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Encyclopedia > Prince's Palace of Monaco
Illustration 1: Prince's Palace of Monaco
Illustration 1: Prince's Palace of Monaco

The Prince's Palace of Monaco is the official residence of the Prince of Monaco. Founded in 1191 as a Genoese fortress, during its long and often dramatic history it has been bombarded and besieged by many foreign powers. Since the end of the 13th century, it has been the stronghold and home of the Grimaldi family who first captured it in 1297. The Grimaldi ruled the area first as feudal lords, and from the 17th century as sovereign princes, but their power was often derived from fragile agreements with their larger and stronger neighbours. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 234 pixelsFull resolution (5183 × 1516 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 234 pixelsFull resolution (5183 × 1516 pixel, file size: 2. ... Prince(ss) of Monaco is a title given to certain members of the princely family of Monaco. ... The Republic of Genoa, in full the Most Serene Republic of Genoa (known as the Ligurian Republic from 1798 to 1805) was an independent state in Liguria on the northwestern Italian coast from ca. ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... Grimaldi usually refers to House of Grimaldi, the rulers of Monaco. ... Feudalism comes from the Late Latin word feudum, itself borrowed from a Germanic root *fehu, a commonly used term in the Middle Ages which means fief, or land held under certain obligations by feodati. ... Look up sovereign in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Thus while other European sovereigns were building luxurious, modern Renaissance and Baroque palaces, politics and common sense demanded that the palace of the Monaco rulers be fortified. This unique requirement, at such a late stage in history, has made the palace at Monaco one of the most unusual in Europe. Ironically, when its fortifications were finally relaxed during the late 18th century, it was seized by the French and stripped of its treasures, and fell into decline, while the Grimaldi were exiled for over 20 years. Tempietto di San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, 1502, by Bramante. ... Baroque architecture, starting in the early 17th century in Italy, took the humanist Roman vocabulary of Renaissance architecture and used it in a new rhetorical, theatrical, sculptural fashion, expressing the triumph of absolutist church and state. ...


The Grimaldi's occupation of their palace is also unusual because, unlike other European ruling families, the absence of alternative palaces and land shortages have resulted in their use of the same residence for more than seven centuries. Thus, their fortunes and politics are directly reflected in the evolution of the palace. Whereas the Romanovs, Bourbons, and Habsburgs could, and frequently did, build completely new palaces, the most the Grimaldi could achieve when enjoying good fortune, or desirous of change, was to build a new tower or wing, or, as they did more frequently, rebuild an existing part of the palace. Thus, the Prince's Palace reflects the history not only of Monaco, but of the family which in 1997 celebrated 700 years of rule from the same palace.[1] The House of Romanov (Рома́нов, pronounced ) was the second and last imperial dynasty of Russia, which ruled the country for five generations from 1613 to 1761. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


During the 19th and early 20th centuries, the palace and its owners became symbols of the slightly risqué glamour and decadence that were associated with Monte Carlo and the French Riviera. Glamour and theatricality became reality when the American film star Grace Kelly became chatelaine to the palace in 1956. In the 21st century, the palace remains the residence of the current Prince of Monaco. See also Decadent movement Decadence refers to a personal trait and, much more commonly, to a state of society. ... Monte Carlo is a very wealthy section of the city-state of Monaco known for its casino, gambling, beaches, glamour, and sightings of famous people. ... The Quai des États-Unis in Nice on the French Riviera at night. ... For the Mika song, see Grace Kelly (song). ... Châtelain (Med. ... Albert II, Prince of Monaco (Albert Alexandre Louis Pierre Grimaldi; born 14 March 1958), styled His Serene Highness The Sovereign Prince of Monaco, is the head of the House of Grimaldi and the current ruler of the Principality of Monaco. ...

Illustration 2: The arms of the Prince of Monaco. The supporters represent François Grimaldi who, according to legend, in 1297 captured the fortress disguised as a monk

Contents

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... In heraldry, supporters are figures placed on either side of the shield and depicted holding it up. ... François Grimaldi (François Malizia - the Cunning) was the leader of the Guelphs who captured the Rock of Monaco on the night of January 8, 1297. ... For other uses, see Monk (disambiguation). ...

Princely Palace

Illustration 3: A: Entrance; B, C: State apartments, double loggia, and horse-shoe stairs; D:chapel; E:Swimming pool, F: All Saints Tower; G: Serravalle; H: South Tower; K: Middle Tower; M: St Mary's Tower; N: Administrative and domestic offices etc.
Illustration 3: A: Entrance; B, C: State apartments, double loggia, and horse-shoe stairs; D:chapel; E:Swimming pool, F: All Saints Tower; G: Serravalle; H: South Tower; K: Middle Tower; M: St Mary's Tower; N: Administrative and domestic offices etc.
Illustration 4: The Prince's Palace in 1890 shows clearly a blend of classical facades and medieval fortifications. Due to the modern development of Monte Carlo and growth of flora this view of the palace is not possible today.
Illustration 4: The Prince's Palace in 1890 shows clearly a blend of classical facades and medieval fortifications. Due to the modern development of Monte Carlo and growth of flora this view of the palace is not possible today.

The palace is a blend of architectural styles, its ancient origins are indicated by a lack of symmetry. Thus to evaluate the architecture, wings and blocks have to be observed separately. The principal façade appears as a terrace of Renaissance style palazzi from differing periods of the Renaissance era (Illustrations 1 and 12) which—even though they form only one palace—is exactly what they are. These wings are however united by their common rusticated ground floor. This Renaissance architecture seems to mask earlier fortifications, the towers of which rise behind the differing classical façades. These towers—many complete with crenellations and machicolations—were actually mostly rebuilt during the 19th century. At the rear of the palace the original medieval fortifications seem untouched by time. (Illustration 4). A greater architectural harmony has been achieved within the court of honour around which the palace is built, where two tiers of frescoed open arcades serve as both a ceremonial balcony for the prince's appearances and a state entrance and corridor linking the formal state rooms of the palace. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 575 pixelsFull resolution (1261 × 906 pixel, file size: 481 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) View of Monaco, c. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 575 pixelsFull resolution (1261 × 906 pixel, file size: 481 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) View of Monaco, c. ... Simplified schematic of an islands flora - all its plant species, highlighted in boxes. ... Sphere symmetry group o. ... For blocks on Wikipedia, please see Wikipedia:Blocking policy. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... For other uses of Rustication, see Rustication (disambiguation). ... Crenellation (or crenelation) is the name for the distinctive pattern that framed the tops of the walls of many medieval castles, often called battlements. ... Parapets at Newark Castle, Inverclyde, Scotland, supported on decorative machicolation. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Blenheim Palace, The Cour dHonneur is the large central court formed by the secondary wings containing kitchens and domestic offices flanking the Corps de logis Versailles: Louis Le Vau opened up the interior court to create the expansive entrance cour dhonneur, later copied all over Europe Cour d... This article is about the floor of a room or building. ... For other uses, see Fresco (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Arcade. ... A State Room in a large European mansion, is usually one of a suite of very grand rooms which were designed to impress, they were the most luxurious in the house and contained the finest works of art. ...


The most notable of the many rooms are the state apartments. These were laid out from the 16th century onwards, and were enhanced in the style of those at Versailles during the 18th century. In the 19th century and again during the late 20th century, large scale restoration of the state rooms consolidated the 18th century style which prevails today. A State Room in a large European mansion, is usually one of a suite of very grand rooms which were designed to impress, they were the most luxurious in the house and contained the finest works of art. ... This article is about the city of Versailles. ...


