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Encyclopedia > Professional wrestling holds

Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. This article covers the various pins, stretches and transition holds used in the ring. Moves are listed under general categories whenever possible. For the NES video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... Submission can refer to: An object to hand in A proposal for a presentation at an academic conference Domination and submission, where it is opposite in meaning to dominance. ...

Contents

Stretches

An element borrowed from professional wrestling's catch wrestling origins, stretches (or submission holds) are techniques in which a wrestler holds another in a position that puts stress on their body. They are usually employed to weaken an opponent or to force them to submit, either vocally or by tapping out: slapping the mat, floor, or opponent with a free hand three times. Catch wrestling is a popular style of wrestling. ...


Many of these holds, when applied vigorously, stretch the opponent's muscles or twist their joints uncomfortably, hence the name. Chokes, although not in general stress positions like the other stretches, are usually grouped with them as they serve the same tactical purposes. In public performance, for safety's sake, stretches are usually not performed to the point where the opponent must submit or risk injury. Likewise, chokes are usually not applied to the point where they cut off the oxygen supply to the opponent's brain. A notable exception is Japanese shoot-style wrestling, in which wrestlers are expected to apply legit submissions to end matches. While some stretches rely entirely on the acting ability of the opponent to sell them as painful or debilitating, many are legitimately effective when fully applied. They should not be attempted without proper training and supervision, as there is significant risk of serious injury.-1... In professional wrestling, clowning, stunt fighting and stage combat, the sell is the physical element of making the action appear realistic to the crowd. ...


Head, face, chin and shoulder locks

Anaconda vice

A BJJ & Judo compression choke popularized by Hiroyoshi Tenzan, the anaconda vice (also spelled vise) is done from a position in which the wrestler and the opponent are seated on the mat facing each other. The wrestler sits on one side of the opponent and using his near arm encircles the opponent in a headlock position and grabs the opponent's near wrist, bending the arm upwards. Then, the wrestler maneuvers his other arm through the "hole" created by the opponent's bent wrist, and locks his hand upon his own wrist, then pulls the opponent forward, causing pressure on the opponent's arm and neck. Hiroyoshi Tenzan is an accomplished Japanese Heavyweight wrestler. ...


In a variation called the Anaconda Cross. The opponent's other arm is also trapped as it is wrapped over the opponent's chest and pinned under the wrestler's arms. This variation was innovated by Hiroyoshi Tenzan. Hiroyoshi Tenzan is an accomplished Japanese Heavyweight wrestler. ...


Camel clutch

Edge applying the Camel Clutch submission to John Cena

The wrestler sits on the back of his opponent, who is face down on the mat, and places the arm or, more commonly, both arms of the opponent on his thighs. The wrestler then reaches around the opponent's head and applies a chinlock. The wrestler then leans back and pulls the opponent's head and torso. A camel clutch can also refer simply to a rear chinlock while seated on the back of an opponent, without placing the arms on the thighs. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Adam Joseph Copeland (born October 30, 1973 in Orangeville, Ontario),[5] better known by his ring name Edge, is a Canadian professional wrestler currently signed to World Wrestling Entertainment and wrestling on the SmackDown! brand. ... John Felix Anthony Cena, Jr. ...


It was invented by Salvador "Gory" Guerrero, who gave the move to his tag team partner, El Santo, who then popularized its use. It was first known as the La de a Caballo ('on horseback'). Iranian-American wrestler The Sheik used it as a finisher, giving it the name Camel clutch. In the 1980s Iranian wrestler The Iron Sheik popularized it as well. Gory Guerrero Salvador Gory Guerrero Quesada (January 11, 1921 – April 18, 1990) was one of the premier Hispanic professional wrestlers in the early days of Lucha Libre when most wrestlers were imported from outside of Mexico. ... Rodolfo Guzman Huerta (September 23, 1917 - February 5, 1984), more widely known as Santo, El Enmascarado de Plata, or Samson, the silver-masked man in English translations, was a Mexican wrestler, actor, and folk hero. ... Edward George Farhat (June 7, 1924 - January 18, 2003) was a professional wrestler best known as The Sheik (or The Original Sheik to distinguish him from the wrestler the Iron Sheik of the 1980s). ... Hossein Khosrow Ali Vaziri (born on March 15, 1943) is a retired Iranian professional wrestler better known by his stage name The Iron Sheik. ...


Scott Steiner began using a standing variation of the camel clutch -- applying more pressure to the neck, instead of the torso as with the normal camel clutch -- as a finisher during his time with the nWo it was dubbed the Steiner Recliner. Scott Carl Rechsteiner (born July 29, 1962) better known by his ring name Scott Steiner, is an American professional wrestler. ... The New World Order was a stable of wrestlers, originally in World Championship Wrestling (WCW) and later in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF). ...


Camel clutch sleeper

In this variation of the camel clutch, a wrestler sits on the back of an opponent while they are lying on the mat face down. Instead of putting the opponent in a rear chinlock, they put him/her in a sleeper hold. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with rear naked choke. ...


Chickenwing camel clutch

A wrestler stands behind an opponent and applies a double chickenwing. The wrestler then forces the opponent face-down to the mat, sits on his back, and pulls backwards, stretching the opponent's neck and upper body backwards.


Inverted facelock camel clutch

Also known as a Dragon Clutch, an inverted facelock camel clutch sees the wrestler stand behind their opponent and apply an Inverted facelock. They then force the opponent to the mat face down, sit on their back, and pull backwards, stretching the opponent's neck and upper body backwards.


Leg hook camel clutch

Essentially a regular Camel Clutch, but before the wrestler locks in the chinlock, he pulls the opponent's leg backwards (as in the Single Leg Crab), and tucks it under the wrestler's underarm, then continues to perform the typical camel clutch, applying more pressure to the lower back with the leg's new position.


Chinlock

Randy Orton applying a Chinlock on John Cena.

Also known as a rear chin-lock this hold sees an attacking wrestler lift his opponent, who is lying on the mat face up, to a sitting position. The wrestler then places his knee in the opponents back and grasps the opponents chin then either pulls straight back on the chin or wrenches it to the side. However, this hold is dangerous, it could strain, or even snap the tendons in the opponents neck. Randal Randy Keith Orton[1] (born on April 1, 1980), nicknamed The Legend Killer, is an American professional wrestler currently signed to World Wrestling Entertainment wrestling on its RAW brand. ... John Felix Anthony Cena, Jr. ...


A variation of this hold, referred to as a bridging reverse chinlock, sees the attacking wrestler kneel before the opponent and grasp their neck into a reverse chinlock, before flipping forward to plant their feet and bridge their back adding additional pressure to the opponent's neck and upper back.


Clawhold

Popularly known as an Iron Claw and sometimes known as a head vice or skull clutch, the clawhold was a finishing hold of Teutonic heels, Fritz Von Erich and his sons David, Kevin, Kerry, Mike, and Chris as well as Baron Von Raschke. The claw was a squeezing of the skull, by curling one's finger tips in using primarily the last two knuckles of the finger, thereby applying five different points of pressure. The focal point is to use gripping power to almost attempt to shove ones fingers into the opponent's head as oppose to just squeezing with the flat of ones fingers. Usually the ref would declare the opponent incapacitated and call the match. A ruthless user of the hold, such as Blackjack Mulligan, could draw blood either by breaking the nose or inducing a hemorrhage. The term Germanic peoples may refer to: the Germanic tribes that in the first millennium were seen as a barbarian threat by the Roman Empire and its successors; the Germanic Christianity that in the second millennium came to dominate much of Northern Europe, politically organized in the Holy Roman Empire... In professional wrestling, a heel is a villain character. ... Jack Barton Adkisson (August 16, 1929 - September 10, 1997) was an American professional wrestler under the ring name Fritz Von Erich, better known today as a wrestling promoter and the patriarch of the Von Erich wrestling family. ... Baron Von Raschke James Donald Raschke (born 1940 in Omaha, Nebraska) was a professional wrestler best known as Baron Von Raschke. ... This article is about the American wrestler. ...


The Undertaker, while wrestling as "Mean" Mark Callous in the late 1980s, used a variation in which he would claw the opponents jaw rather than head. He dubbed this variation as the Callous Clutch. Both The Great Khali and Brian Adams have also used a double-claw variation. The wrestler performing the hold would approach their opponents from behind and grip their heads with both hands. While in the vise, the wrestler could control their opponent by the temples and bring them down to a seated position where more pressure could be exerted. An illegal variation of the clawhold known as alternatively the Testicular claw, or the Crotch Claw, exists. This variation, as the name implies, sees a wrestler grab the crotch of their opponent and squeeze. Another variation is known as the Stomach claw, which in form is just like the clawhold, only applied to one's stomach. For the Combichrist song, see Everybody Hates You Mark Calaway (born March 24, 1965[2][3]) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name The Undertaker. ... Dalip Singh Rana[2] (born August 27, 1972) better known by his ring name The Great Khali, is an Indian professional wrestler and actor. ... This article is about the professional wrestler. ... Bench vise A vise (American and Canadian English) or vice (British English) is a mechanical screw apparatus used for holding or clamping a work piece to allow work to be performed on it using other tools, such as saws, planes, drills, mills, screwdrivers, sandpaper, In general, vises have a fixed... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ...


Shoulder claw
Shaun Koen applying the Lion's Claw (Shoulder claw)

Similar to a clawhold, the attacking wrestler applies a nerve lock onto the opponent's shoulder(s) using his/her hands and fingers for a submission attempt, sometimes by the same effect as a sleeper hold. One variant may see the wrestler instead lock their hands on the opponent's neck. Another variation may see the wrestler mount an opponent on their back and apply the hold for either a pinfall or a submission.


Cobra clutch

Popularized by Sgt. Slaughter and also known as a cross-arm lock or cross-arm choke. Later coined as "Million Dollar Dream" by Ted DiBiase, the wrestler stands behind the opponent and uses one arm to place the opponent in a half nelson. The wrestler then uses their free arm to pull the opponents arm (the same side arm as the one the wrestler is applying the half nelson) and pulls it across the face of the opponent and locks their hands behind the neck. This article is about the wrestler Robert Remus. ... Theodore Marvin Ted DiBiase Sr. ...


