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Encyclopedia > Priory of Sion
Prieuré de Sion logo

The Prieuré de Sion, translated from French to English as Priory of Sion (or "Priory of Zion"), is a name that refers to several groups, both real and fictitious. Historically, it refers specifically to an obscure fraternal organization founded and dissolved during the French Fourth Republic. However, it has come to refer to a mythical secret society plotting to restore the Merovingian dynasty to the thrones of Europe and Jerusalem, which was speculated about in, and popularized by, the 1982 controversial non-fiction book The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail,[1] and later claimed as factual in the preface of the 2003 conspiracy fiction novel by Dan Brown, The Da Vinci Code.[2] Sion may be: Sion, Czech Republic  a castle in the Czech Republic, near Kutná Hora Sion, France  a municipality in the Gers départment, France. ... Image File history File links Prieure_de_sion-logo. ... Image File history File links Prieure_de_sion-logo. ... Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן, tziyyon; Tiberian vocalization: tsiyyôn; transliterated Zion or Sion) is a term that most often designates the Land of Israel and its capital Jerusalem. ... A fraternal organization, sometimes also known as a fraternity, is an organization that represents the relationship between its members as akin to brotherhood. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article is about a system of myths. ... For the Europe album, see Secret Society (Europe album). ... For other uses, see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... This is a list of controversial non-fiction books aimed at the general reader which discuss controversial issues, or are (or were at the time of writing) controversial for other reasons. ... Book cover of The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail 2005 illustrated hardcover edition. ... Particularly since the 1960s, conspiracy theory has been a popular subject of fiction. ... Dan Brown (born June 22, 1964) is an American author of thriller fiction, best known for the 2003 bestselling novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ...


Although it has been characterized as anything from the most influential cabal in Western history to a modern ludibrium modelled after the fictitious Rosicrucian Order of the 17th century, the Priory of Sion myth has been exposed as a hoax started in 1961 by Pierre Plantard, a false pretender to the French throne.[3] The evidence presented in support of its historical existence and role prior to 1956 was discovered to have been forged and then planted in various locations around France by Plantard and his accomplices. Nevertheless, many conspiracy theorists insist on the truth of the Priory of Sion's existence and role as a 1000-years-old secret society which conceals a subversive secret.[4] A cabal is a number of persons united in some close design, usually to promote their private views and interests in a church, state, or other community by intrigue. ... The term Western World or the West can have multiple meanings depending on its context. ... Ludibrium is a word derived from Latin ludus(ludi), meaning a plaything or a trivial game. ... The Temple of the Rosy Cross, Teophilus Schweighardt Constantiens, 1618 The Rosicrucians are a legendary and secretive order dating from the 15th or 17th century, generally associated with the symbol of the Rose Cross, which is also used in certain rituals of the Freemasons. ... A hoax is an attempt to trick an audience into believing that something false is real. ... Pierre Athanase Marie Plantard (born March 18, 1920, died February 3, 2000) was the principal figure associated with the known history of the Priory of Sion, and is widely believed to have been the main creator of many of the claims about the Priorys supposed past history that later... This article is about pretender as applied to a monarchy. ... A conspiracy theory is a theory that defies common historical or current understanding of events, under the claim that those events are the result of manipulations by two or more individuals or various secretive powers or conspiracies. ... A millennium (pl. ... This article is about the computer software framework. ... Secrecy is the condition of hiding information from others. ...

Contents

Priory of Sion history

The Priory of Sion was a fraternal organization that was founded in 1956, in the French town of Annemasse. As with all associations, French law required that the association be registered with the government. It was registered with its statutes at the subprefecture of Saint-Julien-en-Genevois, in May 1956, and its registration was noted on July 20, 1956, in the Journal Officiel de la République Française. The founders and signatories inscribed with their pseudonyms were Pierre Plantard (also known as "Chyren"), André Bonhomme (also known as "Stanis Bellas"), Jean Delaval, and Armand Defago. The purpose of the association according to its statutes was entered as "studies and mutual aid of the members". In practice, the originator of the association and its key protagonist was Pierre Plantard, its Secretary General, although its nominal head or President was André Bonhomme. The choice of the name "Sion" was based on a popular local feature, a hill south of Annemasse in France, known as Mont Sion, where the founders intended to establish a retreat center.[5] The accompanying title to the name was "Chevalerie d'Institutions et Règles Catholiques d'Union Independante et Traditionaliste": this subtitle forms the acronym CIRCUIT and translates in English as "Knighthood of Catholic Rule and Institution and of Independent Traditionalist Union". A fraternal organization, sometimes also known as a fraternity, is an organization that represents the relationship between its members as akin to brotherhood. ... Annemasse is a municipality in France. ... In academic terms, French law can be divided into two areas: private law (droit privé) and public law (droit public). Private law includes, in particular, civil law (droit civil) and criminal law (droit pénal). Public law includes, in particular, administrative law (droit administratif) and constitutional law (droit constitutionnel). However... A subprefecture in Verdun, France Subprefectures (French: sous-préfectures) are the administrative towns of arrondissements in France that do not contain the prefecture for its department. ... The church of Saint-Julien-en-Genevois under a double rainbow Saint-Julien-en-Genevois is a commune of the Haute-Savoie département, in France. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Alias. ... Pierre Athanase Marie Plantard (born March 18, 1920, died February 3, 2000) was the principal figure associated with the known history of the Priory of Sion, and is widely believed to have been the main creator of many of the claims about the Priorys supposed past history that later... The term retreat has several related meanings, all of which have in common the notion of safety or temporarily removing oneself from ones usual environment. ... A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ... Traditionalist Catholic and Traditional Catholic are broad terms used to denote Roman Catholics who reject some or all of the reforms that were instituted after the Second Vatican Council, in particular the revised rite of Mass, which was promulgated in 1969 by Pope Paul VI as part of the process...


The statutes and registration documents of the Priory of Sion were deposited on May 7, 1956, while the first issue of its journal, Circuit, is dated May 27, 1956, (in total, twelve issues of the journal appeared). Considering the political instability of the French Fourth Republic, the objectives of the journal were regarded with suspicion by the local authorities. It was indicated as a "news bulletin for the defence of the rights and the freedom of public housing". Indeed, some of the articles took a political position in the local council elections. Others attacked and criticized property developers of Annemasse. The offices of the Priory of Sion and the journal were at Plantard's apartment.[6] is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A local authority tower block in Cwmbrân, South Wales Public housing or project homes are forms of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ...


The articles of the Priory of Sion as indicated in its statutes also formalized the goal of creating a chivalric order,[7] but the activities of the Priory of Sion bore no resemblance whatsoever to the objectives as outlined in its statutes. Article VII says that its members are expected, "to carry out good deeds, to help the Roman Catholic Church, teach the truth, defend the weak and the oppressed". There is ample evidence that it had several members, as indicated by the numerous articles contained in its journal Circuit, written by a number of different people. Towards the end of 1956 the association had aims to forge links with the local Catholic Church of the area involving a school bus service run by both the Priory of Sion and the church of Saint-Joseph in Annemasse.[8] Chivalric Orders were created by European monarchs after the failure of the Crusades. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ...


The formally registered association was dissolved sometime after October 1956 but intermittently revived for different reasons by Plantard between 1961 and 1993, though in name and on paper only. The Priory of Sion is considered "dormant" by the subprefecture because it has indicated no activities since 1956. According to French law, subsequent references to the Priory bear no legal relation to that of 1956 and no one, other than the original signatories, is entitled to use its name in an official capacity. André Bonhomme played no part since 1956. He officially resigned in 1973 when he heard that Plantard was linking his name with the association, so as of last report, there is no one who is currently around who has official permission to use the name.[9]


Priory of Sion myth

Hoax

In order to build a cult of personality and cult of intelligence around himself in esoteric circles, Pierre Plantard set out to have the Priory of Sion perceived as an aristocratic, Hermetic, Christian, chivalric order of Freemasonry, responsible for spreading the underground culture of esotericism in Europe since the Middle Ages, and now dedicated to the installment of the "Great King", prophesied by Nostradamus, on the throne of France.[10] A cult of personality or personality cult arises when a countrys leader uses mass media to create a larger-than-life public image through unquestioning flattery and praise. ... Etymology Esoteric is an adjective originating during Hellenic Greece under the domain of the Roman Empire; it comes from the Greek esôterikos, from esôtero, the comparative form of esô: within. It is a word meaning anything that is inner and occult, a latinate word meaning hidden (from which... Pierre Athanase Marie Plantard (born March 18, 1920, died February 3, 2000) was the principal figure associated with the known history of the Priory of Sion, and is widely believed to have been the main creator of many of the claims about the Priorys supposed past history that later... Aristocracy is a form of government in which rulership is in the hands of an upper class known as aristocrats. ... This article is about the magical and religious movement stemming from the teachings of Hermes Trismegistus. ... In fashion then as of a snow-white rose Displayed itself to me the saintly host, Whom Christ in his own blood had made his bride - The Divine Comedy, Paradiso, Canto XXXI “Esoteric Christianity” is a term which refers to an ensemble of spiritual currents which regard Christianity as a... Chivalric Orders were created by European monarchs after the failure of the Crusades. ... This box:      The fraternity of Freemasonry, also known as Free and Accepted Masons, is organized into lodges, chapters, councils, commanderies, consistories, etc. ... Freemasons redirects here. ... The Alph is supposedly an underground river of Esotericism in Europe, symbolising the secret knowledge held in that Continent. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Myst franchise Games Myst Riven Myst III: Exile Myst IV: Revelation Myst V: End of Ages Uru: Ages Beyond Myst Ages of: Myst Riven Myst III: Exile Myst IV: Revelation Uru Novels Myst: The Book of Atrus   Tiana   Dni Comic Books #0   #1 Miscellaneous Dni Ages   The... Nostradamus: original portrait by his son Cesar Michel de Nostredame (December 14, 1503 – July 2, 1566), usually Latinized to Nostradamus, was a French apothecary and reputed seer who published collections of prophecies that have since become famous world-wide. ...


