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Encyclopedia > Progress Party (Norway)
Fremskrittspartiet
Progress Party
Leader Siv Jensen
Founded 1973
Headquarters Oslo
Political ideology Liberal conservatism
Website www.frp.no
See also the politics of Norway series
Norway

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Norway
Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_Norway_stylised. ... Norwegian politics officially have the structure of a constitutional monarchy, giving the King mainly symbolic power while maintaining a stable Western democracy. ...


Parliamentary
1973 · 1977 · 1981
1985 · 1989 · 1993
1997 · 2001 · 2005
Local
2003 (county) · 2007

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The Progress Party (Bokmål: Fremskrittspartiet, Nynorsk: Framstegspartiet, Norwegian abbreviation: FrP) is the second largest political party in Norway as of the 2005 parliamentary elections. The FrP defines itself a liberal conservative party. The Party was founded on principle of reducing what it considered an excessive control the Norwegian society by the state. Progress Party believes that in many areas people themselves or private organizations can handle better than the state. This article is in need of improvement. ... Harald V, K.G. (born February 21, 1937) is the King of Norway. ... This is a list of viceroys (visekonge), governors (Rigsstatholder), first ministers (førstestatsrÃ¥d) and Prime Ministers (statsminister) of Norway. ...   (born March 16, 1959) is a Norwegian economist, leader (since 2002) of the Norwegian Labour Party and the current Prime Minister of Norway. ... The Red-Green Coalition is a coalition of Norwegian parties, formed by the Labour, the Socialist Left Party, and the Centre Party. ... The Storting (Stortinget, literally The Big Thing) is the Norwegian Parliament, and is located in the capital city Oslo. ... This article lists political parties in Norway. ... This article is part of the Politics of Norway series. ... Results ¹A coalition of some members from the Socialist Peoples Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti), The Communist Party of Norway (Norges Kommunistiske Parti), and the Labour Party, which became the Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti) in 1975. ... Results Categories: Elections in Norway | 1977 elections ... Results Categories: Elections in Norway | 1981 elections ... A general election to the Storting, the parliament of Norway, was held on 9 September 1985. ... A general election to the Storting, the parliament of Norway, was held on 11 September 1989. ... Results of the general election to the Storting, the parliament of Norway, held on September 13, 1993. ... A general election to the Storting, the parliament of Norway, was held on 15 September 1997. ... A general election to the Storting, the parliament of Norway, was held on 10 September 2001. ... Parliamentary elections were held in Norway on 12 September 2005. ... The 2003 county council election was held on Monday September 15, 2003 for all eighteen county councils in Norway. ... Country-wide local elections for seats in municipality and county councils were held throughout Norway on September 10, 2007, with some areas polling on September 9 as well. ... Norway is divided into 19 administrative regions, called counties (fylker, singular - fylke, Nynorsk: singular and plural fylke; until 1918 known as singular and plural- amt), and 433 municipalities (kommuner - Nynorsk: kommunar). ... Norway is divided into 19 administrative regions, called counties (fylker, singular - fylke), and 431 municipalities/communes (kommuner). ... The Sami Parliament of Norway (Sámediggi in Northern Sami, Sämitigge in Inari Sami, in Skolt Sami) is the representative body for people of Sami heritage in Norway. ... Norway supports international cooperation and the peaceful settlement of disputes, recognizing the need for maintaining a strong national defense through collective security. ... One of the most important and divisive issues in Norwegian political and economic debate since World War II has been the countrys relationship with the European Union. ... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... BokmÃ¥l (lit. ... Nynorsk (literally New Norwegian) is one of the two officially sanctioned orthographic standards of the Norwegian language, the other being BokmÃ¥l. ... Parliamentary elections were held in Norway on 12 September 2005. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Party advocates free market economics and deregulation of the economy, stricter limits on immigration, especially from immigrants who break the law, closer cooperation with NATO, United States and also Israel in foreign policy, a more controlled state aid to developing countries, social and cultural conservatism, the decentralization of government. A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... This article is about the military alliance. ... A developing country is a country with low average income compared to the world average. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Cultural conservatism is conservatism with respect to culture. ... Decentralization is the process of dispersing decision-making closer to the point of service or action. ...