Bridging cobra clutch

With the opponent lying face down, the wrestler sits beside the opponent, facing the same way, locks on the cobra clutch, and then arches his legs and back, bending the opponent's torso and neck upwards. Wrestler Delirious is known for using this move, he calls it the Cobra Stretch. William Hunter Johnston[1][2], better known by his ring name Delirious is an American professional wrestler currently wrestling on the independent circuit, most notably in Ring of Honor. ...


Crossface

From behind the opponent the wrestler locks his hands together and pulls back on the face of the opponent, pulling the neck of the opponent backwards. The move requires some leverage to be applied, and as such it cannot be applied on a freely standing opponent.

Benoit with the Crippler Crossface (Arm trap crossface) on MVP.

The most common variant sees a wrestler lock one arm of a fallen opponent, who is belly down on the mat with the wrestler on top and to the side, and placing it between their legs before locking their hands around the opponent's chin or face and pulling back to stretch the opponent's neck and shoulder. This variation was innovated by Dean Malenko, and made popular by Chris Benoit as the Crippler Crossface. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 2. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... Alvin Burke, Jr. ... Dean Simon (born August 4, 1960) is a retired professional wrestler best known by the ring name Dean Malenko. ... Christopher Michael Benoit (IPA: ) (May 21, 1967 – June 24, 2007) was a Canadian professional wrestler who wrestled for Extreme Championship Wrestling, World Championship Wrestling, and World Wrestling Entertainment. ...


A variation where the wrestler just lies on his side on the back of the opponent while applying the crossface was popularised by TAKA Michinoku as Just Facelock. Takao Yoshida ) (born October 26, 1973) better known by his stage name TAKA Michinoku (TAKA is written in all caps in Japanese script), is a professional wrestler who has wrestled all over the world. ...


Mitsuharu Misawa innovated a seated variation where he hooks an arm of a seated opponent with one of his legs and places his other leg against the back of the opponent to trap him before applying the crossface. Mitsuharu Misawa ) is a Japanese professional wrestler. ...


Chris Hero uses an inverted cravate variation as part of his Hangman's Clutch submissions where after locking the opponent's arm he twists his body so the hand positioning is reversed with the right hand on the left side of the opponents face and the left hand on the right side. Chris Spradlin (born December 24, 1979) is an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Chris Hero. ...


Another variation of this move, known as a spinning headscissors crossface, sees the attacking wrestler perform a spinning headscissors before wrapping around the opponent's body and bringing the opponent's arm between the wrestler's legs, forcing them to the ground and applying the crossface hold. Body Slam redirects here. ...


Chickenwing over the shoulder crossface

A variation of a crossface in which a wrestler goes to a fallen opponent and places one arm over the wrestler's nearest shoulder before applying the crossface where the attacking wrestler locks his/her hands around the opponent's chin (or lower face), then pulls back to stretching the opponent's neck and shoulder.


This move is not to be confused with the Crossface chickenwing.


Front chancery

The wrestler faces his opponent, and both are in same position (prone or standing). The wrestler then places his forearm under opponent's chin and armpit on top of it. The wrestler may also underhook his opponent's arm with his free arm.


Front sleeper

The wrestler places the opponent in a front chancery and rolls backwards, pulling the opponent over him an onto their back, with the wrestler ending up lying on the opponent. The wrestler then squeezes the opponent's torso with his legs, similar to a body scissors and arches his back backwards, pulling the opponent's head forward, and thus applying pressure on the neck.


Front facelock

The wrestler faces his opponent, who is bent forward. The wrestler tucks the opponent's head in his armpit and wraps his arm around the head so that the forearm is pressed against the face. The wrestler then grabs the arm with his free hand to lock in the hold and compress the opponent's face.


Full nelson

Chris Masters applies the Master Lock (swinging full nelson) to René Duprée.

From behind his opponent, the wrestler slips both arms underneath the opponent's armpits and locks his hands behind his neck, pushing the opponent's head forward against his chest. It can be combined into either a suplex (throwing the opponent backwards) or a slam (lifting the opponent while in the nelson and then releasing). Image File history File links [1] This is a copyrighted promotional photo with a known source. ... Image File history File links [1] This is a copyrighted promotional photo with a known source. ... Chris Mordetsky, better known by his stage name Chris Masters, born on January 8, 1983 in Santa Monica, California, is a professional wrestler who performs for World Wrestling Entertainment on its RAW brand. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Quarter nelson as illustrated in Farmer Burns correspondence course, c 1912. ... The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ...


A full nelson can also be done as a combination of a half nelson maneuver with one of the wrestler's hands and arms holding one of the opponent's arms and the other arm being held by the wrestler's legs (an arm scissors) to complete the nelson.


Another slightly different variation best described as a swinging full nelson is used by Chris Masters dubbed the Master Lock in which he crosses one hand over the other and grip each of his fingers locking them in place to which he then swings his opponent sideways back and forth, creating pressure, thus making much more difficult to simply "breakout" (by brute force alone) Only Bobby Lashley has been able to officially break the Master Lock. (There was an instance at WWE Tribute to the Troops 2006 where a soldier unofficially broke the Master Lock with interference from John Bradshaw Layfield.) Chris Mordetsky, better known by his stage name Chris Masters, born on January 8, 1983 in Santa Monica, California, is a professional wrestler who performs for World Wrestling Entertainment on its RAW brand. ... Franklin Roberto Bobby Lashley (born July 16, 1976)[2] is an American professional wrestler and former Collegiate amateur wrestler. ... John Bradshaw Layfield featured in the No Mercy pay-per-view poster. ...


Half nelson

The wrestler stands behind their opponent and wraps one arm under the opponent's armpit (on the same side) and places the hand behind the opponent's head. The wrestler then pulls back with that side of his body while pushing forward with the hand, bending the opponent's shoulder back and pressing the chin against the chest. Quarter nelson as illustrated in Farmer Burns correspondence course, c 1912. ...


Hausch Arrest

Orginated by Mike Hausch, It consists of knocking the oppenent down into a facedown position on the mat and locking in a full nelson. While the full nelson is locked in you lock in leg scissors around the oppenents torso; mostly around the stomach. The wrestler than turns to his side and tightens the full nelson and the scissors as tight as possible. It results in quick tapouts and excrutiating pain.


Inverted facelock

The wrestler stands behind his opponent and bends him backwards. The wrestler tucks the opponent's head face-up under his armpit, and wraps his arm around the head so that his forearm is pressed against the back of the opponent's neck. The wrestler then pulls the opponent's head backwards and up, wrenching the opponent's neck.


Bite of the Dragon

Named by Low Ki, this sees a wrestler stand behind an opponent with the ring ropes between them before grabbing an inverted facelock on the opponent and wrapping his legs around the opponent's body for a body scissors. As the move uses the ring ropes it's illegal under most match rules, and the attacking wrestler has to release the hold before the referee reaches a five count or be disqualified. Brandon Silvestry (born September 6, 1979), better known by his ring name, Low Ki, is an American professional wrestler of Puerto Rican descent. ...


Melina uses another variation of this maneuver, rather than holding the opponent in an inverted facelock, she applies a rear chinlock, wrenching her opponent's neck against the top rope. Melina Perez (born March 9, 1979), better known simply as Melina, is an American professional wrestler and manager, currently signed to World Wrestling Entertainment wrestling on its RAW brand. ...


Stretch Plum

The wrestler applies an Inverted facelock to a seated opponent and places his far leg between the opponent's legs and pushes his near leg's knee against the opponent's back. The wrestler then pulls the opponent's head backwards with their arms and the opponent's far leg outwards with their leg. This move is also known as Eastern Stretch. It was named after Japanese women's wrestler Plum Mariko. Plum Mariko Born Mariko Umeda on November 1, 1967 - August 16, 1997) was a Japanese Female Professional wrestler who wrestled for Japanese Womens Pro Wrestling from 1986 to 1992 and then, JWP from 1992 until her death in 1997. ...


Mandible claw

Main article: Mandible claw

The wrestler darts their middle and ring fingers into the soft tissue under the opponent's tongue with their thumb under the chin, squeezing the mandible between them. The move is said to attack a nerve cluster, which both causes intense pain and causes the opponent to reflexively gag until they pass out. The Mandible Claw is a professional wrestling maneuver which, when applied correctly, causes intense and legitimate pain. ...


The move was invented by Dr. Sam Sheppard, a doctor who was convicted of his wife's murder, and became a wrestler following his subsequent acquittal and release from prison. The move was later popularized by Mick Foley, using it as his finisher for his Mankind persona. He originally wore a tongue-depressor-like rubber protective covering over the two middle fingers. Later, he would often place a sock puppet known as Mr. Socko over his hand before applying the move; this variant is known as the Socko Claw. The move can also be performed barehanded.


Neck scissors

Also referred to as a head scissors, this hold sees a wrestler approach a fallen opponent and sit next to them before turning onto their side towards the opponent and placing their legs on either side of the opponent's head, crossing the top leg after its gone around the opponent's chin. The wrestler then tightens the grip to choke an opponent by compressing their throat.


Often, however, an opponent will simply place their hands under the knee of the attacking wrestler and push it up over their chin so they can escape. Another way to escape the hold will see the opponent raise themselves to their feet while still in the hold, forcing the attacking wrestler to a seated position. This in turn uncrosses their legs, allowing the opponent to simply lift their head out.


Melina innovated another variation of this maneuver, where she climbs to the top turnbuckle, and does the neck scissors from the top turnbuckle to a standing opponent. This is an illegal maneuver, so must be broken before a five count. The name Melina has its origin in the Greek language which means honey. People carrying the name Melina: Melina Kanakaredes, Greek-American actress. ...


Three-quarters face lock

The wrestler stands in front of the opponent while both persons are facing the same direction, with some space in between the two. Then, the wrestler moves slightly to the left while still positioned in front of the opponent. The wrestler then uses the right hand to reach back and grab the opponent from behind the head, thus pulling the opponent's head above the wrestler's shoulder. The move is also referred to as the European Headlock, due to its prominence in European wrestling.


The two-handed version sees the wrestler use both hands, and can be referred to as the three-quarter chancery, side head chancery or, most often, the Cravate. This hold is a staple of European style professional wrestling and technical wrestling influenced by European professional wrestling. An inverted version of the cravate is used by Chris Hero as part of his Hangman's Clutch submissions in which the hand positioning is the same as a normal cravate but the facelock is connected around the face of the opponent, not from behind the opponent's head, thus pulling the opponents head backwards rather than forwards putting significant pressure on the neck by stretching it backwards and in other directions toward which the neck would not normally bend. Chris Spradlin (born December 24, 1979) is an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Chris Hero. ...


