...

Yes performing in Indianapolis in 1977.

With the advent of punk rock in the late 1970s, critical opinion in England moved toward a simpler and more aggressive style of rock, with progressive bands increasingly dismissed as pretentious and overblown, ending progressive rock's reign as one of the leading styles in rock.[8][9] This development is often seen as part of wider commercial turn in popular music in the second half of the 1970s, during which many funk or soul bands switched to disco, and smooth jazz gained popularity over jazz fusion. Yes concert, Indianapolis, August 30, 1977, by Rick Dikeman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Yes concert, Indianapolis, August 30, 1977, by Rick Dikeman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ... This article is about the music genre. ... Smooth Jazz, also sometimes referred to as new adult contemporary music,[1] is generally described as a genre of music that utilizes instruments (and, at times, improvisation) traditionally associated with jazz and stylistic influences drawn from mostly R&B, but also funk and pop. ...


However, established progressive bands still had a strong fan base; Rush, Genesis, ELP, Yes, and Pink Floyd all regularly scored Top Ten albums with massive accompanying tours, the largest yet for some of them. After 1977 even early heavy metal/hard rock stalwarts Led Zeppelin would exhibit an increasingly prog-influenced sound on their Presence and In Through the Out Door albums. Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... Presence is the seventh studio album by English rock band Led Zeppelin, released by Swan Song Records on March 31, 1976. ... In Through the Out Door is the final studio album by English rock band Led Zeppelin, recorded in November and December of 1978 at Polar Studios in Stockholm, Sweden, and released by Swan Song Records on 15 August, 1979. ...


By 1979, by which time punk had mutated into New Wave, Pink Floyd released their rock opera The Wall, one of the best selling albums in history. Many bands which emerged in the aftermath of punk, such as Siouxsie and The Banshees, Cabaret Voltaire, Ultravox, Simple Minds, and Wire, all showed the influence of prog, as well as their more usually recognised punk influences.[10] For other Pink Floyd works based around this album, see The Wall (Pink Floyd). ... Siouxsie and the Banshees are a British gothic rock band. ... Cabaret Voltaire was a British music group from Sheffield, England. ... Ultravox (formerly Ultravox!) was one of the primary exponents of the British electronic pop music movement of the early 1980s. ... Simple Minds is a rock band from Scotland, which had its greatest worldwide popularity from the mid-1980s to the early-1990s. ... Wire are an English rock band formed in 1976 (and intermittently active to the present) by Graham Lewis (bass, vocals), Bruce Gilbert (guitar), Colin Newman (vocals, guitar) and Robert Gotobed (né Grey) (drums). ...


1980s revival

Main article: Neo-progressive rock

The early 1980s saw something of a revival of the genre, led by artists such as Marillion, IQ, Pendragon, Galahad, Mach One, Pallas, and Saga. The Groups that arose during this time are sometimes termed neo-progressive, neo-prog, or occasionally the New Wave of British Prog Rock.[citation needed] Bands of this style were influenced by 70s progressive rock groups like Genesis, Yes and Camel, but incorporated some elements that were reflective of the New Wave and other rock elements found in the 1980s. The digital synthesiser became a prominent instrument in the style. Neo-prog continued to remain viable into the '90s and beyond with bands like Arena, Jadis, Collage and Iluvatar. Their sound was generally similar in style and sound to neo-prog pioneers like Marillion and IQ, which differentiated them from the emerging Third Wave movement in the 1990s. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Marillion is a British Rock group. ... IQ is a British progressive rock band founded by Mike Holmes in 1982 following the dissolution of his original band The Lens (1976 - 1981). ... Not of This World by Pendragon, cover art by Simon Williams. ... Cover art from The Sentinel, painted by Patrick Woodroffe Pallas is a progressive rock band based in the U.K. Pallas was one of the bands at the vanguard of what was termed the neo-progressive movement during progressive rocks second-wave revival in the early eighties (other major... Saga is a progressive rock quintet, formed in Oakville, Ontario, Canada. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Camel is an English progressive rock band formed in 1971. ... The New Wave was a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centered around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ... Cover art from The Visitor. ... Jadis is a U.K. progressive rock group. ... Third Wave can refer to: Third Wave of the Holy Spirit Third-wave feminism Third wave of ska Third wave of wide-scale change in Alvin Tofflers The Third Wave. ...