Designed as an enfilade and a ceremonial route to the throne room, the processional route begins with an external horseshoe-shaped staircase which leads from the court of honour to the open gallery known as the Gallery of Hercules. From here guests enter the Mirror Gallery, a long hall inspired by the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles.[2] This gallery leads to the first of the state rooms, the Officer's Room, where guests are greeted by court officials before an audience with the prince in the Throne Room. From the Officer's Hall the enfilade continues to the Blue Room. This large drawing room, decorated with blue brocade, is hung with Grimaldi family portraits and has chandeliers of Murano glass. The following room, the largest of the state apartments, is the Throne Room. Its ceiling and frescoes were executed by Orazio de Ferrari and depict the surrender of Alexander the Great. The throne, in the Empire style, is positioned on a dais, beneath a red silk canopy of estate surmounted by a gilt crown. The floors are of Carrara marble. All state ceremonies have been held in this room since the 16th century.[3] Hall of Mirrors redirects here. ... A contemporary chandelier in the Galt House in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Murano glass has been a famous product of the Venetian island of Murano for centuries. ... Christ and the adultress, attributed to Orazio de Ferrari Orazio de Ferrari (1606-1657) was an Italian artist, active in the Baroque period, born in Voltri, a suburb of Genoa. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Empire is an early 19th century style of architecture and furniture design that and originates from Napoleons rule of France. ... Dais (French dais, estrade, Italian predella), originally a part of the floor at the end of a medieval hall, raised a step above the rest of the building. ... Carrara is a city in the Massa Carrara province of Tuscany, Italy, famous for the white or blue_gray marble quarried there. ...


Other rooms in the state suite include the Red Room, so called because its walls are covered in red brocade, a large drawing room containing paintings by Jan Brueghel and Charles Le Brun. Like much of the palace the room contains ornate 18th-century French-style furniture. From the Red Room leads the York Room. Furnished as a state bedchamber, this room is frescoed with illustrations of the four seasons by Gregorio de Ferrari. The following room, known as the Yellow Room (or sometimes as the Louis XV Bedchamber), is another state bedroom. Jan Brueghel can refer to two Flemish painters: Jan Brueghel the Elder (1568-1625) Jan Brueghel the Younger (1601-1678) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Charles Le Brun, contemporary portrait Charles Le Brun (February 24, 1619 - February 22, 1690) was a French painter and art theorist, one of the dominant artists in 17th century France. ... Gregorio de Ferrari (c. ... Louis XV (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ...


The most remarkable room in the suite is the Mazarin Room. This drawing room is lined with Italian gilded and painted polychrome boiseries by craftsmen brought to France by Cardinal Mazarin, who was related by marriage to the Grimaldi. Cardinal Mazarin's portrait hangs above the fireplace. Polychrome is one of the terms used to describe the use of multiple colors in one entity. ... Mentmore Towers The boiseries were from from the Hôtel de Villars, Paris, and are inset with paintings and Genoese velvet Boiserie (often used in the plural boiseries) is the term to used to define ornate and intricately carved panelling. ... Jules Mazarin, French diplomat and statesman, by Pierre-Louis Bouchart. ...


While the overriding atmosphere of the interior and exterior of the palace is of the 18th century, the palace itself is not. Much of its appearance is a result of a long evolution dating from the 12th century, overshadowed by heavy restoration and refurnishing during the 19th and 20th centuries.


Grimaldi fortress

Illustration 5: The Rocher de Monaco overlooks both the port and the Mediterranean. The Prince's Palace is on the Rocher in the foreground. The imposing Palladian building in the far background is the Oceanographic Museum, founded by Prince Albert I in 1906. The remains of All Saints Tower (F, see Illustration 6) and the serravalle (G) can be seen at the bottom left of the picture.
Illustration 5: The Rocher de Monaco overlooks both the port and the Mediterranean. The Prince's Palace is on the Rocher in the foreground. The imposing Palladian building in the far background is the Oceanographic Museum, founded by Prince Albert I in 1906. The remains of All Saints Tower (F, see Illustration 6) and the serravalle (G) can be seen at the bottom left of the picture.

Monaco's history predates the Roman occupation of AD 122. Its large natural harbour ensured a steady stream of visitors from Byblos, Tyre, and Sidon. Later the Phoenicians came to trade silk, oil, and spices with the natives. It was the Phoenicians who introduced to this area of the Mediterranean their god Melkart, later known by the Romans as Hercules Monoikos. It was after this god that the Romans renamed the area Portus Hercules Moneici, which has evolved to the present name of Monaco.[4] The seat of the Prince of Monaco was established on the Rocher de Monaco (Illustration 5) as a fortress in 1191 when the harbour, that is today lined by Monte Carlo, was acquired by the Republic of Genoa. The harbour and its immediate area were given to the Genoese by the Emperor Henry IV with the proviso that the Genoese protect the coastline from piracy. Further territory was ceded to the new owners by the Council of Peille and the Abbaye de Saint Pons. In 1215 work began on a new fortress, comprising four towers connected by ramparts protected by a curtain wall. This forms the core of the present palace. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Rock of Monaco has always been a coveted possession, from the nations beggining as the Greek colony of Monoïkos the Ligurian tribes who occupied the area vied for control of it, and before that it was a shelter for primitive populations. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... The Rock of Monaco has always been a coveted possession, from the nations beggining as the Greek colony of Monoïkos the Ligurian tribes who occupied the area vied for control of it, and before that it was a shelter for primitive populations. ... A villa with a superimposed portico, from Book IV of Palladios I Quattro Libri dellArchitettura, in a modestly priced English translation published in London, 1736. ... Albert I, Prince of Monaco (13 November 1848 – 26 June 1922) was the reigning Prince of Monaco from 10 September 1889 until his death. ... The ruins of the Crusader castle in Byblos. ... Tyre (Arabic , Phoenician , Hebrew Tzor, Tiberian Hebrew , Akkadian , Greek Týros) is a city in the South Governorate of Lebanon. ... View of the new city the Sea Castle. ... Phoenicia was an ancient civilization in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coastal plain of what is now Lebanon and Syria. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Melqart (less accurately Melkart, Melkarth or Melgart (greek disposed of the letter Q (Qoppa) replacing it with additional use of K (Kappa) and G (Gamma)), Akkadian Milqartu, was the tutelary god of the Phoenician city of Tyre, as Eshmun protected Sidon. ... The Rock of Monaco has always been a coveted possession, from the nations beggining as the Greek colony of Monoïkos the Ligurian tribes who occupied the area vied for control of it, and before that it was a shelter for primitive populations. ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... Monte Carlo is a very wealthy section of the city-state of Monaco known for its casino, gambling, beaches, glamour, and sightings of famous people. ... The Republic of Genoa, in full the Most Serene Republic of Genoa (known as the Ligurian Republic from 1798 to 1805) was an independent state in Liguria on the northwestern Italian coast from ca. ... Henry IV (November 11, 1050–August 7, 1106) was King of Germany from 1056 and Holy Roman Emperor from 1084 until his forced abdication in 1105. ... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Peille is a small village percher (perched on a rock) between Monaco and Mentmon in the Alpes Maritimes Département of France. ... Saint-Pons-de-Thomières is a commune of the Hérault département, in France. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Separation barrier. ... Glass curtain wall of the Bauhaus Dessau. ...