Three-quarter nelson

A wrestler stands behind their opponent and places one of the opponent's arms in a half nelson and then places the opponent's other arm in either a hammerlock or chickenwing. Quarter nelson as illustrated in Farmer Burns correspondence course, c 1912. ...


Side headlock

Chris Masters applies a standing side headlock on Shawn Michaels

In this hold a wrestler who is facing away from an opponent would wrap his/her arm around the neck of an opponent. This is also called a reverse chancery. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Chris Mordetsky, better known by his stage name Chris Masters, born on January 8, 1983 in Santa Monica, California, is a professional wrestler who performs for World Wrestling Entertainment on its RAW brand. ... Michael Shawn Hickenbottom (born July 22, 1965) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name Shawn Michaels. ...


Though this is an often used rest hold, it is also sometimes the beginning of a standard bulldog move. Body Slam redirects here. ...


STF

Short for Stepover Toehold Facelock. STF is also short for "Submission Through Fear." Invented by Lou Thesz, and popularised by his Japanese disciple, Masahiro Chono. This hold is performed on an opponent who is lying face down on the mat. A wrestler grabs one of the opponent's legs, and places the opponent's ankle between his/her thighs. The wrestler then lays on top of the opponent's back and locks his arms around the opponent's head. The wrestler then pulls back stretching the opponent's back, neck, and knee. This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Masahiro Chōno (蝶野正洋 Chōno Masahiro) is a Japanese professional wrestler. ...


A slight variation is performed by Chris Hero named the Hangman's Clutch where after locking the ankle he twists his body so that he can place his left hand around the right side of the opponents head and vice versa and then lock the hands to form the facelock, making it resemble the hand position of a cravate. He then pulls down with his arms to stretch the opponent's back, neck, and knee. Chris Spradlin (born December 24, 1979) is an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Chris Hero. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Cross-legged STF

The wrestler takes the opponent's legs, bends them at the knees, and crosses them, placing one ankle in the other leg's knee-pit. The wrestler then grabs the free ankle and places its ankle between his thighs. He then lays on top of the opponent's back and locks his arms around the opponent's face. The wrestler then pulls back stretching the opponent's back, neck, and knees.


In the variation known as the Regal Stretch, as named by William Regal, in addition to crossing the opponent's legs, the wrestler reaches under one of the opponent's arms to lock his hands around the opponent's head. This causes the opponent's upper body to twist, causing extra pressure. Darren Kenneth Matthews (born May 10, 1968),[1][2] better known by his ring name William Regal, is an English professional wrestler. ...


Muta Lock

Also known as an Inverted STF or Sickle hold this hold is named after The Great Muta, who innovated it. The wrestler first takes the opponent's legs, bends them at the knees, and crosses them, placing one ankle in the other leg's knee-pit before then turning around so that they are facing away from the opponent and places one of his feet into the triangle created by the opponent's crossed legs. The wrestler then places the opponent's free ankle under his knee-pit and bridges backwards to reach over their head and locks his/her arms around the opponent's head. Keiji Mutoh , born December 23, 1962) is a Japanese professional wrestler who first gained international fame in the National Wrestling Alliance. ...


STS
John Cena applying the STFU (STS) on Randy Orton.

Short for Stepover Toehold Sleeper and innovated by Masahiro Chono, this hold is a modified STF in which the wrestler wraps his arm around the neck of the opponent in a sleeper hold instead of pulling back on the head of the opponent. It is also used by John Cena, who calls it the STFU and is modified with crossed hands and more elevation than the STF. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... John Felix Anthony Cena, Jr. ... Randal Randy Keith Orton[1] (born on April 1, 1980), nicknamed The Legend Killer, is an American professional wrestler currently signed to World Wrestling Entertainment wrestling on its RAW brand. ... Masahiro Chōno (蝶野正洋 Chōno Masahiro) is a Japanese professional wrestler. ... John Felix Anthony Cena, Jr. ...


A variation exists in which, after applying the STS, the wrestler turns to his side, pulling the opponent on top of him, face up. This was also innovated and popularized by Masahiro Chono, who calls it the FTS.


Arm locks

Further information: Armlock

The juji-gatame armbar (see below) is one of the most effective and versatile joint locks. ...

Armbar

Hardcore Holly with an armbar locked on Mr. Kennedy.

Also known as an arm wrench. The wrestler takes the opponents arm and twists it, putting pressure on the shoulder and elbow. Robert William Bob Howard[2] (born January 29, 1963) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name, Bob Hardcore Holly. ... Kenneth Anderson (born March 6, 1976) is an American professional wrestler better known by the ring name Mr. ...


Crucifix armbar

The wrestler holds an opponent's arm with his arms, pulling the arm across his chest. He is situated perpendicular to and behind the opponent. The wrestler then holds the other arm with his legs, stretching the shoulders back in a crucifying position and hyperextending the elbow.


This technique is also called a cross armbreaker, or jujigatame, a term borrowed from Judo. The juji-gatame armbar is one of the most effective and versatile joint locks. ... This article is about the martial art and sport. ...


Tiger feint crucifix armbar

The opponent begins supine, lying with their back on the bottom or second rope and facing into the ring. The wrestler runs towards the opponent and jumps through the second and top rope while holding on to the ropes, then swings around and grapevines the opponent's arms, applying a crucifix armbar.


Fujiwara armbar

A grounded armbar with the opponent lying on his belly, the aggressor lies on the opponent's back, at a 90° angle to him, putting some or all of his weight on the opponent to prevent him from moving. The opponent's arm is then hooked and pulled back into his body, stretching the forearms, biceps and pectoral muscles. Variations of this can include clasping the opponent's hand instead of hooking the upper arm, for extra leverage and bridging out, while performing the move to increase leverage and immobilize the opponent. The move is named after Yoshiaki Fujiwara. Similar to or the same as Ude-Hishigi-Waki-Gatame in judo. Ude-Hishigi-Waki-Gatame is one of the official 29 grappling techniques of Kodokan Judo. ...


Headscissors armbar

The wrestler wraps his legs around the opponent's head, facing towards the opponent. He then grabs one of the opponent's arms and wrenches in backwards, causing pressure on the shoulder and elbow of the opponent. This can often be performed on a standing wrestler.


Kensuke Sasaki crosses his legs before applying the head scissors with his shins on an opponent who is lying down on the mat face down. Sasaki then turns to his side, forcing the opponent's body of the mat, causing extra pressure, as the opponent has to support his bodyweight on his squeezed neck. He calls this variation Strangle Hold Alpha. Kensuke Sasaki is a Japanese professional wrestler who currently wrestles for various promotions through his own agency, such as All Japan Pro Wrestling. ...


Scissored armbar

The wrestler approaches a prone, face down opponent from the side. The wrestler then "scissors" (clasps) the near arm of the opponent with their legs and takes hold of the far arm of the opponent with both hands, forcing the opponent onto their side and placing stress on both shoulder joints, as well as making it harder for the opponent to breathe.


Seated armbar

Known as Ashigatame in Japan. The wrestler sits on either side of an opponent who is lying prone on the mat, with the wrestler's legs scissoring one of the opponent's arms. The wrestler then grabs hold of the wrist of that arm, pulling it upwards, causing hyperextension of the shoulder and elbow.


Satoshi Kojima uses a slight variation where both of his legs are on the same side of the opponent's arm. He calls it the Koji MAX hold. Satoshi Kojima ) is a Japanese professional wrestler and currently works for All Japan Pro Wrestling. ...


Barely Legal

From behind a seated opponent, the wrestler grabs one of the opponent's elbows and pulls it up and backward toward himself. He then bends the wrist and forces the open palm of the opponent's hand into his chest, putting pressure on the wrist. Named by Barry Darsow. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Chickenwing

The wrestler stands behind the opponent and hooks one of his arms so that both wrestlers' elbow joints are snug together and their arms are wrapped around one another. The wrestler then pulls the arm upward against the back of his opponent.


Chickenwing arm lock

In Mixed martial arts this move is known as the Kimura, after Masahiko Kimura. The wrestler lays on top of the opponent's torso, in a 90° angle. He or she then grabs hold of the opponent's wrist with his or her far hand and pushes it behind the opponent's back. He or she then puts his other arm over the opponent's shoulder, reaches under the opponent's arm and grabs hold of his or her other wrist. He or she then uses both arms to pull the opponent's arm behind him or her into an unnatural position, causing pressure. For the fighting styles that combine different arts, see hybrid martial arts. ... Masahiko Kimura redirects here. ...


Key lock

This hold is very similar to the Chickenwing arm lock, the difference being that the opponent's arm is bent the other way. The wrestler lays on top of the opponent's torso, in a 90° angle. He then grabs hold of the opponent's wrist with his near hand, so that the opponent's hand is palm up and bent fully, and holds it down. He then reaches under the opponent's arm with his other arm and grabs hold of his other arm's wrist. He then forces the opponent's elbow upwards, bending the arm to an unnatural position.


Crossface chickenwing

A chickenwing variation where the wrestler applies the chickenwing to one of the opponent's arms. The wrestler then uses his free arm to either push the arm, and particularly its radius bone, against the face of the opponent to cause pain, or wrap the arm around the neck of the opponent in a sleeper hold. The wrestler may also grasp his hands together in either variation. This hold is closely associated with Bob Backlund who popularized the move in America. The radius is the bone of the forearm that extends from the outside of your limb to your phlangx (lateral) of the elbow to the thumb side of the wrist. ... Robert Louis Backlund (b. ...