Some progressive rock stalwarts changed musical direction, simplifying their music and making it more commercially viable. In 1981, King Crimson made a surprise comeback with a different lineup (with only Robert Fripp and Bill Bruford as returning veterans from the previous incarnation), incorporating a more techno-rhythmic sound with a slight New Wave slant similar to Talking Heads, from which band new lead singer Adrian Belew came. 1981 also saw the release of Rush's Moving Pictures album, from which the song "Tom Sawyer" would become one of the band's most popular. In 1982, the much anticipated supergroup Asia, composed of Steve Howe (Yes), Carl Palmer (ELP), John Wetton (King Crimson), and Geoff Downes (Buggles/Yes), surprised progressive rock fans with their pop-oriented debut album. The Top 5 single "Heat of the Moment" rotated heavily on MTV for years, while the first Asia album established a sales record for 1982. This demonstrated a market for more commercialised British progressive rock – a style very similar to that played by North American Top 40 stalwarts such as Styx, Foreigner, Boston, and Journey. Kansas flirted with Christian rock under new lead singer John Elefante (with Kerry Livgren and Dave Hope eventually leaving to start a Christian rock band, AD), then with the addition of Deep Purple's Steve Morse and the return of lead singer Steve Walsh, went in this direction as well. The Talking Heads was an American rock band formed in 1974 in New York City and active until 1991. ... Adrian Belew in concert, November 2006. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Tom Sawyer is a 1981 song by Canadian progressive rock band Rush named for Mark Twains literary character. ... Asia is an arena rock/progressive rock group. ... Stephen James Steve Howe (born April 8, 1947 in Holloway, North London, England) is a guitarist best known for his work with the progressive rock group Yes. ... John Kenneth Wetton (born 12 June 1949, Willington, Derby, Derbyshire, England) is an English singer, bassist and guitarist. ... Geoff Downes Geoffrey Downes (born August 25, 1952 in Stockport, Cheshire, England) is a rock keyboard player. ... Buggles (the official version of the band name, used on their albums, singles, and publicity material, omits the prefix The) were a New Wave band formed in 1977 consisting of Trevor Horn, born 1949 in Durham (bass guitar, guitar, percussion, and vocals), Geoff Downes, born 1952 in Stockport, Cheshire (percussion... Heat of the Moment is the first single released by progressive rock band Asia from their 1982 eponymous debut. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Styx is an American rock band that has been popular since the 1970s, with such hits as Come Sail Away, Babe, Lady, Suite Madame Blue, Mr. ... Foreigner is a hard rock band formed in New York City in 1976 by veteran musicians Mick Jones and ex-King Crimson member Ian McDonald, along with then-unknown vocalist Lou Gramm (Louis Grammatico). ... Boston is an American rock band from Boston, Massachusetts that achieved its most notable successes during the 1970s and 1980s. ... Journey is an American rock band formed in 1973 in San Francisco, California. ... Christian rock (occasionally abbreviated CR) is a form of rock music played by bands whose members are Christian and who often focus the lyrics on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... John Elefante (born March 18, 1958 in Levittown, New York) is a Grammy Award-winning American rock and roll vocalist, who got his start in the music business with the rock band Kansas. ... Kerry Livgren (born September 18, 1949) is an American musician and songwriter, best known as one of the founding members and primary writers for the 1970s progressive rock band, Kansas. ... Dave Hope (October 7, 1949 – ) played bass for the American rock band Kansas from 1963 until the band split in 1983. ... A.D. was a 1980s Christian rock band, featuring former Kansas members Kerry Livgren and Dave Hope, and former Bloodrock member Warren Ham sharing the lead vocal duties along with Michael Gleason. ... Steve Morse Steven J. Morse is a rock guitarist and guitar virtuoso, best known for his position as guitarist in the Dixie Dregs and Deep Purple. ... Steve Walsh (born June 15, 1951 in St. ...