Between 1961 and 1984, Plantard contrived a mythical pedigree for the Priory of Sion claiming that it was the offshoot of a Roman Catholic religious order housed in the Abbey of Sion, which had been founded in the Kingdom of Jerusalem during the First Crusade in 1099 and later absorbed by the Jesuits in 1617. The mistake is often made that this Abbey of Sion was a "Priory of Sion", but there is a difference between an abbey and a priory.[11] Calling his original 1956 group "Priory of Sion" presumably gave Plantard the later idea to claim that his organization had been historically founded in Jerusalem during the Crusades.[12] Furthermore, Plantard was inspired by a 1960 magazine Les Cahiers de l'Histoire to center his personal genealogical claims, as found in his Priory of Sion documents, around the Merovingian king Dagobert II.[13] He also adopted "Et in Arcadia ego ...", a slightly altered version of a Latin phrase that most famously appears as the title of two paintings by Nicolas Poussin, as the motto of both his family and the Priory of Sion,[14] because the tomb which appears in these paintings resembled one in the Les Pontils area near Rennes-le-Château. This tomb would become a symbol for his dynastic claims as the last devise of the Merovingian dynasty on the territory of Razès left to remind initiates that the "lost king" would figuratively come back in the form of a hereditary pretender.[15][16] A pedigree is a list of ancestors (usually implying distinguished), a list of ancestors of the same breed (usually in the case of animals), the purity of a breed, individual, or strain, or a document proving any of these things. ... Catholic religious orders (Religious Institutes, cf. ... The Abbey of Our Lady of Mount Zion, often referred to by modern authors as the Abbey of Sion or Order of Sion, was a small mediaeval monastic order which, according to a papal bull of the 12th century, had abbeys on Mount Zion in Jerusalem, on Mount Carmel, in... The kingdom of Jerusalem and the other Crusader states (in shades of green) in the context of the Near East in 1135. ... Combatants Christendom, Catholicism West European Christians, Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia Seljuks, Arabs and other Muslims The First Crusade was launched in 1095 by Pope Urban II with the dual goals of liberating the sacred city of Jerusalem and the Holy Land from Muslims and freeing the Eastern Christians from Muslim... 1099 also refers to a United States tax form used for, among other purposes, reporting payments made to independent Contractors. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed I (1603-1617) to Mustafa I (1617-1623). ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... A priory is an ecclesiastical circumscription run by a prior. ... For other uses, see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... Dagobert II (c. ... Et in Arcadia ego is a Latin phrase that most famously appears as the title of two paintings by Nicolas Poussin (1594–1665). ... This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. ... Poussin redirects here. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Rennes-le-Château (Rènnas del Castèl in occitan) is a small medieval castle village and a commune in the Aude département, in the Languedoc area in southern France. ... Razès is a historical area in southwestern France, in todays Aude département. ... Coming from the Latin, initiation implies a beginning. ... A title is a prefix or suffix added to a persons name to signify either veneration, an official position or a professional or academic qualification. ... This article is about pretender as applied to a monarchy. ...


In order to give credibility to the fabricated lineage and pedigree, Plantard and his friend, Philippe de Cherisey, needed to create "independent evidence." So during the 1960s, they deposited a series of forged documents, the so-called Dossiers Secrets d'Henri Lobineau ("Secret Files of Henri Lobineau"), at the Bibliothèque nationale de France, in Paris. Also in the 1960s, Plantard began writing a manuscript and had a series of "medieval parchments" forged by de Cherisey which contained encrypted messages that referred to the Priory of Sion. They adapted and used to their advantage, the earlier claims put forward by Noel Corbu that a Catholic priest named Bérenger Saunière had supposedly discovered these seemingly ancient parchments inside of a pillar while renovating his church in Rennes-le-Château in 1891. Inspired by the popularity of the stories in France surrounding the discovery of the Dead Sea scrolls, they hoped this same theme would attract attention to their parchments.[17] Their version of the parchments was intended to prove Plantard's claims about the Priory of Sion being a medieval society.[18] Philippe de Cherisey (1925 – 1985) was a French writer and radio humorist, he was also an actor who worked under the name of Amédée (with Jeux interdits,1952, being the most notable film that he appeared in). ... A false document is a form of verisimilitude that attempts to create in the reader (viewer, audience, etc. ... The Dossiers Secrets dHenri Lobineau (Secret Files in English) is a 27 paged document that was deposited in the Bibliothèque nationale de France on 27 April 1967. ... The new buildings of the library. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... German parchmenter, 1568 Parchment is a material for the pages of a book or codex, made from fine calf skin, sheep skin or goat skin. ... Noel Corbu was a hotelier in the Central French town of Rennes-le-Château. ... This article is about the sacrament. ... Bérenger Saunière François Bérenger Saunière (1852-1917) was a priest in the French village of Rennes-le-Château, in the Aude region, from 1885 to 1909. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Dead Sea scrolls consist of roughly 1000 documents, including texts from the Hebrew Bible, discovered between 1947 and 1979 in eleven caves in and around the Wadi Qumran (near the ruins of the ancient settlement of Khirbet Qumran, on the northwest shore of the Dead Sea) in the West...


Plantard then enlisted the aid of author Gérard de Sède to write a book based on his unpublished manuscript and forged parchments,[19] alleging that Saunière had discovered a link to a hidden treasure. The 1967 book, entitled L'Or de Rennes ("The Gold of Rennes") and Le Trésor Maudit de Rennes-le-Château ("The Accursed Treasure of Rennes-le-Château"), became a popular read in France. It included copies of the "found" documents (the originals were of course never produced), though it did not provide translations. One of the Latin texts in the documents was copied from the Novum Testamentum ("New Testament"), an attempted restoration of the Vulgate by John Wordsworth and Henry White.[20] The versions of the Latin texts found in the "parchments" can be precisely dated based on the wording being used, which show that the Latin version in one of the "parchments" was copied from a book first published in 1889, which is problematic considering that de Sède's book was trying to make a case that these documents were centuries old. Gérard de Sède (5 June 1921 – 29 May 2004) (real name Gérard de Sède de Lieux) was a French author who popularised the mystery of Rennes-le-Chateau by re-writing a Pierre Plantard manuscript that failed to find a publisher: this was the 1967 L... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The Vulgate Bible is an early 5th century version in Latin, partly revised and partly translated by Jerome on the orders of Pope Damasus I in 382. ... The Reverend John Wordsworth was born at Harrow-on-the-Hill, to the Reverend Christopher Wordsworth, nephew of the poet William Wordsworth. ...


In 1969, an English actor and science-fiction scriptwriter, Henry Lincoln, read Le Trésor Maudit, and became intrigued. He discovered one of the encrypted messages, which read "À Dagobert II Roi et à Sion est ce trésor, et il est là mort" ("To King Dagobert II and to Sion does this treasure belong, and he died there"). This was an allusion to a treasure belonging to the Merovingian king Dagobert II, who had been assassinated in the 7th century. Lincoln expanded on the conspiracy theories, writing his own books on the subject, and creating a series of BBC Two documentaries in the 1970s about the mysteries of the Rennes-le-Château area. In response to a tip from Gérard de Sède, Lincoln claims he was also the one who "discovered" the Dossiers Secrets, a series of planted genealogies which appeared to further confirm the link with the line of Merovingians. The documents claimed that the Priory of Sion had been founded in 1099, and created the Knights Templar. Henry Lincoln (born 1930) is the most popular pseudonym of Henry Soskin, an English writer and actor. ... For other uses, see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... Dagobert II (c. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 2. ... For other uses, see Knights Templar (disambiguation). ...


Letters in existence dating from the 1960s written by Plantard, de Cherisey and de Sède to each other confirm that the three were engaging in an out-and-out confidence trick, describing schemes on how to combat criticisms of their various allegations and how they would make up new allegations to try to keep the whole thing going. These letters (totalling over 100) are in the possession of French researcher Jean-Luc Chaumeil, who has also retained the original envelopes. Jean-Luc Chaumeil during the 1970s was part of the Priory of Sion ring, and wrote books and articles about Plantard and the Priory of Sion before splitting from it during the late 1970s and exposing Plantard's past in French books. A letter later discovered at the subprefecture of Saint-Julien-en-Genevois also indicated that Plantard had a criminal conviction as a con man.[21][22][23][24] Scam and Confidence Man redirect here. ...