Double Arm Elevated Chickenwing
Jazz applies the Bitch Clamp (Double Arm Elevated Chickenwing) to Trish Stratus

Also called a Elevated Double Chickenwing by Jim "J.R." Ross, the attacking wrestler hooks both arms and pushes upward on the opponent's back, lifting them in the air in a torturous manner followed by the opponent being dropped to the mat. Notable users include Jazz, who dubbed it the Bitch Clamp, and Beth Phoenix. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 368 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (842 × 1371 pixel, file size: 240 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Bitch Clamp, performed by Jazz on Trish Stratus. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 368 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (842 × 1371 pixel, file size: 240 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Bitch Clamp, performed by Jazz on Trish Stratus. ... Carlene Moore Begnaud (born August 27, 1973 in New Orleans, Louisiana) better known as Jazz is an American professional wrestler and two-time former WWE Womens Champion . ... Patricia Anne Stratigias[6][10] (born December 18, 1975, pronounced ), better known by her stage name Trish Stratus, is a former fitness model, former professional wrestler and television personality from Canada. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... Carlene Moore Begnaud (born August 27, 1973 in New Orleans, Louisiana) better known as Jazz is an American professional wrestler and two-time former WWE Womens Champion . ... Elizabeth Carolan née Kocanski[2] (born November 24, 1980) better known by her ring name Beth Phoenix, is an American professional wrestler currently working for World Wrestling Entertainment on its RAW brand. ...


Sitting double chickenwing

The wrestler locks both of the opponent's arms into chickenwings, forces him to a seated position, and pushes his chest forward against the opponent's shoulders while pulling the opponent's arms upwards.


Bridging grounded double chickenwing

When an opponent is lying face down on the mat the wrestler locks a double chickenwing on their arms and then performs a forward roll into a bridging position further stressing the hold. This hold is popularly associated with Bryan Danielson who uses it as a finisher named the Cattle Mutilation. Bryan Danielson (born May 22, 1981 in Aberdeen, Washington)[1] is an American independent professional wrestler, known as the American Dragon. ...


Hammerlock

The wrestler grabs his/her opponent's arm, pulling it around behind the opponent's back. This stretches the pectorals and shoulder joint, and immobilizes the arm. This is a legitimate controlling/debilitating hold, and is commonly used by police officers in the United States to subdue uncooperative persons for arrest. The Pectoralis major is a thick, fan-shaped muscle, situated at the upper front (anterior) of the chest wall. ...

William Regal immobilises Cody Rhodes with a standing wrist lock

Darren Kenneth Matthews (born May 10, 1968),[1][2] better known by his ring name William Regal, is an English professional wrestler. ... Cody Runnels (born June 30, 1985) is an American professional wrestler and the son of The American Dream Dusty Rhodes as well as the half-brother of Virgil Runnels III, better known as Goldust. ...

Wrist lock

The wrestler grasps the opponent's hand and twists backwards, placing pressure on the wrist. While this can inflict pain on its own, it is most often used as a transition hold, leading into either a hammer lock, an elbow to the held arm, or kicks to the opponent's abdominal area.


Another form of wrist lock sometimes known as a figure four wristlock involves the wrestler (after applying the initial wrist lock with the left hand) threading their right arm through the gap the two arms provide, forming a '4', and providing leverage on the wristlock.


Chokes

Arm triangle choke

Main article: Arm triangle choke

The wrestler wraps his arms around the head and one arm of the opponent and squeezes, choking the opponent. It is considered legal in professional wrestling, although it is a chokehold. Santino Marella uses this move as a finisher. The standing side choke is a type of arm triangle choke Arm triangle choke (or simply arm triangle) is a generic term describing chokeholds in which the opponent is strangled inbetween his or her own shoulder and the performers arm. ... The lateral vascular neck restraint is a very potent chokehold. ... Anthony John Carelli (born March 6, 1974) is an Italian American professional wrestler better known by his ring names, Boris Alexiev and, currently, Santino Marella. ...


Corner foot choke

The wrestler pushes their opponent into the turnbuckle and extends their leg, choking their opponent while using the top two ropes for support. This attack is illegal and results in a wrestler's disqualification, should the move not be broken by a count of five.


Straight jacket

Also known as the Japanese stranglehold (Goku-Raku Gatame), Criss-cross Stranglehold, or a Cross armed choke. The wrestler sits on the back of an opponent who is lying face down on the mat. The wrestler then grabs hold of the opponent's wrists and crosses their arms under their chin. The wrestler then pulls back on the arms, causing pressure.


Double choke

The wrestler grabs his opponent's throat with both hands and throttles him.


Figure four necklock

This neck lock sees a wrestler sit above a fallen opponent and wrap his/her legs around the opponent in the form of the figure 4, with one leg crossing under the opponent's chin and under the wrestler's other leg the wrestler squeezes and chokes the opponent.


In an illegal version of the hold, best described as a hanging figure four necklock, the wrestler stands on top of the turnbuckle, wraps his/her legs around the head of the opponent, who has their back turned against the turnbuckle, in the figure 4 and falls backwards, choking the opponent. In most matches the hold would have to be released before a five count. This version is most commonly used by Candice Michelle This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Gogoplata

Main article: Gogoplata

The gogoplata is executed from a guard. Specifically, it is usually executed from a "rubber guard," where the legs are held very high, against the opponent's upper back. The fighter then slips one foot in front of the opponent's head and under his chin, locks his hands behind the opponent's head, and chokes the opponent by pressing his shin or instep against the opponent's trachea. Wrestlers use a modified version, where they just push the shin into the throat in the exact same manner, instead of grabbing your toes and pulling towards yourself. In 2008, The Undertaker began using a variation of this hold. In this gogoplata, the opponents throat is trapped between the fighters shin and forearm. ... For the Combichrist song, see Everybody Hates You Mark Calaway (born March 24, 1965[2][3]) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name The Undertaker. ...


Guillotine choke

Main article: Guillotine choke

The wrestler applies a front sleeper and proceeds to take the opponent downward and applies a body scissors with the legs.This move is a favorite of many mixed martial arts fighters. The guillotine choke is a chokehold in martial arts applied from in front of the opponent. ... For the fighting styles that combine different arts, see hybrid martial arts. ...


In addition to the normal version, Jun Akiyama uses a modified version where he traps the opponent's legs instead of applying a body scissors. Akiyama calls this variation the King Crab Lock. Jun Akiyama STERNNESS DVD cover Jun Akiyama (秋山準 Akiyama Jun) is a Japanese professional wrestler who currently works for Pro Wrestling NOAH. Career In junior high school Akiyama practised swimming and in senior high school he did freestyle amateur wrestling and judo. ...


Half nelson choke

The wrestler puts his opponent in a half nelson with one arm and grabs the opponent's neck with the other. This hold is the judo choke hold known as a katahajime with an added body scissors. This choke was popularized in professional wrestling by Tazz as his finisher the Tazz Mission. This article is about the martial art and sport. ... Kata-Ha-Jime (alternate spelling: Katahajime) is one of the twelve constriction techniques of Kodokan Judo in the Shime-waza list. ... Peter Senerchia (born October 11, 1967),[2] is a retired American professional wrestler best known by his ring name Tazz, (originally Tazmaniac and later shortened to simply Taz). ...


Koji Clutch

The opponent lays face down on the mat. The wrestler lies face up and slightly to the side of the opponent. The wrestler then hooks their far leg across the neck of the opponent. The wrestler then hooks his hands behind the opponent's head, having one arm pass over their own leg and the other under. The wrestler then pulls backwards with his arms and pushes forward with his leg, causing pressure. The name comes from the man who innovated the move, Koji Kanemoto. This move is commonly transitioned from the Reverse STO. This is version was adapted from Christopher Daniels and later Mike Baugh though the latter refers to it as the Moonlight Clutch. Kōji Kanemoto is a Japanese professional wrestler. ... A facebuster, also known as a face plant, is generally a takedown move in professional wrestling in which an attacking wrestler forces his/her opponent down to the mat face-first without involving a headlock or facelock. ...


Spider Twist

The opponent is sitting while the wrestler is behind the opponentholding the opponent's wrist. The wrestler will apply an armscissor with one leg and a headscissors. then the wrestler clasps his hand, one arm passes through the leg applying the headscissors and the other goes under. The wrestler pulls upwards while his leg goes downwards, appling pressure to the shoulders, head and back. Innovated by Mariko Yoshida. Mariko Yoshida (吉田万里子, born February 15, 1970 in Hiroshima) is a professional wrestler best known for her work with the ARSION wrestling promotion, where she was also head trainer. ...


Leg choke

With the opponent hung over the second rope, facing the outside of the ring, the attacking wrestler hooks their left or right leg over the back of the opponent's neck. The attacking wrestler then pulls the second rope upwards, compressing the opponent's throat between the rope and attacking wrestler's leg, choking them. This move is illegal due to usage of the ring ropes, and results in a disqualification for the wrestler should they not release the hold before a count of five.


Rear naked choke

Main article: Rear naked choke

A grounded version of a sleeper hold with an added body scissors that is derived from Martial arts and more recently MMA. The rear naked choke (often abbreviated RNC) is a chokehold in martial arts applied from an opponents back. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... For the fighting styles that combine different arts, see hybrid martial arts. ...


Single arm choke

The wrestler grabs his opponent's throat with one hand and squeezes tightly. A "goozle" is a single arm choke held briefly before performing a chokeslam. Big Show prepairing to give JBL a Chokeslam A chokeslam (Japanese: nodowa otoshi) refers to a type of body slam in professional wrestling in which the wrestler grasps their opponents neck, lifts them up, and slams them to the mat. ...


A wrestler may use his or her free hand to grab the wrist of the choking hand to further apply pressure. The The Undertaker and Kane usually do so before a choke slam or piledriver. For the Combichrist song, see Everybody Hates You Mark Calaway (born March 24, 1965[2][3]) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name The Undertaker. ... Kane can refer to: In sports: Glen Jacobs, the current World Wrestling Entertainment wrestler Kane Justin Kane, Australian boxer Drew Hankinson, a current professional wrestler who performed for World Wrestling Entertainment as the masked Imposter Kane, a Doppelgänger of the current unmasked Kane Lane Huffman, a retired professional wrestler...


Sleeper hold

See also: chokehold#Blood choke and Blood choke

A sleeper hold is generally applied in the following manner: The lateral vascular neck restraint is a very potent chokehold. ...

  • The wrestler applying the hold positions himself behind his opponent.
  • The wrestler then wraps his/her right arm around the opponent's neck, pressing the biceps against one side of the neck and the inner bone of the forearm against the other side (it also works just as well reversed, with the left arm).
  • The neck is squeezed inside the arm extremely tightly. Additional pressure can be applied by grabbing the left shoulder with the right hand, or grabbing the biceps of the left arm near the elbow, then using the left hand to push the opponent's head towards the crook of the right elbow.
  • It is usually taught that at this point (or during the process) the opponent should be brought to the ground if not already there. This is said to help avoid the opponent countering the hold as well as allowing the wrestler to have a leverage to apply more pressure.
  • The opponent will typically go limp after a time in the hold, at which point a referee would raise the opponent's hand and drop it to the ground three times. If the hands drops three times in a row the opponent is considered unconscious and the wrestler would gain a submission victory.