Other British bands followed Asia's lucrative example. In 1983, Genesis achieved some international success with Mama, a song with heavy emphasis on a drum machine riff, signaling the band's change to a more commercial direction during the 1980s. Also in 1983, Yes had a surprise comeback with 90125, featuring their only number one (US) single, "Owner of a Lonely Heart". Written by guitarist Trevor Rabin before joining the group, "Owner" was accessible enough to be played at discos (and more recently has been remixed into a trance single). Often sampled by hip-hop artists, "Owner" also incorporated contemporary electronic effects, courtesy of producer (and former member) Trevor Horn. Likewise, Pink Floyd's A Momentary Lapse of Reason in 1987 was a departure from their former concept albums, featuring much shorter songs and an altogether more electronic sound. Mama was the first single from Genesis 1983 self-titled album (often referred to as the shapes album or simply Mama, after the first track). ... 90125 is the eleventh album by progressive rock group Yes, released in 1983. ... Owner of a Lonely Heart is a song by the rock band Yes. ... Trevor Rabin onstage with Yes, 1995 Trevor Rabin (born Trevor Charles Rabin on January 13, 1954) is a South African guitarist and film composer, best known for being the guitarist and songwriter for the progressive rock band Yes from 1983 - 1995, and since then, as a film composer. ... Trance is a style of electronic music that developed in the 1990s. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Trevor Charles Horn, born July 15, 1949 in Durham, England, is a British pop music record producer, songwriter and musician. ... Alternate cover US remaster cover A Momentary Lapse of Reason is Pink Floyds 1987 album, the bands first release after the official departure of Roger Waters from the band in 1985. ...


1990s and early 2000s

Main article: Progressive metal

The progressive rock genre enjoyed another revival in the 1990s. A notable kickoff to this revival were a trio of Swedish bands: Änglagård, Anekdoten and Landberk, who hit the scene in 1992-1993. Later came the so-called "Third Wave", spearheaded by such bands as Sweden's The Flower Kings, the UK's Porcupine Tree, Italy's Finisterre, and from the United States, Dream Theater, Spock's Beard, Echolyn, Proto-Kaw (a reincarnation of an early lineup of Kansas) and Glass Hammer. Arjen Anthony Lucassen, with the backing of an array of talent from the progressive rock genre, produced a series of innovative concept albums (Ayreon) starting from 1995. Progressive metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music which blends the powerful, guitar-driven sound of metal with the complex compositional structures, odd time signatures, and intricate instrumental playing of progressive rock. ... ÄnglagÃ¥rd is a currently defunct Swedish progressive rock band, with influences including King Crimson, Genesis, TrettioÃ¥riga Kriget, Schicke Führs Fröhling & Van Der Graaf Generator. ... Anekdoten are a Swedish progressive rock band, comprised of guitarist/vocalist Nicklas Berg, cellist Anna Sofi Dahlberg, bassist/vocalist Jan Erik Liljestrom and drummer Peter Nordin. ... Landberk is a Swedish prog/art rock band, characteristic for the dark, sombre tone of their music. ... The Flower Kings are a Swedish progressive rock band. ... Porcupine Tree is an English progressive rock band formed in Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, England by Steven Wilson. ... Dream Theater is an American progressive metal band formed in 1985 under the name Majesty by John Myung, John Petrucci and Mike Portnoy while they attended Berklee College of Music in Boston, before they dropped out to support the band. ... Spocks Beard is a progressive rock band formed in 1992 in Los Angeles by brothers Neal and Alan Morse. ... Echolyn is a progressive rock band and in a way they defy categorization. ... Proto-Kaw (proto=early version of) ( kaw=Native American word for Kansas) has come around full circle in their music careers and again are performing concerts and recording. ... For other uses, see Kansas (disambiguation). ... Glass Hammer is a progressive rock band from Chattanooga, Tennessee. ... Arjen Anthony Lucassen (born April 3, 1960, Hilversum) is a composer and musician from the Netherlands and is most widely known for his albums released under the name Ayreon. ... Ayreon ( ) is a project by Dutch composer and musician Arjen Anthony Lucassen. ...