The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail

For more details on this topic, see The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail.

After reading Le Tresor Maudit, Henry Lincoln persuaded BBC Two's factual television series of the 1970s, Chronicle, to make a series of documentaries, which became quite popular and generated thousands of responses. Lincoln then joined forces with Michael Baigent and Richard Leigh for further research. This led them to the pseudohistorical Dossiers Secrets at the Bibliothèque nationale, which though alleging to portray hundreds of years of medieval history, were actually all written by Plantard and de Cherisey under the pseudonym of "Philippe Toscan du Plantier". Unaware that the documents had been forged, Baigent, Leigh, and Lincoln used them as a major source for their 1982 controversial non-fiction book The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail,[1] in which they reported claims they accepted as "facts" while acknowledging they may not be true:[25] Book cover of The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail 2005 illustrated hardcover edition. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 2. ... Author Michael Baigent Reuters Michael Baigent, born March 1948 in Christchurch, New Zealand, is an author and conspiracy theorist who co-wrote (with Richard Leigh) a number of books that question mainstream perceptions of history and many commonly-held versions of the life of Jesus. ... For other people named Richard Leigh, see Richard Leigh. ... Pseudohistory is a pejorative term applied to texts which purport to be historical in nature but which depart from standard historiographical conventions in a way which undermines their conclusions. ... The Dossiers Secrets dHenri Lobineau (Secret Files in English) is a 27 paged document that was deposited in the Bibliothèque nationale de France on 27 April 1967. ... This is a list of controversial non-fiction books aimed at the general reader which discuss controversial issues, or are (or were at the time of writing) controversial for other reasons. ... Book cover of The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail 2005 illustrated hardcover edition. ... Mount Isa, Australia, is often incorrectly referred to as the largest city in the world by area Toronto, Canada, was never designated by UNESCO as the worlds most multicultural city Factoid can refer to a spurious (unverified, incorrect, or invented) fact intended to create or prolong public exposure or...

The authors further asserted that the modern goals of the Priory of Sion are: For the Europe album, see Secret Society (Europe album). ... 1099 also refers to a United States tax form used for, among other purposes, reporting payments made to independent Contractors. ... Prieuré de Sion, usually rendered in English translation as Priory of Sion or even Priory of Zion, is an elusive protagonist in many works of both non-fiction and fiction. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... For other uses, see Knights Templar (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... Events February 7 - Leo I becomes East Roman emperor. ... Events Pippin the Short is elected as king of the Franks by the Frankish nobility, marking the end of the Merovingian and beginning of the Carolingian dynasty. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... The Jesus bloodline (not to be confused with the genealogy of Jesus) is the modern theory that Jesus Christ had a natural child with Mary Magdalene which was then taken to Egypt and then to France, either during Magdalenes pregnancy or as a young child, and whose blood descendants... This article is about the disciple of Jesus. ... King of the Jews may refer to: One of several historical kings of the Jewish people; see Kingdom of Israel and Kingdom of Judah A title of the Jewish Messiah King Herod the Great, declared King of the Jews by the Roman Senate A title used to refer to Jesus... This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ... Even in death, many Kohanim choose to have this symbol, the special positioning of their fingers and hands during the Priestly Blessing, placed as a crest or symbol on their gravestones to indicate their status. ... Zadok (Hebrew: Tzadok meaning Righteous) was the Israelite High Priest of the tenth century BCE. // Zadok in the Bible A son of Ahitub, of the line of Eleazar (2 Samuel 8:17; 1 Chronicles 24:3), high priest in the time of David (2 Sam. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Cathars being expelled from Carcassonne in 1209. ... For other uses, see Knights Templar (disambiguation). ... In Christianity, the doctrine of Apostolic Succession (or the belief that the Church is apostolic) maintains that the Christian Church today is the spiritual successor to the original body of believers in Christ, composed of the Apostles. ... St Peter redirects here. ... // For other uses, see Dynasty (disambiguation). ...

Baigent, Leigh and Lincoln also incorporated the anti-semitic tract known as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion into their story, concluding that it actually referred to the activities of the Priory of Sion. They viewed the Protocols as the most persuasive piece of evidence for the existence and activities of the Priory of Sion by arguing that: Bors Dilemma - he chooses to save a maiden rather than his brother Lionel Chivalry[1] is a term related to the medieval institution of knighthood. ... Popular Monarchy is a system of monarchical governance in which the monarchs title is linked with the people rather than a unitary state. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... A map displaying todays federations. ... European integration is the process of political and economic (and in some cases social and cultural) integration of European states into a tighter bloc. ... The Arch of Titus This article deals with the main arch of Titus on the Via Sacra. ... A stone (2. ... Zadok (Hebrew: Tzadok meaning Righteous) was the Israelite High Priest of the tenth century BCE. // Zadok in the Bible A son of Ahitub, of the line of Eleazar (2 Samuel 8:17; 1 Chronicles 24:3), high priest in the time of David (2 Sam. ... Israel, with the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Golan Heights The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is an ongoing dispute between the State of Israel and Arab Palestinians. ... A city-state is a region controlled exclusively by a city. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... The United States of Europe (sometimes abbreviated U.S.E. or USE) is a name given to several similar speculative scenarios of the unification of Europe, as a single nation and a single federation of states, similar to the United States of America, both as projected by writers of speculative... This article is about pretender as applied to a monarchy. ... This is a list of Kings of Jerusalem, from 1099 to 1291, as well as claimants to the title up to the present day. ... The President of the European Parliament oversees all the activities of the European Parliament and its constituent bodies. ... In Christianity, the doctrine of Apostolic Succession (or the belief that the Church is apostolic) maintains that the Christian Church today is the spiritual successor to the original body of believers in Christ, composed of the Apostles. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... A sacred king, according to the systematic interpretation of mythology developed by Sir James George Frazer in his influential book The Golden Bough, was a king who represented a solar deity in a periodically re-enacted fertility rite. ... An Imperial cult is a kind of religion in which an Emperor, or a dynasty of emperors (or rulers of another title), are worshipped as demigods or deities. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      For the metal band, refer to Theocracy (band). ... European Empire is a relatively new and obscure phrase used to describe the rapid expansion of the European Union. ... The European Century is a term, which was first used by Mark Leonard in his book Perpetual Power: Why Europe Will Run the 21st Century and is used to describe the belief that the 21st century will become a century in which the current European way of doing things will... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For the 2005 documentary film by Marc Levin, see Protocols of Zion (film). ...

  • the original version emanated from a lodge observing an irregular rite of Freemasonry, which adopted an esoteric Christian supersessionist interpretation of Zion and Davidic messianism, but had nothing to do with a "Judaeo-Masonic conspiracy";
  • the original version was not intended to be inflammatory or released publicly, but was a program for gaining control of Freemasonry;
  • the person responsible for changing the text in about 1903 was Sergei Nilus in the course of his attempt to gain influence in the court of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. The presence of esoteric cliques in the royal court led to considerable intrigue. Nilus' publication of the text resulted from his failure to succeed in wresting influence away from Papus and others; and
  • since Nilus did not recognize a number of references in the text that reflected a background in an esoteric Christian cultural context, he did not change them. This fact established that the original version could not possibly have come from the First Zionist Congress at Basel in 1897.

In reaction to this memetic synthesis of investigative journalism with religious conspiracy theory,[26] many secular conspiracy theorists added the Priory of Sion to their list of secret societies collaborating or competing to manipulate political happenings from behind the scenes in their bid for world domination through synarchy;[27]some occultists speculated that the emergence of the Priory of Sion closely follows The Prophecies by M. Michel Nostradamus;[10] while fringe Christian eschatologists countered that it was a fulfillment of prophecies found in the Book of Revelation and further proof of an anti-Christian conspiracy of epic proportions.[28] In most areas of the world Masons gather together in Masonic Lodges to work the three degrees of Freemasonry: 1° = Entered Apprentice 2° = Fellow Craft 3° = Master Mason Blue Lodge is used to specify the basic Masonic Lodge granting the first three degrees and to differentiate it from other Masonic... In fashion then as of a snow-white rose Displayed itself to me the saintly host, Whom Christ in his own blood had made his bride - The Divine Comedy, Paradiso, Canto XXXI “Esoteric Christianity” is a term which refers to an ensemble of spiritual currents which regard Christianity as a... Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן, tziyyon; Tiberian vocalization: tsiyyôn; transliterated Zion or Sion) is a term that most often designates the Land of Israel and its capital Jerusalem. ... In Jewish messianism and eschatology, the Messiah (Hebrew: משיח; Mashiah, Mashiach, or Moshiach, anointed [one]) is a term traditionally referring to a future Jewish king from the Davidic line who will be anointed (the meaning of the Hebrew word משיח) with holy anointing oil and inducted to rule the Jewish people during... Freemasons redirects here. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Velikoe v malom i antikhrist (1905 edition) Sergei Nilus Sergei Alexandrovich Nilus (also Sergiei, Sergyei, Sergius, Serge); Russian language: Сергей Александрович Нилус; 1862-1929) was a Russian religious writer, self-described mystic, and agent of the Imperial Russian secret police, the Okhranka. ... Nicholas II redirects here. ... Gerard Encausse (July 13, 1865 - 1916), whose esoteric pseudonym was Papus, was the Spanish-born French physician, hypnotist, and popularizer of occultism, who founded the modern Martinist Order. ... The World Zionist Organization [WZO] was founded as the Zionist Organization [ZO] on September 3, 1897, at the First Zionist Congress held in Basel, Switzerland. ... For other uses, see Basel (disambiguation). ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Memetic engineering is a term used by Richard Dawkins in his book The Selfish Gene concerned with the process of modifying human beliefs. ... Investigative journalism is a kind of journalism in which reporters deeply investigate a topic of interest, often involving crime, political corruption, or some other scandal. ... For other uses, see Conspiracy theory (disambiguation). ... A secret society is a social organization that requires its members to conceal certain activities—such as rites of initiation or club ceremonies—from outsiders. ... Alexander the Great Philip II of Spain Napoleon Bonaparte For other uses, see World domination (disambiguation). ... Synarchism (from Greek words meaning to rule together, in Spanish Sinarquismo), is the ideology of a political movement in Mexico dating from the 1930s. ... List of notable occultists and mystics. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      In Christian theology, Christian eschatology is the... This article refers to the topic of prophecy as the purported telling of future events or supernatural revelations. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ... In Christian eschatology, the Antichrist or anti-Christ means a person, office, or group recognized as fulfilling the Biblical prophecies about one who will oppose Christ and substitute himself in Christs place. ...


