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Encyclopedia > Professional wrestling throws

Professional wrestling throws are the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him or her down, which makes up most of the action of professional wrestling. Some of these moves are illegal in some forms of traditional amateur wrestling because they can cause serious injury, especially in a competitive environment. They are sometimes also called "power moves", as they are meant to emphasize a wrestler's strength. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... For the NES video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... FILA Greatest Wrestler of 20th Century (Greco-Roman) Alexander Karelin throws Olympian Jeff Blatnick with his Karelin Lift. Amateur wrestling is the most widespread form of sport wrestling. ...


There is a wide variety of slams and throws in pro wrestling. Many moves are known by several different names. Professional wrestlers frequently give their "finisher" (signature moves that usually result in a win) new names that reflect their gimmick. Professional wrestling has accrued a considerable amount of slang, in-references and jargon. ... Professional wrestling has accrued a considerable amount of slang, in-references and jargon. ...


Moves are listed under general categories whenever possible.

Contents

Armbreaker

An armbreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams the opponent's arm against a part of the wrestler's body, usually a knee or shoulder. where a wrestler concentrates on the arm and drops a part of their body on to the arm.


Armbar takedown

This variation of the armbreaker involves the attacking wrestler grabbing the opponent's left or right arm, holding it across their chest and then falling backwards, dropping the opponent face first as well as damaging the opponent's arm and shoulder. This move is also known as a single arm DDT.


Arm drag

A move in which the wrestler uses his or her opponent's momentum to the opponent's disadvantage. The wrestler hooks the opponent's arm and flips him or her over onto the mat. The wrestler may roll on to his or her side to give the move extra momentum.


Japanese arm drag

This move is performed when an opponent runs towards the wrestler facing him or her. When the opponent is in range, the wrestler hooks the opponent's near arm with both hands and falls backwards forcing the wrestler's own momentum to cause him or her to flip forwards over the head of the wrestler and onto his or her back.


Over the shoulder arm drag

The wrestler grabs his or her opponent's arm, then turns to face the other direction and pulls the opponent over his or her shoulder. It is essentially the same as the ippon seoinage found in Judo. Sacrifice throws are considered risky since they put the thrower in a disadvantagous position. ... This article is about the martial art and sport. ...


Springboard arm drag

An arm drag performed where the attacking wrestler grabs an opponent's arm, runs up the corner ring ropes and springboards, usually off the top rope, over the opponent. This drags the opponent by his or her arm to flip over onto the mat or on to the ropes. Rey Mysterio performing one of many aerial techniques to Dvon Dudley Aerial techniques are used in professional wrestling to show of the speed and agility of a wrestler. ...


Arm wringer

An Arm Wringer or Spinning Wristlock is a move in which the wrestler grabs the opponent's arm by the wrist/arm and twists it over the wrestler's head to spin it around with enough force to take the opponent to the mat. The maneuver is a popular rest hold in American wrestling. Quite frequently the move is broken with an Irish Whip, reversed into a hammerlock, or countered with a reverse elbow or eye rake/gouge.


Atomic drop

A move in which the wrestler goes behind an opponent puts his head under the opponent's shoulder and lifts his opponent up and then drops him or her tailbone-first on the wrestler's knee.


Inverted atomic drop

A move in which the wrestler puts his or her head under the opponent's shoulder and lifts the opponent up and then drops him or her "lower abdomen region" or groin first on the wrestler's knee. It is called a Manhattan Drop in Japan, as named by Masahiro Chono. Even though this move is an indirect low blow, it is considered a legal move. Theoretically, it is the opponent's groin that has impacted with the wrestler's knee, not the other way around. Masahiro Chōno (蝶野正洋 Chōno Masahiro) is a Japanese professional wrestler. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ...


Backbreaker

Main article: Backbreaker

A backbreaker is any move in which the wrestler lifts his/her opponent up and jumps or drops his/her opponent so that the opponent's back impacts or is bent backwards against a part of the wrestler's body. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Back body drop

A back body drop or backdrop, is a move in which a wrestler bends forward or crouches in front of his/her opponent, grabs hold of his/her opponent, and stands up, lifting the opponent up and over and dropping him/her behind the back. It is applied frequently against a charging opponent.


In Japan, a backdrop is the term for what is called a belly-to-back suplex in America. The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ...


Mountain Bomb

The opponent runs towards the wrestler. The wrestler ducks, hooks one of the opponent's legs with one of his arms, stands up and falls backwards, flipping the opponent and driving him back first down to the mat, with the wrestler landing on top of the opponent. Innovated and named by Hiroyoshi Tenzan. Hiroyoshi Yamamoto is a Japanese professional wrestler who currently works for New Japan Pro Wrestling, and is better known by his stage name Hiroyoshi Tenzan. ...


Body slam

Mr. Kennedy executes a regular body slam (scoop slam) on Hardcore Holly.

A body slam is any move in which a wrestler picks up his or her opponent and throws him or her down to the ground. When used by itself, the term body slam generally refers to a basic scoop slam. Ken Anderson (born March 6, 1976 in Minneapolis, Minnesota), better known as Ken Kennedy or Mr. ... Body Slam redirects here. ... Robert William Bob Howard[2] (born January 29, 1963) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name, Bob Hardcore Holly. ...


Alabama slam

Described as a double-leg slam, or flapjack spinebuster, this high-angle spinebuster variation involves a wrestler placing their head between an opponent's knees or under the opponent's arm, then standing up, holding onto their opponent's legs, so that the opponent is facing the wrestler's back. The wrestler then simply brings both hands down, throwing the opponent back-first to the mat. They may also hold the opponent in place while spinning in several circles before throwing the opponent down. The move has been known by the name Water-Wheel Slam and the Alabama Slam, named by Bob "Hardcore" Holly after his home state of Alabama. Robert William Bob Howard[2] (born January 29, 1963) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name, Bob Hardcore Holly. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Biel throw

The wrestler stands to the side of their opponent, grabs them, and throws them forward, causing them to flip over onto their back. It is considered a very basic technique, so basic that a forward rolling fall is commonly called a biel bump, and is mainly used by very large wrestlers to emphasize power and strength over finesse. A bump occurs whenever a wrestler hits the mat or the arena floor after receiving a move from his/her opponent. ...


Chokeslam

Main article: Chokeslam

A chokeslam is any body slam in which the wrestler grasps their opponent's neck, lifts them up, and slams them to the mat, causing them to land on their back. Kane, Big Show and The Undertaker are most notable in using this move as finishers or as signature moves. Big Show prepairing to give JBL a Chokeslam A chokeslam (Japanese: nodowa otoshi) refers to a type of body slam in professional wrestling in which the wrestler grasps their opponents neck, lifts them up, and slams them to the mat. ... Glen Thomas Jacobs (born April 26, 1967) better known by his ring name Kane, is an American professional wrestler. ... Paul Wight, Jr. ... For the Combichrist song, see Everybody Hates You Mark Calaway (born March 24, 1965[2][3]) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name The Undertaker. ...


Cobra clutch slam

In this slam a wrestler places the opponent in a cobra clutch and then lift the opponent into the air by their neck before jumping backwards, falling face down or into a sitting position, driving the opponent back first down to the mat. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Fireman's carry slam

The wrestler first drapes an opponent over their shoulders in a fireman's carry position. The wrestler then takes hold of the thigh and arm of the opponent, which are hung over the front side of the wrestler, and leans forward, pulling the opponent over their head and shoulders, slamming them down on their back in front of the wrestler. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


A Rolling fireman's carry slam is a variation that sees the wrestler keep hold of the opponent and run forward before slamming the opponent to the ground, using the momentum to roll over the opponent. Mr. Kennedy has been known to perform a jumping variation from the second rope (and on occasion, the top rope), and calls it the Green Bay Plunge. Ken Anderson (born March 6, 1976 in Minneapolis, Minnesota), better known as Ken Kennedy or Mr. ... Aerial techniques are used in professional wrestling to show off the speed and agility of a wrestler. ...


Fireman's carry takeover

John Cena performs his FU (standing fireman's carry takeover) on Kurt Angle.

The wrestler kneels down on one knee and simultaneously grabs hold of one the opponent's thighs with one arm and one of the opponent's arms with his other arm. He then pulls the opponent on his shoulders and then rises up slightly, using the motion to push the opponent off his shoulders, flipping him to the mat onto his back. This is usually used as a transition move. It is also known as "kata-guruma", or "standing shoulder wheel" in Judo. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... John Felix Anthony Cena, Jr. ... Kurt Steven Angle (born December 9, 1968) is an American professional wrestler and former Olympic amateur wrestler. ...


