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Encyclopedia > Principality of Moldavia
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It has been suggested that Moldavia (historical region) be merged into this article or section. (Discuss)
and the article be renamed to Moldavia.
For other uses see Moldova (disambiguation).
Principality of Moldavia, 1793-1812, highlighted in orange
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Principality of Moldavia, 1793-1812, highlighted in orange
Principality of Moldavia, before the union with Wallachia, highlighted in orange
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Principality of Moldavia, before the union with Wallachia, highlighted in orange

Moldavia, (Romanian: Moldova, Turkish: Bogdan) was a medieval principality on the lower Danube river which, along with Wallachia, formed the basis for the modern Romanian state. Its name originates from the Moldova river. Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... Jump to: navigation, search It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Principality of Moldavia. ... Moldavia (Moldova in Romanian) was a Romanian principality, originally created in the Middle Ages, now divided between Romania, Moldovan Republic and Ukraine. ... Moldova can refer to any of the following: Moldova, a European country Moldova (region), a region of Romania Moldavia, a medieval principate, that encompassed both the Moldova region of Romania and Moldova, the country. ... Image File history File links Rom1793-1812. ... Image File history File links Rom1793-1812. ... Image File history File links Rom1856-1859. ... Image File history File links Rom1856-1859. ... Length 2,888 km Elevation of the source 1,078 m Average discharge 30 km before Passau: 580 m³/s Vienna: 1,900 m³/s Budapest: 2,350 m³/s just before Delta: 6,500 m³/s Area watershed 817,000 km² Origin Black Forest (Schwarzwald-Baar, Baden- Württemberg, Germany... Map of Romania with Wallachia in yellow. ... Jump to: navigation, search A state is an organized political community occupying a definite territory, having an organized government, and possessing internal and external sovereignty. ... Moldova river is a river of the Moldavia region of Romania, which rises from the Obcine of Bukovina in Suceava county. ...


The principality in its greatest extent streched from Transylvania in the west to the Dniester River in the east, but had its nucleus in the northwestern part, the Ţara de Sus ("Upper Land"), which later became known as Bukovina. This area contained Suceava, the capital of the principality from 1359-1565. Iaşi was the capital from 1565-1859. Jump to: navigation, search Transylvania (Romanian: Transilvania or Ardeal; Hungarian: Erdély; German: Siebenbürgen; see also other languages) forms the western and central parts of Romania. ... Length 1350 km Elevation of the source -  m Average discharge -  m³/s Area watershed 62,000  km² Origin  Ukraine Mouth  Black Sea Basin countries Ukraine, Moldova The river Dniester (Polish: Dniestr, Ukrainian: Дністер, Romanian: Nistru, Russian: Днестр, Latin: Tyras) is a river in Eastern Europe. ... Bukovina, in green, divided between Romania (red) and Ukraine (yellow) Bukovina is the territory on the slopes of the northeastern Carpathian Mountains and the adjoining plains. ... Suceava (German Suczawa, Yiddish שאָץ Shots) is a city in the Suceava county, Bucovina, Romania. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Orhan I (1326-1359) to Murad I (1359-1389) Berlin joins the Hanseatic League. ... Events March 1 - the city of Rio de Janeiro is founded April 27 - Cebu City is established becoming the first Spanish settlement in the Philippines. ... Jump to: navigation, search IaÅŸi (also known as Jassy) is a city and a county (see IaÅŸi County) in north-eastern Romania, in the historic region of Moldavia. ... Events March 1 - the city of Rio de Janeiro is founded April 27 - Cebu City is established becoming the first Spanish settlement in the Philippines. ... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ...