Genoa was important in the politics of 12th century Europe. The Genoese were a nation of merchants, and such was their wealth that they frequently fulfilled a role as bankers to the other nation states. However, the Genoese became divided following the rift caused when the Emperor Frederick II challenged the power of Pope Innocent IV. Two distinct camps formed: the Guelphs who supported the pope and the Ghibellines who were loyal to the imperial crown. Siding with the Guelphs were one of the patrician families of Genoa—the Grimaldi. Throughout the 13th century these two groups fought. Finally at the end of the century the Ghibellines were victorious and banished their opponents, including the Grimaldi, from Genoa. The Grimaldi settled in the area today known as the French Riviera. Several castles in the area are still known as Chateau Grimaldi, and testify to the strong presence of various branches of the family in the vicinity. Merchants function as professional traders, dealing in commodities that they do not produce themselves. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... Frederick II (December 26, 1194 – December 13, 1250), of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was a pretender to the title of King of the Romans from 1212 and unopposed holder of that monarchy from 1215. ... Pope Innocent IV (Manarola, 1180/90 – Naples, December 7, 1254), born Sinibaldo de Fieschi, Pope from 1243 to 1254, belonged to the feudal nobility of Liguria, the Fieschi, counts of Lavagna. ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in Italy during the 12th century and 13th century. ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in Italy during the 12th century and 13th century. ... Grimaldi usually refers to House of Grimaldi, the rulers of Monaco. ... The Quai des États-Unis in Nice on the French Riviera at night. ... Château Grimaldi is the name given to several Châteaux in Europe which we founded by various members of the Grimaldi Family. ...

Illustration 6: The statue of François Grimaldi outside the palace commemorates his capture of the fortress disguised as a monk in 1297.
Illustration 6: The statue of François Grimaldi outside the palace commemorates his capture of the fortress disguised as a monk in 1297.

Legend relates that in January 1297 François Grimaldi, disguised as a monk, sought shelter at the castle. On obtaining entry he murdered the guard, whereupon his men miraculously appeared and captured the castle.[5] Thus the fortress became the stronghold of the Grimaldi. This event is commemorated by a statue of François Grimaldi in the precincts of the palace (Illustration 6) and in the arms of the House of Grimaldi where François is depicted wielding a sword while in the garb of a monk (Illustration 2). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... François Grimaldi (François Malizia - the Cunning) was the leader of the Guelphs who captured the Rock of Monaco on the night of January 8, 1297. ... For other uses, see Monk (disambiguation). ...


Charles I, who ruled from 1331 to 1357, and was the son of François Grimaldi's cousin Rainier I, significantly enlarged the fortress by adding two large buildings: one against the eastern ramparts and the second looking out over the sea. This changed the appearance of the fortress, making it appear more of a fortified house than a fortress.[6] The fortifications remained very necessary, for during the next three decades the fortress was alternately lost and regained by the Grimaldi to the Genoese. In 1341 the Grimaldi took Menton and then Roquebrune, thus consolidating their power and strength in the area. Subsequently they strengthened not only the defences of the harbour but also their fortress on the Rocher. The Grimaldi's stronghold was now a power base from which the family ruled a large but very vulnerable area of land. Charles I of Monaco (died August 15, 1357), was the first true Lord of Monaco, and is thus widely considered the founder of the dynasty. ... Rainier I of Monaco (1267 - 1314) was the first sovereign Grimaldi ruler of the area now known as Monaco. ... Menton (Occitan: Menton in classical norm or Mentan in Mistralian norm; Italian: Mentone) is a town and commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département of the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of France. ... Roquebrune-Cap-Martin is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département in southeastern France. ...


For the next hundred years the Grimaldi defended their territory from attacks by other states which included Genoa, Pisa, Venice, Naples, France, Spain, Germany, England and Provence. The fortress was frequently bombarded, damaged, and restored. Gradually the Grimaldi began to make an alliance with France which strengthened their position. Now more secure, the Grimaldi lords of Monaco now began to recognise the need not only to defend their territory, but also to have a home reflecting their power and prestige.


Throughout the 15th century, both the fortress and the Rocher continued to be extended and further defended until it became a garrison accommodating some 400 troops.[2] The slow transformation from fortified house to palace (Illustration 7) began during this era, first with building by Lamberto Grimaldi, Lord of Monaco (who between 1458 and 1494 was "a noteworthy ruler who handled diplomacy and the sword with equal talent"[7]), and then by his son Jean II. This period saw the extension of the east side of the fortress with a three–floored wing, guarded by high scalloped walls connecting the bastion towers—St Mary (M in Illustration 7), Middle (K) and South (H). This large new wing contained the palace's principal room, the State Hall (today known as the Guard Room). Here the princes carried out their official business and held court.[6] Further, more luxurious, rooms complete with balconies and loggias were designed for the private use of the Grimaldi family. In 1505 Jean II was killed by his brother Lucien.[8] Lamberto Grimaldi (March 16, 1458 – March 1494) was a Lord of Monaco he was married to his cousin Claudia Grimaldi in 1465 in order to secure the Grimaldi inheritance of Monaco which by the small states constitution could only pass to male heirs. ... The point of a bastion on a reconstructed French fort in Illinois. ... For the surname, see Loggia (surname). ...


Fortress to palace

Lucien I (1505–1523)

Illustration 7: The palace in the 17th century. North is to the right of the picture. A: Entrance; B, C: State apartments, double loggia, and horse-shoe stairs; D: Future site of chapel; E, F: All Saints Tower; G: Serravalle; H: South Tower; K: Middle Tower; M: St Mary's Tower.

Jean II was succeeded by his brother Lucien I. Peace did not reign in Monaco for long; in December 1506 14,000 Genoese troops besieged Monaco and its castle, and for five months 1,500 Monégasques and mercenaries defended the Rocher before achieving victory in March 1507. This left Lucien I to walk a diplomatic tightrope between France and Spain in order to preserve the fragile independence of the tiny state which was in truth subject to Spain. Lucien immediately set about repairing the ravages of war to the fortified palace which had been damaged by heavy bombardment.[9] To the main wing (see Illustrations 3 & 7 - H to M ), built by Prince Lambert and extended during the reign of Jean II, he now added a large wing (H to C) which today houses the state apartments. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Honoré I (1523–1581)

During the reign of Honoré I the internal transformation from fortress to palace was continued. The Treaty of Trodesillas at the beginning of Honoré's rule clarified Monaco's position as a protectorate of Spain, and thus later of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. This provided the security to allow the Lord of Monaco to concentrate on the more comfortable side of his residence rather than the constant need to defend it. The Treaty of Trodesillas was signed in Burgos in 1524. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ...


The courtyard was rebuilt, the architect Dominique Gallo designing two arcades, stretching between points H and C. The arcades, fronting the earlier wing by Lucien I, each have twelve arches, decorated by white marble balustrading on the upper level. Today the upper arcades are known as the Galerie d'Hercule (gallery of Hercules) because their ceilings were painted with scenes depicting the Labours of Hercules by Orazio de Ferrari during the later reign of Honoré II. These arcades or loggias provide corridors to the state rooms in the south wing (today known as the State Rooms Wings). On the other side of the courtyard a new wing was constructed and the Genoese artist Luca Cambiasi was charged with painting its external walls with frescoes. It is thought that the galleries (B) to the north wing overlooking the harbour were built at this time.[9] For other uses, see Arcade. ... A page of fanciful balusters from A Handbook of Ornament, Franz S. Meyer, 1898 A baluster (through the French balustre, from Italian balaustro, from balaustra, pomegranate flower [from a resemblance to the post], from Lat. ... Hercules and the hydra by Antonio Pollaiuolo The Twelve Labours of Hercules (Greek: dodekathlos) are a series of archaic episodes connected by a later continuous narrative, concerning a penance carried out by the greatest of the Greek heroes Herakles, romanised as Hercules. ... Christ and the adultress, attributed to Orazio de Ferrari Orazio de Ferrari (1606-1657) was an Italian artist, active in the Baroque period, born in Voltri, a suburb of Genoa. ... For the surname, see Loggia (surname). ... Luca Cambiasi (1527-1585), Genoese painter, familiarly known as Lucchetto da Genova (his surname is written also Cambiaso or Cangiagio), was born at Moneglia in the Genoese state, the son of a painter named Giovanni Cambiasi. ...