Its current chairman is Siv Jensen. Siv Jensen (born June 1, 1969 in Oslo) is the chairman of the Progress Party, the largest opposition party in Norway. ...

Contents

History

Foundation

The Progress Party was founded on April 8, 1973 with an address held by Anders Lange. Anders Lange intended the party to be more like a protest movement than a regular political party. The protest was directed against what he claimed to be an unacceptably high level of taxes, subsidies, and regulations, against government interventionism, and against the social democrat "nanny state". [1] April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Anders Lange (1904 - October 18, 1974) was the founder of what later became the Norwegian Progress party. ... Chehel Sotouns Wall painting, that dates back to the Safavid era, depicts a Chaharshanbe Suri celebration. ... “Taxes” redirects here. ... In economics, a subsidy is generally a monetary grant given by a government to lower the price faced by producers or consumers of a good, generally because it is considered to be in the public interest. ... In politics, interventionism is a term for significant activity undertaken by a state to influence something not directly under its control. ... Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... Nanny state is a derogatory term that refers to state protectionism, economic interventionism, or regulatory policies, and the perception that these policies are becoming institutionalized as common practice. ...


The party started off with an unusually long name, "Anders Lange's Party for strong reductions of taxes, charges and government intervention", usually referred to as "Anders Lange' Party", or "ALP". It adopted its current name in 1977. Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ...


The first election, in 1973, gave Anders Lange 5%, and four seats in the Norwegian parliament. Results ¹A coalition of some members from the Socialist Peoples Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti), The Communist Party of Norway (Norges Kommunistiske Parti), and the Labour Party, which became the Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti) in 1975. ... The Storting (Stortinget, literally The Big Thing) is the Norwegian Parliament, and is located in the capital city Oslo. ...


Role of Carl I. Hagen

Following Anders Lange's death in 1974, two persons lead the party during a brief period of time. The party performed poorly in 1977 election, which led to Carl I. Hagen taking control of the party in 1978: Results Categories: Elections in Norway | 1977 elections ... An official picture of Carl I. Hagen Carl Ivar Hagen (born May 6, 1944) is a famous Norwegian politician and Vice-President of the Norwegian Parliament. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ...

  • Anders Lange [1973 – 1974]
  • Eivind Eckbo [1974 – 1975] (interim)
  • Arve Lønnum [1975 – 1978]

Carl I. Hagen remained the chairman of Frp until 2006, when he yielded control of the party to Siv Jensen, himself becoming the Vice President of the Stortinget, the Norwegian Parliarment. Under leadership of Carl I Hagen the Progress Party became the second largest political party in Norway. Anders Lange (1904 - October 18, 1974) was the founder of what later became the Norwegian Progress party. ... An official picture of Carl I. Hagen Carl Ivar Hagen (born May 6, 1944) is a famous Norwegian politician and Vice-President of the Norwegian Parliament. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Siv Jensen (born June 1, 1969 in Oslo) is the chairman of the Progress Party, the largest opposition party in Norway. ... The Storting main building The Storting, or Stortinget, (the Great Assembly), is the parliament of Norway, and is located in Oslo. ...


Popular support through history

In the parliamentary election in 1989, the party obtained 13%, and became the third largest party in Norway. It started to gain power in some local administrations. In 1990, Peter N. Myhre, of Frp, became the mayor of Oslo[2]. A general election to the Storting, the parliament of Norway, was held on 11 September 1989. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article is about the capital of Norway. ...