However, academic historians do not accept The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail as a serious contribution to scholarship and regard it as one of the best examples of "counterknowledge".[29][30][31][32][33] French authors like Franck Marie (1978), Jean-Luc Chaumeil (1979, 1984, 1992, 2006) and Pierre Jarnac (1985, 1988) and more recently Marie-France Etchegoin (2004), Massimo Introvigne (2005), Jean-Jacques Bedu (2005), have never taken Pierre Plantard and the Priory of Sion as seriously as Baigent, Leigh, and Lincoln. They eventually concluded that it was all a hoax, outlining in detail the reasons for their verdict, and giving detailed evidence that the Holy Blood authors had not reported comprehensively. They imply that this evidence had been ignored by Baigent, Leigh, and Lincoln in order to bolster the mythical version of the Priory's history that was developed by Plantard during the early 1960s after meeting author Gérard de Sède. This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ... Gérard de Sède (5 June 1921 – 29 May 2004) (real name Gérard de Sède de Lieux) was a French author who popularised the mystery of Rennes-le-Chateau by re-writing a Pierre Plantard manuscript that failed to find a publisher: this was the 1967 L...


As a consequence, in 1989, Plantard tried but failed to salvage his reputation and agenda as a mystagogue in esoteric circles by claiming that the Priory of Sion had actually been founded in 1681 at Rennes-le-Château, and was focused on harnessing the paranormal power of ley lines and megaliths in the area, rather than restoring the Merovingian dynasty. A mystagogue is a person who initiates others into mystic beliefs, an educator or person who has knowledge of the mystic arts. ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... Rennes-le-Château (Rènnas del Castèl in occitan) is a small medieval castle village and a commune in the Aude département, in the Languedoc area in southern France. ... Paranormal is an umbrella term used to describe a wide variety of reported anomalous phenomena. ... Ley lines are alignments of a number of places of geographical interest, such as ancient megaliths. ... Megalithic tomb, Mane Braz, Brittany Bronze age wedge tomb in the Burren area of Ireland For the record label, see Megalith Records. ... For other uses, see Merovingian (disambiguation). ...


The Pelat Affair

In September 1993, while investigative judge Thierry Jean-Pierre was investigating the activities of multi-millionaire Roger-Patrice Pelat in the context of the Pechiney-Triangle Affair, he was informed that Pelat may have once been Grand Master of a clandestine Masonic Lodge known as the Priory of Sion. Indeed, Pelat's name had been on Plantard's list of grand masters since 1989. In fact, Pelat had died in 1989, while he was being indicted for insider trading or "délit d'initié" in French. Plantard may have been naive about financial terms and interpreted the word "initié" esoterically, to mean "initiate". Following a long established pattern, Plantard "recruited" the "initiate" Pelat soon after his death and included him as the most recent Priory of Sion Grand Master.[34] Grand Master is the typical title of the supreme head (in some national orders below the Sovereign Head of state) of various orders of knighthood, including military orders, various religious orders, and some sectarian orders such as the Ancient Order of Hibernians and the Orange Order. ... In most areas of the world Masons gather together in Masonic Lodges to work the three degrees of Freemasonry: 1° = Entered Apprentice 2° = Fellow Craft 3° = Master Mason Blue Lodge is used to specify the basic Masonic Lodge granting the first three degrees and to differentiate it from other Masonic... Insider trading is the trading of a corporations stock or other securities (e. ... Coming from the Latin, initiation implies a beginning. ...


Pelat had been a friend of François Mitterrand, then President of France, and at the centre of a scandal involving French Prime Minister Pierre Bérégovoy. As an investigative judge, Thierry Jean-Pierre could not dismiss any information pertaining to his case that was brought to his attention, especially if it might have led to a Propaganda Due-like scandal, but since he never considered it worthwhile meeting Plantard, he ordered the search of Plantard's home by his officers. Plantard had first claimed that Pelat had been a Grand Master in a Priory of Sion pamphlet dated March 8, 1989, then claimed it again later in a 1990 issue of Vaincre, the official publication of Alpha Galates, a pseudo-chivalric order created by Plantard in Vichy France to support the "National Revolution".[35][36] The search turned up a hoard of forged documents, including some proclaiming Plantard the true king of France. It has been reported that, under oath, Plantard had to admit that he had fabricated everything, including Pelat's involvement with the Priory of Sion.[37][38] Quoting Laurent Octonovo:   IPA: (October 26, 1916 – January 8, 1996) served as President of France from 1981 to 1995, elected as representative of the Socialist Party (PS). ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... Pierre Eugène Bérégovoy (December 23, 1925 - May 1, 1993) was a French Socialist politician of russian origin. ... This box:      Propaganda Due or P2 was an irregular or black Masonic lodge that operated in Italy from 1877-1981, headed in its final decades by Licio Gelli. ... Chivalric Orders were created by European monarchs after the failure of the Crusades. ... Motto Travail, famille, patrie French: Unoccupied zone of Vichy France (until November 1942) Capital Vichy Capital-in-exile Sigmaringen (1944-1945) Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholic Government Dictatorship Chief of state  - 1940 — 1944 Philippe Pétain President of the Council  - 1940 — 1942 Philippe Pétain  - 1942 — 1944 Pierre Laval... Prieuré de Sion, usually rendered in English translation as Priory of Sion or even Priory of Zion, is an elusive protagonist in many works of both non-fiction and fiction. ... Kings ruled in France from the Middle Ages to 1848. ...

Plantard was threatened with legal action by the Pelat family and the time had therefore come for him to do a disappearing act to his house in the south of France. He was then 74 years old and his life was effectively over – nothing more was heard of him.[39]

Plantard died in Paris on February 3, 2000. This article is about the capital of France. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...

Revival

On December 27, 2002, an open letter announced the revival of the Priory of Sion as an integral traditionalist esoteric society, which stated that: "The Commanderies of Saint-Denis, Millau, Geneva and Barcelona are fully operative. According to the Tradition, the first Commanderie is under the direction of a woman", claiming there were 9,841 members.[40] It was signed by Gino Sandri (who claims to be Pierre Plantard's former private secretary) under the title of "General Secretary",[41] and by "P. Plantard" (Le Nautonnier, G. Chyren). Quoting fringe researcher Laurent Octonovo: December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Traditionalist School of thought, also known as Integral Traditionalism (in the sense of Integralism) or Perennialism (in the sense of perennial philosophy, or Sophia Perennis) is an esoteric movement inspired by the interwar period writings of French metaphysician René Guénon and developed by authors such as German-Swiss...

I’ve personally met this Gino Sandri on one occasion, and I had the opportunity to have a really good talk with him, but I think that he's simply seeking attention. He seemed to me to be something of a mythomaniac, which would certainly be an excellent qualification for being Secretary of the Priory of Sion. During our conversation he said something in passing that I found quite extraordinary. He said, “Ultimately, what is the Priory of Sion? It's nothing more than a well-known brand name, but with goodness knows what behind it?” He gave a good brief account of the phenomenon of the Priory of Sion. Thanks to Dan Brown, hundreds of millions of people now have “brand awareness”, and several million of them seem to take it seriously.[42]

The emergence of Sandri as a "reliable source" for the revival of the Priory of Sion is among the subjects of the 2008 dramatic documentary Bloodline-The Movie by filmmakers Bruce Burgess and Rene Barnett, which expands on dubious elements contained in books like The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail.[43] Book cover of The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail 2005 illustrated hardcover edition. ...


The Da Vinci Code

For more details on this topic, see The Priory of Sion in the Da Vinci Code.