Further enlargements were carried out in order to entertain the Emperor Charles V in 1529, when he stayed four nights at the palace during his journey in state to Bologna for his coronation by Pope Clement VII. For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ... For the food product, see Bologna sausage. ... A asses is a ceremony marking the investment of a monarch with regal power through, amongst other symbolic acts, the placement of a crown upon his or her head. ... For the antipope (1378–1394) see antipope Clement VII. Pope Clement VII (May 26, 1478 – September 25, 1534), born Giulio di Giuliano de Medici, was a cardinal from 1513 to 1523 and was Pope from 1523 to 1534. ...

Illustration 8: Prince Honoré II became the first Prince of Monaco in 1633. He did much to create the palace as it appears today.
Illustration 8: Prince Honoré II became the first Prince of Monaco in 1633. He did much to create the palace as it appears today.

Architecturally this was an exciting period, but Honoré I was unable to remodel the fortress in the grand style of a Renaissance palazzo. In spite of the Spanish protection, the risk of attack from France was high and defence remained Honoré's main priority.[9] With this in mind he added two new features: All Saints Tower (F) and the Serravalle Bastion (G). All Saints Tower was semi-circular and guarded the end of the rock promontory. Complete with gun platforms and cannon, it was connected to man-made caves in the rock itself. Subterranean passages also linked it to the Serravalle Bastion, which was in essence a three-storey gun tower bristling with cannon. Underneath the courtyard a cistern was installed, providing sufficient water for 1000 troops for a 20-month siege, with a huge vaulted ceiling supported by nine columns. Monaco was to remain politically vulnerable for another century and little building work took place from 1581 until 1604, during the reigns of Prince Charles II and Prince Hercule. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... For other uses, see Cannon (disambiguation). ... // Getting water out of a cistern A cistern (Middle English cisterne, from Latin cisterna, from cista, box, from Greek kistê, basket) is a receptacle for holding liquids, usually water. ... For other uses, see Column (disambiguation). ...


Honoré II (1597–1662)

Illustration 9:This painting by Joseph Bresson shows the palace in 1762, viewed from a similar angle to the drawing above. The alterations made by Honoré II are clearly visible, as is the horseshoe staircase of Prince Louis I. The cupola surmounting the new chapel is at the rear of the courtyard.
Illustration 9:This painting by Joseph Bresson shows the palace in 1762, viewed from a similar angle to the drawing above. The alterations made by Honoré II are clearly visible, as is the horseshoe staircase of Prince Louis I. The cupola surmounting the new chapel is at the rear of the courtyard.

Monaco's vulnerability was further brought home in 1605 when the Spanish installed a garrison there. In 1633 Honoré II (Illustration 8), was officially addressed as "Serene Prince" by the Spanish king, thus recognizing Monaco as a principality for the first time. However, as Spanish troops were currently in occupation, this recognition was seen as little more than a gesture to keep Honoré happy.[10] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Cupola of St Peters Basilica, Rome In architecture, a cupola consists of a dome-shaped ornamental structure located on top of a larger roof or dome, often used as a lookout or to admit light and provide ventilation. ... For people named Garrison, see Garrison (disambiguation) Garrison House, built by William Damm in 1675 at Dover, New Hampshire Garrison (from the French garnison, itself from the verb garnir, to equip) is the collective term for the body of troops stationed in a particular location, originally to guard it, but... Prince Honoré II Honoré II (24 December 1597-10 January 1662) was Sovereign Prince of Monaco. ... Philip IV (), (April 8, 1605 – September 17, 1665) was King of Spain from 1621 to 1665 and also King of Portugal until 1640. ... A principality is a monarchical feudatory or sovereign state, ruled or reigned over by a Monarch with the title of prince or princess (a synonym is princedom) or (in the widest sense) a Monarch with another title within the generic use of the term prince. ...


Honoré II was a francophile. Following his education in Milan, he had been cultivated by the intellectual salons of Paris.[2] Thus, having close affinities with France both culturally and politically, he rebelled against the Spanish presence in Monaco. While he realised that Monaco needed the protection of another power, France was Honoré II's favoured choice. In 1641, heavily supported by the French, he attacked the Spanish garrison and expelled the Spanish, declaring "the glorious liberty of Monaco".[4] The liberty mentioned was entirely dependent on France, as Monaco now entered a period as a protectorate of France which would last until 1814.[11] As a result of this action Honoré II is today regarded as the hero of Monaco.[4] A Francophile is term given to people with a severe mental illness: its symptoms are a craven attitude towards fighting to preserve what is claimed to be loved, a belief that the French Emprie was and is vastly superior to the British (a falsehood) and an habitual insertion of... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... A Salon of Ladies by Abraham Bosse A salon is a gathering of people under the roof of an inspiring hostess or host, partly to amuse one another and partly to refine their taste and increase their knowledge through conversation and readings, often consciously following Horaces definition of the...


Highly educated and a patron of the arts, Honoré II, secure on his throne, began collecting works by Titian, Dürer, Raphael, Rubens and Michelangelo which formed the basis of the art collection that furnished the palace slowly evolving from the Monaco fortress. Over the following 30-year period he transformed it into a palace suitable for a prince (Illustration 9). Also see: Titian (disambiguation). ... Albrecht Dürer (pronounced ) (May 21, 1471 – April 6, 1528)[1] was a German painter, engraver and mathematician. ... This article is about the Renaissance artist. ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ...


He commissioned the architect Jacques Catone not only to enlarge the palace, but also to soften its grim fortified appearance. The main façade facing the square, the "front" of the palace, was given decorative embellishments. The upper loggias (B) to the right of the entrance were glazed. Inside the palace the State Rooms Wing was restyled and the enfilade of state apartments created. A new chapel adorned by a cupola (built on the site marked D) was dedicated to St John the Baptist. This new work helped conceal the forbidding Serravalle Bastion from the courtyard, to create the lighter atmosphere of a Renaissance palazzo. A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... Cupola of St Peters Basilica, Rome In architecture, a cupola consists of a dome-shaped ornamental structure located on top of a larger roof or dome, often used as a lookout or to admit light and provide ventilation. ... John the Baptist (also called John the Baptizer or John the Dipper) is regarded as a prophet by at least three religions: Christianity, Islam, and Mandaeanism. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ...


Absentee landlords and revolution (1662–1815)

Illustration 10: Antoine Grigho's Baroque entrance to the palace was designed for Louis I.
Illustration 11: Princess Louise-Hippolyte of Monaco. The palace she barely knew is clearly visible in the background of this painting dated 1712.

During the late 17th century and early 18th century, while Monaco was officially an independent state, it was in reality a province of France.[7] Its rulers spent much of their time at the French court, in this way resembling the absentee landlords so prevalent at the time amongst the French aristocracy. The lure of Versailles was greater than that of their own country. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Born in 1697, she is the ancestress of the current reigning royal family of Monaco. ... Absentee landlord is an economic term for a person who owns and rents out a profit-earning property, but does not live within the propertys local economic region. ... This article is about the city of Versailles. ...


