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Encyclopedia > Progressive Conservative leadership convention, 2003
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The 2003 Progressive Conservative leadership convention was held on May 31, 2003 to elect a leader or the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. Peter MacKay was elected as leader to replace former Prime Minister Joe Clark who had retired as party leader. In the end, five candidates emerged as challengers for the leadership by the convention date. Two other candidates had participated in the race but both resigned as contenstants before the vote. Quebec MP André Bachand withdrew his candidacy from the race due to financial concerns and backed Peter MacKay. Former Cabinet Minister and Quebec MP Heward Grafftey also withdrew his candidacy from the race due to health concerns and backed David Orchard. May 31 is the 151st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (152nd in leap years), with 214 days remaining, as the last day of May. ... 2003(MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... Peter Gordon MacKay MP, LL.B., BA, (born September 27, 1965) is the current deputy leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... The Right Honourable Charles Joseph Clark, PC , CC , AOE , MA , LL.D (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada from June 4, 1979, to March 2, 1980. ... This page is about the Canadian politician. ...


The results of the race produced immediate controversy when it emerged that winner Mackay had signed an agreement with David Orchard in order to get elected. This deal promised the party would review the Canadian-American Free Trade Agreement, and that it would not cooperate or merge with the Canadian Alliance. This controversy continued when MacKay ignored the agreement, and signed an agreement to merge his party with the Canadian Alliance to form the new Conservative Party of Canada. The merger was approved by party members in December 2003. The Free Trade Agreement (FTA) was a trade agreement reached by Canada and the United States in October of 1987. ... The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right_of_centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada) is a right wing political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ...

Contents


Candidates

Peter Gordon MacKay MP, LL.B., BA, (born September 27, 1965) is the current deputy leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... Jim Prentice, MP (born July 20, 1956, in South Porcupine, Timmins, Ontario) is a Canadian lawyer and politician. ... Motto: Heart of the new west Area: 712. ... This page is about the Canadian politician. ... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (From many peoples, strength) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant Governor Lynda M. Haverstock Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Area 651,036 km² (7th) Land 591,670 km² Water 59,366 km² (9. ... Scott Brison The Honourable Scott A. Brison, PC , B.Comm , MP (b. ... Craig B. Chandler (born 1970) is a Canadian politician. ... The Progressive Group for Independent Business (PGIB) is a a membership funded right-wing think-tank and business lobby group that was founded in 1992 with the goal of promoting less government, lower taxes and political accountability. ...

Dropped out

  • AndrĂ© Bachand - Member of Parliament - Backed MacKay
  • Heward Grafftey - former Science and Social Programs Minister - Informally Backed Orchard

André Bachand is the name of two former Canadian politicians: André Bachand, a Progressive Conservative Member of Parliament (MP) who represented Richmond—Arthabaska from 1997 to 2003 as a Tory and then sat as an independent until 2004. ... The Honourable William Heward Grafftey, PC , BCL , BA (born August 5, 1928) is a Canadian politician and businessman. ...

Ballot Results

First Ballot

  • MACKAY, Peter Gordon 1,080 (41.08%)
  • ORCHARD, David 640 (24.34%)
  • PRENTICE, Jim 478 (18.18%)
  • BRISON, Scott 431 (16.39%)
  • CHANDLER, Craig 0 (0%)*

Total ballots cast 2,629.


Chandler withdrew before voting began to endorse Prentice. Estimates suggest that Chandler had 12 committed delegates hailing from a few Calgary area ridings who voted in favour of Prentice.


Second Ballot

  • MACKAY, Peter Gordon 1,018 (39.67%)
  • ORCHARD, David 619 (24.12%)
  • PRENTICE, Jim 466 (18.16%)
  • BRISON, Scott 463 (18.04%)

Total ballots cast 2,566.


Brison drops off and supports Prentice. Ironically, Brison was the only candidate to gain votes on this ballot compared to his first ballot result; all of the other candidates lost votes.


Third Ballot

  • MACKAY, Peter Gordon 1,128 (45.01%)
  • PRENTICE, Jim 761 (30.37%)
  • ORCHARD, David 617 (24.62%)

Total ballots cast 2,506.


Orchard throws his support to MacKay after the two men sign an agreement committing MacKay to not merge the PCs with the Canadian Alliance, and to hold a review of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement. The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right_of_centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ...


Fourth Ballot

  • MACKAY, Peter Gordon 1,538 (64.79%)
  • PRENTICE, Jim 836 (35.21%)

Total ballots cast 2,374.


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
CBC News Indepth: Conservative Party (1010 words)
A leadership convention was held in July 2000.
Members of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservatives overwhelmingly approved the merger in early December 2003 – and the Conservative Party of Canada was born.
By the time the convention was over, the rift had been healed and the party adopted policies that moved it more towards the centre of the political spectrum.
Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (2644 words)
Even though the Quebec Conservative Party dominated politics in that province for the first thirty years of Confederation at both the federal and provincial levels, in the 20th century the party was never able to be a force in provincial politics, and ultimately dissolved into the Union Nationale in 1935.
As was common amongst 19th century conservative movements, Canadian Tories opposed the rollback of government intervention in social and economic matters advocated by the liberals of the era.
Diefenbaker remained Progressive Conservative leader until 1967, when increasing unease at his reactionary policies, authoritarian leadership, and perceived unelectability led to the 1967 leadership convention where Nova Scotia Premier Robert Stanfield was elected out of a field of eleven candidates that included Diefenbaker and Manitoba Premier Duff Roblin.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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