The 1993 election halved the party's support to 6.3% and 10 representatives. In 1994, four representatives of the "libertarian wing" broke out, formed an independent group in parliament, and founded the libertarian organization Fridemokratene which tried to organize like a political party, but without success. Results of the general election to the Storting, the parliament of Norway, held on September 13, 1993. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Fridemokratene is an organization formed by former members of the Norwegian Progress Party in 1994. ...


In the 1997 election, Frp obtained 15.3%, and was again the third largest party. A general election to the Storting, the parliament of Norway, was held on 15 September 1997. ...


In the local election in 1999, Progress-Party's Terje Søviknes was elected mayor of Os. 20 municipalities got a deputy mayor from the Progress Party. This article is about the year. ... Politician, became the first Norwegian politician of the Progress Party to become mayor of a municipality. ... County Hordaland District Midhordland Municipality NO-1243 Administrative centre Osøyro Mayor (2005) Terje Søviknes (Frp) Official language form Nynorsk Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 364 140 km² 134 km² 0. ...


In the Norwegian parliamentary election, 2001, Frp lost the advance it had on polls, but maintained its position from the 1997 election, and got 14.6% and 26 members in the parliament. The election result allowed them to unseat the Labour Party Government of Jens Stoltenberg, and replace it with a three-party coalition led by Chritian Democrat Kjell Magne Bondevik. However, the coalition declined to govern together with the Progress party, considering the political differences being too large. A general election to the Storting, the parliament of Norway, was held on 10 September 2001. ... Kjell Magne Bondevik [IPA: çɛl mɑgne bʊnevik](born September 3, 1947) is a Norwegian Lutheran minister and politician. ...


In 2002, the Progress party advanced again in polls, and for a short while it even became the largest party, with a strong margin in December 2002. In the polls in November 2006 illustrating that Frp have 32,9% of the vote and the largest party in Norway today. Also see: 2002 (number). ...


The local elections in 2003 were a success for Frp. In 30 municipalities, the party gained more votes than any other, but it succeeded to elect the mayor only in 13 of these. The Progress Party has participated in local elections since 1975, but until 2003 the party has only gained the mayor position twice. The Progress Party vote in Os—the only municipality that elected a Progress Party mayor in 1999—increased from 36.6% in 1999 to 45.7% in 2003. The party gained ground across the country, but more so in municipalities where the party had the mayor or the deputy mayor[3]. Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Year  % of votes Members of the Storting
1973 5.0 4
1977 1.9
1981 4.5 4
1985 3.7 2
1989 13.0 22
1993 6.3 10
1997 15.3 25
2001 14.6 26
2005 22.1 38

The Storting (Stortinget, literally The Big Thing) is the Norwegian Parliament, and is located in the capital city Oslo. ...

Expulsion of The Democrats

Before the 2001 election, Frp enjoyed a high level of popular support in 1999–2000, but its support fell back to 1997 levels in the actual election, following both internal turmoil (the then second vice-chairman of the party, Terje Søviknes, was involved in a sex scandal) and internal disagreements. This time, several populist local representatives in Oslo and some parliamentarians resigned from the party. Some "soloists", as they were called, were suspended, including Vidar Kleppe, who was suspended for two years, or expelled, as was Jan Simonsen. The "populists" formed a party called The Democrats, with Vidar Kleppe as chairman and Jan Simonsen as vice-chairman. A general election to the Storting, the parliament of Norway, was held on 10 September 2001. ... Vidar Kleppe (born September 16, 1963 in Bergen) is a Norwegian politician. ... Jan Simonsen Jan Simonsen (born March 3, 1953 in Stavanger, Norway) was a member of the Norwegian parliament. ... Demokratene (the Democrats) is a right-wing (Norway)Progress Party. ...


Recent Elections

In the 2005 parliamentary elections, it was the second largest party in Storting, with 22.1% of the votes and 38 seats (up from third-largest with 14.6% and 26 seats in the 2001 elections). Parliamentary elections were held in Norway on 12 September 2005. ... The Storting (Stortinget, literally The Big Thing) is the Norwegian Parliament, and is located in the capital city Oslo. ... A general election to the Storting, the parliament of Norway, was held on 10 September 2001. ...