In recent years, one of the more commercially viable categories of prog has been progressive metal, which mixes some of the common elements associated with progressive rock (lengthy compositions, concept albums, odd time signatures, extended instrumentals, virtuosity, jazz fusion influences) with the power and attitude associated with metal. Prog metal often gives a prominent role to keyboard instruments, in addition to using shred-style electric guitar solos, such as fusion-influenced Planet X and Mr. Big. Progressive metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music which blends the powerful, guitar-driven sound of metal with the complex compositional structures, odd time signatures, and intricate instrumental playing of progressive rock. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Shred guitar is a style of electric guitar playing in which rapid passages are performed using sweep-picking, hammer-ons, pull-offs, and other techniques. ... Two different electric guitars. ... Look up fusion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the astronomical hypothesis. ... Mr. ...


Several of the leading bands in the prog-metal genre – Dream Theater (U.S.), Ayreon (Netherlands), Opeth (Sweden), Fates Warning (U.S.) and Queensrÿche (U.S.) – cite pioneer progressive hard-rockers Rush as a primary influence, although their music exhibits influences from more traditional metal bands such as Black Sabbath or Deep Purple as well. Tool have cited pioneers King Crimson as an influence on their work.[11] King Crimson opened for Tool on their 2001 tour and expressed admiration for the group while continuing to deny the "prog" label.[12] Dream Theater is an American progressive metal band formed in 1985 under the name Majesty by John Myung, John Petrucci and Mike Portnoy while they attended Berklee College of Music in Boston, before they dropped out to support the band. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Ayreon ( ) is a project by Dutch composer and musician Arjen Anthony Lucassen. ... Opeth are a heavy metal band from Stockholm, Sweden. ... Fates Warning is a progressive metal band, formed in 1983 by John Arch, Jim Matheos, Victor Arduini, Joe DiBiase, and Steve Zimmerman in Connecticut, USA. The band directly contributed to the establishment of the progressive metal genre. ... Queensrÿche (pronounced IPA: ) is an American heavy metal / progressive metal band formed in 1981 in Bellevue, Washington. ... Tool is an American rock band that was formed in 1990 in Los Angeles, California. ...


Progressive rock has also served as a key inspiration for genres such as post-rock, avant-garde metal, neo-classical metal and symphonic metal. Dream Theater drummer Mike Portnoy has acknowledged[13] that the prominent use of progressive elements and qualities in metal is not confined to bands conventionally classified as "progressive metal". Many underground metal styles[14] (especially extreme metal styles, which are characterised by extremely fast or slow speed, high levels of distortion, a technical or atmospheric, epic orientation and often abrupt tempo changes, highly unusual melodies, scales, vocal styles, and song structures) and some seminal bands such as Watchtower, Celtic Frost[15] (a highly innovative band having pioneered several styles) or The 3rd and the Mortal remain poorly known even to genre fans. The term post-rock was coined by Simon Reynolds in issue 123 of The Wire (May 1994) to describe a sort of music using rock instrumentation for non-rock purposes, using guitars as facilitators of timbres and textures rather than riffs and powerchords. ... Avant-garde metal or experimental metal is generally regarded as a cross-genre reference to metal bands or more exactly as a stylistic adjunction with specific traits (just like Progressive-, Symphonic-, Viking-, Pagan-, Folk-, Industrial-). It is characterized by large amounts of experimentation and by non-standard sounds, instruments, and... Neo-classical metal is a subgenre of the heavy metal music heavily influenced by classical music in its style of playing and composing[1]. It implies a very technical performance and the use of elements borrowed from classical music and/or by famous classical music composers. ... Symphonic metal is a term used to describe heavy metal music that has symphonic elements; that is, elements that sound similar to a classical symphony. ... Michael Stephen Mike Portnoy (born April 20, 1967) is an American drummer primarily known for his work with the progressive metal band Dream Theater. ... Extreme metal is an umbrella term, somewhat loosely defined, for a number of related heavy metal subgenres that have developed since the 1980s. ... Watchtower is a progressive technical thrash band based in Austin, Texas that was mostly active in the 1980s. ... Celtic Frost are a black metalthrash metal band from Zürich, Switzerland, known for their influence on the extreme metal and gothic metal genres. ... The 3rd and the Mortal (alternative spelling The Third and the Mortal) is a norwegian experimental heavy metal-band. ...