This article is about the body part. ... Look up Biceps in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Elbow redirects here. ...

Arm-hook sleeper

Also known as the Buffalo Sleeper. The wrestler is kneeling behind a seated opponent. He grabs hold of one of the opponent's arms, bends it backwards overhead, and locks its wrist into his armpit. The wrestler then wraps his free arm under the opponent's chin, like in a Sleeper hold, puts his other arm through the arch created by the opponent's trapped arm, and locks his hands. He then squeezes the opponent's neck, causing pressure. The move was innovated by Hiroyoshi Tenzan. Hiroyoshi Yamamoto is a Japanese professional wrestler who currently works for New Japan Pro Wrestling, and is better known by his stage name Hiroyoshi Tenzan. ...


Dragon sleeper

The wrestler stands behind the opponent who is either sitting or lying down, places the opponent in an inverted facelock, and hooks the opponent's near arm with his free arm. The wrestler then pulls backwards and up, wrenching the opponent's neck. If the opponent is sitting, the wrestler can place their knee under the opponent's back, adding more pressure.


A dragon sleeper with body scissors is sometimes referred to as a Beast Choker as named by Dan "The Beast" Severn. Daniel The Beast Severn (born June 8, 1958 in Coldwater, Michigan) is an American mixed martial artist and professional wrestler, notable for his success in the early years of Ultimate Fighting Championship tournaments. ...


Thumb choke hold

The attacking wrestler stands behind an opponent and reaches around the opponent's neck with one arm. The wrestler then extends a thumb and thrusts it into the windpipe of the opponent, cutting off their air supply. This hold was popularized and was dubbed the Oriental Spike by Terry "Bamm Bamm" Gordy of the Fabulous Freebirds in the 1980s. Prior to this, it was known (and to this day still popularly referred to) as the Asiatic Spike and was used by Don Muraco, wrestling as the masked "Magnificent M" in Florida Championship Wrestling. The trachea (IPA treik-i-a), or windpipe, is a tube extending from the larynx to the bronchi in mammals, and from the pharynx to the syrinx in birds, carrying air to the lungs. ... Terry Gordy (April 23, 1961 - July 16, 2001) was a professional wrestler who was most famous for being a member of the Fabulous Freebirds. ... The Fabulous Freebirds were a groundbreaking professional wrestling tag-team that attained fame in the 1980s, performing into the 1990s. ... Don Muraco (Born Don Morrow on September 10, 1949), also known as The Magnificent Muraco was a Hawaiian professional wrestler in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. ...


Tonga death grip

The wrestler darts his/her hand under an opponent's chin and grabs a hold of a pressure point above the throat, squeezing the nerve. This cuts off the air supply and the opponent fades out, yet this is not considered an air choke as it is not squeezing the windpipe. This hold is unique in that it can be used as a sleeper like submission or, should the "unconscious" opponent end up lying on his back, a pinfall. The move was popularised by wrestler Tonga 'Uli'uli Fifita who went by the name of Haku in the WWF and later Meng in the WCW. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Tonga Uliuli Fifita (b. ...


Triangle choke

Main article: Triangle choke

The wrestler grabs hold of one his opponent's arms, wraps his legs around the opponent's throat and arm in a figure four and squeezes. Although it is a choke hold, it is still considered a legal hold. Commonly used in Japanese wrestling promotions and MMA. This move was commonly used as a regular submission move by The Undertaker. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Figure-four formation in a toe hold. ... For the fighting styles that combine different arts, see hybrid martial arts. ... For the Combichrist song, see Everybody Hates You Mark Calaway (born March 24, 1965[2][3]) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name The Undertaker. ...


Two-handed chokelift

Also known as a Neck-Hanging Tree a wrestler grasps an opponent's neck with both hands then lifts them up, choking them. This is a transition hold for moves such as the two-handed chokeslam and the chokebomb. Big Show prepairing to give JBL a Chokeslam A chokeslam (Japanese: nodowa otoshi) refers to a type of body slam in professional wrestling in which the wrestler grasps their opponents neck, lifts them up, and slams them to the mat. ... A Powerbomb is a professional wrestling move in which an opponent is lifted up (usually so that they are sitting on the wrestlers shoulders) and then slammed back-first down to the mat. ...


Body locks

Bear hug

Chris Masters applying a bear hug on Shawn Michaels.
Further information: Bear hug

A wrestler stands in front of an opponent and locks his hands around the opponent, squeezing him. Often he will shake his body from side to side, in order to generate more pain around the ribs and spine. Frequently used by powerhouse style wrestlers, this rather simple to apply hold was used by heels and faces alike. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 355 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (400 × 675 pixel, file size: 271 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Professional wrestling holds... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 355 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (400 × 675 pixel, file size: 271 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Professional wrestling holds... Chris Mordetsky, better known by his stage name Chris Masters, born on January 8, 1983 in Santa Monica, California, is a professional wrestler who performs for World Wrestling Entertainment on its RAW brand. ... Michael Shawn Hickenbottom (born July 22, 1965) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name Shawn Michaels. ... One wrestler has a bear hug on the other, and uses it for a takedown attempt, if the person being hugged is taken down from behind in an attempt to escape from the referee position, the move is known as a mat return. In wrestling, the bear hug (also known...


Side bear hug

A wrestler stands to one side of an opponent, facing them, and locks their arms around the opponent, linking their hands under the arm of the opponent on the opposing side. The wrestler then brings their arms closer together, compressing the torso of the opponent.


Body scissors

A wrestler approaches a sitting opponent from in front, behind, or either sides. The attacking wrestler then sits next to the opponent and wraps their legs around the opponent, crossing their ankles and then tightening their grip by squeezing together their thighs or straightening their legs to choke the wrestler by compressing their torso. This hold is often used in conjunction with a hold applied to the head or the arms in order to restrain the opponent.


Gutwrench

This is basically a bearhug from behind. A wrestler stands behind an opponent and locks his hands around the opponent's stomach, pulling up and squeezing it.


Back and torso stretches

Abdominal stretch

The Big Show locks John Cena in an abdominal stretch.

Also known as a Cobra Twist, this hold begins with a wrestler facing his opponent's side. The wrestler first straddles one of the opponent's legs, then reaches over the opponent's near arm with the arm close to the opponent's back and locks it. Squatting and twisting to the side, flexs the opponent's back and stretches their abdomen. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Paul Wight, Jr. ... John Felix Anthony Cena, Jr. ...


Backbreaker

See Backbreaker This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Bending Backbreaker

The wrestler puts opponent's arms behind his/her head and grabs them, then grabs opponent's legs similar to the Gutwrencher. Then pulls, while pulling the wrestler jumps and lands on opponent's back. This move can also be done of the ropes. This move was created Bruno Summartino and almost never used it.


Boston crab

Main article: Boston crab

This typically starts with the opponent on his back, and the wrestler standing and facing him. The wrestler hooks each of the opponent's legs in one of his arms, and then turns the opponent face-down, stepping over him in the process. The final position has the wrestler in a semi-sitting position and facing away from his opponent, with the opponent's back and legs bent back toward his face. Boston crab The Boston crab is a professional wrestling hold that typically starts with the opponent laying back-first on the mat, with the wrestler standing and facing them. ...


Bow and arrow hold

The wrestler kneels on his opponent's back with both knees, hooking the head with one arm and the legs with the other. He then rolls back so that his opponent is suspended on his knees above him, facing up. The wrestler pulls down with both arms while pushing up with the knees to bend the opponent's back. Awesome Kong uses a variation in which she places her opponent over her shoulders in a reverse torture rack position. Then she pulls forward opponent's head with one arm and legs with the other arm, flexing the back. This variation is known as Bow and arrow rack. This article is about the currently active female wrestler. ...


Gory special

This hold, also known as the Gory lock and innovated by Salvador "Gory" Guerrero, sees a wrestler lift their opponent over their shoulder so that the opponent's upper back is across the wrestler's shoulder. Thus, the wrestler and opponent are back to back, facing opposite directions. The opponent's legs are tucked around the wrestler's hips. The wrestler can now apply pressure by applying a chinlock and pressing down. One or both of the opponent's arms can also be hooked for extra pressure. Salvador Guerrero's grandson, Chavo Guerrero, Jr., uses a variation of this move called the Gory Bomb. There is also a varation of the move by starting back to back. Gory Guerrero Salvador Gory Guerrero Quesada (January 11, 1921 – April 18, 1990) was one of the premier Hispanic professional wrestlers in the early days of Lucha Libre when most wrestlers were imported from outside of Mexico. ... Chavo Guerrero, Jr. ...


Octopus hold

The wrestler stands behind the opponent and hooks a leg over the opponent's opposite leg. The wrestler then forces the opponent to one side, traps one of the opponent's arms with their own arm, and drapes their free leg over the neck of the opponent, forcing it downward. This elevates the wrestler and places all the weight of the wrestler on the opponent. The wrestler has one arm free, which can be used for balance.


Popularized by Antonio Inoki in New Japan Pro Wrestling, the Japanese name for the move is the manji-gatame (inverted swastika hold). Antonio Inoki (アントニオ猪木), real name Kanji Inoki[1] (猪木寛至 Inoki Kanji), born February 20, 1943) is a Professional Wrestling Promoter and retired Japanese professional wrestler and mixed martial artist who now resides in New York City. ... New Japan Pro Wrestling (新日本プロレス, shin nihon puroresu) is a major professional wrestling federation in Japan, founded by Antonio Inoki in 1972. ... This article is about the symbol. ...


Surfboard

The surfboard hold first sees a wrestler stand behind a fallen opponent, who is lying stomach first to the floor. The wrestler places one foot down just above each of the opponent's knees and bends his or her legs up, hooking them around his or her own knees; at this point the wrestler grasps both of his opponent's wrists (usually slapping the opponent's back in an attempt to bring the arms in reach), and falls backwards while compressing the opponent's shoulder-blades and lifting him or her off the ground. This can see the wrestler fall to a seated position or go onto his or her own back, lifting the opponent skyward, which will increase pressure on the opponent but put the wrestler in risk of pinning his or her own shoulders to the mat.


