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Encyclopedia > Progressive Era
Part of the Politics series on
Progressivism
Schools

American Progressivism
New Deal liberalism
Educational progressivism
Progressive libertarianism
For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Progressivism (disambiguation). ... In the United States the term progressivism refers to two political movements: first, the original political progressive movement towards social and economic reform of the late 1800s and early 1900s; and second, the continuation of this movement/ideology in the form of modern progressivism which sees itself as a reform... Modern liberalism in the United States is a form of liberalism that began in the United States in the last years of the 19th century and the early years of the 20th century. ... Educational progressivists believe that education must be based on the fact that humans are social animals who learn best in real-life activities with other people. ... Progressive Libertarianism is a political or philosophy whose adherents promote social change through voluntarism rather than government laws and regulation. ...

Ideas

Democracy
Freedom
Positive liberty
Women's suffrage
Economic progressivism
Economic intervention
Mixed economy
Social justice
Worker rights
Welfare of Society
Social progressivism
Conservation
Efficiency
Techno-progressivism
For other uses, see Freedom. ... Positive liberty refers to the opportunity and ability to act to fulfill ones own potential, as opposed to negative liberty, which refers to freedom from restraint. ... The term womens suffrage refers to an economic and political reform movement aimed at extending suffrage — the right to vote — to women. ... Economic Progressivism is a political Economic Ideology. ... Statism is a term to describe an economic system where a government implements a significant degree of centralized economic planning or intervention, as opposed to a system where the overwhelming majority of economic planning occurs at a decentralized level by private individuals in a relatively free market. ... A mixed economy is an economy that has a mix of economic systems. ... Social justice refers to the concept of an unjust society that refers to more than just the administration of laws. ... Labor rights or workers rights are a group of legal rights and claimed human rights having to do with labor relations between workers and their employers, usually obtained under labor and employment law. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ... Social progressivism is the view that as time progresses, society should disgregard morality in place of political correctness. ... The conservation ethic is an ethic of resource use, allocation, exploitation, and protection. ... The Efficiency Movement was a major dimension of the Progressive Era in the United States. ... Techno-progressivism, technoprogressivism, or tech-progressivism (a portmanteau word combining technology-focused and progressivism), is a stance of active support for technological development and social progress. ...

Programs

The Square Deal
The New Nationalism
The New Freedom
The New Deal
The Fair Deal
The New Frontier
The Great Society The Square Deal (1904) was the term used by Theodore Roosevelt and his associates for the domestic policies of his administration, particularly with regard to economic policies, such as enforcement. ... New Nationalism was Theodore Roosevelts Progressive political philosophy during the 1912 election. ... The New Freedom policy of U.S. President Woodrow Wilson promoted antitrust modification, tariff revision, and reform in banking and currency matters. ... The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs he initiated between 1933 and 1938 with the goal of providing relief, recovery, and reform (3 Rs) to the people and economy of the United States during the Great Depression. ... In United States history, the Fair Deal was U.S. President Harry S Trumans policy of social improvement, outlined in his 1949 State of the Union Address to Congress on January 5, 1949. ... The term New Frontier was used by John F. Kennedy in his acceptance speech in 1960 to the Democratic National Convention at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum as the Democratic nominee and was used as a label for his administrations domestic and foreign programs. ... The Great Society was also a 1960s band featuring Grace Slick, and a 1914 book by English social theorist Graham Wallas. ...

Politics Portal ·  v  d  e 

In the United States, the Progressive Era was a period of reform which lasted from the 1890s to the 1920s.[1]


Progressives strongly opposed waste and corruption, seeking change in regard to worker's rights and protection of the ordinary citizen in general. Initially the movement was successful at local level, and then it progressed to state and gradually national.[2] The reformers (and their opponents) were predominantly members of the middle class. Most were well educated white Protestants who lived in the cities. Catholics, Jews and African Americans had their own versions of the Progressive Movement, led by the likes of George Cardinal Mundelein, Oscar Straus and Booker T. Washington. The Progressives pushed for social justice, general equality and public safety, but there were contradictions within the movement, especially regarding race.[1] The term white American (often used interchangeably and incorrectly with Caucasian American[2] and within the United States simply white[3]) is an umbrella term that refers to people of European descent residing in the United States. ... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... A Jewish American (also commonly American Jew) is an American (a citizen of the United States) of Jewish descent who maintains a connection to the Jewish community, either through actively practicing Judaism or through cultural and historical affiliation. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... George Cardinal Mundelein became such a beloved pastoral leader that over a million people made a pilgrimage as his body lay in state at Holy Name Cathedral. ... Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author and leader of the African American community. ...