Former members of the pioneering post-hardcore band At the Drive-In, Cedric Bixler-Zavala and Omar Rodriguez-Lopez went on to form The Mars Volta, a successful progressive band that incorporates jazz, funk, punk rock, Latin music, and ambient noise into songs that range in length from a few minutes to more than thirty. They have achieved some crossover success, with their 2005 album Frances the Mute reaching #4 on the Billboard 200 chart after the single "The Widow" became a hit on modern rock radio. Post-hardcore; this specific genre was created by others as a sourse to relaese the emotion that builds inside, making the music intimate and touching to listeners. ... At the Drive-In were an American post-hardcore band from El Paso, Texas, that was active from 1993 to 2001. ... The Mars Volta is an American rock group founded by Cedric Bixler-Zavala, Omar Rodriguez-Lopez, Isaiah Ikey Owens and Jeremy Michael Ward in 2001. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Latin American music, or the music of Latin America, is sometimes called Latin music. ... Ambient music is a musical genre in which sound is more important than notes. ... Frances the Mute is the second studio album by progressive rock band The Mars Volta released in the US on March 1, 2005. ... It has been suggested that Billboard be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the song, The Widow. ...


The first decade of the 2000s were also the years when progressive rock gained more popularity in eastern Europe, especially in Russia, where the InProg festival gained popularity and bands like Little Tragedies, EXIT project, Kostarev Group and Disen Gage reached major success in the Russian rock scene and were noted outside Russia. Other north and eastern European bands worth mentioning are the Latvian band Olive Mess and the Polish band Riverside. Statistical regions of Europe as delineated by the United Nations (UN definition of Eastern Europe marked red):  Northern Europe  Western Europe  Eastern Europe  Southern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current borders: Russia (dark orange), other countries formerly part of the USSR... InProg is an international Progressive rock festival held yearly since 2002 in Moscow, Russia. ... Little Tragedies (Russian: -Malenkiye Tragediyi) are a Russian language progressive rock, Art-rock and Symphonic rock band from Russia. ... Exit project an instrumental progressive rock, art rock, experimental music, easy listening and jazz fusion band from Russia. ... Aleksander Kostarev a Russian instrumental progressive rock musician. ... Disen Gage is a highly professional instrumental progressive rock, psychedelic rock, jazz fusion and fusion group from Russia. ... Rock and roll became known in the Soviet Union in the 1960s and quickly broke free from its western roots. ... Northern Europe Northern Europe is the northern part of the European continent. ... Eastern Europe is, by convention, a region defined geographically as that part of Europe covering the eastern part of the continent. ... Olive Mess is a progressive rock band from Latvia singing in English, one of the most famous Baltic progressive rock bands. ... Riverside is a critically acclaimed progressive rock band from Warsaw, Poland. ...


New England-based Dreadnaught USA represents a modern take on progressive rock self described as "Progabilly"; a blend of progressive rock and roots-based rock. Dreadnaught is a New Hampshire, USA-based experimental rock group that has internationally released 5 full-length albums since its formation in 1996. ...