John Cena uses a standing variation of this move as one of his FU variations, where he stands up after lifting the opponent over his shoulders, then grabbing onto the right leg of the opponent and then flips them over and drops them down on their back while first tucking the opponents head into his abdomen. The second variation of the FU used by Cena is the technique of picking up 400-500 pounders, this sees him lifting up the opponent in the standard position and simply tilting them to one side, making the follow through easier, meaning that Cena can still land in the power slam position. John Felix Anthony Cena, Jr. ...


Fallaway slam

Also known as a Table Top Suplex or the Last Call. The wrestler, while standing in front of an opponent would reach between their opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around their back from the same side with their other arm. The wrestler lifts their opponent up so they are horizontal across the wrestler's body then falls backward throwing the opponent over their head down to the mat back-first. This slam can be either bridged into a pin, or the wrestler can float over into another fallaway slam. It can also be performed from the second turnbuckle, usually called a Super Fallaway Slam or Super Last Call. This move was popularized by the professional wrestler Scott Hall. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the professional wrestler. ...


Full nelson slam

In this move the aggressor places their opponent in a full nelson hold and uses it to lift them off the ground. Once in the air, the aggressor removes one of their arms (so their opponent is now in a half nelson) and slams them down to the mat. Another similar variation known as Double chickenwing slam sees the wrestler apply double chickenwing instead of a full nelson before slamming the opponent. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Sitout full nelson bomb

The wrestler places the opponent in a full nelson. The wrestler then lifts the opponent into the air, maintaining the hold. The wrestler then drops to a sitting position, driving the lower spine of the opponent into the ground. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Gorilla press slam

This slam sees a wrestler first lift their opponent up over their head with arms fully extended (as in the military press used in weight lifting), before lowering the arm under the head of the opponent so that the opponent falls to that side, while flipping over and landing on his/her back. The attacking wrestler may repeatedly press the opponent overhead to show his strength, prior to dropping them. Weightlifting is a sport where competitors attempt to lift heavy weights mounted on steel bars. ...


In a variation of the move, the wrestler falls to a seated position, slamming the opponent down between their legs, in a fashion similar to that of the Michinoku Driver II. This is referred to as a Gorilla Press Driver. This also works for bigger wrestlers


Gorilla press drop

The wrestler lifts their opponent up over their head with arms fully extended then drops the opponent down face-first in front or back. It is a popular technique for very large wrestlers because it emphasizes their height and power. This move is also called the Military Press Slam.


Half nelson slam

The wrestler stands behind, slightly to one side of and facing the opponent. The wrestler reaches under one of the opponent's arms with their corresponding arm and places the palm of their hand on the neck of the opponent, thereby forcing the arm of the opponent up into the air to complete the half nelson. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up, turns, and falls forward, slamming the opponent into the mat Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Olympic slam

The wrestler stands behind the opponent and grabs hold of one of the opponent's wrists, tucks his head under that arm's armpit, and wraps his free arm around the near leg of the opponent. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up on his shoulders sideways, and at the same time spins 90° and falls down on to his back, slamming the opponent down to the mat back first. Originally named and innovated by Kurt Angle, who later started calling it the Angle Slam. Kurt Steven Angle (born December 9, 1968) is an American professional wrestler and former Olympic amateur wrestler. ...


Hirooki Goto uses a wrist-clutch variation called Goto Heaven. In this variation, instead of just wrapping his arm around the opponent’s leg, he grabs hold of the opponent's free arm, pulls it down from the front side between the opponent's legs, grabs hold of the wrist of that arm between the opponent's legs, and then performs the slam. Justice Pain uses an inverted arm-hook variation called the Pain Thriller. Hirooki Gotō , born June 25, 1979 in Kuwana, Mie) is a Japanese professional wrestler. ... Christopher Wilson is an American professional wrestler from Combat Zone Wrestling better known as Justice Pain. ...


Pumphandle drop

Also known as a Tilt slam, the wrestler stands behind their opponent and bends them forward. One of the opponent's arms is pulled back between their legs and held, while the other arm is hooked. The wrestler then lifts their opponent up until they are parallel with the wrestler's chest, then throws themselves forward, driving the back of the opponent into the ground with the weight of the wrestler atop them.


Pumphandle slam

The wrestler stands behind their opponent and bends them forward. One of the opponent's arms is pulled back between their legs and held, while the other arm is hooked (pumphandle). The attacking wrestler uses the hold to lift the opponent up over their shoulder, while over the shoulder the attacking wrestler would fall forward to slam the opponent against the mat back-first, normally the type of powerslam delivered is a front powerslam. The move can also see other variations of a powerslam used, Snitsky is known to drop the opponent into a Sidewalk slam position and calls it the Massacre Slam; even though this version is usually referred to as a Pumphandle Side Slam. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... A Powerslam is a professional wrestling body slam move in which the wrestler performing the slam falls face-down on top of his/her opponent. ... A Powerslam is a professional wrestling body slam move in which the wrestler performing the slam falls face-down on top of his/her opponent. ... Eugene A. Snisky, better known as Gene Snitsky or simply Snitsky (born January 14, 1970 in Nesquehoning, Pennsylvania) is a professional wrestler currently performing for World Wrestling Entertainment on the RAW brand. ... A Powerslam is a professional wrestling body slam move in which the wrestler performing the slam falls face-down on top of his/her opponent. ...


Pumphandle Michinoku driver II

The wrestler lifts the opponent as with a pumphandle slam, but falls to a sitting position and drops the opponent between their legs as with a Michinoku Driver II.


Pumphandle fallaway slam

Also known as the Tilt Suplex. The wrestler hooks up the opponent as a pumphandle slam, then the wrestler goes through the body movements for the fallaway slam, executing the release of the opponent as they enter the apex of the throw, instead of at or just past the apex of the throw like when one executes the fallaway slam. Usually the opponent then adds effort to gain extra rotations in the air for effect or to ensure that they do not take the bump on their side.


Samoan drop

Technically known as a Fireman's carry drop, the wrestler drapes an opponent over their shoulders in a fireman's carry position then falls backwards, driving the opponent down to the mat on their back. The move has been a signature move for Samoan wrestlers throughout the years. A Samoan drop is usually a counter to drop the opponents momentum. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Scoop slam

Ivory performing a Scoop Slam on Trish Stratus.

Facing their opponent, the wrestler reaches between their opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around their back from the same side with their other arm. The wrestler lifts their opponent up and turns them upside down so that they are held up by the wrestler's arm cradling their back. The wrestler then throws the opponent to the ground so that they land on their back. The opponent will often assist the slammer by placing their arm on the slammers thigh. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 310 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (772 × 1493 pixel, file size: 576 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Ivory performing a scoop slam on Trish Stratus. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 310 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (772 × 1493 pixel, file size: 576 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Ivory performing a scoop slam on Trish Stratus. ... Lisa Mary Moretti (born November 26, 1961 in Inglewood, California) is an American professional wrestler. ... Patricia Anne Stratigias[6][10] (born December 18, 1975, pronounced ), better known by her stage name Trish Stratus, is a former fitness model, former professional wrestler and television personality from Canada. ...


Side slam

The wrestler stands face to face with the opponent, slightly to their side. The wrestler tucks his head under the opponent's near arm, reaches across the opponent's chest and around their neck with his near arm, and places his other arm against their back. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up and throws them forward while still standing to slam them down to the mat back first. This more common Powerslam Version sees the wrestler falls down to the mat with the opponent. A Powerslam is a professional wrestling body slam move in which the wrestler performing the slam falls face-down on top of his/her opponent. ...


Spinebuster

The wrestler starts by facing their opponent. They then grab the opponent around the waist and lift them up, turning 180°, and toss them forward onto their back or slam them down while landing on top of them. It is usually performed against a charging opponent, using the opponent's own momentum to make the throw more powerful. It is called a rolling spinebuster or spinning spinebuster in Japan. This version is generally associated with Arn Anderson and his name is often evoked whenever a wrestler performs it (Double-A Spinebuster, Anderson Spinebuster, etc.). This article is about momentum in physics. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Another version, more commonly used by larger wrestlers sees the wrestler elevate the opponent up and drop down with them to the mat without spinning, slamming their opponent's back and giving them legitimate whiplash.-1...