Another version of a surfboard which is most often applied by a standing wrestler against a prone opponent -- but may also be applied by a seated wrestler or against a seated or kneeling opponent -- sees the wrestler grasp both of his opponent's wrists, while placing his or her foot or knee on the opponent's upper back, pulling back on the arms to compress the opponent's shoulder blades.


The surfboard is also called La Tapatía or Romero Special, named after the inventor Rito Romero. Rito Romero Loza was a succesful luchador who wrestled in Mexico and in the NWA territories of Texas and Los Angeles. ...


Leg locks

Ankle lock

Kurt Angle holds Shawn Michaels in the ankle lock.

A wrestler will grab the opponent's foot and lift their leg off the ground. Then with one hand grab the opponent's toes or outside of foot, and with the other wrap around the ankle and through the "hole" created and grab his own wrist, essentially putting the opponent's ankle in a Key Lock. Then they will bend the opponent's ankle. Kurt Steven Angle (born December 9, 1968) is an American professional wrestler and former Olympic amateur wrestler. ... Michael Shawn Hickenbottom (born July 22, 1965) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name Shawn Michaels. ...


A variation of this move is the grapevine ankle lock, in which the wrestler applying the hold falls to the mat and scissors the leg of the opponent. This stops the opponent from rolling out of the move and makes it harder for him/her to crawl to the ropes but lessens the pressure that can be applied.


Argentine leglock

Technically known as an Over the shoulder single leg Boston crab and commonly known as a Stretch Muffler. The wrestler stands over a face-down opponent lying on the ground. He lifts one leg of the opponent and drapes it over his neck. He then uses his arms to force the shin and thigh of the opponent down, thereby placing pressure on the opponent's knee. For a short time, Brock Lesnar used the Boston crab version of this maneuver and called it the Brock Lock. Boston crab The Boston crab is a professional wrestling hold that typically starts with the opponent laying back-first on the mat, with the wrestler standing and facing them. ... Brock Edward Lesnar[4] (born July 12, 1977[3]) is an American mixed martial artist, former professional and amateur wrestler. ... Boston crab The Boston crab is a professional wrestling hold that typically starts with the opponent laying back-first on the mat, with the wrestler standing and facing them. ...


Tony Mamaluke introduced a variation where he steps over the downed opponent and sits on their lower back as in a half Boston crab, calling it the Sicilian Crab. Último Guerrero uses a variation where he grabs his opponent's corresponding leg and wraps his feet around their neck called the Guerrero Special ll. Shuji Kondo uses his own variation where both his opponent's legs are crossed over the neck called Cat's Cradle. Charles John Spencer (born July 19, 1977) is an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring names, Tony Mamaluke and Anthony LaGotta. ... Boston crab The Boston crab is a professional wrestling hold that typically starts with the opponent laying back-first on the mat, with the wrestler standing and facing them. ... Último Guerrero is a Mexican professional wrestler currently working for Consejo Mundial de Lucha Libre. ... Shuji Kondo Shuji Kondo (近藤修司, Kondo Syuji) is a Japanese professional wrestler who currently works for All Japan Pro Wrestling. ...


Cross kneelock

With the opponent lying face down on the mat, the wrestler grabs hold of shin of one of the opponent's legs and wraps his legs around the leg. The wrestler then twists the leg, hyperextending the knee. Very similar to the grapevine ankle lock, with the only difference that the wrestler wraps his arms around the shin, and not his hands around the ankle of the opponent.


Commonly used as a counter to an attack from behind. The wrestler flips forward down on to his back, placing his legs around one of the legs of the opponent on the way down, and thus using his momentum to drop the opponent forward down to the mat. The move can be also applied by running towards the opponent and then performing the flip when next to him.


Figure four leglock

The wrestler stands over the opponent who is lying on the mat face up and grasps a leg of the opponent. The wrestler then does a spinning toe hold and grasps the other leg, crossing them as he does so and falls to the mat, applying pressure to the opponent's crossed legs with his own.


This move was made popular as the finishing move of "Nature Boy" Buddy Rogers, Carlitos Colón and Ric Flair, who sometimes adds to it by twisting his opponents ankle as it is locked in, Ric Flair often uses his hands to elevate himself, causing more pressure on the legs. Also, if the referee is distracted, he will hold the ropes to apply more pain, and at least once when he was part of The Four Horsemen he held onto their hands and they pulled to help him gain leverage. Nature Boy Buddy Rogers (born Herman C. Rohde Jr. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Richard Morgan Fliehr[2] (born on February 25, 1949 in Minneapolis, Minnesota[2]) better known by his ring name Ric Flair , is a legendary American professional wrestler of iconic staus signed to World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) on its SmackDown! brand. ... Richard Morgan Fliehr[2] (born on February 25, 1949 in Minneapolis, Minnesota[2]) better known by his ring name Ric Flair , is a legendary American professional wrestler of iconic staus signed to World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) on its SmackDown! brand. ...


An inverted variation exists more recently used by Mr. Kennedy where the wrestler takes on of the opponent's legs, turns 90 degrees, then grabs the other opponent's leg and crosses it with the other, puts one foot in between and the other on the other leg, and then bridges over.


A wrestler may counter the figure four by rolling over on to their stomach, which applies the pressure on the original applier's legs. This counter to the figure four is often called a modified indian deathlock or sometimes referred to as a sharpshooter variant.


Inverted figure four-ankle lock

This submission hold involves a combination of the Figure-Four Leglock and the Ankle lock. However, instead of locking the opponents legs in a "4" shape, the attacking wrestler crosses one of the opponent's legs over to the other and applies pressure on the opponent's crossed leg with one of his own and at the same time uses a key ankle lock submission grapevine on the other leg.


Ringpost figure four leglock

The opponent is either downed or standing next to one of the ring corner posts. The wrestler exits the ring to the outside and drags the opponent by the legs towards the ringpost, so that the post is between the opponent's legs (similar to when somebody 'crotches' their opponent with the ringpost). The executer then stands on the ring apron, on the outside of the turnbuckle/ropes and applies the figure four leglock with the ringpost between the opponent's legs. The performer of the hold then falls back while grabbing the opponent's legs/feet, hanging upside down from the ring apron. The ringpost assists the move, creating more damage and leverage to the opponent's knee.


Because the performer is out of the ring while he/she has this hold locked in, this move doesn't last long as it usually results in a count-out. This move also uses the ring-post, which is illegal in professional wrestling, and a 5 count is used which leads to a disqualification.


Standing figure four leglock

The opponent is down on their back with the wrestler standing over one of their legs with one foot placed on either side of the leg. The wrestler plants his foot in the knee of the opponents other leg and then bends that leg at the knee over the top of the first leg forming the figure four. The wrestler then bridges back.


Kneeling figure four leglock

The opponent is down on their back with the wrestler standing over one of their legs. The wrestler applies a spinning toehold, crosses the opponent's legs and kneels on them. It is commonly known as the Prison Lock or Jailhouse Lock and is sometimes confused with the Indian Deathlock.


Haas of Pain

A submission invented and named by the Haas brothers Charlie and Russ Haas, this modified inverted reverse figure-four leglock variation sees the wrestler cross one leg of an opponent over the other and stand on the crossed leg, then take hold of the free leg and lay down on his back, raising the opponent's legs up into the air and causing pain to their legs and lower back. This article is about the professional wrestler. ... Thomas Russell Haas (March 11, 1974 – December 15, 2001), better known as Russ Haas was a professional wrestler. ...


Inverted three quarter figure four leglock

The opponent is lying face down on the ground. The wrestler kneels over the opponent's thighs with his left leg between the opponent's leg, then bends his opponent's left leg around his left thigh. After that he places the opponent's right leg over the opponent's left ankle and puts his own right leg under the opponent's left ankle. Finally, he puts both of his feet over the opponent's right foot and presses on it.


This hold was once used as the finisher of Japanese wrestler Oji Sakaharo, and was the first of two leg locks referred to as the Oji-kiru.


Damascus head-leglock

The wrestler forces the opponent to the ground and opens up the legs of the opponent, stepping in with both legs. The wrestler then wraps his legs around the head of the opponent and crosses the opponent's legs, applying pressure on them with his hands. The wrestler next turns 180 degrees and leans back, compressing the spine. This hold applies pressure on the temples, the calves, and compresses the spine. Also known as the D-lock for the capital D formed.


Kneebar

Main article: Leglock#Kneebar

Also called a straight legbar, the basic kneebar is performed similarly to an armbar by holding the opponents leg in between the legs and arms so the opponent's kneecap points towards the body. The wrestler pushing the hips forward, the opponent's leg is straightened, and further leveraging hyperextends the knee. The leglock is a joint lock in martial arts which attacks the opponents leg joints, usually the knee but less commonly the hip. ...


Indian deathlock

Also known as the British Figure Four Leglock, the wrestler lifts up a leg of a face up opponent and walks one of their legs around the leg before dropping to a kneeling position, thus locking the opponents leg behind the wrestlers knee. The wrestler then reaches over and grabs the opponents far leg and places it on top of the trapped foot of the opponent. The wrestler then performs a forward roll while maintaining the hold. This forces the opponent onto their chest while the wrestler ends in a sitting position facing the same direction as their opponent. From here the wrestler can reach forwards and perform many upper body submissions as well.


A standing version can also be applied which sees a standing wrestler place one of his legs between the legs of a face down opponent and then bends one leg behind the leg of the wrestler, placing it on top of the knee pit of the opponents other leg. The wrestler then picks up the straight leg of the opponent, bends it backwards to lock the other leg in the knee pit and places the foot in front of the shin of the standing leg in the knee pit, thus locking the leg.


Super Dragon innovated a move known as the Curb Stomp in which he applies a standing reverse Indian deathlock with a surfboard and then lifts his free leg up, placing it on the back of the head of the opponent. He then releases the surfboard and stomps the leg down to drive the opponents head face first into the mat. Dragon also innovated another variation of this move where he applies the standing reverse Indian deathlock, but rather than using the traditional surfboard he pulls his opponents hair, face, or mask, before stomping the opponents head face first into the mat.In another variation the wrestler just graps a hold of the opponent's wrists without putting him/her in a Standing reverse Indian deathlock before stomping his/her head. // Super Dragon (born Daniel Lyon) began wrestling in 1997. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ...