The political entity known as Moldavia was founded in the mid-14th century by the Vlach leader Dragoş of Maramureş, who had been ordered by the Hungarian king to establish a defence line for the Kingdom of Hungary against the Tatars. Bogdan I became the first independent prince of Moldavia when he rejected Hungarian authority in 1359. Later it became a vassal of Poland. Jump to: navigation, search This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right}. It is housed in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was that century which... Vlachs (also called Wlachs, Wallachs, Olahs) are the Romanized population in Central and Eastern Europe, including Romanians, Aromanians, Istro-Romanians and Megleno-Romanians, but since the creation of the Romanian state, this term was mostly used for the Vlachs living south of the Danube river. ... DragoÅŸ was the first Romanian voevode ruling over the lands of Moldavia (ruled between 1351-1353). ... Jump to: navigation, search MaramureÅŸ (Hungarian: Máramaros) is a county (judeÅ£) in the MaramureÅŸ region, northern Romania, in the North of Transylvania with the capital city at Baia Mare (population: 149,735). ... The Kingdom of Hungary (Hungarian: Magyar Királyság) is the name of a multiethnic kingdom that existed in Central Europe from 1000 to 1918. ... Jump to: navigation, search Tatar dance - Tatar (left) fighting with the soldier of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (right). ... Bogdan of Cuhea (aka Bogdan-Vodă; Bogdan I of Moldavia) was a voivode of MaramureÅŸ who invaded Moldavia and disposed the-then voevod of Moldavia, Prince Bâlc, grandson of DragoÅŸ. He ruled Moldavia between 1359 and 1365 and secured her independence from Hungary. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Orhan I (1326-1359) to Murad I (1359-1389) Berlin joins the Hanseatic League. ...


The greatest Moldavian prince was Ştefan cel Mare, (Stephen the Great), who ruled from 1457-1504. With his army of boyars and retainers, Stefan fought off invasions from the Ottoman Empire, the Kingdom of Poland, and the Crimean Tatars. Ştefan fought 36 major battles, but suffered only two defeats. By the end of his reign, Moldavia had kept its independence, although an annual tribute was made to the Ottomans. Stephan the Great (Romanian icon) Åžtefan cel Mare (Stephen the Great or St. ... Events University of Freiburg founded. ... Jump to: navigation, search Events January 1 - French troops surrender Gaeta to the Spanish under Cordoba. ... Jump to: navigation, search A boyar (also spelt bojar; Romanian: boier) was a member of the highest rank of the feudal Russian and Romanian aristocracy, second only to the ruling princes, from the 10th through the 17th century. ... Jump to: navigation, search Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (the Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Bursa (1335 - 1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Ä°stanbul (Constantinople) (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanli... The state formed by Boleslaus I of Poland in 1025 during his coronation. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Crimean Tatars (Qırımtatar aka Qırımtürk, Pl. ... A tribute (from Latin tribulum, contribution) is wealth one party gives to another as a sign of respect or, as was often case in historical contests, of submission or allegiance. ...


Ştefan was succeeded by weak princes who let incompetent boyars rule the state; because the boyars did not pay taxes, the state became bankrupt. Moldavia succumbed to Ottoman power in 1512, becoming a vassal of the empire for the most of the next 300 years. In addition to paying tribute to the Ottoman Empire, Moldavia later acceded to the selection of local rulers by Ottoman authorities. Moldavia suffered repeated invasions by the Ottomans, Crimean Tatars, and Russians. Jump to: navigation, search Events April 11 - Battle of Ravenna. ... A vassal or liege, in the terminology that both preceded and accompanied the feudalism of medieval Europe, is one who enters into mutual obligations with a lord, usually of military support and mutual protection, in exchange for certain guarantees, which came to include the terrain held as a fief. ... A tribute (from Latin tribulum, contribution) is wealth one party gives to another as a sign of respect or, as was often case in historical contests, of submission or allegiance. ...


In the beginning of the 17th century, magnates of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth clashed with the Ottomans over control of Moldavia in the Moldavian Magnate Wars. (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... For a wealthy or powerful business baron, executive, or tycoon, see business magnate Magnate is a title of nobility commonly used in Sweden, Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, and some other medieval empires. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Moldavian Magnate Wars refer to the period at the end of the 16th century and the beginning of the 17th century when the magnates of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth intervened in the affairs of Moldavia, clashing with the Habsburgs and the Ottoman Empire for domination of the territory. ...