Brainbuster

Main article: Brainbuster

A brainbuster, also known as an Avalanche Suplex, is a move in which a wrestler puts his/her opponent in a front facelock, hooks his/her tights, and lifts him/her up as if he/she was performing a vertical suplex. The wrestler then jumps up and falls onto his/her back so that the opponent lands on his/her head while remaining vertical. A Brainbuster, also known as an Avalanche Suplex, is a professional wrestling throw in which a wrestler puts his/her opponent in a front facelock, hooks his/her tights, and lifts him/her up as if he/she was executing a vertical suplex. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ...


Bulldog

A bulldog, originally known as bulldogging or a bulldogging headlock, is any move in which the wrestler grabs an opponent's head and jumps forward, so that the wrestler lands, often in a sitting position, and drives the opponent's face into the mat.[1] This move plus some other variations are sometimes referred to as a facebuster. A facebuster, also known as a face plant, is generally a takedown move in professional wrestling in which an attacking wrestler forces his/her opponent down to the mat face-first without involving a headlock or facelock. ...


Cobra clutch bulldog

The wrestler applies a Cobra Clutch and then leaps forward, falling into a sitting position and driving the face of the opponent into the ground. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Half nelson bulldog

The wrestler hooks a half nelson hold on his opponent with one arm and his opponents waist with the other. He then leaps forward into a sitting position, driving the face of the opponent into the ground. This move is also incorrectly referred to as a faceplant, which is a different move altogether. A facebuster, also known as a face plant, is generally a takedown move in professional wrestling in which an attacking wrestler forces his/her opponent down to the mat face-first without involving a headlock or facelock. ...


One-handed bulldog

Chris Jericho performing a One-handed bulldog on Booker T.

The one-handed bulldog is in fact more of a facebuster than an actual bulldog and generally sees a wrestler run up from behind their opponent, grab the opponent's head with one hand and leap forward to drive this opponent's face into the mat. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 557 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (979 × 1054 pixel, file size: 494 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Chris Jericho hitting a Bulldog on Booker T. Key Arena Seattle, WA March 31, 2003. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 557 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (979 × 1054 pixel, file size: 494 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Chris Jericho hitting a Bulldog on Booker T. Key Arena Seattle, WA March 31, 2003. ... Christopher Keith Irvine (born November 9, 1970), better known by the ring name Chris Jericho, is an American-Canadian actor, radio host, rock musician, and professional wrestler. ... Robert Booker Tio Huffman[2] (born March 1, 1965)[2], better known by his wrestling personas Booker T and King Booker, is an American professional wrestler. ... A facebuster, also known as a face plant, is generally a takedown move in professional wrestling in which an attacking wrestler forces his/her opponent down to the mat face-first without involving a headlock or facelock. ...


A two-handed variation of this sees the attacking wrestler charge at the opponent and push, with both hands, down on the back of the opponent's head to force them face-first into the mat below.


Spinning bulldog

The wrestler places the opponent in a modified fireman's carry in which the opponent is held diagonally across the wrestlers back with their legs across one shoulder and head under the opposite shoulder (usually held in place with a facelock). The wrestler then spins simultaneously throwing the opponent's legs off the wrestler's shoulders and dropping to the ground, driving the opponent's head into the mat in a bulldog position. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Cutter

See also: Cutter

This variant is done from the front, using a three-quarters facelock, and has many derivative variants. Randy Orton performing his RKO finisher (Jumping cutter) on Kane In professional wrestling, a cutter is a common term which refers to the three-quarter facelock bulldog maneuver. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Catapult

A Catapult or Slingshot Catapult is a throw that typically starts with the opponent on his/her back, and the wrestler standing and facing him. The wrestler hooks each of the opponent's legs in one of his/her arms then falls backwards to slingshot the opponent into a turnbuckles, ladders, ropes etc. This can also be held for a backbreaker. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


DDT

Main article: DDT

Similar to a bulldog, a DDT is any move in which the wrestler falls down or backwards to drive the opponent's head into the mat. The classic DDT is performed by putting the opponent in a front facelock and falling backwards so that the opponent is forced to dive forward onto his/her head. In professional wrestling a DDT is any move in which the wrestler falls down or backwards to drive a held opponents head into the mat. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Death Valley driver

Often abbreviated to D.V.D. and known as a Death Valley Bomb in Japan. This is a move in which a brainbuster-type slam is performed from a fireman's carry. The wrestler falls in the direction that the opponent's head is facing, driving the opponent's head into the mat. This move was innovated by Etsuko Mita. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Louie Spicolli used the move as a finisher during his tenure in Extreme Championship Wrestling. Upon his death the move was unofficially renamed the Spicolli Driver by announcer Joey Styles, who would call the move by this name when any wrestler performed it in ECW, usually by Tommy Dreamer. Louis Mucciolo (February 10, 1971 - February 15, 1998) was an American professional wrestler. ... This article is about the independent promotion from 1992-2001. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Thomas Laughlin (born February 14, 1971),[2] is an American professional wrestler better known by his ring name, Tommy Dreamer. ...


Sean O'Haire uses a variation in which he throws out his opponent on the opposite side. He calls this the Widow Maker or the Prophecy. Toby Klein does a version he calls the Insanity Driver, where he gets his opponent in position then he spins before slamming them (quite often onto a weapon of some sort). Sean Christopher Haire (born February 25, 1971) is an American mixed martial artist and former professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Sean OHaire. ... Toby Klein is a professional wrestler well known for deathmatches in CZW and IWA Mid South. ...


Beth Phoenix uses a variation in which she and the opponent were on the second rope. The she lifts the opponent in the Fireman's carry position. She and the opponent would then descend to the mat, impacting the opponent's head. Elizabeth Carolan née Kocanski[2] (born November 24, 1980) better known by her ring name Beth Phoenix, is an American professional wrestler currently working for World Wrestling Entertainment on its RAW brand. ... The firemans carry is a technique that allows one to carry another person without assistance. ...


Inverted Death Valley driver

Also known as a Burning Hammer or inverted D.V.D. The move is executed from a Argentine backbreaker rack (face up, with the neck and one leg cradled) position. The wrestler falls sideways, driving the opponent's head to the mat. This is considered an extremely dangerous move as the opponent's body cannot roll with the natural momentum of the move to absorb the impact. The move was popularized by Kotetsu Yamamoto in the 1970s. It was later popularized by Kenta Kobashi as the Burning Hammer. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kenta Kobashi ) is a professional wrestler who currently works for Pro Wrestling NOAH. He has previously worked for All Japan Pro Wrestling. ...


A cut-throat variation of this driver was innovated by Mark Briscoe, which he named the Cut-Throat Driver, where instead of holding the body of the opponent he would hold the far arm of the opponent across the opponents own throat, and maintain it by holding the opponents wrist, before performing the inverted Death Valley driver. The Briscoe Brothers are the professional wrestling tag team of Jay and Mark Briscoe. ...


Side Death Valley driver

A variation between the regular Death Valley driver and the inverted one. The opponent lays on the shoulders of the wrestler on his side, facing either the opposite or the same direction as the wrestler, with the wrestler holding the opponent by the lower leg, and either the head or lower arm. The wrestler then falls sideways, driving the opponent down to the mat shoulder and neck first.


Kenta Kobashi has used a pumphandle variation known as the Burning Hammer II or the Wrist-Clutch Burning Hammer. Kenta Kobashi ) is a professional wrestler who currently works for Pro Wrestling NOAH. He has previously worked for All Japan Pro Wrestling. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Driver

A Driver is a variation of many moves that involves an opponent being driven down between the legs of a wrestler (who is dropping to a seated position) on the back of his/her neck/shoulder area.


Blue Thunder driver

See also: Spin-out powerbomb

A Powerbomb is a professional wrestling move in which an opponent is lifted up (usually so that they are sitting on the wrestlers shoulders) and then slammed back-first down to the mat. ...

Electric chair driver

In this variation of a driver the wrestler lifts the opponent on his/her shoulders in an electric chair sitting position and then takes hold of the opponent and pulls them over their shoulder and down to the mat while falling to a sit out position so that the opponent lands on their upper back and neck between the legs of the wrestler, facing towards them usually resulting in a pin. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Fisherman driver

The wrestler places the opponent in a front facelock and hooks one of the opponent's legs with his free arm. The wrestler then lifts the opponent upside down or onto his shoulders, and then sits down, driving the opponent between his legs, head and shoulder first. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


A wrist-clutch variation of this driver exists which sees the wrestler lift the opponent onto their shoulders and while the opponent is on their shoulders they use the hand hooking the opponent's leg to reach upwards and clutch the wrist of the arm opposite the hooked leg. While maintaining the wrist-clutch they then perform the driver. There is a further variation that does not include the shoulder lift that sees the wrestler hook the leg and wrist while the opponent is standing in front of them, lift the opponent upside down and then fall to the sitout position.