Party leadership

  • Anders Lange [1973 – 1974]
  • Eivind Eckbo [1974 – 1975] (interim)
  • Arve Lønnum [1975 – 1978]
  • Carl I. Hagen [1978 – 2006] (2006 retirement announced in 2003)
  • Siv Jensen [2006 – ]

Anders Lange (1904 - October 18, 1974) was the founder of what later became the Norwegian Progress party. ... An official picture of Carl I. Hagen Carl Ivar Hagen (born May 6, 1944) is a famous Norwegian politician and Vice-President of the Norwegian Parliament. ... Siv Jensen (born June 1, 1969 in Oslo) is the chairman of the Progress Party, the largest opposition party in Norway. ...

Political platform

The Progress Party defines itself as a "liberalistic party[4], built on Norwegian and Western traditions and cultural heritages, with a basis in a Christian and humanist understanding of life. Its main declared goal is a strong reduction in taxes and government intervention. Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... For the opening number of Fiddler on the Roof, see Tradition (song). ... Cultural heritage (national heritage or just heritage) is the legacy of physical artifacts and intangible attributes of a group or society that are inherited from past generations, maintained in the present and bestowed for the benefit of future generations. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... See also the specific life stance known as Humanism For the Renaissance liberal arts movement, see Renaissance humanism Humanism is a broad category of ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appeal to universal human qualities...


Specific Issues

Society and Economy
The Progress Party places highly in its program the right of the individual to decide about its own life and economy, and claims the individual is, together with the family and the right to own private property, a fundamental of society. The party does not want the state to solve problems that they claim might be handled better by individuals, private companies or organizations. It also proposes to increase taxation on consumption to compensate for reduced taxation on work, although it has given very high priority to reduction of gas taxes and supported the reduction of food taxes from 24% to 12%. It opposes a recently posed suggestion to raise the taxes by one percent, to 13%. [citation needed]
Democracy
The party promotes decentralisation and binding referendums. In Norway, the result of a referendum is not binding, even if in practice politicians have always followed their indications. Furthermore, it favors abolishing the current laws that make a vote cast in a large Norwegian county carry more weight than one cast in densely populated urban areas such as Oslo. Since it is considered an entity based on ethnicity, the party wants to abolish the Norwegian branch of the Sami parliament.
Labour economics
The party proposes a deregulation of the job market, so that laws no longer restrict the contract between an employer and employee beyond safety and health requirements.
Welfare State
The Progress Party wants to reorganize the way welfare is distributed to allow for competition and private production of such services, without reducing the welfare state itself. It has long favoured increased benefits for the elderly, which has become one of their main electoral groups[citation needed].

For other uses, see Society (disambiguation). ... a family of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso in 1997 Family is a Western term used to denote a domestic group of people, or a number of domestic groups linked through descent (demonstrated or stipulated) from a common ancestor, marriage or adoption. ... This page deals with property as ownership rights. ... The term indirect tax has more than one meaning. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        The term direct tax has more than one meaning: a colloquial... Decentralisation (American: decentralization) is any of various means of more widely distributing decision-making to bring it closer to the point of service or action. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Norway is divided into 19 administrative regions, called counties (fylker, singular - fylke, Nynorsk: singular and plural fylke; until 1918 known as singular and plural- amt), and 433 municipalities (kommuner - Nynorsk: kommunar). ... This article is about the capital of Norway. ... This article or section should be merged with ethnic group Ethnicity is the cultural characteristics that connect a particular group or groups of people to each other. ... The Sami people (also Sámi, Saami, Lapps, sometimes also Laplanders) are the indigenous people of Sápmi, which today encompasses parts of northern Sweden, Norway, Finland and the Kola Peninsula of Russia. ... The Sami Parliament is a representative body for peoples of Sami heritage in several Scandinavian countries. ... Construction workers generally work long hours for their pay Labor economics seeks to understand the functioning of the market and dynamics for labor. ... Deregulation is the process by which governments remove, reduce, or simplify restrictions on business and individuals in order to (in theory) encourage the efficient operation of markets. ... The Welfare State of the United Kingdom was prefigured in the William Beveridge Report in 1942, which identified five Giant Evils in society: squalor, ignorance, want, idleness and disease. ...