Honoré II was succeeded by his grandson, Prince Louis I. The new prince had an urbane personality and spent much time with his wife at the French court, where he enjoyed the unusual distinction of being both a foreign head of state and a peer of France. Impressed by the palaces of the French king, who had employed the architect Jean du Cerceau to carry out alterations to the palace at Fontainebleau, Louis I used Fontainebleau as the inspiration for enhancements to his palace at Monaco. Thus he was responsible for two of the palace's most notable features: the entrance—a huge Baroque arch surmounted by a broken pediment bearing the Grimaldi Arms (Illustration 10)—and more memorable still, a double horseshoe staircase modelled on that at Fontainebleau.[12] The thirty steps which compose the staircase are said to have been sculpted from a single block of Carrara marble.[13] Both the architrave of the new entrance and the horseshoe stairs were designed by Antoine Grigho, an architect from Como.[14] A royal or noble court, as an instrument of government broader than a court of justice, comprises an extended household centered on a patron whose rule may govern law or be governed by it. ... The Peerage of France (French: ) was a distinction within the French nobility which appeared in the Middle Ages. ... Androuet du Cerceau was a family of French architects and designers active in the 16th and early 17th century. ... The Royal Château of Fontainebleau (in the Seine-et-Marne département) is one of the largest French royal châteaux. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ... A pediment is a classical architectural element consisting of a triangular section or gable found above the horizontal superstructure (entablature) which lies immediately upon the columns. ... Carrara is a city in the Massa Carrara province of Tuscany, Italy, famous for the white or blue_gray marble quarried there. ... The architrave is the lintel or beam that rests on the capitals of the columns. ... For other uses, see Como (disambiguation). ...


A prince noted for the permissiveness of his private life, Louis I's prodigality was notorious. While visiting England in 1677 he incurred the ire of King Charles II by showering expensive gifts on Hortense Mancini, the king's mistress.[14] The English and Prince Louis later became political enemies when Louis took part in the Anglo-Dutch Wars against England, leading his own Monaco Cavalry into battles in Flanders and Franche Comté. These acts earned Louis the gratitude of Louis XIV who made him ambassador to the Holy See, charged with securing the Spanish Succession. However, the cost of upholding his position at the papal court caused him to sell most of his grandfather Honoré II's art collection, denuding the palace he had earlier so spectacularly enhanced.[15] Louis died before securing the Spanish throne for France, an act which would have earned the Grimaldi huge rewards. Instead Europe was immediately plunged into turmoil as the War of the Spanish Succession began. Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Hortense Mancini (1646 - 1699) Ortensia or Hortense Mancini, Duchess of Mazarin (1646 – November 9, 1699), was the niece of Cardinal Mazarin, chief minister of France, and a mistress of Charles II, King of England. ... Madame de Pompadour, the mistress of King Louis XV of France. ... The painting Dutch attack on the Medway, June 1667 by Pieter Cornelisz van Soest, painted c. ... For other uses, see Flanders (disambiguation). ... (Region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Doubs Haute-Saône Jura Territoire de Belfort Arrondissements 8 Cantons 116 Communes 1,786 Statistics Land area1 16,202 km² Population (Ranked 20th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638–September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ... This is a list of Spanish monarchs - that is, rulers of united Spain. ... Combatants Habsburg Empire England (1701-6) Great Britain (1707-14)[1] Dutch Republic Kingdom of Portugal Crown of Aragon Duchy of Savoy [2] Kingdom of France Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Bavaria Hungarian Rebels [3] Commanders Eugene of Savoy Margrave of Baden Count Starhemberg Duke of Marlborough Marquis de Ruvigny...


In 1701, Prince Antoine succeeded Louis I and inherited an almost bankrupt Monaco, though he did further embellish the Royal Room. On its ceiling, Gregorio de Ferrari and Alexandre Haffner depicted a figure of Fame surrounded by lunettes illustrating the four seasons. Antoine's marriage to Marie de Lorraine was unhappy and yielded only two daughters.[7] Monaco's constitution confined the throne to members of the Grimaldi family alone, and Antoine was thus keen for his daughter Princess Louise-Hippolyte (Illustration 11) to wed a Grimaldi cousin. However, the state of the Grimaldi fortunes, and the lack of (the politically necessary) approval from King Louis XIV, dictated otherwise. Louise-Hippolyte was married to Jacques de Goyon Matignon, a wealthy aristocrat from Normandy. Louise-Hippolyte succeeded her father as sovereign of Monaco in 1731 but died just months later. The King of France, confirming Monaco's subservient state to France, ignored the protests of other branches of the Grimaldi family, overthrew the Monégasque constitution, and approved the succession of Jacques de Goyon Matignon as Prince Jacques I.[16] Antonio I (January 25, 1661-January 20, 1731) ruled the Principality of Monaco from 1701 to 1731. ... Gregorio de Ferrari (c. ... In Greek mythology, Pheme (Φημη) (Roman equivalent: Fama) was the personification of fame and renown. ... In architecture, a lunette (diminutive of French lune, moon) is a half-moon shaped space, either masonry or void. ...


Jacques I assumed the name and arms of the Grimaldi, but the French aristocracy showed scant respect towards the new prince who had risen from their ranks and chose to spend his time absent from Monaco. He died in 1751 and was succeeded by his and Louise-Hippolyte's son Prince Honoré III.[7] Prince Honoré III (November 10, 1720-March 21, 1795) ruled the Principality of Monaco for almost sixty years from 1733 to 1793. ...


Honoré III married Catherine Brignole[17] in 1757 and later divorced her. Interestingly, before his marriage Honoré III had been conducting an affair with his future mother-in-law.[18] After her divorce Marie Brignole married Louis Joseph de Bourbon, prince de Condé, a member of the fallen French royal house, in 1798. Louis Joseph of Bourbon or Louis V (August 9, 1736 – May 13, 1818) was Prince of Condé from 1740 to his death. ...


Ironically, the Grimaldi fortunes were restored when descendants of both Hortense Mancini and Louis I married: Louise d'Aumont Mazarin married Honoré III's son and heir, the future Honoré IV. This marriage in 1776 was extremely advantageous to the Grimaldi, as Louise's ancestress Hortense Mancini had been the heiress of Cardinal Mazarin. Thus Monaco's ruling family acquired all the estates bequeathed by Cardinal Mazarin, including the Duchy of Rethel, and the Principality of Château-Porcien.[15] Louise dAumont Mazarin (22 October 1759 - 13 December 1826) was the daughter of Louis Marie dAumont, Duc dAumont, de Mazarin et de La Meilleraye and Louise Jeanne de Durfort, Duchesse de Mazarin et de La Meilleraye. ... Honoré IV (May 17, 1758-February 16, 1819) was Sovereign Prince of Monaco. ... Cardinal Jules Mazarin, French diplomat and statesman Jules Mazarin, born Giulio Raimondo Mazzarino; but best known as Cardinal Mazarin (July 14, 1602 – March 9, 1661) served as the France from 1642, until his death. ... This is a list of counts and dukes of Rethel. ...

Illustration 12: By the end of the 18th century the palace was once again a "splendid place". Honoré II's front created a palace effect by masking the Genoan towers.
Illustration 12: By the end of the 18th century the palace was once again a "splendid place".[19] Honoré II's front created a palace effect by masking the Genoan towers.