Half nelson driver

The wrestler stands behind the opponent and applies a half nelson hold on his opponent, placing one of his hands against the opponent's neck after hooking the opponent's arm with it. He the scoops the opponent's near leg with his other arm and lifts the opponent up, flips the opponent upside down, and then either kneels or sits down, driving the opponent down to the mat on their neck. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Michinoku driver II

Also known as a 'sitout body slam piledriver', but is named after its inventor TAKA Michinoku. While facing his/her opponent, the wrestler reaches between his/her opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around his/her back from the other side with his/her other arm. The wrestler lifts his/her opponent up and turns him/her upside down so that he/she is held up by the wrestler's arm cradling his/her back. The wrestler then throws the opponent to the ground as he/she falls to a sitting position so that the opponent lands on his/her upper back. This is often simply called a Michinoku Driver because TAKA Michinoku rarely uses the original Michinoku Driver, a double underhook brainbuster. Takao Yoshida ) (born October 26, 1973) better known by his stage name TAKA Michinoku (TAKA is written in all caps in Japanese script), is a professional wrestler who has wrestled all over the world. ... A Brainbuster, also known as an Avalanche Suplex, is a professional wrestling throw in which a wrestler puts his/her opponent in a front facelock, hooks his/her tights, and lifts him/her up as if he/she was executing a vertical suplex. ...


Michinoku driver II-B

TAKA Michinoku also invented a variation of the Michinoku Driver II in which the wrestler stands behind the opponent, applies an inverted facelock, lifts them upside down, and then drops down to a sitting position, driving the opponent down to the mat between the wrestler's legs upper back first. Takao Yoshida ) (born October 26, 1973) better known by his stage name TAKA Michinoku (TAKA is written in all caps in Japanese script), is a professional wrestler who has wrestled all over the world. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Samoan driver

This move is essentially a fireman's carry variation of a Michinoku Driver II. The attacking wrestler drapes an opponent over their shoulders in a fireman's carry position and then takes hold of the opponent and pulls them over their shoulder and down to the mat while falling to a sitting position so that the opponent lands on their upper back and neck between the legs of the wrestler, facing towards them. Chris Sabin uses a variation of the move called the Cradle Shock, where the opponent's legs are crossed during the move. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... Josh Harter[2](born February 4, 1982), better known by his ring name Chris Sabin, is an American professional wrestler, currently working for Total Nonstop Action Wrestling. ...


Tiger driver

Invented by Mitsuharu Misawa. The wrestler faces a bent over opponent and double underhooks the opponent's arms. The wrestler then lifts them up, flips the opponent and drops the opponent on their back while falling to sitting position, often pinning the opponent in the process. This is also known as a 'sitout double underhook powerbomb'. Mitsuharu Misawa ) is a Japanese professional wrestler. ...


Jaguar Yokota innovated a variation in which the opponent is dropped on their neck and shoulders, rather than their back, and the wrestler drops to their knees. This variation is usually called the Tiger Driver '91, after the year in which Mitsuharu Misawa (who popularized the move) first performed it. It is also known as a kneeling spike double underhook powerbomb. Rimi Yokota is a Japanese professional wrestler and later wrestling trainer, who wrestled under the name Jaguar Yokota. ... Mitsuharu Misawa ) is a Japanese professional wrestler. ...


There is some dispute over the correct name because the move resembles a Powerbomb more than a driver - thus, the move is also sometimes referred to as a Tiger Bomb. However, Tiger Driver is the original and more commonly accepted name. Some consider a double underhook powerbomb where the wrestler does not sitout to be a Tiger Bomb, while the sit-out variant is considered the Tiger Driver. A Powerbomb is a professional wrestling move in which an opponent is lifted up (usually so that they are sitting on the wrestlers shoulders) and then slammed back-first down to the mat. ... A Powerbomb is a professional wrestling move in which an opponent is lifted up (usually so that they are sitting on the wrestlers shoulders) and then slammed back-first down to the mat. ...


Electric chair drop

The wrestler lifts the opponent on his/her shoulders in an electric chair sitting position and then falls backwards driving the opponent back-first into the mat. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Manami Toyota innovated a cross-armed version which is bridged into a pin, calling it the Japanese Ocean Cyclone Suplex. Frankie Kazarian uses a wrist-lock variation of this move, also bridged into a pin, called Back to the Future. Manami Toyota(豊田真奈美) is a professional wrestler best known for her work with the All Japan Womens Pro-Wrestling wrestling promotion. ... Franklin Edward Kazarian (born August 4, 1977) is an American professional wrestler who currently works for Total Nonstop Action Wrestling as Kaz and has worked for numerous promotions, including World Wrestling Entertainment in its cruiserweight division. ...


Electric chair bomb

See also: electric chair facebuster

A facebuster, also known as a face plant, is generally a takedown move in professional wrestling in which an attacking wrestler forces his/her opponent down to the mat face-first without involving a headlock or facelock. ...

Facebreaker

A facebreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's face against a part of the wrestler's body, usually the knee.


Facebreaker DDT

The wrestler applies a front facelock and then falls backwards, much like a normal DDT, but instead of the opponent's head impacting the mat, the wrestler falls to a kneeling or sitting position driving the face of the opponent onto his/her knee. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... In professional wrestling a DDT is any move in which the wrestler falls down or backwards to drive a held opponents head into the mat. ...


Facebreaker knee smash

The knee smash, also called a Coconuts crush, is a standard facebreaker which involves the wrestler facing an opponent and grabbing him or her by the head or hair and pulling the opponent's face down, dropping it on to the wrestler's knee. Often used by a wrestler to stun an opponent and set him or her up for another move.


Many other facebreakers use the knee to inflict the damage; one variation sees the wrestler apply a standing side headlock, and simultaneously pull the opponent forward and smash the wrestler's knee to the opponent's head. There is also a double knee variation. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Double knee facebreaker

This facebreaker involves an attacking wrestler, who is standing face-to-face with an opponent, hooking both hands around the opponent's head and then leaping to bring both knees up to the face of the opponent. The wrestler then falls backwards to the mat, thus forcing the opponent to fall forwards and impact the exposed knees. CIMA and his Typhoon stablemates, most notably Susumu Yokosuka, use a double-team variation from a wheelbarrow position called the Superdrol. A single knee variation is also possible. Petey Williams uses a version where he slingshots off the ring apron into the ring and drives both knees into his opponents chest. Naomichi Marufuji has recently started using the maneuver, and after seeing him perform it at an ROH show, Chris Jericho adopted a running variation called the Codebreaker as his new finisher, usually preceded by his signature stance. Nobuhiko Oshima, better known by his stage name CIMA (pronounced Shima), is a Japanese professional wrestler who currently wrestles for Dragon Gate. ... Susumu Mochizuki (望月享), better known by his ring name Susumu Yokosuka (born August 18, 1978 in Yokosuka, Kanagawa, Japan) is a Japanese professional wrestler currently performing for the Dragon Gate professional wrestling promotion. ... Naomichi Marufuji ) is a Japanese professional wrestler who competes for Pro Wrestling NOAH and the US based independent wrestling promotion, Ring of Honor. ... Christopher Keith Irvine (born November 9, 1970), better known by the ring name Chris Jericho, is an American-Canadian actor, radio host, rock musician, and professional wrestler. ...


Hangman's facebreaker

Also described as an over the shoulder facebreaker, this facebreaker is performed when an attacking wrestler, who is standing in a back-to-back position with an opponent, reaches back to pull the opponent's head over his/her shoulder before (while keeping a hold of the opponent's head) spinning round to twist the opponent's head over as they drop down to one knee forcing the opponent face-first into the wrestlers exposed knee in one quick fluid motion.


