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Encyclopedia > Princeton Theological Seminary
 The steeple of Alexander Hall
The steeple of Alexander Hall

Princeton Theological Seminary is a theological seminary located in the Borough of Princeton, New Jersey in the United States. It is independent of nearby Princeton University, despite collaboration between scholars at both schools. Image File history File links Princetonsteeple. ... Image File history File links Princetonsteeple. ... Nassau Street, the main street of the Borough of Princeton Princeton highlighted in Mercer County. ... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ...


PTS is one of the world's leading institutions for graduate theological education and home of the largest theological library in the United States. Today it is an international community with nearly 1000 students, a faculty of 53, and an ecumenical and worldwide constituency. Although the roots of Princeton Seminary are in Presbyterianism, not all the students are candidates for the ministry in the Presbyterian Church; some are candidates for ministry in other denominations, while others are studying toward careers in academia, and still others are pursuing fields less directly related to theology, such as law, medicine, social work, administration and education. Presbyterianism is a form of church government which is most prevalent within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... This article needs cleanup. ...


Like other elite theological institutions, such as Duke Divinity School and Candler School of Theology, Princeton Theological Seminary has roots in a distinctive denominational heritage. Whereas university-affiliated divinity schools such as Harvard and Yale are of Congregationalist founding (with Harvard subsequently becoming Unitarian and with both universities eventually disavowing all religious affiliation), Princeton Seminary was affiliated from the beginning with the Presbyterian Church. The Divinity School at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina is one of thirteen seminaries founded and supported by the United Methodist Church. ... One of 13 seminaries of the United Methodist Church, the Candler School of Theology is one of the nine academic divisions of Emory University. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ...

Contents

History

The Seminary's beginnings are in the early 19th century, when a separation began to be more common between higher-level professional education and the general education given at many universities in the United States. The General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church established The Theological Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey in 1812, with the support of the directors of the nearby College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), as the first graduate theological school in the United States. The Seminary remains an institution of the Presbyterian Church (USA), being the largest of the ten theological seminaries affiliated with the 2.5-million member denomination. For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ...

 Alexander Hall
Alexander Hall

In 1812, the Seminary boasted three students and the Reverend Dr. Archibald Alexander as its first professor. By 1815 the number of students had gradually increased and work began on a building: Alexander Hall was designed by John McComb, Jr., a New York architect, and opened in 1817. The original cupola was added in 1827, but it burned in 1913 and was replaced in 1926. The building was simply called "Seminary" until 1893, when it was officially named Alexander Hall. Since its founding, Princeton Seminary has graduated approximately 14,000 men and women who have served the church in many capacities, from pastoral ministry and pastoral care to missionary work, Christian education and leadership in the academy and business. Image File history File linksMetadata Alexpts. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Alexpts. ... Archibald Alexander (1772 – October 22, 1851) was an American Presbyterian theologian who was a professor at the Princeton Theological Seminary and served for 27 years as that institutions first principal from 1812 to 1840. ...


The seminary was made famous during the 19th and early 20th centuries for its defense of Calvinistic Presbyterianism. The college was later the center of a modernist/fundamentalist battle which ultimately led to the formation of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church and Westminster Theological Seminary under the leadership of J. Gresham Machen. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... In an unadorned church, the 17th century congregation stands to hear the sermon. ... Presbyterianism is a form of church government which is most prevalent within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... Modernism, modernist Christianity, and liberalism are labels applied to proponents of a school of Christian thought which rose as a direct challenge to more conservative traditional Christian orthodoxy. ... Fundamentalist Christianity, or Christian fundamentalism, is a movement that arose mainly within British and American Protestantism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by conservative evangelical Christians, who, in a reaction to modernism, actively affirmed a fundamental set of Christian beliefs: the inerrancy of the Bible, the virgin birth... Along with Westminster Theological Seminary, the Orthodox Presbyterian Church (OPC) was founded by conservative Presbyterians who revolted against the modernist theology within the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (PCUSA) during the 1930s. ... Westminster Theological Seminary is a Presbyterian and Reformed Christian graduate educational institution with campuses located in Glenside, Pennsylvania (a suburb of Philadelphia), and Dallas, Texas, and programs of study in New York City, and London. ... Categories: Stub | 1881 births | 1937 deaths | American theologians | Christian fundamentalism | Presbyterianism | Reformed theologians ...