As a result of Dan Brown's best-selling 2003 conspiracy fiction novel The Da Vinci Code and the 2006 film made from it,[2] there has been a new level of public interest in the Priory of Sion. Brown's novel promotes the mythical version of the Priory but departs from the ultimate conclusions presented in The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail. Rather than plotting to create a "United States of Europe" ruled by a Merovingian sacred king descended from the historical Jesus, the Priory of Sion initiates its members into a mystery cult seeking to restore the feminist theology necessary for a complete understanding of early Christianity, which was supposedly suppressed by the Roman Catholic Church. The author has presented this speculation as fact in a non-fiction preface, public appearances, and interviews. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dan Brown (born June 22, 1964) is an American author of thriller fiction, best known for the 2003 bestselling novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... Particularly since the 1960s, conspiracy theory has been a popular subject of fiction. ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ... This article is about the film. ... Book cover of The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail 2005 illustrated hardcover edition. ... The United States of Europe (sometimes abbreviated U.S.E. or USE) is a name given to several similar speculative scenarios of the unification of Europe, as a single nation and a single federation of states, similar to the United States of America, both as projected by writers of speculative... For other uses, see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... A sacred king, according to the systematic interpretation of mythology developed by Sir James George Frazer in his influential book The Golden Bough, was a king who represented a solar deity in a periodically re-enacted fertility rite. ... This article is about Jesus the man, using historical methods to reconstruct a biography of his life and times. ... A mystery religion is any religion with an arcanum, or body of secret wisdom. ... Feminist theology is a movement, generally in the Western religious traditions (mostly Christianity and Judaism), to reconsider the traditions, practices, scriptures, and theologies of those religions from a feminist perspective. ... // Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Early Christianity is the Christianity of the three centuries between the death of Jesus ( 30) and the First Council of Nicaea (325). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ...


Furthermore, in their 1986 sequel The Messianic Legacy,[44] Baigent, Leigh, and Lincoln suggested that there was a current conflict between the Priory of Sion and the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, which originated from the real rivalry between the Knights Templar and Knights Hospitaller during the Crusades. For the dramatic structure of The Da Vinci Code, Brown chose to replace the Knights of Malta, widely known for their humanitarian work, with the Roman Catholic prelature Opus Dei as the nemesis of the Priory of Sion in order to capitalize on controversies about Opus Dei. The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail (retitled Holy Blood, Holy Grail in the United States) is a controversial book by authors Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh, and Henry Lincoln, which was first published in 1982 by Jonathan Cape in London. ... Motto Tuitio Fidei et Obsequium Pauperum(Latin) Defence of the faith and assistance to the poor Anthem (Latin) Hail, thou White Cross Capital Palazzo Malta, Rome Official languages Italian Government  -  Grand Master Fra Andrew Bertie Currency Scudo The Sovereign Military Hospitaller Order of Saint John of Jerusalem, of Rhodes and... For other uses, see Knights Templar (disambiguation). ... The Knights Hospitaller (also known as the , Sovereign Order of Saint John of Jerusalem of Rhodes and of Malta, Knights of Malta, Knights of Rhodes, and Chevaliers of Malta; French: Ordre des Hospitaliers) is a Christian organization that began as an Amalfitan hospital founded in Jerusalem in 1080 to provide... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... A prelate is a member of the clergy having a special canonical jurisdiction over a territory or a group of people; usually, a prelate is a bishop. ... For other uses, see Opus Dei (disambiguation). ... Opus Dei is depicted as a dangerous cult by the Da Vinci Code. ...


The Sion Revelation

Further conspiracies are alleged in the 2006 pseudohistory book The Sion Revelation: The Truth About the Guardians of Christ's Sacred Bloodline by Lynn Picknett and Clive Prince[45] (authors of the 1997 book The Templar Revelation, the principal source for Dan Brown's claims about hidden messages in the work of Leonardo da Vinci). They accept the evidence that the Priory of Sion was a hoax created by Pierre Plantard, and that its pre-1956 history is fraudulent, but they insist that this was a part of a complex red herring designed to discredit the story of a "Jesus bloodline" and the secret society that would be the power behind the throne. They argue that elites and shadowy forces have been plotting to create a "United States of Europe" in line with French occultist Alexandre Saint-Yves d'Alveydre's synarchist vision of an ideal form of government. Pseudohistory is a pejorative term applied to texts which purport to be historical in nature but which depart from standard historiographical conventions in a way which undermines their conclusions. ... Lynn Picknett is a writer, researcher, and lecturer on the paranormal, the occult, and historical and religious mysteries. ... The Templar Revelation: Secret Guardians of the True Identity of Christ is a book written by Lynn Picknett and Clive Prince and published in 1997. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... In literature, a red herring is a plot device intended to distract the reader from a more important event in the plot, usually a twist ending. ... The Jesus bloodline (not to be confused with the genealogy of Jesus) is the modern theory that Jesus Christ had a natural child with Mary Magdalene which was then taken to Egypt and then to France, either during Magdalenes pregnancy or as a young child, and whose blood descendants... For the Europe album, see Secret Society (Europe album). ... The phrase power behind the throne refers to a person or group that informally exercises the real power of an office. ... For other uses, see Elite (disambiguation). ... The United States of Europe (sometimes abbreviated U.S.E. or USE) is a name given to several similar speculative scenarios of the unification of Europe, as a single nation and a single federation of states, similar to the United States of America, both as projected by writers of speculative... List of notable occultists and mystics. ... Synarchism (from Greek words meaning to rule together or harmonious rule, in Spanish Sinarquismo) is a word that has been used to describe several different political processes in various contexts. ...


Criticism

Despite the exhaustive debunking of the Priory of Sion myth by journalists and scholars,[46][47][48][49][50][51][52][53] some skeptics have expressed concern that the dissemination and popularity of books, websites and films inspired by this myth have contributed to the mainstreaming of conspiracy theories, pseudohistory, superstition and other confusions but also of the romantic reactionary ideology unknowingly or knowingly promoted in these works.[54][55][56][25] A debunker is a skeptic who pursues dispelling false and unscientific claims. ... Skepticism (Commonwealth spelling: Scepticism) can mean: Philosophical skepticism - a philosophical position in which people choose to critically examine whether the knowledge and perceptions that they have are actually true, and whether or not one can ever be said to have absolutely true knowledge; or Scientific skepticism - a scientific, or practical... Mainstream is, generally, the common current of thought of the majority. ... A conspiracy theory is a theory that defies common historical or current understanding of events, under the claim that those events are the result of manipulations by two or more individuals or various secretive powers or conspiracies. ... Pseudohistory is a pejorative term applied to texts which purport to be historical in nature but which depart from standard historiographical conventions in a way which undermines their conclusions. ... For other uses, see Superstition (disambiguation). ... In an historical context, Premodernity is the period in Western civilization that came after Ancient history and before Modernity, which is usually recognized to have begun in the mid-1400s, marked by the invention of movable type and the printing press. ... Reactionary (or reactionist) is a political epithet, generally used as a pejorative, originally applied in the context of the French Revolution to counter-revolutionaries who wished to restore the real or imagined conditions of the monarchical Ancien Régime. ...


Alleged Grand Masters of the Priory of Sion

The Priory of Sion was supposedly led by a "Nautonnier", an Old French word for a navigator, which means Grand Master in their internal esoteric nomenclature. The following list of Grand Masters is derived from the Secret Dossiers of Henri Lobineau compiled by Pierre Plantard under the pseudonym of "Philippe Toscan du Plantier" in 1967: All the names on this list were selected after the people in question had died. Many of the names chosen seem to have a common thread of being known for an interest in esotericism or heresy. Nautonnier is an Old French word for a navigator. ... Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of modern Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300. ... A navigator is the person onboard a ship responsible for the navigation of the vessel. ... Grand Master is the typical title of the supreme head (in some national orders below the Sovereign Head of state) of various orders of knighthood, including military orders, various religious orders, and some sectarian orders such as the Ancient Order of Hibernians and the Orange Order. ... The Dossiers Secrets dHenri Lobineau (Secret Files in English) is a 27 paged document that was deposited in the Bibliothèque nationale de France on 27 April 1967. ... Pierre Athanase Marie Plantard (born March 18, 1920, died February 3, 2000) was the principal figure associated with the known history of the Priory of Sion, and is widely believed to have been the main creator of many of the claims about the Priorys supposed past history that later... For other uses, see Alias. ... Look up Esotericism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Heresy (disambiguation). ...