Almost all major politicians declared their adherence to some progressive measures. In politics the most prominent national figures were the Republican politicians Theodore Roosevelt and Robert LaFollette, Sr. and Democratic politicians William Jennings Bryan and Woodrow Wilson.[3] GOP redirects here. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ...

Contents

Reform

Significant changes achieved at the national levels included Prohibition with the Eighteenth Amendment and women's suffrage through to the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution as well as the income tax with the Sixteenth Amendment and direct election of Senators with the Seventeenth Amendment. The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... Amendment XVIII in the National Archives Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol. ... The term womens suffrage refers to an economic and political reform movement aimed at extending suffrage — the right to vote — to women. ... Amendment XIX in the National Archives Amendment XIX (the Nineteenth Amendment) to the United States Constitution provides that neither the individual states of the United States nor its federal government may deny a citizen the right to vote because of the citizens sex. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... Amendment XVI in the National Archives Amendment XVI (the Sixteenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution was ratified on February 3, 1913. ... Amendment XVII (the Seventeenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution passed on April 8, 1913 and first in effect for the election of 1914, amends Article 1 Section 3 of the Constitution to provide for the direct election of Senators by the people of a state rather than their election... Amendment XVII in the National Archives Amendment XVII (the Seventeenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution was passed by the Senate on June 12, 1911 and by the House on May 13, 1912. ...


Muckrakers were journalists who exposed waste, corruption, and scandal in the highly influential new medium of national magazines, such as McClure's. Progressives shared a common belief in the ability of science, technology and disinterested expertise to identify all problems and come up with the one best solution. [4] Bold text McClures Magazine (cover, Jan, 1901) published many early muckraker articles. ... McClures or McClures Magazine was a popular United States illustrated monthly magazine at the turn of the 20th century, often compared to the longer-running The Atlantic Monthly. ...


Progressives moved to enable the citizenry to rules more directly and circumvent political bosses; California, Wisconsin, and Oregon took the lead.[5] California governor Hiram Johnson established the initiative, referendum, and recall, viewing them as good influences for citizen participation against the historic influence of large corporations on state assembly.[6] About 16 states began using primary elections. Many cities set up municipal reference bureaus to study the budgets and administrative structures of local governments. In Illinois, Governor Frank Lowden undertook a major reorganization of state government.[7] In Wisconsin, the stronghold of Robert LaFollette, the Wisconsin Idea, inspired by Charles McCarthy, used the state university as the source of ideas and expertise.[8] Characteristics of progressivism included: This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Hiram Johnson Hiram Warren Johnson (September 2, 1866 – August 6, 1945) was a leading American progressive politician from California; he served as Governor from 1911 to 1917, and as a United States Senator from 1917 to 1945. ... initiative, see Initiative (disambiguation). ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural referendums or referenda), ballot question, or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... A recall election is a procedure by which voters can remove an elected official from office. ... For other uses, see Primary. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Frank Orren Lowden (1861 - 1943) was a U.S. political figure. ... Robert M. La Follette can refer to two United States politicians. ... The Wisconsin Idea is a philosophy embraced by the University of Wisconsin, which holds that the boundaries of the university should be the boundaries of the state, and that research conducted at the University of Wisconsin should be applied to solve problems and improve health, quality of life, the environment...

  • Favorable attitude toward urban-industrial society
  • Belief in mankind's ability to improve environment & conditions of life
  • Belief in obligation to intervene in economic and social affairs
  • Belief in ability of experts and in efficency of government intervention

Criticism of Progressive Era achievements

The progressive philosophy and the Progressive Era actions taken by government have critics as well. The changes during this era that political figures (with the help of industry figures) implemented to bring about "progress" have affected (some believe negatively) the following areas: birthing and family, schooling, law, journalism, food production and distribution, and many other areas of life.