Facebuster

Main article: Facebuster

A facebuster, also known as a faceplant, is any move in which the wrestler forces his/her opponent's face down to the mat which does not involve a headlock or facelock. If these are used then the move is either a DDT or bulldog variation. Also, inverted Mat Slams are commonly referred to as facebusters. A standard Facebuster also known as a Jumping facebuster involves the wrestler grabbing hold of the opponent by his/her head or hair and jumping down, forcing the opponent's face into the mat. A facebuster, also known as a face plant, is generally a takedown move in professional wrestling in which an attacking wrestler forces his/her opponent down to the mat face-first without involving a headlock or facelock. ... In professional wrestling a DDT is any move in which the wrestler falls down or backwards to drive a held opponents head into the mat. ...


Flapjack

A flapjack, also known as a Pancake slam, is any move that throws the opponent so that he/she is pushed upward and therefore having him/her fall on his/her front. In a basic flapjack, a wrestler pushes his opponent upward by reaching under his legs and lifting him into the air. While retaining the hold on the opponent's leg, the wrestler would fall backwards, dropping the opponent front-first into the canvas. It is commonly used by a wrestler when an opponent is charging towards him.


The move is similar to a back drop, but the wrestler pushes upwards so that the opponent falls onto his/her face instead of falling back-first.


A Hotshot is referred to when a flapjack is performed so that the opponent falls across the ring ropes. The fireman's carry flapjack sees the wrestler lift the opponent on to a fireman's carry, and then throw the upper body of the opponent away from the wrestler while the wrestler falls backwards, driving the opponent down to the mat chest first. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Alley Oop

Also known as a reverse powerbomb. The wrestler lifts the opponent so that they are seated on the wrestler’s shoulders, facing away from him, as in a powerbomb. The wrestler then falls backwards while throwing the opponent the same way, dropping them down to the mat on their chest. Tori used a variation of this maneuver where she wouldn't keep the opponent on her shoulders, but instead, she would do the maneuver very fast so it whipped the opponent. A Powerbomb is a professional wrestling move in which an opponent is lifted up (usually so that they are sitting on the wrestlers shoulders) and then slammed back-first down to the mat. ... Terri Poch (born August 20, 1967 in Portland, Oregon) is an American former professional wrestler, best known for her appearances with the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) as Tori. ...


Another variation of this is best called a Package powerbomb throw, or Steenalizer (The latter name coming from the most known user of this variation Kevin Steen). This version sees the wrestler pick the opponent up onto their shoulders in powerbomb position and dropping backwards while throwing the opponents so that the opponent flips forward and lands on their neck and upper back. Kevin Steen is a Canadian professional wrestler. ...


Giant swing

A Giant swing starts with an opponent lying on the mat, face up, and the wrestler at the opponent's feet. The wrestler takes the opponent's legs up under his/her arms, similar to the setup for a catapult, but instead pivots, spinning around to lift the opponent off the mat. The attacking may release the opponent to send him/her flying, or simply slow until the back of the opponent returns to the ground. Body Slam redirects here. ...


Guillotine drop

Innovated by Nicole Raczynski and mostly known as Barbie Crusher for her Nikki Roxx gimmick and Voodoo Drop for her Roxxi Laveaux gimmick.This move sees the attacking wrestler first to apply a hammerlock then to lift the opponent in a standing guillotine choke and finally to drop the opponent lower spine first to the mat. This eventually causes an effect to the whole spine and neck. Chris Hero uses a variation of the move where he applies a cravate instead of a guillotine choke. He calls the move Cravate Countdown. Nicole Raczynski (born April 19, 1979) is an American professional wrestler. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... Chris Spradlin (born December 24, 1979) is an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Chris Hero. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Gutbuster

A Gutbuster is any move in which the wrestler lifts his/her opponent up and jumps or drops him/her so that the opponent's stomach impacts against part of the wrestler's body, usually the knee. A basic gutbuster is often called a stomach breaker and is essentially the same as a backbreaker but with the opponent facing the opposite direction. This similarity with backbreakers is reflected in almost every gutbuster variation, which if inverted would become backbreakers and visa versa. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ...


Double knee gutbuster

This gutbuster involves an attacking wrestler, who is standing face-to-face with an opponent, hooking both hands around the opponent's head and leaping to bring both knees up to the stomach of the opponent; the wrestler will then fall backwards, forcing the opponent to fall forwards and impact the exposed knees.


Elevated gutbuster

This variation of a gutbuster sees an opponent first elevated into a high lifting transition hold before being dropped down for a gutbuster. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Fireman's carry gutbuster

This is the most common version of the elevated gutbuster and sees the attacking wrestler first lift the opponent up across their shoulders; a position known as a "fireman's carry", before then dropping down to one knee while simultaneously elevating the opponent over their head forcing them to drop down and impact their exposed knee. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


A slight variation of this, innovated by Roderick Strong, uses a modified double knee gutbuster and sees the attacking wrestler drop down to their back while bringing both knees up for the opponent to land on. This variation is also used as a finisher by Jamie Noble.


Gorilla press gutbuster

This version of the elevated gutbuster first sees the attacking wrestler lift an opponent over their head with their arms fully extended; a position known as a "Gorilla press", before then dropping down to one knee while simultaneously elevating the opponent over their head forcing them to drop down and impact their exposed knee. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Gutbuster drop

An elevated gutbuster in which an attacking wrestler would lift an opponent up, stomach-first, across one of their shoulders before dropping down to their knees forcing the opponent's stomach to impact on the wrestler's shoulder.


Rib breaker

A rib breaker is a version of a gutbuster that involves the wrestler scooping the opponent up by reaching between the legs of the opponent with one arm and reaching around their back from the same side with his/her other arm. The wrestler then lifts his/her opponent up so they are horizontal across the wrestler’s body. From here the wrestler drops down to one knee, forcing the opponent to drop stomach/rib-first against the wrestler's raised knee.


Headscissors takedown

The move can be performed two ways, with the wrestler facing up or down. With the wrestler's legs scissored around the opponent's head, and if the wrestler is facing up, he performs a backflip, dragging the opponent into a forced somersault that throws the opponent away and on to their back. If the wrestler is facing down, he bends forward instead of performing a backflip. Of the two variations the facing down version is more often referred to as a Headscissors takedown with the facing up version being referred to as a Frankensteiner or Hurricanrana.


A variation where the wrestler forces the opponent to spin before releasing him is referred to as a Satellite (spinning) headscissors. Another variation when the attacking wrestler rotates numerous times around the opponent before performing the head scissors is known as Déjà Vu as named by Dragon Kid. For other uses, see Déjà vu (disambiguation). ... Nobuyoshi Nakamura (born February 2, 1976) is a Japanese professional wrestler who wrestles for Dragon Gate. ...


Frankensteiner

This move is commonly referred to as a huracanrana or hurricanrana, although it is technically slightly different. The move is described as a headscissors takedown that is performed against a running opponent. The wrestler jumps on the shoulders of the charging opponent and performs a backflip, using his momentum to throw the opponent over him and on to their back.[2]


It was named "Frankensteiner" by Scott Steiner, who used it as a finishing move.[3] The move also has a variation where the opponent is sitting on the top rope, that variation is also referred to as frankensteiner. Another variation of the Frankensteiner sees a grounded wrestler first "kip-up" on to a standing opponent's shoulders, this is where a wrestler roll onto the back of his/her shoulders bringing his/her legs up and kicking forward to build momentum to lift themselves off the floor and on to the standing opponent. This is often referred to as a kip-up hurricanrana, though technically it's a frankensteiner. Scott Carl Rechsteiner (born July 29, 1962) better known by his ring name Scott Steiner, is an American professional wrestler. ... Aerial techniques are used in professional wrestling to show off the speed and agility of a wrestler. ... The Kip-up or Matty Special is an acrobatic move employed in martial arts, breakdancing, and gymnastics which takes a person from a supine position directly to his feet. ...


Reverse frankensteiner

Also known as an Inverted Frankensteiner or Poison Rana, this move is similar to a standard frankensteiner. The wrestler jumps on the shoulders of an opponent and performs a backflip, using the momentum to throw the opponent over. However, in this version a wrestler jumps on the shoulders of an opponent from behind, so that they are facing the same way as the opponent. By leaning backwards the wrestler attempts to perform a backflip and throw the opponent over on their belly. Due to the difficulty in performing a backflip with the extra weight often the ending of this move sees the opponent's head stuck between the legs of the wrestler hitting the mat first; giving it a resemblance to a back-to-back flip piledriver. A piledriver is a professional wrestling driver move in which the wrestler grabs his opponent, turns him upside-down, and drops into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the opponents head into the mat. ...