Inverted Indian deathlock

With the opponent on his back, the wrestler standing beside him, sits with his leg over and between the opponents legs (often using a legdrop to the knee). Then places the opponents far leg in the knee-pit of the near leg, finishing the submission by putting the opponents ankle on top of his own ankle and rolling both onto their bellys and pushing back with the wrestlers ankle.


Modified figure four leglock

This version, used by Shawn Michaels and invented by Jamie Noble, is a variant where with the opponent face up, the wrestler grabs the opponent's legs puts his own leg through it and twists them as if doing a sharpshooter, but instead puts his other leg on the foot of the opponent nearest to him, drops down to the mat and applies pressure. Michael Shawn Hickenbottom (born July 22, 1965) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name Shawn Michaels. ... James Howard Gibson (born December 23, 1976) better known by his ring name Jamie Noble, is an American professional wrestler. ...


Reverse figure four leglock

The wrestler using this move stands over the opponent with the opponent face up and grasps a leg of the opponent. The wrestler then turns 90 degrees and grasps the other leg, crossing them as he does so and falls to the mat, applying pressure to the opponent's crossed legs with his own.


Even though the move is called a reverse figure four leglock the wrestler is only turned 90 degrees, making the term side figure four leglock more appropriate. However reverse figure four leglock is the most common name. It is most closely associated with Japanese wrestler Yuji Nagata, who calls it the Nagata Lock. Nagata would salute to signal the maneuver to the crowd before dropping to the mat. There are also standing and spinning versions. Yuji Nagata Height: 60 (183cm) Weight: 238lbs (108kg) Date of Birth: 4/24/68 Place of Birth: Togane City, Chiba Debut: September 14th, 1992 (vs. ...


Sharpshooter

Probably invented by Riki Chōshū. Made popular by Bret "Hitman" Hart and is arguably the most famous wrestling move in Canada. The opponent starts supine. The wrestler steps between his opponent's legs with one leg and wraps the opponent's legs around that leg. Holding the opponent's legs in place, the wrestler then steps over the opponent, flipping him over into a prone position. Finally, the wrestler leans back to compress the legs. Hart's neice Natalya has recently taken the Sharpshooter as a finisher in reference to her father Jim "The Anvil" Neidhart and uncle Bret Hart in the Hart Foundation. Bret Hart applying the Sharpshooter on Shawn Michaels. ... This article is about the professional wrestler. ... Natalie (Nattie) Neidhart is a Canadian professional wrestler who is currently signed with World Wrestling Entertainment. ... James Henry Jim Neidhart (born August 2, 1956)[1] is an American professional wrestler, best known for his appearances in the 1980s and 1990s in the World Wrestling Federation as Jim The Anvil Neidhart. ... The Hart Foundation was a collective name used by various stables in the World Wrestling Federation. ...


Legendary wrestler Sting uses his own variation of the move calling it the Scorpion Deathlock. While Bret Hart is credited to popularising the maneuver, Sting has used the move as his submission finisher throughout his career, particularly during the late 1980s when Hart was part of the Hart Foundation as a tag team wrestler and wasn't using the Sharpshooter during this time. Sting Sting (real name Steve Borden; born March 20, 1959 in Omaha, Nebraska) is a professional wrestler who has wrestled with several wrestling leagues, such as NWA, WCW, and NWA:TNA since the early 1980s. ... The Hart Foundation was a collective name used by various stables in the World Wrestling Federation. ...


Spinning toe hold

The wrestler using this move stands over the opponent who is lying on the mat, face up and grasps a leg of the opponent. The wrestler then turns 360 degrees over the leg twisting it inward. A wrestler will repeatedly step over the leg and round again to twist the knee, and ankle joint even more. Popularized by the Funk brothers, Dory Funk Jr. and Terry Funk, who were taught the hold by their father, Dory Funk. Dory Funk, Jr. ... Terrance (Terry) Funk (born June 30, 1944) is an American professional wrestler, known chiefly for the hardcore wrestling style he adopted in the later part of his career that inspired many later wrestlers, most notably Mick Foley. ... Dory Funk (May 4, 1919 – June 3, 1973) was a professional wrestler. ...


Cloverleaf

Karl Harker performing a Cloverleaf

Also popularly known as a Texas cloverleaf, the wrestler stands at the feet of his supine opponent, grabs the opponent's legs and lifts them up. The wrestler then bends one leg so that the shin is behind the knee of the straight leg and places the ankle of the straight leg in their armpit. With the same arm, they reach around the ankle and through the opening formed by the legs, and lock their hands together. The wrestler then steps over his opponent, turning the opponent over as in a sharpshooter and proceeds to squat and lean back. The hold compresses the legs, flexes the spine, and stretches the abdomen. Image File history File links Karlharker. ... Image File history File links Karlharker. ...


The move was pioneered by Dory Funk, Jr., but is most closely associated with Dean Malenko, who used it as his regular finisher. Christian Cage is another popular user of this hold. Another version of this hold, considered to be an Elevated cloverleaf / Elevated Texas cloverleaf, was used by Eddie Guerrero, which saw Guerrero turn the body of the opponent and place a knee over the opponent's neck, pulling back for more pressure. Guerrero dubbed this the Lasso From El Paso. Dorrance Funk, Jr. ... Dean Simon (born August 4, 1960) is a retired professional wrestler best known by the ring name Dean Malenko. ... William Jason (Jay) Reso (born November 30, 1973 in Kitchener, Ontario), better known by his stage name Christian is a Canadian professional wrestler. ... Eduardo Eddie Gory Guerrero Llanes (October 9, 1967 — November 13, 2005) better known as Eddie Guerrero, was a Mexican-American professional wrestler born into a legendary Mexican wrestling family. ... El Paso redirects here. ...


Inverted cloverleaf

In this variation of a cloverleaf instead of turning around when turning the opponent over, the wrestler faces the same direction as the opponent to squat and lean forward to apply more pressure to the legs, spine, and abdomen. This hold is a finisher of Shuji Kondo, who named it the Gorilla Clutch. Kondo also uses a variation where he falls back and applies a body scissors the abdomen of his opponent. Shuji Kondo Shuji Kondo (近藤修司, Kondo Syuji) is a Japanese professional wrestler who currently works for All Japan Pro Wrestling. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ...


Leglock cloverleaf

This variation of the cloverleaf sees the wrestler, after crossing one of the opponents legs over the other in a figure four shape, lock the over leg behind their near knee before placing the straight leg under their armpit and turning over. The wrestler proceeds to lean back pulling on the leg under the armpit. This keeps the over leg, now under, locked while putting pressure on the leg and stretching the legs and back. This hold was popularized by T.J. Perkins, who refers to it as the Figure Four Deathlock. T.J. Perkins is an American professional wrestler from Southern California. ...


Cloverleaf with armlock

An armlock variation of the cloverleaf that is similar to a single leg Boston crab with armlock. This hold begins with a supine opponent lying face up on the mat. The attacking wrestler then seizes one of the arms and proceeds to walk over the opponent while continuing to hold the arm, forcing them to turn over onto their stomach. The wrestler then kneels down on the opponents back, locking the opponent's arm behind his knee in the process. The wrestler then reaches over and bends one leg so that the shin is behind the knee of the straight leg and places the ankle of the straight leg in their armpit. With the same arm, the wrestler reaches around the ankle and through the opening formed by the legs, and locks his hands together as in a Cloverleaf. The wrestler then pulls back so as to stretch the legs, back and neck of the opponent while keeping the arm trapped. Boston crab The Boston crab is a professional wrestling hold that typically starts with the opponent laying back-first on the mat, with the wrestler standing and facing them. ...


Rivera Cloverleaf

A variation of the cloverleaf. The wrestler hooks the legs like a cloverleaf but weaves his hands through to clasp his other hand. When the wrestler applies this modified cloverleaf he also hooks the sticking out ankle with his leg [which ever one it is] into his kneepit. Now the wrestler wrenches back like a normal cloverleaf. Innovated by Chris Hero. Chris Spradlin (born December 24, 1979) is an American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name, Chris Hero. ...


Transition holds

Some holds are meant neither to pin an opponent, nor weaken them or force them to submit, but are intended to set up the opponent for another attack.


Arm trap

This is when a wrestler holds both the opponent's arms under his own, from here the opponent is left prone and unable to counter or move away from the wrestler. Al Snow was known to deliver a series of headbutts from this position, while other wrestlers use this to secure a suplex. Allen Sarven (born July 18, 1963 in Lima, Ohio) is a professional wrestler better known by his stage name of Al Snow. ... Attacking maneuvers in the kayfabe of professional wrestling are mainly used to wear down an opponent for a submission hold or as a set up for a throw. ... The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ...


Butterfly

Technically known as a double underhook. The wrestler and the opponent begin facing one another, with the opponent bent over. The wrestler approaches the opponent and reaches under the opponent's shoulders, then threads their arms up and around the opponent's torso, with their hands meeting in the middle of the opponent's back or neck (essentially an inverted full nelson hold). The hold in itself is not a submission move, and is more commonly a set up for various throws, drops or slams, but it can be applied from various positions that cause it to become one.Mick Foley would commonly use the butterfly to execute a DDT. Body Slam redirects here. ... Michael Francis Mick Foley, Sr. ...


When the opponent is seated on the mat while the wrestler applies the butterfly hold it is known as a butterfly lock. Matt Hardy uses a variation called the Scar where he applies the double underhook and then wraps his legs around the torso of the opponent, in a body scissors. Matthew Moore Matt Hardy (born September 23, 1974)[2] is an American professional wrestler, currently working for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) on their SmackDown![1] brand, where he is one half of the WWE Tag Team Champions along with his onscreen rival, Montel Vontavious Porter. ...


Crucifix

The wrestler stands in front of and facing a bent over opponent and places them in a gutwrench waistlock. The wrestler then flips the opponent up and over so the opponent is lying face up on the back of the wrestler. The wrestler then moves his hands to the upper arm or wrists of the opponent, holding them in position, and spreading the arms of the opponent (as though they were being crucified). This is mainly often a set-up for a Crucifix Powerbomb. For other uses, see Crucifixion (disambiguation). ... A Powerbomb is a professional wrestling move in which an opponent is lifted up (usually so that they are sitting on the wrestlers shoulders) and then slammed back-first down to the mat. ...