While Princeton Theological Seminary and Princeton University are separate entities, there is reciprocity for use of certain facilities such as the libraries, as well as cross enrollment in classes. Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ...


Princeton Theology

Principals and Presidents of Princeton Theological Seminary

Prior to the creation of the office of President in 1902, the seminary was governed by the principal.


The Principals

The Presidents Archibald Alexander (1772 – October 22, 1851) was an American Presbyterian theologian who was a professor at the Princeton Theological Seminary and served for 27 years as that institutions first principal from 1812 to 1840. ... Charles Hodge Charles Hodge (1797-1878) was the principal of Princeton Theological Seminary between 1851 and 1878. ... A. A. Hodge Archibald Alexander Hodge (July 18 1823 - November 12 1886), an American Presbyterian leader, was the principal of Princeton Seminary between 1878 and 1886. ... Benjamin Breckinridge (B.B.) Warfield (1851 - 1921) was the principal of Princeton Seminary from 1887 to 1921. ...

  • Francis Landey Patton (1902-1913)
  • J. Ross Stevenson (1914-1936)
  • John A. Mackay (1936-1959)
  • James I. McCord (1959-1983)
  • Thomas W. Gillespie (1983-2004)
  • Iain R. Torrance (2004-)

Francis Landey Patton (February 22, 1843 - November 25, 1932), United States educationalist and theologian, was born in Warwick parish, Bermuda. ... The sixth president of Princeton Theological Seminary, the Very Rev. ...

Princeton Theological Seminary libraries

The Seminary's libraries comprise the largest theological collection in the United States and second in the world, behind only the Vatican Library in Rome. The library has over 537,000 bound volumes, pamphlets, and microfilms. It currently receives about 2,100 journals, annual reports of church bodies and learned societies, bulletins, transactions, and periodically issued indices, abstracts, and bibliographies. The Libraries are:

  • Speer Library, opened in 1957 and named in honor of the renowned missionary statesman Robert E. Speer, 400,000 volumes and 200 readers
  • Henry Luce III Library, dedicated in 1994 and named in honor of a distinguished trustee, Henry Luce III, 350,000 volumes and 250 readers

Degree programs

  • Master of Divinity (M.Div.)
  • Masters of Arts (M.A.)
  • Master of Arts (Theological Studies)
  • Master of Theology (Th.M.)
  • Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.)
  • Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
  • Dual M.Div./M.A. in Christian Education or Youth Ministry
 Miller Chapel
Miller Chapel

Image File history File links Millerchapel. ... Image File history File links Millerchapel. ...

Miller Chapel

Built in 1834, Princeton's chapel was named to honor Samuel Miller, the second professor at the Seminary. Originally located beside Alexander Hall, it was moved in 1933 toward the center of the campus, its steps now leading down onto the Seminary's main quad. Miller Chapel underwent a complete renovation in 2000, with the addition of the Joe R. Engle Organ.


Endowed lectureships

  • The Stone Lectures, brings an internationally distinguished scholar to the Seminary each year to deliver a series of public lectures. Created in 1871 by Levi P. Stone, Esq., of Orange, New Jersey, a director and also a trustee of the Seminary. Previous lecturers include Abraham Kuyper (1898), and Nicholas Wolterstorff. The Stone Lecturer for 2005 is Dr. Leander E. Keck, Winkley Professor Emeritus of Biblical Theology at Yale Divinity School.
  • The Warfield Lectures are an annual series of lectures which honor the memory of Annie Kinkead Warfield, wife of Dr. Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield, distinguished professor of theology at the Seminary from 1887 to 1921. The 2005 Warfield Lecturer is Dr. Marilyn McCord Adams, Regius Professor of Divinity at Oxford University. Previous distinguished lecturers include Karl Barth.
  • The Frederick Neumann Memorial Lecture
  • Students┬┤ Lectureship on Missions
  • Women in Church and Ministry Lecture
  • The Alexander Thompson Lecture
  • Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture
  • Abraham Kuyper Prize and Lecture
  • Dr. Geddes W. Hanson Lecture