Festivals

Renewed interest in progressive rock in the 1990s led to the development of festivals. ProgFest began in 1993, in UCLA's Royce Hall and featured Sweden's Änglagård, England's IQ, Quill and Citadel. ProgDay, held at Storybook Farm near Chapel Hill, North Carolina began in 1995 and was still being held as of 2007[16]. A Southern California festival called CalProg held every year at Whittier in LA. ([1]). NEARfest held its first event in 1999 in Bethlehem, PA and has held annual concerts ever since. An international festival called InProg has been held in Moscow, Russia, since 2001. Most of the performers at this festival are from Russia, but there are also bands from other countries. IQ is a British progressive rock band founded by Mike Holmes in 1982 following the dissolution of his original band The Lens (1976 - 1981). ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Orange, Durham, and Chatham Founded 1793 Government  - Mayor Kevin C. Foy Area  - City  19. ... The North East Art Rock Festival, or NEARfest for short, is a two-day event celebrating the resurgence of art rock and eclectic music in the United States and around the world. ... Bethlehem is a city located in USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 71,329. ... InProg is an international Progressive rock festival held yearly since 2002 in Moscow, Russia. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ...


Other festivals include the annual Rites of Spring Festival (RoSfest)[17] in Glenside, PA, The Rogue Independent Music Festival (or Rogue Fest) in Atlanta, GA, Baja Prog in Mexicali, Mexico, CalProg in Whittier, CA, Prog In The Park in Rochester, NY, Gouveia Art Rock in Portugal, Prog Sud in Marseille (France), Tiana in Barcelona (Spain), Progfarm in Holland, Rio Art Rock Festival in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and ProgPower USA in Atlanta, Georgia. Glenside is a census-designated place (CDP) in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... The Rogue Independent Music Festival, also know as Rogue Fest, was a two-day festival of progressive rock and art rock held annually in Atlanta, GA from 2002 to 2006. ... Baja Prog is an annual progressive rock festival in Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico, held since 1997. ... Mexicali is the capital of the State of Baja California, Mexico. ... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ... This article is about the Brazilian city. ... ProgPower USA is a progressive and power metal festival held annually in the United States since 2001. ... Atlanta redirects here. ...


Progressive Nation is being held in 2008 featuring progressive metal bands Dream Theater, Opeth, Between the Buried and Me, and Three. Dream Theater is an American progressive metal band formed in 1985 under the name Majesty by John Myung, John Petrucci and Mike Portnoy while they attended Berklee College of Music in Boston, before they dropped out to support the band. ... Opeth are a heavy metal band from Stockholm, Sweden. ... Between the Buried and Me is a progressive metal quintet from Raleigh, North Carolina. ... 3 is an American experimental/progressive rock band formed in Woodstock, New York in the early 90s. ...


See also

This is a list of events, artists, and albums constituting a timeline of major developments in progressive rock. ... Listed here are musical compositions or pieces in Western music that have unusual time signatures. ... Art rock is a term used to describe a subgenre of rock music with experimental or avant-garde influences that emphasizes novel sonic texture. ...

Related genres, scenes and sub-genres

Avant-progressive rock is a style of art music based on rock music that explores unconventional territory, often incorporating non-standard chord progressions, tempo changes within a piece, odd time signatures, avant garde passages and complex horn and orchestral arrangements. ... The Canterbury Scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a term used to loosely describe the group of progressive rock musicians that were based around the city of Canterbury, Kent, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Krautrock, also known as Kosmische Musik, is a generic name for the experimental music scene that appeared in Germany in the late 1960s and gained popularity throughout the 1970s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mathcore (also known as technical metalcore, technical hardcore, and math metal) is a style of metalcore recognized for a high level of technical musicianship. ... Neo-progressive (or neo-prog) is a sub-genre of rock music, a form of progressive rock developed and briefly popular in the 1980s, although it lives on today. ... New Prog (sometimes called Nu Prog or post-prog) is a term used to describe a number of recent alternative rock bands who incorporate elements from progressive rock. ... Progressive folk is a type of folk music that rejects or de-emphasizes the conventions of traditional folk music and encourages stylistic or thematic innovation. ... Progressive metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music which blends the powerful, guitar-driven sound of metal with the complex compositional structures, odd time signatures, and intricate instrumental playing of progressive rock. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Flyer for the 1st RIO festival, 12 March 1978, The New London Theatre, London. ... Symphonic rock is a subgenre of rock music, and more specifically, progressive rock. ...