Reverse crucifix

The wrestler stands in front of and with their back to a standing opponent. The wrestler then leans backwards and seizes the opponent around the waist, pulling them forward and upwards so they are lying across the shoulder of the opponent, facing downwards. The wrestler then takes hold of the upper arms or wrists of the opponent and spreads them, holding the opponent in place.


Electric chair

A transitional hold in which an attacking wrestler hoists an opponent up onto their shoulders so that they are both facing in the same direction


It is often used to set up various drops and slams in singles competition. However it is more often used in double team maneuver, in which another wrestler uses flying attacks to knock opponents off the shoulders of the wrestler. (See Doomsday Device.) Body Slam redirects here. ... This article is about the theoretical world-ending destruction. ...


Like many transition holds, the defensive wrestler often uses the position to perform a variety of counter moves, most notably the Victory roll. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Fireman's carry

Mr Kennedy holds Hardcore Holly in a fireman's carry, prior to executing a rolling fireman's carry slam

The wrestler bends over with the opponent standing to the side of the wrestler. The wrestler then pulls the opponent's arm over his/her farthest shoulder and distributes the wrestler's body over his/her shoulders while having the other hand between and holding onto one of the opponent's legs and stands up. The opponent is draped face-down across the wrestler's shoulders, with the wrestler's arms wrapped around from behind. It is a key component of several throws, drops and slams. Kenneth Anderson (born March 6, 1976) is an American professional wrestler better known by the ring name Mr. ... Robert William Bob Howard[2] (born January 29, 1963) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name, Bob Hardcore Holly. ... Body Slam redirects here. ... Body Slam redirects here. ...


Gorilla press

A transition lift taken from weight lifting, where the move gets its other common name; Military press, sees the wrestler lift an opponent up over their head with arms fully extended. From here many throws, drops and slams can be performed. It became a popular technique for larger and stronger wrestlers as the lift is seen to emphasize their height and power. Weightlifting is a sport where competitors attempt to lift heavy weights mounted on steel bars. ... Body Slam redirects here. ...


Gutwrench

A set up for many throws and slams, this sees the attacking wrestler put a bent at the waist opponent to one side of him, reach the near hand around and lock his hands around the waist. A common move out of this transition can be a powerbomb.


Gutrencher

The wrestler grabs opponent's arms, the grabs th opponent's legs similar to the bending backbreaker then slams opponent to the mat.


Lady of the Lake

This is a move used to trick an unsuspecting opponent. The wrestler sits down, crosses his or her legs, tucks their head into their chest and wraps one arm around their ankle (so they are effectively rolled into a ball). The wrestler then extends their remaining arm between their legs and then waits. The opponent, ostensibly confused, normally takes the offered hand, at which point the wrestler rolls forward and into an arm lock. This move can be easily countered into an entanglement submission hold.


The Lady of the Lake is an old British wrestling technique where it was most useful in the context of classic rules that limited attacking a downed opponent. The move is often called the Johnny Saint Special in reference to British wrestler Johnny Saint who popularized the hold which was invented by his mentor, George Kidd. Johnny Saint (born in Manchester) is a retired English professional wrestler who worked around English during the World Of Sport era. ...


Mounted

The wrestler sits on top of the opponent's torso, facing their head, with his legs on either side. When the opponent is facing down the position is referred to as back mount. Various strikes to the opponent's head are often performed from this position.


Pumphandle

The wrestler stands behind his opponent and bends him forward. One of the opponent's arms is pulled back between his legs and held, while the other arm is hooked, then the wrestler lifts the opponent up over his shoulder. From here many throws, drops and slams can be performed. Body Slam redirects here. ...


Scoop

Facing his opponent, the wrestler reaches between his opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around their back from the same side with his other arm. The wrestler lifts his opponent up so they are horizontal across the wrestlers body. From here many throws, drops and slams can be performed. Body Slam redirects here. ...


Tilt-a-whirl

The wrestler stands facing the opponent. The wrestler bends the opponent down so they are bent facing in front on the wrestler's body. The wrestler reaches around the opponent's body with their arms and lifts them up, spinning the opponent in front of the wrestler's body, often to deliver a slam or most commonly a Tilt-a-whirl backbreaker. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Usually performed on a charging opponent, this can also be a transition hold for counter attacks that sees the wrestler (who is being tilt-a-whirled) hit many throws and drops like a DDT or headscissors takedown. This variation was made popular by "Flyin'" Brian Pillman. Body Slam redirects here. ... In professional wrestling a DDT is any move in which the wrestler falls down or backwards to drive a held opponents head into the mat. ... Body Slam redirects here. ...


Wheelbarrow

This move is achieved when a wrestler wraps a forward facing opponent's legs around his waist (either by standing behind an opponent who is lying face-first on the mat or by catching a charging opponent), then the wrestler would apply a gutwrench hold and lift the opponent up off the ground into the air, then either continue lifting and fall backwards to wheelbarrow suplex, or forcing the opponent back down to the mat to hit a wheelbarrow facebuster. A facebuster, also known as a face plant, is generally a takedown move in professional wrestling in which an attacking wrestler forces his/her opponent down to the mat face-first without involving a headlock or facelock. ...


This can also can be a transition hold for counter attacks that sees the wrestler (who is being wheelbarrowed) hit many throws and drops like a DDT or a bulldog and rolling pin combinations. Body Slam redirects here. ...


The Matrix

This is an evasion which sees the wrestler doing a "Matrix" (bending over backwards into a standing bridge, such as when Neo does a similar move near the end of the first Matrix movie) to avoid a clothesline or any other attack. This move was first used by Cheerleader Melissa, but it was popularized by Trish Stratus during her run in the WWE, and was referred to as the MaTrish. Thomas A. Anderson (alias Neo) is a fictional character in the Matrix trilogy: The Matrix, The Matrix Reloaded, and The Matrix Revolutions. ... This article is about the 1999 film. ... Melissa Anderson aka Cheerleader Melissa (born August 17, 1982 in Los Angeles, California) is a professional wrestler. ... Patricia Anne Stratigias[6][10] (born December 18, 1975, pronounced ), better known by her stage name Trish Stratus, is a former fitness model, former professional wrestler and television personality from Canada. ...


Miscellaneous

Armpit claw

The armpit claw was a squeezing of the muscle in the front of the armpit with the four fingers dug into the armpit and the thumb pressing into the front of the shoulder. The opponent's arm would bend at the wrist and elbow, and his fingers would curl into a claw. The hold caused great pain, causing the opponent to submit or to lose all control of his arm and hand, at which point the referee would call for the bell.


Collar-and-elbow tie up

See also: Collar-and-elbow position

This is a stand-up grappling position where both wrestlers have a collar tie, and hold the opponent's other arm at the elbow. The collar-and-elbow is generally a neutral position, but by pushing the hand on the elbow up and towards the inside of the opponent's arms, a controlling wrestler can turn an opponent into a belly-to-back position. Alternatively, if a controlling wrestler pushes forward while releasing the collar tie they can wrap their extended arm around the head of their opponent back round to their own other arm to sinch in a side headlock. The collar-and-elbow position (often referred to simply as collar-and-elbow) is a stand-up grappling position where both combatants have a collar tie, and hold the opponents other arm at the elbow. ... A grappling position refers the relative positioning and holds of two combatants engaged in grappling. ... The wrestler on the left has a collar tie. ... Two wrestlers in a clinch, using over- and underhooks. ...


Fish hook

The wrestler bends one of his fingers into a hook, and uses it to stretch the opponent's mouth or nose. An illegal hold under usual rules.


Austin Aries uses a half surfboard variation, called Fish Hook of Doom, where the opponent is lying face down. He grabs one of the opponent's wrists with one hand and fish hooks the opponent's mouth with the other. He then places his knees against the opponent's stretched arm, and pulls back with his arms. Dan Solwold[1] (born April 15, 1978), better known by his ring name Austin Aries, is an American professional wrestler currently performing in Ring of Honor. ...


Giant swing

See also: Professional wrestling throws#Giant swing

The wrestler takes hold of a supine opponent's legs and pivots rapidly, elevating the opponent and swinging the opponent in a circle. The wrestler may release the hold in mid-air or simply slow until the back of the opponent returns to the ground. Body Slam redirects here. ...


Skin the cat

Popularized by Ricky Steamboat, this defensive maneuver is used when a wrestler is thrown over the top rope. While being thrown over the wrestler grabs the top rope with both hands and holds on so that they end up dangling from the top rope but not landing on the apron or on the floor. The wrestler then proceeds to lift their legs over their head and rotate their body back towards the ring to go back over the top rope and into the ring, landing in the ring on their feet. WWE wrestler Shawn Michaels has been known to use this maneuver on a number of occasions, most notably using it to win the 1995 Royal Rumble, also as a reversal when he is irish whiped to a turnbuckle, most commonly followed by a clothsline. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Michael Shawn Hickenbottom (born July 22, 1965) is an American professional wrestler, better known by the ring name Shawn Michaels. ... Royal Rumble 1995 was the eighth annual Royal Rumble professional wrestling pay-per-view event from the World Wrestling Federation. ...


Sunset flip

Eamon O'Neill performs a sunset flip out of the corner on Phil Powers

This move commonly sees an attacking wrestler dive over an opponent who is facing him/her, usually bent over forwards, catching the opponent in a waistlock from behind and landing back-first behind the opponent. From that position the wrestler rolls forward into a sitting position, pulling the opponent over backwards and down to the mat so that he lands on his back into a sitout pin position. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 521 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (972 × 1118 pixel, file size: 500 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 521 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (972 × 1118 pixel, file size: 500 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Phil Powers is an English professional wrestler, who has worked on the United Kingdoms independent circuit for over 12 years. ... This article is about the pinfall (or pin) as it is defined in professional wrestling. ...


While being held on the shoulders of an attacking wrestler in a position where this second wrestler is straddling the head of the attacking wrestler while facing in the other direction; as if they were


Tree of Woe

This involves a wrestler suspending an opponent upside down on a turnbuckle, with the opponent's back being up against it. To do this the opponent's legs are then hooked under the top ropes, leaving the opponent facing the attacking wrestler, upside down.


Often an attacking wrestler will choke, kick, or stomp the opponent until the referee uses up his five count. The technique is also used to trap an opponent while the attacking wrestler runs at them and delivers some form of offensive maneuver, such as a running knee attack or a baseball slide.


 
 

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