Leonardo da Vinci, alleged to be the Priory of Sion's 12th Grand Master
  1. Jean de Gisors (1188-1220)
  2. Marie de Saint-Clair (1220-1266)
  3. Guillaume de Gisors (1266-1307)
  4. Edouard de Bar (1307-1336)
  5. Jeanne de Bar (1336-1351)
  6. Jean de Saint-Clair (1351-1366)
  7. Blanche d'Evreux (1366-1398)
  8. Nicolas Flamel (1398-1418)
  9. René d'Anjou (1418-1480)
  10. Iolande de Bar (1480-1483)
  11. Sandro Filipepi (1483-1510)
  12. Léonard de Vinci (1490-1519)
  13. Connétable de Bourbon (1519-1527)
  14. Ferdinand de Gonzague (1527-1575)
  15. Louis de Nevers (1575-1595)
  16. Robert Fludd (1595-1637)
  17. J. Valentin Andrea (1637-1654)
  18. Robert Boyle (1654-1691)
  19. Isaac Newton (1691-1727)
  20. Charles Radclyffe (1727-1746)
  21. Charles de Lorraine (1746-1780)
  22. Maximilian de Lorraine (1780-1801)
  23. Charles Nodier (1801-1844)
  24. Victor Hugo (1844-1885)
  25. Claude Debussy (1885-1918)
  26. Jean Cocteau (1918-1963)

A later document, Le Cercle d'Ulysse, identifies François Ducaud-Bourget, a prominent Traditionalist Catholic, as the Grand Master following Cocteau's death. Plantard himself is later identified as the last Grand Master. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 382 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (420 × 659 pixel, file size: 67 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Leonardo da Vinci was a genius from the Renaissance period. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 382 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (420 × 659 pixel, file size: 67 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Leonardo da Vinci was a genius from the Renaissance period. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Jean de Gisors (1133 - 1220) was a Norman lord of the fortress of Gisors in Normandy, where meetings were traditionally convened between English and French kings and where, in 1188, a curious squabble occurred that involved the cutting of an elm. ... Saladin unsuccessfully besieges the Hospitaller fortress of Krak des Chevaliers in modern Syria. ... // The world in 1220 Middle Ages in Europe Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Events Mongols first invade Abbasid caliphate - Bukhara and Samarkand taken End of the Kara-Khitan Khanate, destroyed by Genghis Khans Mongolian cavalry Dominican Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Pope... // The world in 1220 Middle Ages in Europe Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Events Mongols first invade Abbasid caliphate - Bukhara and Samarkand taken End of the Kara-Khitan Khanate, destroyed by Genghis Khans Mongolian cavalry Dominican Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Pope... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... Guillaume de Gisors (1219-1307). ... For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... January 18 - German king Albrecht I makes his son Rudolf king of Bohemia. ... Edouard de Bar (who died in 1336) is the grandson of Edward I Longshanks (King of England). ... January 18 - German king Albrecht I makes his son Rudolf king of Bohemia. ... Events End of the Kemmu restoration and beginning of the Muromachi period in Japan. ... Jeanne de Bar is the grand daughter of Edward I Longshanks King of England and sister of Edouard de Bar. ... Events End of the Kemmu restoration and beginning of the Muromachi period in Japan. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Suko of Japan, third of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Start of the reign of Emperor Go-Kogon of Japan, fourth of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders May 1 Zürich joins the Swiss Confederation. ... Marie de Saint-Clair b abt 1192 was said-to-be descended from Henry de Saint-Clair, Baron of Roslin in Scotland, who accompanied Godfroi de Boullion on the First Crusade. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Suko of Japan, third of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Start of the reign of Emperor Go-Kogon of Japan, fourth of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders May 1 Zürich joins the Swiss Confederation. ... Events Births Anne of Bohemia, Queen consort of Richard II of England. ... Blanche dEvreux (1333 - 1398) was a French princess. ... Events Births Anne of Bohemia, Queen consort of Richard II of England. ... Events Glendalough monastery, Wicklow Ireland destroyed. ... This imaginative portrait of Nicolas Flamel dates from the nineteenth century. ... Events Glendalough monastery, Wicklow Ireland destroyed. ... Events May 19 - Capture of Paris by John, Duke of Burgundy September - Beginning of English Siege of Rouen Mircea the Old, ruler of Wallachia dies and is succeeded by Vlad I Uzurpatorul. ... René dAnjou, René I of Naples (René I the Good, French Le bon roi René) (January 16, 1409–July 10, 1480), was Duke of Anjou, Count of Provence (1434–1480), Count of Piedmont, Duke of Bar (1430–1480), Duke of Lorraine (1431–1453), King of Naples (1438–1442; titular... Events May 19 - Capture of Paris by John, Duke of Burgundy September - Beginning of English Siege of Rouen Mircea the Old, ruler of Wallachia dies and is succeeded by Vlad I Uzurpatorul. ... Events March 6 - Treaty of Toledo - Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain recognize African conquests of Afonso of Portugal and he cedes the Canary Islands to Spain Great standing on the Ugra river - Muscovy becomes independent from the Golden Horde. ... Rene dAnjou, Count of Anjou, Duke of Bar, Duke of Anjou, called the Good, (died 1480), was a descendant of the kings of France and Sicily. ... Events March 6 - Treaty of Toledo - Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain recognize African conquests of Afonso of Portugal and he cedes the Canary Islands to Spain Great standing on the Ugra river - Muscovy becomes independent from the Golden Horde. ... Events The São Tomé settlement is founded. ... Alessandro di Mariano Filipepi, better known as Sandro Botticelli (Florence March 1, 1445 - May 17, 1510) was an Italian painter of the Florentine school during the Early Renaissance (Quattrocento). ... Events The São Tomé settlement is founded. ... Year 1510 (MDX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Events Tirant Lo Blanc by Joanot Martorell, Martí Joan De Galba is published. ... Events March 4 - Hernán Cortés lands in Mexico. ... Charles III de Bourbon, engraved portrait by Thomas de Leu Charles III of Bourbon-Montpensier, Eighth Duke of Bourbon (February 17, 1490 – May 6, 1527 in Rome) was Count of Montpensier and Dauphin of Auvergne. ... Events March 4 - Hernán Cortés lands in Mexico. ... January 5 - Felix Manz, co-founder of the Swiss Anabaptists, was drowned in the Limmat in Zürich by the Zürich Reformed state church. ... Ferrante I Gonzaga (Italian: Ferdinando I, January 28, 1507 - November 15, 1557) was an Italian condottiero, a member of the House of Gonzaga and the first of the branch of the Gonzaga of Guastalla. ... January 5 - Felix Manz, co-founder of the Swiss Anabaptists, was drowned in the Limmat in Zürich by the Zürich Reformed state church. ... Year 1575 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Louis Gonzaga, Duke of Nevers (Italian: Ludovico or Luigi di Gonzaga-Nevers; September 18, 1539 - October 23, 1595) was an Italian-French dignitiary and diplomat in France. ... Year 1575 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Events January 30 - William Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet is performed for the first time. ... Robert Fludd Robert Fludd, also known as Robertus de Fluctibus (1574, Bearsted, Kent – September 8, 1637, London) was a prominent English Paracelsian physicist, astrologer, and mystic. ... Events January 30 - William Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet is performed for the first time. ... Events February 3 - Tulipmania collapses in Netherlands by government order February 15 - Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor December 17 - Shimabara Rebellion erupts in Japan Pierre de Fermat makes a marginal claim to have proof of what would become known as Fermats last theorem. ... Johannes Valentinus Andreae (1586-1654), a. ... Events February 3 - Tulipmania collapses in Netherlands by government order February 15 - Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor December 17 - Shimabara Rebellion erupts in Japan Pierre de Fermat makes a marginal claim to have proof of what would become known as Fermats last theorem. ... Events April 5 - Signing of the Treaty of Westminster, ending the First Anglo-Dutch War. ... Robert Boyle (Irish: Robaird Ó Bhaoill) (25 January 1627 – 30 December 1691) was an Irish natural philosopher, chemist, physicist, inventor, and early gentleman scientist, noted for his work in physics and chemistry. ... Events April 5 - Signing of the Treaty of Westminster, ending the First Anglo-Dutch War. ... Events March 5 - French troops under Marshal Louis-Francois de Boufflers besiege the Spanish-held town of Mons March 20 - Leislers Rebellion - New governor arrives in New York - Jacob Leisler surrenders after standoff of several hours March 29 - Siege of Mons ends to the city’s surrender May 6... Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... Events March 5 - French troops under Marshal Louis-Francois de Boufflers besiege the Spanish-held town of Mons March 20 - Leislers Rebellion - New governor arrives in New York - Jacob Leisler surrenders after standoff of several hours March 29 - Siege of Mons ends to the city’s surrender May 6... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... Charles Radclyffe (3 September 1693 - 8 December 1746) or Charles Radcliffe, titular 5th Earl of Derwentwater who claimed the title Fifth Earl of Derwentwater, an early Scottish Rite Freemason and, allegedly, a Grand Master of the Rosicrucian Priory of Sion (1727-1746). ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... // Events Catharine de Ricci (born 1522) canonized. ... Prince Charles Alexander of Lorraine Prince Charles Alexander of Lorraine (December 12, 1712 – July 4, 1780) was the son of Leopold Joseph, Duke of Lorraine. ... // Events Catharine de Ricci (born 1522) canonized. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Maximilian Franz visits with his sister Marie Antoinette and King Louis XVI. Painting by Josef Hauzinger Maximilian Franz (1756-1801) was the 16th and the last child of Empress Maria Theresa of Austria and her husband, Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Charles Nodier (April 29, 1780 - January 27, 1844), was a French author. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Jan. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... Jan. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (5 July 1889 – 11 October 1963) was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... A traditionalist Catholic is a Roman Catholic who believes that there should be a restoration of the liturgical forms, public and private devotions, and presentation of Catholic teachings that prevailed in the Catholic Church just before the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965). ...