Role of the State

The role of the state is considered to be limited to a few areas: Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ...

Military
With a close cooperation with NATO;
Foreign policy
Based on the protection of Norwegian interests, with closer cooperation with the United States and closer relationship with Israel, and a more controlled state-financed help to third-world countries.
Judiciary
The party proposes a simplification and update of laws in form and content, and reduction of the use of wiretapping, that should be limited to serious crimes and threats to the state's security.
Education
The main point of difference with other parties is the support for state funding of private schools and universities, in order to provide equal conditions. An increase in discipline and decrease in social responsibility in Norwegian schools are also often defended.
Social responsibility
The party declares its principle to be "helping people help themselves". It is in favour of using money to help the families of the ill, instead of financing public institutions for education of the young and care for the sick or elderly.
Transport
The Progress Party has often been considered "the motorist's party". They are for increased spending in road building and maintenance, and are against the commonplace system of financing public roads with tolls due to the fact that, in Norway, very little of the money collected from toll stations is actually used for road construction and maintenance.
Bank of Norway
An increased degree of independence for the Bank of Norway is advocated.
Outsourcing
The party supports outsourcing of some public services.

This article is about the military alliance. ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ... For the Jamaican reggae band, see Third World (band). ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      In the law, the judiciary or judicial system is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ... It has been suggested that Voice logging be merged into this article or section. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Illness (sometimes referred to as ill-health) can be defined as a state of poor health. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Norges Bank is the central bank of Norway. ... Outsourcing became part of the business lexicon during the 1980s and refers to the delegation of non-core operations from internal production to an external entity specializing in the management of that operation. ...

Historical Issues

2003 Iraq invasion

The only Norwegian party to do so, FrP supported the U.S led invasion of Iraq in 2003. The subject of this article is the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ...


Criticism

Critics claim that the differences between the Progress party and other parties can be stark in many areas, and that of all Norwegian parties the Progress party is likely the one that inspires the most opinionated comments, in one way or another. Some scholars classified the Party in the 1990s as an "extreme right", or a "radical right-wing extremist" political movement.[5][6][7][8][9][10][11][not in citation given] Since then the terms used by a variety of scholars to describe the Progress Party (and similar parties and movements in Europe) have ranged from conservative-libertarian, to radical right wing populist[citation needed], to xenophobic ethno-nationalist[citation needed]. The Progress Party rejects all these labels. Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ...


Populism

Frp are sometimes connected to right-wing populism in Europe[12] because they are skeptical towards immigration and have the same perspective on means to combat crime. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Immigration

The immigration policy of the Progress party has for a long time been a matter of heated discussion. The policy of the party is to favour immigrants who quickly learn Norwegian and get jobs, while expelling the criminal foreigners. In a speech during opening of the election campaign for the 2007 election, the party chairman Siv Jensen claimed that the present immigration policy is a failure because it lets criminals stay in Norway, while throwing out people who work hard and follow the law. [1] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Siv Jensen (born June 1, 1969 in Oslo) is the chairman of the Progress Party, the largest opposition party in Norway. ...