Prof. ... 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The philosopher Nicholas Paul Wolterstorff was born January 21, 1932 in Bigelow, Minnesota. ... Yale Divinity School is the one of the constituent graduate schools of Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. ... Regius Professorships are Royal Professorships at the universities of Cambridge, Oxford, Dublin, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Edinburgh. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... “Martin Luther King” redirects here. ... Prof. ...

Center for Barth Studies

The Center for Barth Studies was established at Princeton Seminary in 1997 and is administered by a board of seminary faculty. The Center sponsors conferences, research opportunities, discussion groups, and publications that seek to advance understanding of the theology of Karl Barth (1886-1968), the Swiss-German professor and pastor widely regarded as the greatest theologian of the 20th century. The Karl Barth Research Collection, part of Special Collections in the Princeton Theological Seminary Libraries, supports the scholarly activities of the Center for Barth Studies. The Karl Barth Research Collection is acquiring an exhaustive collection of writings by and about Karl Barth. Although many volumes are still needed, the Research Collection has already acquired Barth's most important works in German and English, several first editions, and an original hand-written manuscript by Karl Barth. Karl Barth. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Abraham Kuyper Center for Public Theology

Princeton Dead Sea Scrolls Project

Institute for Youth Ministry

Journal: Theology Today

Journal: Koinonia

Koinonia Journal is published annually by doctoral students at Princeton Theological Seminary. The publication and its annual forum promote written and face-to-face interdisciplinary discussion around issues in theology and the study of religion. It is distributed to well over 100 libraries worldwide.


Center of Continuing Education

Center of Theological Inquiry

In 1978 Princeton Theological Seminary's Board of Trustees established the Center as an independent, ecumenical institution for advanced theological research, "to inquire into the relationship between theological disciplines, [and of these with]...both human and natural sciences, to inquire into the relationship between diverse religious traditions . . . , to inquire into the present state of religious consciousness in the modern world, and to examine such other facets of religion in the modern world as may be appropriate . . ." Today, the Center has its own board, funding, mission and staff, yet maintains close relations with Princeton Theological Seminary.


Notable faculty

The Princeton theology is a tradition of conservative, Christian, Reformed and Presbyterian theology at Princeton Seminary, in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Archibald Alexander (1772 – October 22, 1851) was an American Presbyterian theologian who was a professor at the Princeton Theological Seminary and served for 27 years as that institutions first principal from 1812 to 1840. ... Charles Hodge Charles Hodge (1797-1878) was the principal of Princeton Theological Seminary between 1851 and 1878. ... A. A. Hodge Archibald Alexander Hodge (July 18 1823 - November 12 1886), an American Presbyterian leader, was the principal of Princeton Seminary between 1878 and 1886. ... B. B. Warfield Benjamin Breckinridge (B.B.) Warfield (November 5, 1851 - February 16, 1921) was the principal of Princeton Seminary from 1887 to 1921. ... Categories: Stub | 1881 births | 1937 deaths | American theologians | Christian fundamentalism | Presbyterianism | Reformed theologians ... Emil Brunner (1889-1966) A higly influential Swiss theologian, who along with Karl Barth, is associated with the movement called neo-orthodoxy or dialectical theology. ... The sixth president of Princeton Theological Seminary, the Very Rev. ... Rev. ... Robert Blairgonie Young Scott was a clergyman of the United Church of Canada and an eminent Old Testament scholar at Princeton University in the U.S.A. He is noted nowadays for his staunch support for the social gospel ethos of the United Church, both at Princeton and at home... Gregory Boyd Gregory A. Greg Boyd is an evangelical pastor, theologian, and author. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Bruce Metzger pictured on the cover of his autobiography Reminiscences of an Octogenarian Bruce Manning Metzger (born 1914) is a professor emeritus at Princeton Theological Seminary and Bible editor who serves on the board of the American Bible Society. ... David Otis Fuller David Otis Fuller (born 1903 died 1988) was a graduate of Wheaton College, Princeton Theological Seminary, and Dallas Theological Seminary. ... Dr. James H. Charlesworth is the George L. Collord Professor of New Testament Language and Literature at Princeton Theological Seminary, noted for his research in Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Hebrew and Christian Bibles, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Josephus, the Historical Jesus, and the Gospel of John. ... Warren Carter is an exegete specializing in the Gospel of Matthew, as well as the Greek New Testament in general. ... Harold C. Washington is the professor of Hebrew Bible at Saint Paul School of Theology in Kansas City, Missouri. ... Max L. Stackhouse is a notable professor at Princeton Theological Seminary. ... Charles Augustus Aiken was a clergyman and academic. ...