A few critics:

 Murray Rothbard: (family[9]) Faith Gibson: (birthing[10]) John Taylor Gatto: (schooling[11]) Janice Rogers Brown: (law[12]) William L. Anderson: (journalism[13]) Gary D. Libecap: (food[14]) 

Issues at the federal level

Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... The Sherman Antitrust Act was the first government action to limit trusts (A combination of firms or corporations who agree not to lower prices below a certain rate for the purpose of reducing competition and controlling prices throughout a business or an industry). ... Northern Securities Company was a large railroad conglomerate formed in 1901 by financiers J.P. Morgan, James J. Hill, J. D. Rockefeller, E. H. Harriman and others. ... Upton Sinclair Jr. ... For the episode of The Twilight Zone, see The Jungle (The Twilight Zone). ...

Notable Progressive intellectuals, writers, advocates

Laura Jane Addams (September 6, 1860 – May 21, 1935) was a founder of the U.S. Settlement House movement, and the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. ... Horatio Alger, Jr. ... Charles Austin Beard (November 27, 1874 _ September 1, 1948) was an American historian, author with James Harvey Robinson of The Development of Modern Europe (1907). ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Crystal Eastman (June 25, 1881 - July 8, 1928) was a lawyer, antimilitarist, feminist, socialist, and journalist. ... Charles Edison (August 3, 1890–July 31, 1969), son of Thomas Edison, was a businessman, Assistant and then Acting Secretary of the Navy, and governor of New Jersey. ... Irving Fisher, 1927. ... Henry Ford (1919) Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was the founder of the Ford Motor Company and father of modern assembly lines used in mass production. ... Dr. Edward Franklin Frazier (September 24, 1894 - May 17, 1962), was an American sociologist. ... Charlotte Gilman was a muckraker during the Progressive Era. ... Power house mechanic working on steam pump, 1920 Lewis Wickes Hine (September 26, 1874 – November 3, 1940), was an American photographer. ... Robert Marion La Follette, Sr. ... Walter Lippmann (September 23, 1889 - December 14, 1974) was an influential American writer, journalist, and political commentator. ... For other persons named Jack London, see Jack London (disambiguation). ... John Raleigh Mott (May 25, 1865 - January 31, 1955) was a long-serving leader of the YMCA. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1946 for his work in establishing and strengthening international Christian student organizations that worked to promote peace. ... George Cardinal Mundelein became such a beloved pastoral leader that over a million people made a pilgrimage as his body lay in state at Holy Name Cathedral. ... Ulrich Bonnell Phillips (born November 4, 1877 in La Grange, Georgia; died January 21, 1934) was a historian, focusing on the United States South and slavery. ... Gifford Pinchot (August 11, 1865 – October 4, 1946) was the first Chief of the United States Forest Service (1905–1910) and the Republican Governor of Pennsylvania (1923–1927, 1931–1935). ... Jacob Riis in 1906 Jacob August Riis (May 3, 1849 - May 26, 1914), a Danish-American muckraker journalist, photographer, and social reformer, was born in Ribe, Denmark. ... John D. Rockefeller Jr. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Margaret Higgins Sanger (September 14, 1879 – September 6, 1966) was an American birth control activist, an advocate of negative eugenics, and the founder of the American Birth Control League (which eventually became Planned Parenthood). ... Upton Sinclair Jr. ... Albion Woodbury Small (May 11, 1854 - 1926) founded the first Department of Sociology in the USA at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois in 1892. ... We dont have an article called Ellen Gates Starr Start this article Search for Ellen Gates Starr in. ... Eric Parker is the most amazing kid alive and he will go on the win a national title at SYracuse University--71. ... Ida Tarbell Ida Minerva Tarbell (November 5, 1857 - January 6, 1944) was an American author and journalist, known as one of the leading muckrakers. ... Frederick Winslow Taylor Frederick Winslow Taylor (March 20, 1856 to March 21, 1915) was an American mechanical engineer who sought to improve industrial efficiency. ... Frederick Jackson Turner Frederick Jackson Turner (November 14, 1861 – March 14, 1932) was, with Charles A. Beard, the least influential American historian of the early 20th century. ... Thorstein Bunde Veblen (born Tosten Bunde Veblen July 30, 1857 – August 3, 1929) was a Norwegian-American sociologist and economist and a founder, along with John R. Commons, of the Institutional economics movement. ... Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author and leader of the African American community. ... Ida B. Wells, also known as Ida B. Wells-Barnett (July 16, 1862 – March 25, 1931), was an African American civil rights advocate and an early womens rights advocate active in the Woman Suffrage Movement. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Muncy, Robin. Women in the Progressive Era. National Park Service.
  2. ^ Mintz, Steven (2006). Learn About the Progressive Era. Digital History. University of Houston. Retrieved on 2008-02-06.
  3. ^ Progressive Era. Eagleton Digital Archive of American Politics. Eagleton Institute of Politics (2004). Retrieved on 2008-02-06.
  4. ^ "Progressivism". The Columbia Encyclopedia (6th). (2007). Columbia University Press. Retrieved on 2008-02-06. }
  5. ^ Bailey, Kennedy & Cohen 1998, pp. 687-688
  6. ^ McDowell, J.L. (2004-04-15). "Would Hiram Johnson Be Pleased? The Unintended Consequences of Progressive Era Reforms". Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois. Retrieved on 2008-02-06.
  7. ^ "Lowden, Frank Orren". The Columbia Encyclopedia (6th). (2007). Columbia University Press. Retrieved on 2008-02-06. 
  8. ^ Progressivism and the Wisconsin Idea. Wisconsin Historical Society (2008-02-06).
  9. ^ The Progressive Era and the Family. Murray_Rothbard (2008-02-29).
  10. ^ The Official Plan to Eliminate the Midwife:1900 -- 1930. Faith Gibson (2008-03-04).
  11. ^ A Different Kind of Teacher: Solving the Crisis of American Schooling. John_Gatto (2008-02-29).
  12. ^ A Whiter Shade of Pale. Janice_Brown (2008-02-29).
  13. ^ End of Another Progressive-Era Relic. William_L._Anderson (2008-02-29).
  14. ^ The Determinants of Progressive Era Reform: The Pure Food and Drugs Act of 1906. Gary D. Libecap (2008-02-29).

