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Encyclopedia > Prince Asaka
Prince Asaka Yasuhiko, circa 1937
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Prince Asaka Yasuhiko, circa 1937

His Imperial Highness Prince Asaka (Yasuhiko) of Japan (jp: 朝香鳩彦 Asaka Yasuhiko, 2 October 1887 - 13 April 1981), Prince Asaka-no-miya (朝香宮) of Japan, was a member of the Japanese imperial family and a career army officer. A son-in-law of Emperor Meiji and an uncle-in-law of Emperor Shōwa, Prince Asaka commanded the final assault of Japanese forces on Nanjing, then the capital city of Nationalist China, in December 1937. He was implicated in the Nanjing massacre, but never charged. October 2nd is the 275th day (276th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 90 days remaining. ... 1887 is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (104th in leap years). ... 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Imperial Household of Japan (also referred to as the Imperial Family or kōshitsu (jp: 皇室)) refers those members of the extended family of the reigning Emperor of Japan who undertake official and public duties, as well as their minor children. ... Emperor Mutsuhito Mutsuhito or Mitsuhito (睦仁), the Meiji Emperor (明治天皇, literally wise ruling heaven emperor) (3 November 1852–30 July 1912) was the 122nd Emperor of Japan. ... Hirohito (裕仁), the Shōwa Emperor (昭和天皇, Shōwa tennō), (April 29, 1901 – January 7, 1989) reigned over Japan from 1926 to 1989. ... Nanjing (Chinese: 南京; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Nan-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Nanking), is the capital of Chinas Jiangsu province and a city with a prominent place in Chinese history and culture. ... December is the twelfth and last month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1937 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Nanking Massacre (Chinese: 南京大屠殺, pinyin: Nánjīng Dàtúshā; Japanese: 南京大虐殺, Nankin Daigyakusatsu), also known as the Rape of Nanking and sometimes in Japan as the Nanking Incident (南京事件, Nankin Jiken), refers to what many historians recognize as widespread atrocities committed by the Japanese army in and around Nanking (now Nanjing...

Contents


Early Years

Prince Yasuhiko was born in Kyoto, the eighth son of Prince Kuni Asahiko (Kuni no miya Asahiko Shinnō) and the court lady Tsunoda Sugako. His father, Prince Kuni, was former Buddhist priest and minor prince descended from the Fushimi-no-miya, one the four branch houses of the imperial dynasty (shinnōke) entitled to provide a successor to the throne. In 1872, the Emperor Meiji granted him the title Kuni-no-miya and authorization to begin a new branch of the imperial family. Prince Yasuhiko was a half-brother of Prince Higashikuni Naruhiko, Prince Nashimoto Morimasa, and Prince Kuni Kuniyoshi, the father of the future Empress Kojun, the consort of Emperor Shōowa. This page is about the city Kyoto. ... His Imperial Highness Prince Kuni (Asahiko) of Japan (27 February 1824 - 29 October 1891) (Kuni no miya Asahiko Shinnō), also known as Prince Asahiko (Asahiko Shinnō) and Prince Nakagawa (Nakagawa-no-miya), was a member of the Japanese imperial family who played a key role in the Meiji Restoration. ... The Fushimi House (伏見宮) is the oldest of the shinnōke, branches of the Imperial Family which are eligible to succeed to the Chrysanthemum Throne if the main line should die out. ... Shinnōke (literally shinnō houses) were the collective name of four cadet branches of the Imperial Household of Japan, entitled to provide a successor to the Chrysanthemum throne if the main line failed to produce an heir. ... Prince Naruhiko Higashikuni (東久邇 稔彦 Higashikuni Naruhiko, also Higashikuni no miya Naruhiko ō (東久邇宮 稔彦王)) (3 December 1887 – 26 January 1990) was the 43rd Prime Minister of Japan from 17 August 1945 to 9 October 1945, a period of 54 days. ... Prince Nashimoto Morimasa (Nashimoto no miya Morimasa ō) (9 March 1874 - 2 January 1951) was a one-time member of the Japanese imperial family, field marshal in the Imperial Japanese Army, and the chief priest of the Ise Shrine from 1937 until 1947. ... Prince Kuni Kuniyoshi (Kuni no miya Kuniyoshi ō) (23 June 1873 - 29 June 1929) was a member of the Japanese imperial family and a career army officer during the Meiji and Taisho periods. ... Nagako (良子), Empress and later Empress Dowager of Japan, consort to the Emperor Showa Hirohito, (March 6, 1903 - June 16, 2000) and mother of the Emperor Akihito. ... Hirohito (裕仁), the Shōwa Emperor (昭和天皇, Shōwa tennō), (April 29, 1901 – January 7, 1989) reigned over Japan from 1926 to 1989. ...


Marriage and Family

Like the other imperial princes of the Meiji period, it was expected that Prince Yasuhiko would pursue a career in the Imperial Japanese Army or the Imperial Japanese Navy. He received his early education at the Gakushuin Boy's School and the Central Military Preparatory School, before graduating the Imperial Military Academy in 1908 as a second lieutentant. On 30 March 1906, the Emperor Meiji granted him the title Asaka-no-miya and authorization to begin a new branch of the imperial family. On 6 May 1909, Prince Asaka married Princess Nobuko (7 August 1891 - 3 November 1933), the eighth daughter of Emperor Meiji. Prince and Princess Asaka had four children: The Imperial Japanese Army (大日本帝国陸軍 Dai-Nippon Teikoku Rikugun) was the official armed force of Japan from 1867 to 1945. ... The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) (大日本帝國海軍 Dai-Nippon Teikoku Kaigun or 日本海軍 Nippon Kaigun) was the navy of Japan before 1945. ... The Gakushuin University (学習院大学 Gakushūin Daigaku) or formerly Peers School (now incorporated as the Gakushuin School Corporation) is an educational institution in Tokyo established in 1877, during the Meiji era, for the education of the children of the Japanese aristocracy, though it eventually also opened its doors to the offspring... March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (90th in Leap years). ... 1906 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... 1909 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... 1891 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 1933 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...