Notable alumni

Rev. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public press for its citizens and their associations, extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ... This English poster depicting the horrific conditions on slave ships was influential in mobilizing public opinion against slavery. ... Historic Alton Home Alton is a city in Madison County, Illinois, United States. ... An ochlocracy from The Simpsons Ochlocracy (Greek: οχλοκρατία or ohlokratía; Latin: ochlocratia) is government by mob or a mass of people, or the intimidation of constitutional authorities. ... Cornelius Van Til Cornelius Van Til (May 4, 1895 - April 17, 1987), born in Grootegast, the Netherlands, was a Christian philosopher, Reformed theologian, and presuppositional apologist. ... Presuppositional apologetics is a school of Christian apologetics, a field of Christian theology that aims to (1) present a rational basis for the Christian faith, (2) defend the faith against objections, and (3) expose the perceived flaws of other worldviews. ... Victor Paul Wierwille,Th. ... A Masters degree which is typically earned after one has already completed a Master of Divinity or a Master of Theological Studies. ... The Way International is a biblical research, teaching and fellowship ministry founded by Dr. Victor Paul Wierwille. ... New Knoxville is a village located in Auglaize County, Ohio. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ...

Bibliography

  • Princeton Seminary, 2 volumes, by David B. Calhoun is the now standard history of the Seminary
  • John Updike's 1986 novel Roger's Version appears to be partly set in Princeton Seminary; his 1996 novel In the Beauty of the Lilies features the family is Clarence Wilmot, a Princeton-educated preacher schooled in the works of theologians Charles and A. A. Hodge and Benjamin Warfield.

External links

  • Princeton Theological Seminary website

  Results from FactBites:
 
Princeton Theological Seminary - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1119 words)
Princeton Theological Seminary, located in Princeton, New Jersey, is one of the world's leading institutions for graduate theological education and home of the largest theological library in the United States.
The Seminary's beginnings are in the early 19th century, when higher-level professional education was beginning to be separated from the general education given at many universities in the United States.
The Theological Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey, was established by the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in 1812, with the support of the directors of nearby College of New Jersey (later to be re-named Princeton University), as the first graduate theological school in the United States.
Princeton (6211 words)
PRINCETON Theological Seminary prior to 1929 was regarded by theologians of all shades of opinion as the citadel of historic Christianity.
Princeton Seminary was known not only as an institution which defended historic Christianity, but as one which stood firmly for the propagation and defense of the Reformed faith or the Calvinistic system of doctrine that is set forth in the Westminster Confession of Faith and is taught in the Bible.
Princeton was organized to uphold the Westminster Confession of Faith and the Larger and Shorter Catechisms, maintained the faculty, and by no standard of judgment could anyone say that all the ministers or officers of the church held to the truths of these documents in their historic meaning.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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