Honoré III was a soldier who fought at both Fontenoy and Raucoux. He was happy to leave Monaco to be governed by others, most notably a former tutor. It was on one of Honoré III's rare visits to the palace in 1767 that illness forced Edward, Duke of York, to land at Monaco. The sick duke was allocated the state bedchamber where he promptly died. Since that date the room has been known as the York Room. Image File history File links Palace in Monaco Author: Slawojar (April 2004) File links The following pages link to this file: Monaco-Ville ... Image File history File links Palace in Monaco Author: Slawojar (April 2004) File links The following pages link to this file: Monaco-Ville ... Combatants Britain United Provinces Hanover France Commanders Duke of Cumberland Maurice, comte de Saxe Strength 50,000[1] 101 guns 60,000 70 guns Casualties 9,000 dead or wounded 3,000 captured 5,600 dead or wounded 400 captured The Battle of Fontenoy (May 11, 1745) near Fontenoy in... Prince Edward Augustus, Duke of York (25 March 1739 – 17 September 1767) was the younger brother of George III of the United Kingdom, the second son of Frederick, Prince of Wales and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha. ...


Despite its lack of continuous occupancy, by the final quarter of the 18th century the palace was once again a "splendid place"[19] (Illustration 12). However revolution was afoot, and in the late 1780s Honoré III had to make concessions to his people who had caught the revolutionary fever from their French neighbours. This was only the beginning of the Grimaldi's problems. In 1793 the leaders of the French Revolution annexed Monaco. The prince was imprisoned in France and his property and estates, including the palace, were forfeited to France. The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on...


The palace was looted by the prince's subjects,[2] and what remained of the furnishings and art collection was auctioned by the French government.[20] Further humiliations were heaped on both the country and palace. Monaco was renamed Fort d'Hercule and became a canton of France while the palace became a military hospital and poorhouse. In Paris, the prince's daughter-in-law Francoise-Thérèse de Choiseul-Stainville (1766–1794)[21] was executed, one of the last to be guillotined during the Reign of Terror.[22] Honoré III died in 1795 in Paris, where he had spent most of his life, without regaining his throne. A canton is a territorial subdivision of a country, e. ... A poorhouse is a publicly maintained facility for the support and housing of dependent or needy persons, typically run by a local government entity such as a county or municipality. ... For other uses of terror, see Terror; Great Fear . ...


19th century

Regaining the palace

Illustration 14: St Mary's Tower (M), rebuilt by Charles III to resemble a medieval fortress. To the right is Albert I's clock tower in white stone from La Turbie.
Illustration 13: Prince Honoré V began restoration of the palace following the French Revolution.
Illustration 13: Prince Honoré V began restoration of the palace following the French Revolution.

Honoré III was succeeded by his son Honoré IV (1758–1819) whose marriage to Louise d'Aumont Mazarin had done so much to restore the Grimaldi fortunes. Much of this fortune had been depleted by the hardships of the revolution. On 17 June 1814 under the Treaty of Paris, the Principality of Monaco was restored to Honoré IV. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 439 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (920 × 1256 pixel, file size: 289 KB, MIME type: image/gif)Edited deatil from Image:Panorama schloss monaco. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 439 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (920 × 1256 pixel, file size: 289 KB, MIME type: image/gif)Edited deatil from Image:Panorama schloss monaco. ... La Turbie or the Trophy of the Alps is a Roman monument on the Côte dAzur. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Honoré IV (May 17, 1758-February 16, 1819) was Sovereign Prince of Monaco. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Treaty of Paris was signed on May 30, 1814 and ended the war between France and the Sixth Coalition of the United Kingdom, Russia, Austria, Sweden, Portugal and Prussia. ...


The fabric of the palace had been completely neglected during the years in which the Grimaldi had been exiled from Monaco. Such was the state of disrepair that part of the east wing had to be demolished along with Honoré II's bathing pavilion, which stood on the site occupied today by the Napoleon Museum and the building housing the palace archives. The Napoleon Museum in Monte Carlo, Monaco is a museum of artefacts which once belonged to the French Emperor Napoleon I. The museum which is attached to the Prince of Monacos palace contains a collection assembled by Prince Louis II the grandfather of the present Prince of Monaco. ...


Restoration

Honoré IV died shortly after his throne was restored to him, and structural restoration of the palace began under Honoré V and was continued after his death in 1841 by his brother Prince Florestan. However, by the time of Florestan's accession, Monaco was once again experiencing political tensions caused by financial problems. These resulted from its position as a protectorate of Sardinia, the country to which it had been ceded by France following the end of the Napoleonic wars. Florestan, an eccentric (he had been a professional actor), left the running of Monaco to his wife, Maria Caroline Gibert de Lametz. Despite her attempts to rule, her husband's people were once again in revolt. In an attempt to ease the volatile situation Florestan ceded power to his son Charles, but this came too late to appease the Monégasques. Menton and Roquebrune broke away from Monaco, leaving the Grimaldi's already small country hugely diminished—little more than Monte Carlo. Florestan I, Prince of Monaco (Paris, 10 October 1785 – 20 June 1856) was Prince of Monaco from 2 October 1841 until his death. ... Combatants Austria[a] Portugal Prussia[a] Russia[b] Sicily[c] Sardinia  Spain[d]  Sweden[e] United Kingdom French Empire Holland[f] Italy Etruria[g] Naples[h] Duchy of Warsaw[i] Confederation of the Rhine[j] Bavaria Saxony Westphalia Württemberg Denmark-Norway[k] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack... Maria Caroline Gibert de Lametz, Princess consort of Monaco (1793 - 1879) was the wife of Florestan I, Prince of Monaco and the daughter of Charles Thomas Gibert de Lametz. ... Menton (Occitan: Menton in classical norm or Mentan in Mistralian norm; Italian: Mentone) is a town and commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département of the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of France. ... Roquebrune-Cap-Martin is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département in southeastern France. ...

Illustration 15: Prince Charles III completed the restoration of the palace following the French Revolution.

Florestan died in 1856 and his son, Charles, who had already been ruling what remained of Monaco, succeeded him as Charles III (Illustration 15). Menton and Roquebrune officially became part of France in 1861, reducing Monaco's size at a stroke by 80%. With time on his hands, Charles III now devoted his time to completing the restoration of his palace begun by his uncle Honoré V. He rebuilt St Mary's Tower (Illustration 14) and completely restored the chapel, adding a new altar, and having its vaulted ceiling painted with frescoes, while outside the façade was painted by Jacob Froëschle and Deschler with murals illustrating various heroic deeds performed by the Grimaldi. The Guard Room, the former great hall of the fortress (now known as the State Hall), was transformed by new Renaissance decorations and the addition of a monumental chimneypiece. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Charles III, Prince of Monaco (8 December 1818 – 10 September 1889) was reigning Prince of Monaco from 20 June 1856 to his death. ... Menton (Occitan: Menton in classical norm or Mentan in Mistralian norm; Italian: Mentone) is a town and commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département of the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of France. ... Roquebrune-Cap-Martin is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département in southeastern France. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Mantelpiece. ...


Charles III also made serious attempts to find the various works of art and furniture looted, sold and dispersed during the revolution. Together with new purchases, a fine art collection once again adorned the palace which included not only family portraits such as that of Lucien I by de Predis; Honoré II by Philippe de Champaigne; the head of Antoine I by Hyacinthe Rigaud, and van Loo's portrait of Louise-Hyppolyte (Illustration 11) but also such masterpieces as the The Music Lesson by Titian. Fine art refers to arts that are concerned with beauty or which appealed to taste (SOED 1991). ... Ambrogio de Predis (c. ... Ex Voto (1662) by Philippe de Champaigne Philippe de Champaigne (26 May 1602 - 12 August 1674) was a Baroque era painter of the French school. ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) Hyacinthe Rigaud (July 20, 1659-December 27, 1743) was a French painter. ... The Triumph of Galatea Jean-Baptiste van Loo (14 January 1684 – 19 December 1745) was a French subject and portrait painter. ... Also see: Titian (disambiguation). ...