Critics accuse the party of xenophobia, whereas supporters argue that the policy is to address a real problem as non-European immigrants are overrepresented in some of the crime statistics.[13] Look up xenophobia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The 2005 Brochure on Immigration

During the 2005 electoral campaign, the Progress Party printed a brochure focusing on criminal immigrants. The text on the brochure reads "The perpetrator is of foreign origin ...!" Heavy criticism followed by the other Norwegian parties, centered on the allegation that such an advertisement criminalized immigrants as a group. Prime-minister Kjell Magne Bondevik said that "the Progress Party plays on the fear of foreigners." A brochure is a flyer or other paper material distributed for the purposes of advertising. ... Kjell Magne Bondevik [IPA: çɛl mɑgne bʊnevik](born September 3, 1947) is a Norwegian Lutheran minister and politician. ...


The Progress Party protested that the critics were mutilating their message. They pointed out that the next page of the brochure read: "«Those most eager to get rid of criminal immigrants are us honest immigrants!» (Pakistani-born immigrant in Norway)". Frp chairman Hagen argued "Bondevik is wrong here. The brochure says that many immigrants are law-abiding citizens that do a fantastic job for Norway. But unfortunately there are too many who are not. Statistics clearly show that criminality is growing among immigrants."[14] The Progress Party maintains that it has nothing against law-abiding immigrants who are in Norway on legal premises, and they reject discrimination based on colour, race, cultural, ethnic or religious affiliation. [15]


War on Terror

Although the War on Terror is not an issue the Progress Party promotes a lot, they have a clear position in support of the United States. Former party chairman Carl I Hagen sometimes claims that there is a link between Islamist fundamentalism and terror. This position receives particularly broad support among conservative Christian communities. [citation needed] This article is about U.S. actions, and those of other states, after September 11, 2001. ...


Carl I Hagen once said in an interview that "Not all Muslims are terrorists, but most terrorists are Muslim". Upon question of why he did not consider terrorism in the Basque country and Northern Ireland, he replied that these were "national conflicts, and [had] nothing to do with [international terrorism]".[16] Pays Basque) see Northern Basque Country. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: ) is a part of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ...


Environmental policies

The Progress Party is the only Norwegian party to debate the threat of global warming, and to oppose Norwegian participation in the Kyoto protocol due to it not involving the major contributors to CO2 release like the USA and China. They suggest that there are several reasons for global warming and not all of them are man made. It also favours reduction of the gasoline price, which is currently heavily taxed and is some times as high as 12 krones per liter (about 7,5$/gallon). [2] Global warming refers to the increase in the average temperature of the Earths near-surface air and oceans in recent decades and its projected continuation. ... Kyoto Protocol Opened for signature December 11, 1997 in Kyoto, Japan Entered into force February 16, 2005. ...


Isolation

Since its foundation, other parties have consistently refused the Progress Party's efforts to formally join any governing coalition at the state level, despite the Progress Party having broad popular support.[17]


However, in the wake of the 2005 elections that saw an increase in support for the FrP, the Conservatives stated they wanted to be "a bridge between FrP and the centre".[18] The Conservative Party (Høyre, H, meaning right) is a Norwegian political party. ...


See also

Norwegian politics officially have the structure of a constitutional monarchy, giving the King mainly symbolic power while maintaining a stable Western democracy. ... Fremskrittspartiets Ungdom (Youth of the Progress Party), the youth league of Fremskrittspartiet Categories: Stub | Youth wings of Norwegian political parties ...