When the Dossiers Secrets were exposed as a forgery by French researchers and authors, Plantard kept quiet but had to acknowledge that the above list was a fraud when investigated by the police for giving false evidence. In 1989, he tried to make a comeback and revive the Priory of Sion by publishing a second list of Priory Grand Masters. This second list, which included the names of the deceased Roger-Patrice Pelat and his own son Thomas Plantard de Saint-Clair [57], should not be confused with the first. Post-1989, Plantard sought to distance himself from the first list, which belonged to an older, discredited version of the Priory. The second list of the Grand Masters of the Priory of Sion appeared in Vaincre No. 3, September 1989, page 22. Prieuré de Sion, usually rendered in English translation as Priory of Sion or even Priory of Zion, is an elusive protagonist in many works of both non-fiction and fiction. ...

  1. Jean-Tim Negri d'Albes (1681-1703)
  2. François d'Hautpoul (1703-1726)
  3. André-Hercule de Fleury (1726-1766)
  4. Charles de Lorraine (1766-1780)
  5. Maximilian de Lorraine (1780-1801)
  6. Charles Nodier (1801-1844)
  7. Victor Hugo (1844-1885)
  8. Claude Debussy (1885-1918)
  9. Jean Cocteau (1918-1963)
  10. François Balphangon (1963-1969)
  11. John Drick (1969-1981)
  12. Pierre Plantard de Saint-Clair (1981)
  13. Philippe de Chérisey (1984-1985)
  14. Roger-Patrice Pelat (1985-1989)
  15. Pierre Plantard de Saint-Clair (1989)
  16. Thomas Plantard de Saint-Clair (1989)

Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... Events February 2 - Earthquake in Aquila, Italy February 4 - In Japan, the 47 samurai commit seppuku (ritual suicide) February 14 - Earthquake in Norcia, Italy April 21 - Company of Quenching of Fire (ie. ... Events February 2 - Earthquake in Aquila, Italy February 4 - In Japan, the 47 samurai commit seppuku (ritual suicide) February 14 - Earthquake in Norcia, Italy April 21 - Company of Quenching of Fire (ie. ... Events George Friderich Handel becomes a British subject. ... Cardinal Fleury, one of many studio copies of the official portrait by Hyacinthe Rigaud Cardinal André-Hercule de Fleury, Bishop of Fréjus (June 22 or 26, 1653–January 29, 1743) was a French cardinal who served as the chief minister of Louis XV. He was born in Lodève... Events George Friderich Handel becomes a British subject. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Prince Charles Alexander of Lorraine Prince Charles Alexander of Lorraine (December 12, 1712 – July 4, 1780) was the son of Leopold Joseph, Duke of Lorraine. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Maximilian Franz visits with his sister Marie Antoinette and King Louis XVI. Painting by Josef Hauzinger Maximilian Franz (1756-1801) was the 16th and the last child of Empress Maria Theresa of Austria and her husband, Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Charles Nodier (April 29, 1780 - January 27, 1844), was a French author. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Jan. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... Jan. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (5 July 1889 – 11 October 1963) was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Pierre Athanase Marie Plantard (born March 18, 1920, died February 3, 2000) was the principal figure associated with the known history of the Priory of Sion, and is widely believed to have been the main creator of many of the claims about the Priorys supposed past history that later... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Philippe de Chérisey (February 13, 1923 – July 17, 1985) was a French writer and radio humorist, he was also an actor who worked under the name of Amédée (with Jeux interdits,1952, being the most notable film that he appeared in). ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Pierre Athanase Marie Plantard (born March 18, 1920, died February 3, 2000) was the principal figure associated with the known history of the Priory of Sion, and is widely believed to have been the main creator of many of the claims about the Priorys supposed past history that later... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...

In popular culture

The Priory of Sion myth has had several minor and major influences on popular culture. Notable examples include: Popular culture (or pop culture) is the widespread cultural elements in any given society that are perpetuated through that societys vernacular language or lingua franca. ...