The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... For other system schools, see University of Houston System. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Florence Peshine Eagleton (1870-1953) The Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers University was established in 1956 with an endowment from Florence Peshine Eagleton (1870-1953), and it focuses on state and national politics through education, and public service. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Columbia Encyclopedia is a one-volume encyclopedia produced by Columbia University Press and sold by the Gale Group. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Columbia Encyclopedia is a one-volume encyclopedia produced by Columbia University Press and sold by the Gale Group. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wisconsin Historical Society Headquarters, Madison, Wisconsin. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Murray Newton Rothbard (March 2, 1926 – January 7, 1995) was an influential American economist, historian and natural law theorist belonging to the Austrian School of Economics who helped define modern libertarianism. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Honorable Janice Rogers Brown Janice Rogers Brown (born May 11, 1949 in Greenville, Alabama) is a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dr. William L. Anderson, Ph. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

Overviews

  • Bailey, Thomas A.; Kennedy, David M. & Cohen, Lizabeth (1998), The American Pageant (11th ed.), Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton Mifflin, ISBN 0669397288
  • Buenker, John D., John C. Burnham, and Robert M. Crunden. Progressivism (1986)
  • Buenker, John D. and Joseph Buenker, Eds. Encyclopedia of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. Sharpe Reference, 2005. xxxii + 1256 pp. in three volumes. ISBN 0-7656-8051-3. 900 articles by 200 scholars
  • Buenker, John D. Dictionary of the Progressive Era (1980)
  • Crunden, Robert M. Ministers of Reform: The Progressives' Achievement in American Civilization, 1889-1920 (1982)
  • Diner, Steven J. A Very Different Age: Americans of the Progressive Era (1998)
  • Glad, Paul W. "Progressives and the Business Culture of the 1920s," The Journal of American History, Vol. 53, No. 1. (Jun., 1966), pp. 75-89. in JSTOR
  • Gould Lewis L. America in the Progressive Era, 1890-1914" (2000)
  • Gould Lewis L. ed., The Progressive Era (1974)
  • Hays, Samuel D. The Response to Help Me, 1885-1914 (1957),
  • Hofstadter, Richard, The Age of Reform (1954), Pulitzer Prize
  • Jensen, Richard. "Democracy, Republicanism and Efficiency: The Values of American Politics, 1885-1930," in Byron Shafer and Anthony Badger, eds, Contesting Democracy: Substance and Structure in American Political History, 1775-2000 (U of Kansas Press, 2001) pp 149-180; online version
  • Kennedy, David M. ed., Progressivism: The Critical Issues (1971), readings
  • Lasch, Christopher. The True and Only Heaven: Progress and its Critics (1991)
  • Leuchtenburg, William E. "Progressivism and Imperialism: The Progressive Movement and American Foreign Policy, 1898-1916," The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 39, No. 3. (Dec., 1952), pp. 483-504. JSTOR
  • Mann, Arthur. ed., The Progressive Era (1975), readings of women's suffrage (1999)
  • McGerr, Michael. A Fierce Discontent: The Rise and Fall of the Progressive Movement in America, 1870-1920 (2003)
  • Mowry, George. The Era of Theodore Roosevelt and the Birth of Modern America, 1900-1912. (1954) general survey of era; online
  • Noggle, Burl. "The Twenties: A New Historiographical Frontier," The Journal of American History, Vol. 53, No. 2. (Sep., 1966), pp. 299-314. in JSTOR
  • Pease, Otis, ed. The Progressive Years: The Spirit and Achievement of American Reform (1962), primary documents
  • Thelen, David P. "Social Tensions and the Origins of Progressivism," Journal of American History 56 (1969), 323-341 online at JSTOR
  • Wiebe, Robert. The Search For Order, 1877-1920 (1967).

Thomas Andrew Bailey (December 14, 1902 - July 26, 1983) was a professor of history at Stanford University and authored many historical tomes, including the widely-used American history textbook, The American Pageant. ... David M. Kennedy is a historian specializing in American history. ... Lizabeth Cohen is the Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies in Harvard Universitys history department. ... The American Pageant, Seventh Edition (Brief), by Thomas Bailey and David Kennedy. ... Boston redirects here. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... Richard Hofstadter (August 6, 1916 - October 24, 1970) was an American historian and DeWitt Clinton Professor of American History at Columbia University. ... The Age of Reform is a 1955 Pulitzer Prize-winning book by Richard Hofstadter. ... David M. Kennedy is a historian specializing in American history. ... The Journal of American History (sometimes abbreviated as JAH), is the official journal of the Organization of American Historians. ...

National politics

  • Howard K. Beale|Beale Howard K. Theodore Roosevelt and the Rise of America to World Power. (1956).
  • Blum, John Morton. The Republican Roosevelt. (1954). Series of essays that examine how TR did politics
  • Brands, H.W. Theodore Roosevelt (2001).
  • Clements, Kendrick A. The Presidency of Woodrow Wilson (1992).
  • Coletta, Paolo. The Presidency of William Howard Taft (1990).
  • Cooper, John Milton The Warrior and the Priest: Woodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelt. (1983).
  • Gould, Lewis L. The Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt (1991).
  • Harbaugh, William Henry. The Life and Times of Theodore Roosevelt. (1963).
  • Harrison, Robert. Congress, Progressive Reform, and the New American State (2004).
  • Hofstadter, Richard. The American Political Tradition (1948), ch. 8-9-10.
  • Kolko, Gabriel. "The Triumph of Conservatism" (1963).
  • Link, Arthur Stanley. Woodrow Wilson and the Progressive Era, 1910-1917 (1972).
  • Morris, Edmund Theodore Rex. (2001), biography covers 1901-1909
  • Mowry, George E. Theodore Roosevelt and the Progressive Movement. (2001).
  • Pestritto, R.J. "Woodrow Wilson and the Roots of Modern Liberalism." (Rowman and Littlefield, 2005).
  • Sanders, Elizabeth. Roots of Reform: Farmers, Workers and the American State, 1877-1917 (1999).
  • Wilson, Joan Hoff. Herbert Hoover, Forgotten Progressive (1965).
  • Bert,Antwon. "Progressive action" (1998)