This move is dangerous in that the attacking wrestler cannot let go of the head scissors because the opponent has no natural momentum with the move so most of the time the opponent lands on their head between the legs of the wrestler, and if the opponent doesn't aid the backflip enough the wrestler can end up being crushed by the opponent landing on their back.


Hurricanrana

The correct name for this maneuver is the Huracanrana, but it is commonly misspelled in English as Hurricanrana and was invented by Luchador Huracan Ramirez. This is a Frankensteiner headscissors takedown that ends in a rana pinning hold. The rana is any double-leg cradle. The huracanrana is typically done with more velocity than the headscissors takedown, as the opponent needs to land directly underneath the wrestler, instead of being tossed away.[4] Lucha libre, a Spanish phrase loosely translated into English as free fight, is a genre of professional wrestling developed in Mexico. ... Huracan Ramirez is a Mexican Professional Wrestler. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


It is often confused with the more impactful non-pinning headscissor variation known as a Frankensteiner, although the difference is similar to seeing a bridged suplex compared to a released one.


Hip toss

The wrestler stands next to the opponent with both facing the same direction, and the wrestler hooks their closest arm underneath and behind the opponent's closest armpit. The wrestler then quickly lifts the opponent up with that arm and throws them forward, which would lead the wrestler to flip the opponent onto their back to end the move.


Mideon used a variation of this move in which the wrestler first puts the opponent into a pumphandle setup and then flips the opponent over on their back. Dennis Knight (born December 26, 1968 in Biggers, Arkansas) is an American professional wrestler, best known for his appearances with the World Wrestling Federation as Phineas I. Godwinn and Mideon. ...


Iconoclasm

This top rope flipping slam sees a wrestler stand under an opponent, who is situated on the top turnbuckle, turn his/her back to this opponent while taking hold of the opponent's arms from below, often holding underneath the opponent's arm pits. The wrestler would then throw the opponent forward while falling to a seated position, flipping the opponent over in midair, and slamming them down to the mat back first. The Iconoclasm was popularized and named by Dragon Gate wrestler, CIMA.[5][6] There is also a cross armed variation, dubbed the goriconoclasm by CIMA. Dragon Gate is a Japanese professional wrestling promotion formerly known as Toryumon Japan. ... Nobuhiko Oshima, better known by his stage name CIMA (pronounced Shima), is a Japanese professional wrestler who currently wrestles for Dragon Gate. ...


Christopher Daniels uses a variation, which he calls the Fall From Grace, in which Daniels wraps one of the opponent's arms around their own neck and throws them down by the wrapped arm. Daniel Christopher Covell (born December 24, 1971) is an American professional wrestler, best known in the United States by his ring name The Fallen Angel Christopher Daniels. ...


Irish whip

Gene Snitsky Irish-whips Brian Kendrick to the turnbuckle.

Also called a hammer throw. A move in which the wrestler grabs one of his/her opponent's arms and spins, swinging the opponent into an obstacle such as the ring ropes, a turnbuckle, or the stairs leading into the ring. Eugene Alan Snitsky (born January 14, 1970) is a professional wrestler, better known by his ring name Snitsky who is currently signed to World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) wrestling on its RAW brand. ... Brian David Kendrick[3] (born May 29, 1979) is an American professional wrestler currently signed to World Wrestling Entertainment performing on its RAW brand. ...


An Irish whip into the ring ropes is usually used to set the opponent up for another technique as he/she bounces off, such as a back body drop, clothesline or sleeper hold. An Irish whip into the turnbuckles usually sees the opponent remain in the corner, allowing a follow-up attack from the wrestler, such as a corner clothesline, avalanche, Stinger splash, or a running knee; the opponent may remain standing or slump to the ground, usually in a seated position, which will vary the attack. One occasional use of the Irish whip is to try to "hit for the cycle" by whipping one's opponent into each corner in turn. Body Slam redirects here. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ...


Jawbreaker

A jawbreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's jaw against a part of the wrestler's body, usually his/her knee, head or shoulder.


Sitout Jawbreaker

Jeff Hardy does this as he pulls his opponents jaw on top of his head and lands in a sitting position. He does this when his opponent is about to pick him up. A standard jawbreaker is seen when a wrestler (either stands facing or not facing opponent) places his/her head under the jaw of the opponent and holds the opponent in place before falling into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the jaw of the opponent into the top of his/her head. Sometimes it is also used to counter a headlock by the opponent. Jeffrey Nero Jeff Hardy (born August 31, 1977) is an American professional wrestler currently performing on the RAW brand of World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE), where he is the reigning Intercontinental Champion. ...


Shoulder jawbreaker

The wrestler stands facing the opponent, places his/her shoulder under the jaw of the opponent and holds the opponent in place before falling into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the jaw of the opponent into his/her shoulder.


Stunner

Main article: Stunner

A Stunner is a sitout three-quarter facelock jawbreaker. It involves an attacking wrestler applying a three-quarter facelock (reaching behind the head of an opponent, thus pulling the opponent's jaw above the wrestler's shoulder) before falling to a seated position and forcing the defender's jaw to drop down on the shoulder of the attacking wrestler. It is the finishing move used by Stone Cold Steve Austin. The original user of the move was Mikey Whipwreck. A stunner is a common term in professional wrestling referring to the sitout three-quarter facelock jawbreaker maneuver. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... Steven James Williams (born Steven Anderson on December 18, 1964)[2] better known by his ring name Stone Cold Steve Austin, is an American actor and former professional wrestler. ... James Watson (born June 4, 1973), better known as Mikey Whipwreck, is a semi-retired American professional wrestler best known for his career with Extreme Championship Wrestling. ...


Mat slam

A mat slam is any move in which the wrestler forces the back of the opponent's head into the mat which does not involve a headlock or facelock. If these are used then the move is considered a type of DDT (if the wrestler falls backwards) or bulldog. A standard Mat Slam involves the wrestler grabbing hold of the opponent by his/her head or hair and pulling back, forcing the back of the opponent's head into the mat. In professional wrestling a DDT is any move in which the wrestler falls down or backwards to drive a held opponents head into the mat. ...


Double underhook mat slam

The wrestler faces an opponent, overhooks both arms, and then pivots 180º so that the opponent is facing upwards with his or her head pressed against the upper back--or under an arm--of the wrestler. The wrestler then drops down to his/her back, driving the back of the opponent's head and neck into the mat.


Sitout rear mat slam

The wrestler takes hold of their opponent from behind, holding them by either their hair or the top of their head. The wrestler then jumps backwards and falls to a sitting position, driving the back of the opponent's head into the ground between their legs.


A variation sees the wrestler run up the corner turnbuckles, perform a backflip over a chasing opponent, and at the same time grab hold of the opponents head and perform the slam. In another variation the wrestler could put the opponent in a straight jacket hold before dropping him/her in a sitout position. Edge calls his version the Edge-O-Matic and X-Pac calls his version the X-O-Matic. Talia Madison uses the variation of this move by applying the Crucifix before dropping the opponent. She calls this move the Re-TALIA-Tion. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... Adam Joseph Copeland (born October 30, 1973 in Orangeville, Ontario),[5] better known by his ring name Edge, is a Canadian professional wrestler currently signed to World Wrestling Entertainment and wrestling on the SmackDown! brand. ... Sean Michael Waltman (born July 13, 1972) is an American professional wrestler. ... Talia Madison (born on June 2nd, 1981 in New Britain, Connecticut) is an American professional wrestler, valet, and model. ... For other uses, see Crucifix (disambiguation). ...


Sleeper slam

This slamming version of a headlock takedown sees a wrestler apply a sleeper hold to the opponent, then falls face first to the ground, pulling the opponent down with them and driving the back and head of the opponent into the ground. Chris Jericho popularized this move and calls it the Flashback. Another version Jericho popularized involves catching the head of a charging opponent, swinging around them to pull them down to the mat. A similar variation is used by Masato Yoshino and Hiroshi Tanahashi, named the Sling Blade, in which he runs towards an opponent, catches their head, swings around them and pulls their head down to the mat with him. Christopher Keith Irvine (born November 9, 1970), better known by the ring name Chris Jericho, is an American-Canadian actor, radio host, rock musician, and professional wrestler. ... Masato Yoshino is a Japanese professional wrestler, currently working for the Dragon Gate wrestling promotion. ... Hiroshi Tanahashi (born November 13, 1976) is a Japanese professional wrestler who works primarily for New Japan Pro Wrestling, where he is the reigning IWGP World Heavyweight Champion. ...