Further reading

  • Lucky, Jerry. The Progressive Rock Files. Burlington, Ontario: Collector's Guide Publishing, Inc (1998), 304 pages, ISBN 1-896522-10-6 (paperback). Gives an overview of progressive rock's history as well as histories of the major and underground bands in the genre.
  • Macan, Edward. Rocking the Classics: English Progressive Rock and the Counterculture. Oxford: Oxford University Press (1997), 290 pages, ISBN 0195098870 (hardcover), ISBN 0195098889 (paperback). Analyzes progressive rock using classical musicology and also sociology.
  • Martin, Bill. Listening to the Future: The Time of Progressive Rock. Peru, Ill.: Carus Publishing Company (1998), 356 pages, ISBN 0-8126-9368-X (paperback). An enthusiastic analysis of progressive rock, intermixed with the author's Marxist political views.
  • Snider, Charles. The Strawberry Bricks Guide To Progressive Rock. Chicago, Ill.: Lulu Publishing (2007) 364 pages, ISBN 978-0-6151-7566-9 (paperback). A veritable guide to progressive rock, with band histories, musical synopses and critical commentary, all presented in the historical context of a timeline.
  • Stump, Paul. The Music's All That Matters: A History of Progressive Rock. London: Quartet Books Limited (1997), 384 pages, ISBN 0-7043-8036-6 (paperback). Smart telling of the history of progressive rock focusing on English bands with some discussion of American and European groups. Takes you from the beginning to the early 1990s.

Underground music is music which has developed a cult following, independent of commercial success. ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... The Carus Publishing Company is a publisher with offices in Chicago and Peru, Illinois. ... Marxism is both the theory and the political practice (that is, the praxis) derived from the work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. ...

References and notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f Prog-Rock/Art Rock. AllMusic. AllMusic (2007). Retrieved on 2007-12-04.
  2. ^ a b c d Piero Scaruffi
  3. ^ Brian Hogg, The History of Scottish Rock and Pop. (BBC/Guiness Publishing)
  4. ^ '1-2-3 and the Birth of Prog,' Mojo, Nov. 1994
  5. ^ The Who at progarchives.com
  6. ^ The album had actually been released in 1974
  7. ^ "The Early History of Art-Rock/Prog Rock" by Bruce Eder (All-Music Guide Essay). Available at: http://www.vanguardchurch.com/the_history_of_art_rock.htm
  8. ^ Holm-Hudson, K. (October 2001). Progressive Rock Reconsidered. Routledge. ISBN 0-8153-3714-0. 
  9. ^ Brian L. Knight. Rock in the Name of Progress (Part VI -"Thelonius Punk"). Retrieved on 2006-09-19.
  10. ^ Tommy Udo (September 2006). "Did Punk kill prog?". Classic Rock Magazine Issue 97. 
  11. ^ Blair Blake (2001). Augustember 2001 E.V.. Tool Newsletter. Retrieved on 2006-04-28.
  12. ^ Eyes Wide Open
  13. ^ Mike Portnoy Pledges Alliance to One Nation Under Prog
  14. ^ An Overview of Metal Genres on GEPR
  15. ^ Interview with Christofer Johnsson, leader of symphonic metal pioneers Therion
  16. ^ http://www.progday.com/ ProgDay home page
  17. ^ http://rosfest.com RoSfest home page

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mojo is a popular music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom. ... Routledge is an imprint for books in the humanities part of the Taylor & Francis Group, which also has Brunner-Routledge, RoutledgeCurzon and RoutledgeFalmer divisions. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Prog Archives Site dedicated to Progressive Music in all its forms.
  • Progression magazine A large print publication devoted to coverage of progressive rock and related subgenres.