Foucaults Pendulum (original title: Il pendolo di Foucault) is a novel by Italian novelist and philosopher Umberto Eco. ... Umberto Eco (born January 5, 1932) is an Italian medievalist, semiotician, philosopher and novelist, best known for his novel The Name of the Rose (Il nome della rosa) and his many essays. ... List of notable occultists and mystics. ... Preacher was a comic book series created by writer Garth Ennis and artist Steve Dillon, published by the American comic book label Vertigo imprint of DC Comics, with painted covers by Glenn Fabry. ... Garth Ennis (born January 16, 1970 in Holywood, Northern Ireland) is a Northern Irish comics writer, best known for the DC/Vertigo series Preacher, co-created with artist Steve Dillon. ... The Grail is a fictional secret society from the comic book Preacher. ... The Jesus bloodline (not to be confused with the genealogy of Jesus) is the modern theory that Jesus Christ had a natural child with Mary Magdalene which was then taken to Egypt and then to France, either during Magdalenes pregnancy or as a young child, and whose blood descendants... To immanentize the eschaton means trying to bring about the eschaton (transcendent, spiritual, or future; the end of days, see eschatology) in the immanent (present or material) world. ... Inbreeding is breeding between close relatives, whether plant or animal. ... Millennium is a grim, suspenseful American television series, produced by Chris Carter (creator of The X-Files), and set during the years leading up to the dawn of the new millennium. ... This is full list of episodes of Millennium tv-series by Chris Carter. ... The Millennium Group is a fictional private investigation and law enforcement consulting firm in the Millennium TV series. ... Apparition of The Virgin to St Bernard by Filippino Lippi (1486) Oil on panel, 210 x 195 cm Church of Badia, Florence A Marian apparition is an event in which the Virgin Mary is believed to have supernaturally appeared to one or more persons, typically Catholics, although not always devout... This article is about a fictional character. ... Jane Jensen (b. ... For other uses, see Supernatural (disambiguation). ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... Monty Pythons Life of Brian is a 1979 comedy written and performed by the Monty Python comedy team. ... Vampire: The Masquerade (Revised Edition) cover. ... The Followers of Set (Setites) are a fictional clan of vampires (also known as The Snake Clan), from White Wolf Game Studios books and role-playing games set in the World of Darkness (Vampire: The Dark Ages and Vampire: The Masquerade). ... The Black Madonna of Częstochowa, Poland A Black Madonna or Black Virgin is a statue or painting of Mary in which she is depicted with dark or black skin. ... The Cainite Heresy is a fictional heretical cult, practised by some vampires and their human subjects in the setting of Vampire: The Dark Ages, a role-playing game by White Wolf Game Studio. ... Cult typically refers to a cohesive social group devoted to beliefs or practices that the surrounding culture considers outside the mainstream, with a notably positive or negative popular perception. ... Selective breeding in domesticated animals is the process of developing a cultivated breed over time. ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines The Old Port of Marseille Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban... Particularly since the 1960s, conspiracy theory has been a popular subject of fiction. ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ... This article is about the film. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Baigent, Michael; Leigh, Richard; Lincoln, Henry (1982). The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail. Corgi. ISBN 0-552-12138-X. 
  2. ^ a b c Brown, Dan (2003). The Da Vinci Code. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-50420-9. 
  3. ^ Pierre Plantard, Gisors et son secret...(ORBIS, 1961), abridged version contained in Gérard de Sède, Les Templiers sont parmi nous (1962).
  4. ^ Rennes-le-Château: Alternative Religions Resource Guides
  5. ^ http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/04/27/60minutes/main1552009_page2.shtml Transcription of 60 minutes program
  6. ^ Bernardo Sanchez Da Motta, Do Enigma de Rennes-le-Château ao Priorado de Siao - Historia de um Mito Moderno, p. 322, reproducing the Priory of Sion Registration Document showing the group was based in Plantard's apartment (Esquilo, 2005).
  7. ^ Jean-Luc Chaumeil, "Les Archives du Prieuré de Sion" (Le Charivari, N°18, 1973), contains a transcript of the 1956 Statutes of the Priory of Sion.
  8. ^ J. Cailleboite, "A Sous-Cassan et aux pervenches un missionnaire regarde la vie ouvriere" (Circuit, Numéro spécial, Octobre 1956).
  9. ^ Pierre Jarnac, Les Archives de Rennes-le-Château, Tome II, p. 566 (Editions Belisane, 1988).
  10. ^ a b Anderson, Stephen (2000). "Pierre Plantard: the Grand Monarch". Retrieved on 2008-03-10.
  11. ^ Introvigne, Massimo. Beyond The Da Vinci Code: History and Myth of the Priory of Sion
  12. ^ Bill Putnam, John Edwin Wood, The Treasure of Rennes-le-Château, A Mystery Solved (Suttons Publishing, 2003).
  13. ^ Jean-Luc Chaumeil, La Table d'Isis ou Le Secret de la Lumière, Editions Guy Trédaniel, 1994, p. 121-124.
  14. ^ Madeleine Blancassall, Les Descendants Mérovingiens ou l’énigme du Razès wisigoth (1965), in Pierre Jarnac, Les Mystères de Rennes-le-Château, Mélanges Sulfureux (CERT, 1994).
  15. ^ Jean Delaude, Le Cercle d’Ulysse (1977), in Pierre Jarnac, Les Mystères de Rennes-le-Château, Mélanges Sulfureux (CERT, 1994).
  16. ^ A photograph of a young Thomas Plantard de Saint-Clair standing next to the Les Pontils tomb was published in the book by Jean-Pierre Deloux, Jacques Brétigny, Rennes-le-Château - Capitale Secrète de l'Histoire de France (1982).
  17. ^ Jean-Luc Chaumeil, Rennes-le-Château – Gisors – Le Testament du Prieuré de Sion (Le Crépuscule d’une Ténebreuse Affaire), Editions Pégase, 2006.
  18. ^ Bill Putnam, John Edwin Wood, The Treasure of Rennes-le-Château, A Mystery Solved (Suttons Publishing, 2003).
  19. ^ Jean-Luc Chaumeil, Rennes-le-Château – Gisors – Le Testament du Prieuré de Sion (Le Crépuscule d’une Ténébreuse Affaire), Editions Pégase, 2006
  20. ^ Bill Putnam, John Edwin Wood, The Treasure of Rennes-le-Château, A Mystery Solved, p.189-192 (Sutton Publishing, revised 2005 paperback edition, ISBN 0 7509 4216 9).
  21. ^ The History of a Mystery, BBC 2, transmitted on 17 September 1996
  22. ^ The Priory of Sion, CBS News-60 Minutes, transmitted on 30 April 2006
  23. ^ Jean-Jacques Bedu, Les sources secrètes du Da Vinci Code (2005).
  24. ^ Massimo Introvigne, Gli Illuminati e il Priorato di Sion ( 2005).
  25. ^ a b Thompson, Damian (2008). "How Da Vinci Code tapped pseudo-fact hunger". Retrieved on 2008-03-28.
  26. ^ Burns, Alex (2000). "holy blood, holy grail". Retrieved on 2009-03-10.
  27. ^ Moench, Doug (1995). Factoid Books: The Big Book of Conspiracies. Paradox Press. ISBN-10: 1563891867. 
  28. ^ Aho, Barbara (1997). "The Merovingian Dynasty: Satanic Bloodline of the Antichrist and False Prophet". Retrieved on 2009-03-29.
  29. ^ Professor Martin Kemp, on the documentary The History of a Mystery, BBC Two, transmitted on 17 September 1996.
  30. ^ Dr Thomas Asbridge, on the documentary The Real Da Vinci Code, Channel Four, transmitted on 3 February 2005.
  31. ^ Richard Barber, on the documentary The Real Da Vinci Code, Channel Four, transmitted on 3 February 2005.
  32. ^ Jonathan Riley-Smith, on the documentary The Priory of Sion, CBS News, 60 Minutes, transmitted on 30 April 2006.
  33. ^ Thompson, Damian (2008). Counterknowledge: How We Surrendered to Conspiracy Theories, Quack Medicine, Bogus Science and Fake History. Atlantic Books. ISBN-10: 1843546752. 
  34. ^ "Affaire Pelat: Le Rapport du Juge", Le Point, no. 1112, p.11 (dated 8-14 January 1994).
  35. ^ Les Cahiers de Rennes-le-Chateau" Nr IX, 1989
  36. ^ Jean-Jacques Bedu, Les sources secrètes du Da Vinci Code, 2005
  37. ^ "Affaire Pelat: Le Rapport du Juge", Le Point, no. 1112, p.11 (dated 8-14 January 1994).
  38. ^ Philippe Laprévôte, "Note sur l’actualité du Prieuré de Sion", in: Politica Hermetica Nr. 10 (1996), p. 140-151.
  39. ^ Laurent Octonovo, "Pierre Plantard, Geneviève Zaepfell and the Alpha-Galates" (Actes du Colloque 2006, OdS, 2007).
  40. ^ Bulletin Pégase N°06, Janvier/Mars 2003.
  41. ^ Gino Sandri works for a white-collar trade union for civil servants in the social security sector, http://www.snfocos.org/site/contacts/bureau_national/bureau_national.asp
  42. ^ Laurent Octonovo, "Pierre Plantard, Geneviève Zaepfell and the Alpha-Galates" (Actes du Colloque 2006, OdS, 2007).
  43. ^ (2008). "Tomb Discovered in France Considered Knights Templar - When Excavated, Findings May Challenge the Tenets of Christianity". Retrieved on 2008-04-17.
  44. ^ Baigent, Michael; Leigh, Richard; Lincoln, Henry (1987). The Messianic Legacy. Dell. ISBN 0-440-20319-8. 
  45. ^ Picknett, Lynn; Prince, Clive (2006). The Sion Revelation: The Truth About the Guardians of Christ's Sacred Bloodline. Touchstone. ISBN-10: 0743263030. 
  46. ^ Bill Putnam, John Edwin Wood, The Treasure of Rennes-le-Château, A Mystery Solved (Sutton Publishers, 2003).
  47. ^ Pierre Jarnac, Les Archives de Rennes-le-Château, Tome I, p.197-198 (Editions Bélisane, 1987)
  48. ^ Jean-Luc Chaumeil, La Table d'Isis ou Le Secret de la Lumière, p. 121-124. (Editions Guy Trédaniel, 1994, ISBN 2-85-707-622-3)
  49. ^ Massimo Introvigne, Gli Illuminati e il Priorato di Sion (Piemme, Milano 2005).
  50. ^ Bernardo Sanchez Da Motta, Do Enigma de Rennes-le-Château ao Priorado de Siao - Historia de um Mito Moderno(Esquilo, 2005).
  51. ^ Jean-Jacques Bedu, Les sources secrètes du Da Vinci Code (Éditions du Rocher, 2005).
  52. ^ Franck Marie, Rennes-le-Château, Etude Critique (SRES, 1978)
  53. ^ Pierre Jarnac, Histoire du Trésor de Rennes-le-Château (Editions Belisane, 1985).
  54. ^ Klinghoffer, David (2006). "The Da Vinci Protocols: Jews should worry about Dan Brown’s success". Retrieved on 2008-03-28.
  55. ^ Miller, Laura (2004). "The Da Vinci crock". Retrieved on 2008-04-09.
  56. ^ Miller, Laura (2006). "Jesus: The coverup". Retrieved on 2008-04-09.
  57. ^ http://copainsdavant.linternaute.com/membre/1093561/1376459003/thomas_plantard_de_saint_clair/
  58. ^ O'Neill, Tim (2006). "History vs The Da Vinci Code". Retrieved on 2008-03-25.
  59. ^ Ennis, Garth (1997). Preacher Vol. 2: Until the End of the World. Vertigo. ISBN 1563893126. 
  60. ^ Mizrach, Steven (2005). "Prieure of Sion: the Mystery deepens". Retrieved on 2008-03-25.
  61. ^ Ravipinto, Dan (2004). "Gabriel Knight 3 review". Retrieved on 2008-03-26.
  62. ^ Harris, Craig. "All Music Guide: Priory of Brion Biography". Retrieved on 2008-03-26.
  63. ^ Shomshak, Dean (2001). Clanbook: Followers of Set, Revised Edition. White Wolf. ISBN 1-58846-204-8. 

Author Michael Baigent Reuters Michael Baigent, born March 1948 in Christchurch, New Zealand, is an author and conspiracy theorist who co-wrote (with Richard Leigh) a number of books that question mainstream perceptions of history and many commonly-held versions of the life of Jesus. ... For other people named Richard Leigh, see Richard Leigh. ... Henry Lincoln (born 1930) is the most popular pseudonym of Henry Soskin, an English writer and actor. ... Book cover of The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail 2005 illustrated hardcover edition. ... Dan Brown (born June 22, 1964) is an American author of thriller fiction, best known for the 2003 bestselling novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ... Doubleday is one of the largest book publishing companies in the world. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Asbridge is a University of London medieval history scholar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Lynn Picknett is a writer, researcher, and lecturer on the paranormal, the occult, and historical and religious mysteries. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Garth Ennis (born January 16, 1970 in Holywood, Northern Ireland) is a Northern Irish comics writer, best known for the DC/Vertigo series Preacher, co-created with artist Steve Dillon. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Massimo Introvigne (b. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
PRIORY OF SION: THE FACTS, THE THEORIES, THE MYSTERY (9851 words)
These documents also claim that the Ordre of Sion and the Order of the Temple (officially, the Poor Knights of the Temple of Solomon, later known as the Knights Templar, and officially recognized as such in 1118) were, until 1188, one unified organization with the same leadership.
The implications are obvious; the "priory docs" present the Sinclairs as the "interface" between Templarism and Masonry.
The "priory documents" claim that a new class of "Brethren," the "Children of St. Vincent" or "Free Brothers", were created on January 17th, 1681, in Blois.
Priory of Sion: Information from Answers.com (3970 words)
The claims described the Priory of Sion as a secret society that was founded in the 11th century, to protect and preserve a secret involving the bloodline of Jesus Christ.
Between 1961 and 1984 Plantard contrived a mythical pedigree of the Priory of Sion claiming that it was the offshoot of the monastic order housed in the Abbey of Sion, which had been founded in the Kingdom of Jerusalem during the First Crusade and later absorbed by the Jesuits in 1617.
They accept the evidence that the Priory was created by Plantard, and that its pre-1956 history is fraudulent, but they insist that this was a part of a complex double-bluff designed to discredit the story of the "divine bloodline" and the secret organisations that support it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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