Charles III was also responsible for another palace in Monte Carlo, one which would fund his restorations, and turn around his country's faltering economy. This new palace was Charles Garnier's Second Empire casino, completed in 1878 (Illustration 16). The first Monaco casino had opened the previous decade. Through the casino Monaco became self-supporting.[4] Charles Garnier (6 November 1825 - 3 August 1898) was a French architect, designer of the Paris Opéra and the Opéra de Monte-Carlo. ... The canonical example of Second Empire style is the Opéra Garnier, in which Neo-Baroque meets Neo-Renaissance. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Decline of Grimaldi power

Illustration 16: The Grimaldi's casino created the family's wealth but by the 1880s, Monaco had acquired a reputation as a decadent playground. The contemporary writer Sabine Baring-Gould described its habituées as: "The moral cesspool of Europe."
Illustration 16: The Grimaldi's casino created the family's wealth but by the 1880s, Monaco had acquired a reputation as a decadent playground. The contemporary writer Sabine Baring-Gould described its habituées as: "The moral cesspool of Europe." [23]

By the time of Charles III's death in 1889, Monaco and Monte Carlo were synonymous as one and the same place, and had acquired, through gambling, a reputation as a louche and decadent playground of the rich. It attracted everyone from Russian grand dukes and railway magnates, often with their mistresses, to adventurers, causing the small country to be derided by many including Queen Victoria.[24] In fact so decadent was Monaco considered that from 1882, when she first began visiting the French Riviera, Queen Victoria refused to make a courtesy social call at the palace.[25] The contemporary writer Sabine Baring-Gould described the habituées of Monaco as: "....the moral cesspool of Europe." [23] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Reverend Sabine Baring-Gould (28 January 1834 – 2 January 1924) was an English Victorian hagiographer, antiquarian, novelist and eclectic scholar. ... Madame de Pompadour, the mistress of King Louis XV of France. ... Even Soldiers of Fortune have to sing! 1958 record album An adventurer or adventuress is a term that usually takes one of three meanings: One whose travels are unusual and often exotic, though not so unique as to qualify as exploration. ... The Quai des États-Unis in Nice on the French Riviera at night. ... The Reverend Sabine Baring-Gould (28 January 1834 – 2 January 1924) was an English Victorian hagiographer, antiquarian, novelist and eclectic scholar. ...


The successive rulers of Monaco tended to live elsewhere and visit their palace only occasionally. Charles III was succeeded in 1889 by Albert I. Albert married the daughter of a Scottish aristocrat. The couple had one son, Louis, before divorcing in 1880. Albert was a keen scientist and founded the Oceanographic Institute in 1906; as a pacifist he then founded the International Institute of Peace in Monaco. Albert's second wife, Alice Heine, did much to turn Monte Carlo into a cultural centre, establishing both ballet and the opera in the city. Having brought a large dowry into the family she contemplated turning the casino into a convalescent home for the poor who would benefit from recuperation in warm climes.[26] The couple separated before she was able to put her plan into action. Albert I, Prince of Monaco (13 November 1848 – 26 June 1922) was the reigning Prince of Monaco from 10 September 1889 until his death. ... The building rises from rocks Oceanographic Museum is a museum in Monaco-Ville, Monaco that houses various species of sea animals (sea stars, seahorses, turtles, jellyfish, crabs, lobsters, rays, sharks, sea urchins, sea cucumbers, eels, cuttlefish etc. ... Alice Heine (c. ...


Albert was succeeded in 1922 by his son Louis II. Louis II had been brought up by his mother and stepfather in Germany, and did not know Monaco at all until he was 11. He had a distant relationship with his father and served in the French Army. While posted abroad, he met his mistress Marie Juliette Louvet, by whom he had a daughter, Charlotte Louise Juliette, born in Algeria in 1898. As Prince of Monaco, Louis II spent much time elsewhere, preferring to live on the family estate of Le Marchais close to Paris. In 1911 Prince Louis had a law passed legitimising his daughter so that she could inherit the throne, in order to prevent its passing to a distant German branch of the family. The law was challenged and developed into what became known as Monaco succession crisis. Finally in 1919 the prince formally adopted his illegitimate daughter Charlotte, who became known as Princess Charlotte, Duchess of Valentinois.[27] Louis II's collection of artefacts belonging to Napoleon I form the foundation of the Napoleon Museum at the palace, which is open to the public. Louis II of Monaco (July 12, 1870 – May 9, 1949) was the Sovereign Prince of Monaco from June 26, 1922 until May 9, 1949. ... Marie Juliette Louvet (May 9, 1867 – September 24, 1930) was partner of Prince Louis II of Monaco and was the mother of his only child, Princess Charlotte of Monaco. ... Princess Charlotte, Duchess of Valentinois (Charlotte Louise Juliette Grimaldi, née Louvet) (30 September 1898 – 15 November 1977), styled HSH The Princess Charlotte, was the illegitimate daughter of Louis II, Prince of Monaco, and the mother of Prince Rainier III. From 1922 until 1944, she was the Hereditary Princess of... The Monaco Succession Crisis of 1918 was as a result of the reigning Princes Albert I, Prince of Monaco (child of Charles III, Prince of Monaco) lack of grandson. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ...


During World War II, Louis attempted to keep Monaco neutral, although his sympathies were with the Vichy French Government.[28] This caused a rift with his grandson Rainier, his daughter's son, and the heir[29] to Louis' throne, who strongly supported the Allies against the Nazis. Motto Travail, famille, patrie French: Unoccupied zone of Vichy France (until November 1942) Capital Vichy Capital-in-exile Sigmaringen (1944-1945) Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholic Government Dictatorship Chief of state  - 1940 — 1944 Philippe Pétain President of the Council  - 1940 — 1942 Philippe Pétain  - 1942 — 1944 Pierre Laval... Rainier III, Prince of Monaco (Rainier Louis Henri Maxence Bertrand Grimaldi; 31 May 1923 – 6 April 2005), styled His Serene Highness The Sovereign Prince of Monaco, ruled the Principality of Monaco for almost fifty-six years, making him one of the longest ruling monarchs of the 20th century. ... Look up ally in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Following the liberation of Monaco by the Allied forces, the 75-year-old Prince Louis did little for his principality and it began to fall into severe neglect. By 1946 he was spending most of his time in Paris, and on 27 July of that year, he married for the first time. Absent from Monaco during most of the final years of his reign, he and his wife lived on their estate in France. Prince Louis died in 1949 and was succeeded by his grandson, Prince Rainier III. In general, allies are people or groups that have joined an alliance and are working together to achieve some common purpose. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rainier III, Prince of Monaco (Rainier Louis Henri Maxence Bertrand Grimaldi; 31 May 1923 – 6 April 2005), styled His Serene Highness The Sovereign Prince of Monaco, ruled the Principality of Monaco for almost fifty-six years, making him one of the longest ruling monarchs of the 20th century. ...


Rainier III

Illustration 17: Sentries and cannon guard the entrance to the restored palace
Illustration 17: Sentries and cannon guard the entrance to the restored palace

Prince Rainier III was responsible for not only turning around the fortune and reputation of Monaco but also for overseeing the restoration of the palace. Upon his accession in 1949 Prince Rainier III immediately began a program of renovation and restoration. Many of the external frescoes on the courtyard were restored, while the southern wing, destroyed following the French revolution, was rebuilt. This is the part of the palace where the ruling family have their private apartments.[13] The wing also houses the Napoleon Museum and the archives. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about a military rank. ...