September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 1911 is a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years). ... 1912 is a leap year starting on Monday. ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1935 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... 1921 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... January 4 is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... January is the first month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1944 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... August 2 is the 214th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (215th in leap years), with 151 days remaining. ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...

Military Career and Disputed Responsibility of the Nanjing Massacre

Prince Asaka was promoted to captain in 1912, lieutentant colonel in 1917, and colonel in 1922. In 1922, he went to France to study military strategy and technology at the St. Cyr, the French staff college. However, in April 1923, he was serious injured in automobile accident in a Paris suburb. Princess Asaka travelled to France to nurse her husband. During that period, Prince and Princess Asaka became enthralled with Art Deco. Upon returning to Japan in 1925, Prince Asaka had a new mansion built in the Art Deco style in Tokyo's Shirokanedai neighborhood. The house was completed in May 1933, but Princess Asaka died a few months later. Asheville City Hall. ...


Prince Asaka was promoted to the rank of brigadier general in 1926. In 1930, while Japanese soldiers were being sent to Manchuria to put down the Kuomintang, he became a major general and began teaching at the Military Staff College. In 1933, he was promoted to lieutenant general and assumed command of the First Imperial Guards, giving him an even more influential position over the emperor. Prince Asaka pressed Emperor Showa to replace Prime Minister Okada Keisuke with Hirota Koki in March 1936, following the February 26 Incident. The Kuomintang (KMT) or Nationalist Party of China (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang) is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... Keisuke Okada (岡田 啓介 Okada Keisuke January 20, 1868–October 17, 1952) was a Japanese politician and the 31st Prime Minister of Japan from July 8, 1934 to March 9, 1936. ... Koki Hirota (広田 弘毅 Hirota Kōki, February 14, 1878–December 23, 1948) was a Japanese politician and the 32nd Prime Minister of Japan from March 9, 1936 to February 2, 1937. ... The February 26 Incident (二・二六事件 Ni-niroku jiken) was an uprising against the Japanese government that took place in 1936. ...


Following the full-scale Japanese invasion of China in 1937, Prince Asaka transferred into the Shanghai Expeditionary Force led by the elderly General Matsui Iwane. He became the commander of one of the SEF's main divisions, and led that division toward the city of Nanking in November. Matsui initially led the charge into Nanking, but Prince Asaka temporarily took over late in November due to Matsui's ill health. Gen. ...


Prince Asaka's responsibility for the Nanjing massacre is a matter of debate. Some historians contend that Asaka actually signed the order for Japanese soldiers in Nanjing to "kill all captives." Other historians claim a member of the staff of the Central China Area Army sent this order under the prince's sign manual. Matsui did not arrive in the city until well after the killing had begun. The Nanking Massacre (Chinese: 南京大屠殺, pinyin: Nánjīng Dàtúshā; Japanese: 南京大虐殺, Nankin Daigyakusatsu), also known as the Rape of Nanking and sometimes in Japan as the Nanking Incident (南京事件, Nankin Jiken), refers to what many historians recognize as widespread atrocities committed by the Japanese army in and around Nanking (now Nanjing...


In February 1938, with vast parts of Nanking burned, looted, and in ruins, both Prince Asaka and Matsui were recalled to Japan. Matsui went into virtual retirement, but Prince Asaka remained on the emperor's Supreme War Council until the end of the war in August 1945. He was promoted to the rank of general in August 1939 but held no further military commands. The International Military Tribunal for the Far East did not prosecute him. General Douglas MacArthur decided to grant immunity to the Imperial family. Categories: Possible copyright violations ... General Douglas MacArthur aboard a battle ship toward the end of World War two, 1945 Douglas MacArthur (January 26, 1880 – April 5, 1964) was an American military leader. ...


Postwar Life as a Commoner

Prince Asaka, his elder son, and his younger daughter lost their membership in the imperial family as a result of the American occupation reform of the Japanese imperial household in October 1947. He and his son were purged from holding any political or public office because they had been officers in the Japanese army. His palatial residence in Shirokanedai was taken over by the government, and now houses the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum. The former prince moved to Atami, on the Izu Peninsula south of Tokyo. He became a Roman Catholic in 1951, and spent most of his time playing golf until his death in April 1981 at age 93. He was survived by a daughter, Kiyoko Asaka, a grandson, Tomohiko Asaka, two grand-daughters (Fukuko Asaka and Minoko Asaka) and a great-grandson (Haruhiko Asaka) October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1947 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... April is the fourth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ... 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Yasuhiko, Prince Asaka - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (969 words)
Prince Yasuhiko was born in Kyoto, the eighth son of Prince Kuni Asahiko (Kuni no miya Asahiko Shinnō) and the court lady Tsunoda Sugako.
Prince Yasuhiko was a half-brother of Prince Higashikuni Naruhiko, Prince Nashimoto Morimasa, and Prince Kuni Kuniyoshi, the father of the future Empress Kojun, the consort of Emperor Shōowa.
Prince Asaka, his elder son, and his younger daughter lost their membership in the imperial family as a result of the American occupation reform of the Japanese imperial household in October 1947.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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