Tilt-a-whirl mat slam

As the name suggests the wrestler would first use a tilt-a-whirl to raise the opponent into a belly-to-belly (piledriver) position, from here the wrestler would fall forward planting the opponent into the mat back-first. This is also called Tilt-a-whirl slam. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... A piledriver is a professional wrestling driver move in which the wrestler grabs his opponent, turns him upside-down, and drops into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the opponents head into the mat. ...


The move is sometimes named by fans and independent commentators as an "Inverted Styles Clash" in reference to a belly-to-back version. Though not often used by many wrestlers, this mat slam does happen as a result of other botched (poorly executed) moves. When a wrestler is lifted for a standard tilt-a-whirl slam they can often be positioned wrong a land in this fashion, also when wrestlers are performing tombstone piledriver if the weight isn't properly distributed the attacking wrestler can fall forward instead of straight down; hitting a mat slam rather than the piledriver they are attempting. A facebuster, also known as a face plant, is generally a takedown move in professional wrestling in which an attacking wrestler forces his/her opponent down to the mat face-first without involving a headlock or facelock. ... To botch in professional wrestling means to attempt a move that does not come out as the wrestler wanted it to come out. ... A piledriver is a professional wrestling driver move in which the wrestler grabs his opponent, turns him upside-down, and drops into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the opponents head into the mat. ...


Monkey flip

This move, often referred to as a Monkey climb in British wrestling, involves an attacking wrestler, who is standing face-to-face with an opponent, hooking both hands around the opponent's head before then bringing up both legs so that they place their feet on the hips/waist of the opponent; making the head hold and the wrestlers' sense of balance are the only things allowing both wrestler to be in an upright position. At this point, the attacking wrestler would shift their weight so that they fall backwards to the mat while forcing the opponent to fall forwards with them only to have the attacking wrestler push up with their legs forcing the opponent to flip forwards, over the wrestler's head, onto their back. This move is most commonly performed out of a ring corner. This is due to it being easier to climb onto an opponent while in the corner as balance is easily retained, and it allows the maximum length of ring to propel the opponent across.


Muscle Buster

The move is performed when an attacking wrestler hooks both an opponent's legs with his/her arms and tucks their head in next to the opponent's before standing and lifting the opponent up, so that they are upside down with their head resting on the attacking wrestler's shoulder. From this position, the attacking wrestler jumps up and drops down to the mat, driving the opponent shoulder first down to the mat with the opponent's neck impacting both the wrestler's shoulder and the mat.


This can see the wrestler pick up an opponent who is standing but bent forward but it often begins with an opponent who is sitting on an elevated position, usually a top turnbuckle, because it's easier to hook and lift an opponent when they are positioned higher than the wrestler. Samoa Joe is noted for often using an Avalanche Muscle Buster, where he falls to the mat from a raised platform, usually the second rope. The move also has a neckbreaker variation which focuses more of the attack on the opponent's neck. Nuufolau Joel Joe Seanoa (born March 17, 1979 in Orange County, California[6]), better known by his ring name Samoa Joe, is an American professional wrestler currently performing for Total Nonstop Action Wrestling, where he is the reigning TNA World Heavyweight Champion. ... In professional wrestling a neckbreaker is any throw or slam that focuses its attack on the opponent’s neck. ...


Neckbreaker

Main article: Neckbreaker

There are two general categories of neckbreaker, which are related only in that they attack the opponent's neck. One category of neckbreaker is the type of move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's neck against a part of the wrestler's body, usually his/her knee, head or shoulder. A neckbreaker slam is another technique in which the wrestler throws his/her opponent to the ground by twisting the opponent's neck. also a back head slam or, when a wrestler drops to the mat while holding an opponent by their neck, without having to twist it. In professional wrestling a neckbreaker is any throw or slam that focuses its attack on the opponent’s neck. ...


Piledriver

Main article: Piledriver

A Piledriver is any move in which the wrestler grabs their opponent, turns them upside-down, and drops into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the opponent's head into the mat. Other variations focus the attack on the neck, rather than the head. A piledriver is a professional wrestling driver move in which the wrestler grabs his opponent, turns him upside-down, and drops into a sitting or kneeling position, driving the opponents head into the mat. ...


Powerbomb

Main article: Powerbomb

A powerbomb is a move in which an opponent is lifted up into the air and then slammed down back-first to the mat.[7] The standard Powerbomb sees the opponent placed in a standing headscissors position (bent forward with their head placed between the wrestler's thighs), lifted up on the wrestler's shoulders, and slammed back-first down to the mat. A Powerbomb is a professional wrestling move in which an opponent is lifted up (usually so that they are sitting on the wrestlers shoulders) and then slammed back-first down to the mat. ...


Powerslam

Main article: Powerslam

A powerslam is any slam in which the wrestler performing the technique falls face-down on top of his/her opponent. The use of the term "powerslam" usually refers to the front powerslam and the scoop powerslam. A Powerslam is a professional wrestling body slam move in which the wrestler performing the slam falls face-down on top of his/her opponent. ... A Powerslam is a professional wrestling body slam move in which the wrestler performing the slam falls face-down on top of his/her opponent. ... A Powerslam is a professional wrestling body slam move in which the wrestler performing the slam falls face-down on top of his/her opponent. ...


Shin breaker

The wrestler faces the opponent from the side, slightly behind. He tucks his head under the opponent's near armpit, and grabs hold of the opponent's near leg, bending it fully. He then lifts the opponent up and slams him downwards, impacting the opponent's bent leg on one of the wrestler's knee. This move is used to weaken the leg for a submission maneuver. Such uses include Ric Flair using a shin breaker to set up for his Figure four leglock. Richard Morgan Fliehr[2] (born on February 25, 1949 in Minneapolis, Minnesota[2]) better known by his ring name Ric Flair , is a legendary American professional wrestler of iconic staus signed to World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) on its SmackDown! brand. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Shoulderbreaker

A shoulderbreaker is any move in which the wrestler slams his/her opponent's shoulder against any part of the wrestler's body, usually the shin or knee. This move is normally used to weaken the arm for a submission maneuver or to make it more difficult for the opponent to kick out of a possible pinfall attempt. The most common version sees the wrestler turn the opponent upside-down and drop the opponent shoulder-first on the wrestler's knee. Usually the opponent is held over the wrestler's shoulder in either a powerslam position, or less commonly an inverted powerslam position for what is sometimes called the Reverse Shoulderbreaker. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... In the context of professional wrestling, a pinfall is scored when a wrestler pins his opponents shoulders to the mat for a count of three, in such matches where pinfalls are scored. ... A Powerslam is a professional wrestling body slam move in which the wrestler performing the slam falls face-down on top of his/her opponent. ... A Powerbomb is a professional wrestling move in which an opponent is lifted up (usually so that they are sitting on the wrestlers shoulders) and then slammed back-first down to the mat. ...


Snake Eyes

This move sees the wrestler place the opponent stomach down on his or her shoulder such that they both are facing the same direction. The wrestler then throws the opponent face-first onto any top turnbuckle or throat-first on any top rope of the ring. The move was made popular by Kevin Nash during his early 90's WCW gimmick of Vinnie Vegas and by the Undertaker in the WWE, usually followed by a Big Boot. Kevin Scott Nash (born July 9, 1959[2] in Detroit, Michigan) is an American professional wrestler and actor. ...


Snapmare

With the wrestler's back to the opponent, he/she applies a three-quarter facelock or cravate, kneels down, and then pulls the opponent forward, flipping them over his/her shoulder down to the mat, back first. Another variation sees the wrestler hold the opponent by the hair instead of putting them in a three quarters facelock before slamming them to the mat. This is often used as a transition to a submission hold, usually a grounded sleeper. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Snapmare driver

A high impact variation of the snapmare where instead of flipping the opponent over, the wrestler drops down either on their chest or down on their knees and drives the opponent's head down to the mat forehead first, with the three quarters facelock Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Suplex

Main article: Suplex

A suplex is the same as the amateur suplex, a throw which involves arching/bridging either overhead or twisting to the side, so the opponent is slammed to the mat back-first. The term suplex (without qualifiers) can also refer specifically to the vertical suplex. The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ... The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ...


Spinning crucifix toss

Sergei lifts the opponent above his back with the opponent's arm spread out in a crucifix hold, spins around, pushes the opponent up, and moves out of the way, dropping the opponent down to the mat. TNA wrestler James Storm performs this move, calling it the Eye of the Storm. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... James Allan Black (born June 1, 1975) is an American professional wrestler who competes under the ring name Tennessee Cowboy James Storm. ...