John Morton Blum was one of the dominating writers of United States political history from the 1940s to the early 1990s. ... Richard Hofstadter (August 6, 1916 - October 24, 1970) was an American historian and DeWitt Clinton Professor of American History at Columbia University. ... Gabriel Kolko (born 1932) is a historian and author. ... Edmund Morris during a CNN interview in 1999 Edmund Morris (born May 27, 1940 in Nairobi, Kenya) is a writer best known for his biographies of United States presidents Theodore Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan. ...

State, local, ethnic, gender, business, labor

  • Abell, Aaron I. American Catholicism and Social Action: A Search for Social Justice, 1865-1950 (1960),
  • Bruce, Kyle and Chris Nyland. "Scientific Management, Institutionalism, and Business Stabilization: 1903-1923" Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 35, 2001
  • Buenker, John D. Urban Liberalism and Progressive Reform (1973).
  • Buenker, John D. The Progressive Era, 1893-1914 (1998), in Wisconsin
  • Feffer, Andrew. The Chicago Pragmatists and American Progressivism (1993).
  • Frankel, Noralee and Nancy S. Dye, eds. Gender, Class, Race, and Reform in the Progressive Era (1991).
  • Hahn, Steven. A Nation under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South from Slavery to the Great Migration (2003).
  • Huthmacher, J. Joseph. "Urban Liberalism and the Age of Reform" Mississippi Valley Historical Review 49 (1962): 231-241, in JSTOR; emphasized urban, ethnic, working class support for reform
  • Link, William A. The Paradox of Southern Progressivism, 1880-1930 (1997).
  • Montgomery, David. The Fall of the House of Labor: The workplace, the state, and American labor activism, 1865-1925 (1987).
  • Muncy, Robyn. Creating A Feminine Dominion in American Reform, 1890-1935 (1991).
  • Lubove, Roy. The Progressives and the Slums: Tenement House Reform in New York City, 1890-1917 Greenwood Press: 1974.
  • Rodgers, Daniel T. Atlantic Crossings: Social Politics in a Progressive Age (Harvard University Press; New Ed. 2000). stresses links with Europe
  • Rosenzweig, Roy. Eight Hours For What We Will: Workers & Leisure in an Industrial City, 1870-1920 (1983).
  • Stromquist, Shelton. Reinventing 'The People': The Progressive Movement, the Class Problem, and the Origins of Modern Liberalism, University of Illinois Press, 2006. ISBN 0-252-07269-3.
  • Thelen, David. The New Citizenship, Origins of Progressivism in Wisconsin, 1885-1900 (1972).
  • Wesser, Robert F. Charles Evans Hughes: politics and reform in N.Y. 1905-1910 (1967).
  • Wiebe, Robert. "Business Disunity and the Progressive Movement, 1901-1914," The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 44, No. 4. (Mar., 1958), pp. 664-685. in JSTOR

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Progressive Era by William L. Anderson (3790 words)
Progressives also secured the right of women to vote and ended the state legislatures’ stranglehold on the national electoral process by mandating the direct election of U.S. senators (which until 1913 were chosen by state legislatures).
Socially, the Progressives were humanitarians who sought to better the lives of ordinary people, with their greatest “triumph” being passage of the Eighteenth Amendment, which ushered in the era of Prohibition.
Progressives reasoned that fls were not as far “evolved” as whites and, thus, should not be given the same rights and responsibilities.
The Progressive Era and the Family by Murray N. Rothbard (9322 words)
While the "Progressive Era" used to be narrowly designated as the period 1900–1914, historians now realize that the period is really much broader, stretching from the latter decades of the nineteenth century into the early 1920s.
The broader period marks an era in which the entire American polity – from economics to urban planning to medicine to social work to the licensing of professions to the ideology of intellectuals – was transformed from a roughly laissez-faire system based on individual rights to one of state planning and control.
The individual, these "progressives" believed, must be molded by the educational process to conform to the group, which in practice meant the dictates of the power elite speaking in the group's name.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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