This article is about the genre. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... Genres: Alternative - Classical - Dance - Folk - Hip hop - Jazz - Military - Ottoman - Opera - Pop - Religious - Rock Awards Kral MV, MÜ-YAP, MGD Charts Billboard Charts Music Festivals Istanbul International Music Festival, Istanbul International Jazz Festival, Izmir European Jazz Festival, Aspendos International Opera and Ballet Festival Media Rolling Stone (Türkiye), MTV (T... Arena rock, also called stadium rock or anthem rock, is a loosely-defined term describing a rock era. ... Art rock is a term used to describe a subgenre of rock music with experimental or avant-garde influences that emphasizes novel sonic texture. ... It has been suggested that Merseybeat be merged into this article or section. ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Boogaloo (shing-a-ling, popcorn music) is a genre of Latin music and dance that was very popular in the United States in the late 1960s. ... For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... The Canterbury Scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a term used to loosely describe the group of progressive rock musicians that were based around the city of Canterbury, Kent, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Christian rock (occasionally abbreviated CR) is a form of rock music played by bands whose members are Christian and who often focus the lyrics on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... Comedy rock is a term used to describe rock music that mixes the music with general comedy. ... For the geological term, see Country rock (geology). ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Frat rock was an early influential American subgenre of rock and roll / roots rock. ... Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a rock music style that developed in the UK in the post-hippie early 1970s which was performed by singers and musicians wearing outrageous clothes, makeup, hairstyles, and platform-soled boots. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Instrumental rock and roll is a type of rock and roll music which emphasises musical instruments, and which features no or very little singing. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... Jangle pop is a musical genre that began in United States during the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... Krautrock, also known as Kosmische Musik, is a generic name for the experimental music scene that appeared in Germany in the late 1960s and gained popularity throughout the 1970s. ... For other uses, see Pop rock (disambiguation). ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Pub rock was a mid- to late-1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... Pub rock is a style of Australian rock and roll popular throughout the 1970s and 1980s, and still influencing contemporary Australian music today. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Rap rock is a hybrid of rap and rock music. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Samba-rock - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... Southern rock is a subgenre of rock music. ... Stoner rock and stoner metal are interchangeable terms describing sub-genres of rock and metal music. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... This is a list of music genres derived from rock and roll, including major rock, metal and punk genres: Categories: | ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... The massive popularity and worldwide scope of rock and roll resulted in an unprecedented level of social impact. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference for Progressive rock - Search.com (3796 words)
Progressive rock songs also often have extended instrumental passages, marrying the classical solo tradition with the improvisational traditions of jazz and psychedelic rock.
As progressive rock songs are, themselves, quite long, such collections have frequently exceeded the maximum length of recorded media, resulting in packages that require multiple vinyl discs, cassettes, or even compact discs to present a single album.
With the advent of punk rock in the late 1970s, critical opinion in England moved toward a simpler and more aggressive style of rock, with progressive bands increasingly dismissed as pretentious and overblown, ending progressive rock's reign as one of the leading styles in rock.
Progressive rock - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4170 words)
Progressive rock (sometimes shortened to prog rock or prog) is a subgenre of rock music which arose in the late 1960s, reached the peak of its popularity in the 1970s, and continues as a musical form to this day.
Progressive rock artists reject the limitations of popular music and aspire to create music for serious listening, often alluding to the sophistication of jazz and classical music, sometimes mixing folk and world music influences in as well.
Progressive rock was born from a variety of musical influences in the late 1960s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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