Trips and sweeps

Double leg takedown

See also: Double leg takedown

A tackle where the intention is to force the opponent down on their back by tackling them at their waist or upper thighs. This usually involves grabbing the opponent with both arms around the opponent's legs while keeping the chest close to the opponent, and using this position to force the opponent to the ground. A takedown is a martial arts and combat sports term for a technique that involves off-balancing an opponent and forcing him or her to the ground, typically with the combatant performing the takedown landing on top. ...


Dragon screw legwhip

This is a legwhip where a wrestler grabs an opponent's leg and holds it parallel to the mat while they are facing each other. The attacking wrestler then spins the leg inwards causing the opponent to fall off balance and twist in the air bringing them to the ground in a turning motion. Popularized by Tatsumi Fujinami who gave the move its name. Tatsumi Fujinami (Fujinami Tatsumi, 藤波辰巳) is a Japanese professional wrestler who is famous for his gimmick as The Dragon. ...


Mandala hineri

Also referred to as Mandara Twist, this is a variant of the dragon screw where the wrestler spins to the outside, causing leg damage and causing their opponent to go airborne.


Drop toe-hold

The wrestler falls to the ground, placing one foot at the front of the opponent's ankle and the other in the back of the shin. This causes the opponent to fall face first into the ground. It is sometimes used illegally to force an opponent into a chair or other elevated weapon; it is also used occasionally to force an opponent face-first into the turnbuckles, stunning him/her or her momentarily. Technical wrestlers may use it as a quick transitional move into a grounded submission hold. Also referred to as a Scissor Sweep. Raven uses this move to trip opponents head-first to an upright chair. Scott Anthony Levy (born September 8, 1964) better known by his ring name Raven, is an American professional wrestler. ...


Half nelson legsweep

The wrestler stands behind, slightly to one side of and facing the opponent. The wrestler reaches under one of the opponent's arms with his/her corresponding arm and places the palm of his/her hand on the neck of the opponent, thereby forcing the arm of the opponent up into the air (the Half Nelson). The wrestler then uses his/her other arm to pull the opponent's other arm behind the opponent's head, so both opponent's arms are pinned. The wrestler then hooks the opponent's near leg and throws themselves backwards, driving the opponent back-first to the ground.


Russian legsweep

Also known as a Side Russian legsweep. A move in which a wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the opponent, facing in the same direction, and reaches behind the opponent's back to hook the opponent's head with the other hand extending the opponent's nearest arm, then while hooking the opponent's leg the wrestler falls backward, pulling the opponent to the mat back-first.


The Sandman uses a variation in which he holds a kendo stick across his opponent's throat, he calls it the White Russian Legsweep. There is also a facebuster variation of this move, noted to have been used by Jeff Jarrett, who called it the Stroke. James (Jim) Fullington (born June 16, 1963) better known by his ring name The Sandman, is an American professional wrestler, best known for his career with Extreme Championship Wrestling (ECW), where he was dubbed The Hardcore Icon. ... A Shinai made from bamboo A shinai (Japanese: ) is a practice weapon used primarily in kendo and is used as if it were a sword. ... The term White Russian may refer to: Members of the White movement whose military arm is known as the White Army or White Guard comprised some of the Russian forces, both political and military, which opposed the Bolsheviks after the October Revolution and fought against the Red Army during the... A facebuster, also known as a face plant, is generally a takedown move in professional wrestling in which an attacking wrestler forces his/her opponent down to the mat face-first without involving a headlock or facelock. ... For the former Assistant Secretary of Energy for Fossil Energy, see Jeffrey D. Jarrett. ...


Three-quarter facelock Russian legsweep

The wrestler stands in front of, facing away from and slightly to one side of the opponent. The wrestler then reaches behind themselves and applies a three-quarter facelock to the opponent. The wrestler then hooks the opponent's near leg with their own near leg and sweeps the leg away, simultaneously throwing themselves backwards, thus driving the opponent to the ground (with the weight of the wrestler on top of them) and wrenching the opponent's neck. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Schoolboy

This technique gives its name to the schoolboy bump and is performed when the wrestler drops down to his (schoolboy)/her (schoolgirl) knees behind the opponent and forces his/her bodyweight forward to trip the opponent over the attacking wrestler so that they fall flat on their back. The name schoolboy also refers to a roll-up pin. A bump occurs whenever a wrestler hits the mat or the arena floor after receiving a move from his/her opponent. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


STO

STO (Space Tornado Ogawa) is a sweep in which a wrestler wraps one arm across the chest of his/her opponent and sweeps the opponent's leg with his/her own leg to slam the other wrestler back-first. This can also be a lariat-legsweep combination to slam down opponent. Same as the judo sweep O-soto-gari. Naoya Ogawa, a former Olympic judoka, adapted the move into pro wrestling. Naoya Ogawa (小川直也 Ogawa Naoya) is a professional wrestler and mixed martial arts fighter from Japan. ... Judo (Japanese: 柔道 Jūdō) is a martial art, a sport and a philosophy which originated in Japan. ...


Clawhold STO

Also known as an STK (Space Tornado Kensuke) as named by Kensuke Sasaki. This move is an STO where the wrestler would first apply a clawhold with one hand before sweeping his/her opponent's leg. Kensuke Sasaki is a Japanese professional wrestler who currently wrestles for various promotions through his own agency, such as All Japan Pro Wrestling. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Reverse STO

See also: Complete Shot

This is a move where a wrestler locks one of his opponents leg and then the neck. A facebuster, also known as a face plant, is generally a takedown move in professional wrestling in which an attacking wrestler forces his/her opponent down to the mat face-first without involving a headlock or facelock. ...


Set up move

Main article: Transition holds

These are transition moves that set up for various throws and slams. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


See also

Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ... Aerial techniques are used in professional wrestling to show off the speed and agility of a wrestler. ... The double-team manuvers in professional wrestling are executed by two wrestlers instead of one and typicaly are used by tag teams in tag team matches. ...

References

  1. ^ Sarah Preston (March 2008). The Dirty Dozen: WWE Diva Maria. Playboy.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-19.
  2. ^ The Rock and Joe Layden (2000). The Rock Says... (p.190). ReganBooks. ISBN 978-0060392987. “I would stand upright and Chris would jump on my shoulders from the front, so that my face would be in his gut and his legs would be hanging over my back. Then he'd do a backflip, landing on his head and arms and dragging me over in the process. In other words, he'd use his legs to hook my head.” 
  3. ^ Tim Towe (June 2001). Big Poppa Is Pumped - wrestler Scott Steiner - Interview. Wrestling Digest. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  4. ^ Molinaro, J. (November 2001). Jericho, Benoit on their time in Mexico - Lucha Libre: A spicy Mexican treat. Canadian Online Explorer. Retrieved on 2007-05-25. “Huracanrana/Huracarrana - A Frankensteiner finishing in a double leg cradle (rana).”
  5. ^ Typhoon. Strong Style Spirit (2007). Retrieved on May 19, 2007. “Iconoclasm: Flipping slam from the corner. Has a cross arm version known as the Goriconoslasm”
  6. ^ Death Valley Driver Move List. Retrieved on 2007-07-31.
  7. ^ Mick Foley (2000). Have A Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks (p.242). HarperCollins. ISBN 0061031011. 

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CANOE (acronym for Canadian Online Explorer, commonly called Canoe. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • LuchaWiki: Comprehensive list and pictures of Wrestling Moves

  Results from FactBites:
 
Professional wrestling throws - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (7435 words)
Much of the action in professional wrestling involves the application of techniques that involve lifting the opponent up and throwing or slamming him/her down.
Professional wrestlers frequently give their "finisher" (signature moves that usually result in a win) new names that reflect their gimmick.
The wrestler places the opponent in a modified fireman's carry in which the opponent is held diagonally across the wrestlers back with their legs across one shoulder and head under the opposite shoulder (usually held in place with a facelock).
Professional wrestling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2525 words)
Professional wrestling is generally any form of wrestling in which the wrestlers receive payment for participating.
However, following the decline of the submission-oriented catch-as-catch-can style from mainstream professional wrestling, the tap out largely faded, regaining prominence as a means of victory mostly in the face of the popularity of the Ultimate Fighting Championships in the early 90's.
Women have long participated in professional wrestling, first in woman-versus-woman matches that were low on the bill compared to mens' matches, and then later as managers or valets accompanying male wrestlers.
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