Starting from the early-18th century the princes were selected by the Ottomans from Phanariotes, influential Greek families from Constantinople (İstanbul), rather than the local nobility. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Jump to: navigation, search Phanariotes (from Phanari (light-house, in turkish Fener), the chief Greek quarter at Istanbul, where the ecumenical patriarchate is situated) were those members of families resident in the Phanar quarter who between the years 1711 and 1821 were appointed voivodes of the Danubian principalities (Moldavia and... Jump to: navigation, search Map of Constantinople. ... Jump to: navigation, search Shows the Location of the Province Istanbul The Sultan Ahmed Mosque, Istanbul Ä°stanbul (a Turkish contraction of Greek εις την πολιν into the city, the former Constantinople, Κωνσταντινούπολις) is the largest city in Turkey, and arguably the most important. ...


In 1774 the territory became a Russian protectorship while remaining formally a vassal of the Ottoman Empire. By the Treaty of Bucharest following the Russo-Turkish War (1806-1812), Moldavia lost Bessarabia to Russia and Bukovina to Austria. In 1821 a revolt overthrew the unpopular Phanariote regime and, after political and economic reforms were implemented with Russian support, a constitution, the Règlement Organique, was adopted in 1832. 1774 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Treaty of Bucharest of 1812 was signed on 28 May 1812 by the Ottoman Empire and the Russian Empire, at the end of the Russian-Turkish war (1806-1812). ... Russo-Turkish War, 1806-1812 was one of the several wars fought between Imperial Russia and Ottoman Empire War broke out in 1806, when Turkey deposed the russophile governors of its vassal states Moldavia and Walachia. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Old map of Bessarabia Bessarabia or Bessarabiya (Basarabia in Romanian, Besarabya in Turkish) was the name by which the Imperial Russia designated the eastern part of the principality of Moldavia annexed by Russia in 1812. ... Bukovina, in green, divided between Romania (red) and Ukraine (yellow) Bukovina is the territory on the slopes of the northeastern Carpathian Mountains and the adjoining plains. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


After Russia's defeat in the Crimean War (1853-1856), the Treaty of Paris stipulated that Moldavia and Wallachia were to be placed under the collective guarantee of the seven powers that signed the treaty, as well as the retrocession to Moldavia of Southern Bessarabia (Izmail, Bolhrad, Cahul counties). Jump to: navigation, search The Crimean War lasted from 28 March 1854 until 1856. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Treaty of Paris of 1856 settled the Crimean War between Russia and Ottoman Empire and its allies France and Britain. ... Izmail or Ismail (Ukrainian: ; Russian: ; Romanian: Ismail), is a town in south-western Ukraine, located near Danube delta in Odessa Oblast (province). ... Bolhrad is a city in South-western Ukraine, and capital of the Bolhrad district, a district with a large Bulgarian majority. ... Cahul is a city and an administrative region in the south of Moldova. ...


In 1859 (formally in 1861) the Principality of Moldavia united with the Principality of Wallachia by the election of Alexander John Cuza as prince of both Wallachia and Moldavia, laying the foundations for modern Romania. 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Alexander Ioan (Alexander John) Cuza Alexandru Ioan Cuza (March 20, 1820, Galaţi - May 15, 1873, Heidelberg), known more commonly in English as Alexander John Cuza, was the domnitor (ruler) of the United Principalites of Romania between 1859 and 1866. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Principality of Moldavia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (534 words)
Moldavia, (Romanian: Moldova, Turkish: Bogdan) was a medieval principality on the lower Danube river which, along with Wallachia, formed the basis for the modern Romanian state.
The political entity known as Moldavia was founded in the mid-14th century by the Vlach leader Dragoş of Maramureş, who had been ordered by the Hungarian king to establish a defence line for the Kingdom of Hungary against the Tatars.
In 1859 (formally in 1861) the Principality of Moldavia united with the Principality of Wallachia by the election of Alexander John Cuza as prince of both Wallachia and Moldavia, laying the foundations for modern Romania.
History of Moldova - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2362 words)
Moldavia succumbed to Ottoman power, in 1512 becoming a vassal of the empire for the next 300 years.
In 1859 Moldavia united with Wallachia by the election of Alexander John Cuza as prince of both Wallachia and Moldavia, laying the foundations for modern Romania.
World War II Formerly ruled by Romania as part of the principality of Moldavia, Eastern Moldova was occupied by the Soviet Union (with consent from Nazi Germany) in 1940 as a consequence of a secret protocol attached to the 1939 Nazi-Soviet Pact.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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