References

  1. ^ Anders Lange's speech at Saga Kino, 8 April, 1973
  2. ^ List of mayors of Oslo, from the website of the City of Oslo
  3. ^ The Norwegian Progress Party: Building Bridges across Old Cleavages by Tor Bjørklund and Jo Saglie, Norwegian Institute for Social Reseach, PDF file.
  4. ^ In Norwegian political parlance, it is common to separate between centrist "liberals" (liberalere) and more right-wing "liberalists" (liberalister). The Progress Party identifies itself in the preamble of its platform as a "liberalistic" party (i.e. a party of "liberalists").
  5. ^ Piero Ignazi, “The Extreme Right in Europe” pp. 47-64 in Peter H. Merkl and Leonard Weinberg, The Revival of Right-Wing Extremism in the Nineties (London: Frank Cass, 1997).
  6. ^ Matland, Richard E. (August 1993). "Institutional Variables Affecting Female Representation in National Legislatures: The Case of Norway". The Journal of Politics 55: 737-755. DOI:10.2307/2131998. Retrieved on 2006-10-15. 
  7. ^ Bjorklund, Tor; Andersen, Jorgen Goul (March, 1999). "Anti-Immigration Parites in Denmark and Norway: The Progress Parties and the Danish People's Party". Arbejdspapirer fra Institut for Okonomi, Politik og Forvaltning, Aalborg Universitet. Retrieved on 2006-10-15.
  8. ^ Andersen, C.J. (November 1996). "Economics, Politics, and Foreigners: Populist Party Support in Denmark and Norway". Electoral Studies 15 (4): 497-511. DOI:10.1016/S0261-3794(96)00030-3. Retrieved on 2006-10-15. 
  9. ^ (July 1993) "The New Politics of Resentment: Radical Right-Wing Populist Parties in Western Europe". Comparative Politics 25 (4): 413-427. DOI:10.2307/422034. Retrieved on 2006-10-15. 
  10. ^ Hans-George, Betz (1994). Radical Right-Wing Populism in Western Europe. New York, New York: St. Martin's Press. 
  11. ^ (1999). "Antisemitism and Racism: Norway". Stephen Roth Institute, Tel Aviv University. Retrieved on 2006-10-15.
  12. ^ Descriptive article on the Progress Party by Aslak Bonde, political journalist of Aftenposten.
  13. ^ Skarðhamar, Torbjørn (2006), Kriminalitet gjennom ungdomstiden blant nordmenn og ikke-vestlige innvandrere, The Norwegian Central Bureau of Statistics, <http://www.ssb.no/emner/03/05/notat_200633/notat_200633.pdf>
  14. ^ "Progress Party brochure sparks racism charges", Aftenposten, 2005-08-16. 
  15. ^ Progress Party's Immigration Platform
  16. ^ Hagen: all terrorists are muslim, from Aftenposten, August 26, 2005.
  17. ^ Struggling Conservatives re-elect same leadership
  18. ^ Struggling Conservatives re-elect same leadership

PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Stephen Roth Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism and Racism is a resource for information, provides a forum for academic discussion, and fosters research on issues concerning antisemitic and racist theories and manifestations. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... Aftenposten is Norways second largest newspaper with a circulation of 256,600 copies for the morning edition, 155,400 copies for the separate evening edition and 232,900 copies for the Sunday edition in 2003. ... Aftenposten is Norways second largest newspaper with a circulation of 256,600 copies for the morning edition, 155,400 copies for the separate evening edition and 232,900 copies for the Sunday edition in 2003. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Aftenposten is Norways second largest newspaper with a circulation of 256,600 copies for the morning edition, 155,400 copies for the separate evening edition and 232,900 copies for the Sunday edition in 2003. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Progress Party (Norway) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2400 words)
The Progress party had run a campaign promising to unseat the Labour government of Jens Stoltenberg, and kept that promise by supporting the new minority government of Kjell Magne Bondevik, although the three parties in that coalition declined to govern together with the Progress party, saying that the political distance was too large.
The Progress Party declares itself to be liberalistic, built on Norwegian and western traditions and cultural heritages, with basis in a Christian and humanist understanding of life.
The Progress Party places highly in its program the right of the individual to decide about its own life and economy, and claims the individual is, together with the family and the right to own private property, the fundamental of society.
Progress Party (Norway) (1277 words)
The Progress Party is a right-wing political party of Norway.
Because of inner tension, the 1993 election halved the party (6.3 percent and 10 representatives).
As the party was founded just after the political upheaval that followed the 1972 EU referendum, the party was believed to be an ephmeral phenomenon, and the leader of the Conservative Party Kåre Willoch characterized it as a "may fly party" (Norwegian: døgnflueparti).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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