The frescoes decorating the open arcade known as the Gallery of Hercules were altered by Rainier III, who imported works by Pier Francesco Mazzucchelli depicting mythological and legendary heroes.[13] In addition many of the rooms were refurnished and redecorated.[30] Many of the marble floors have been restored in the staterooms and decorated with intarsia designs which include the double R monogram of Prince Rainier III.[2] The Martyrdom of Saints Secunda and Rufina. ... This article should be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


Together with his wife, the late Grace Kelly, Prince Rainier not only restored the palace, but from the 1970s also made it the headquarters of a large and thriving business, which encouraged light industry to Monaco, the aim of which was to lessen Monaco's dependence on the income from gambling.[31] This involved land reclamation, the development of new beaches, and high rise luxury housing. As a result of Monaco's increase in prestige, in 1993 it joined the United Nations, with Rainier's heir Prince Albert as head of the Monaco delegation.[1] For the Mika song, see Grace Kelly (song). ...


Princess Grace predeceased her husband, dying in 1982 as the result of a car accident. When Rainier III died in 2005 he left both his palace and his country in a stronger and more stable state of repair financially and structurally than they had been for centuries.


The palace in the 21st century

Illustration 18: HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco.
Illustration 18: HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco.

Today the palace is home to Prince Rainier's son and successor, Prince Albert II (illustration 18). Several other close relations, such as the prince's cousin Dutchess Marin, also reside in the palace. The state rooms are open to the public during the summer, and since 1960, the palace's courtyard has been the setting for open air concerts given by Monte-Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra (formerly known as the Orchestra of the National Opera).[13] Albert II, Prince of Monaco (Albert Alexandre Louis Pierre Grimaldi; born 14 March 1958), styled His Serene Highness The Sovereign Prince of Monaco, is the head of the House of Grimaldi and the current ruler of the Principality of Monaco. ... The Monte-Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra (French: Orchestre Philharmonique de Monte-Carlo) is the main orchestra in the principality of Monaco. ...


However the palace is far more than a tourist attraction and museum: it remains a fully working palace and headquarters of the Monégasque ruler; a fact emphasised by the sentries on constant guard duty at the entrance (Illustration 17). The sovereign princes, although bound by constitution, are involved with the day to day running of Monaco as both a country and a business. Today Monaco covers an area of 197 hectares (487 acres) of which 40 (99) have been reclaimed from the sea since 1980.[32] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about a military rank. ...


For important Monégasque events—such as Grimaldi weddings and births—the palace courtyard is opened and the assembled citizens of Monaco are addressed by the prince from the Gallery of Hercules overlooking the courtyard.[13] The courtyard is also used to host the annual children's Christmas party. Through such events, the palace continues to play a central role in the lives of the prince and his subjects, as it has done for over 700 years.


Notes

  1. ^ a b Glatt p.280
  2. ^ a b c d e The Prince's Palace of Monaco.
  3. ^ Lisimachio p. 207.
  4. ^ a b c d The Grimaldis of Monaco.
  5. ^ The probability of this legend, related in The Prince's Palace of Monaco, is disputed by some modern historians.
  6. ^ a b Lisimachio p. 203.
  7. ^ a b c d The House of Grimaldi.
  8. ^ The Grimaldis of Monaco states that Jean II was assassinated by his brother, while Lucien points out in The History of Monaco to 1949 that many historians feel that the death following a quarrel between the brothers was accidental.
  9. ^ a b c Lisimachio p. 204.
  10. ^ The Grimaldis of Monaco states the title was recognized to keep the prince happy, but erroneously cites the date of Spain recognizing the title as 1612. While Honoré II had in fact referred to himself as a prince in documents dating from 1612 and 1619, Spain did not officially acknowledge the title until 1633 (see Monaco: Early History). The official site The Prince's Palace, Monaco also makes a mistake on this matter, stating "Finally in 1480 Lucien Grimaldi persuaded King Charles of France and the Duke of Savoy to recognize the independence of Monaco". This is clearly wrong as in 1480 not only was Louis XI the King of France but Monaco was ruled by Lamberto Grimaldi.
  11. ^ Monaco, 'French Protectorate (1641–93)' and 'Annexation (1793–1814)'.
  12. ^ de Chimay p. 77.
  13. ^ a b c d e Principauté de Monaco.
  14. ^ a b de Chimay p. 210.
  15. ^ a b Monaco: 1662 to 1815.
  16. ^ Archbishop Honoré-François Grimaldi, brother of Prince Louis I, was as a celibate priest not considered as a sovereign. His death in 1748 brought to a close the Monaco branch of the Grimaldi family.
  17. ^ Sometimes known as Catherine Brignole
  18. ^ Marie Catherine Brignole
  19. ^ a b Lisimachio p. 210.
  20. ^ Lisimachio p. 211
  21. ^ The daughter of Jacques Philippe de Choiseul, comte de Stainville, a Marshal of France, and Thomase Therese de Clermont d'Amboise, she had married Joseph Grimaldi 6 April 1782. (ThePeerage.com).
  22. ^ She shared the tumbrel with Andre Chenier. The History of Monaco to 1949.
  23. ^ a b Baring-Gould, p. 244
  24. ^ Edwards, p. 155-157
  25. ^ Edwards, p. 169
  26. ^ de Fontenoy, p. 87.
  27. ^ Glatt, p.55
  28. ^ Taraborrelli, p.202
  29. ^ Princess Charlotte ceded her succession rights to her son, Rainier, in 1944.
  30. ^ Lisimachio.
  31. ^ Times Online
  32. ^ Monte Carlo. Société des Bains de Mer.

Louis XI (July 3, 1423 – August 30, 1483), called the Prudent (French: ) and the Universal Spider (Old French: luniverselle aragne) or the Spider King, was the King of France from 1461−83. ... Lamberto Grimaldi (March 16, 1458 – March 1494) was a Lord of Monaco he was married to his cousin Claudia Grimaldi in 1465 in order to secure the Grimaldi inheritance of Monaco which by the small states constitution could only pass to male heirs. ... Baton of a modern Marshal of France The Marshal of France (French: Maréchal de France) is a military distinction in contemporary France, not a military rank. ... A common scold gets her comeuppance in the ducking stool. ... André Chénier (October 30, 1762 - July 25, 1794) was a French poet, associated with the events of the French Revolution. ...

References

  • Lisimachio, Albert (1969). Great Palaces (The Royal Palace, Monaco. Pages 203–211). London: Hamlyn Publishing Group Ltd. ISBN 0600 01682 X. 
  • de Chimay, Jacqueline (1969). Great Palaces (Fontainebleau. Pages 67–77). London: Hamlyn Publishing Group Ltd. ISBN 0600 01682 X. 
  • Edwards, Anne (1992). The Grimaldis of Monaco. New York: William Morrow & Co. ISBN 978-0688088378. 
  • de Fontenoy, Marquise (1892). Revelation of High Life Within Royal Palaces. The Private Life of Emperors, Kings, Queens, Princes and Princesses. Written From a Personal Knowledge of Scenes Behind the Thrones. Philadelphia: Hubbard Publishing Co. 
  • Glatt, John (1998). The ruling house of Monaco: the story of a tragic dynasty.. London: Judy Piatkus. ISBN 0749918071. 
  • Taraborrelli, J. Randy (2003). Once Upon a Time. New York: Rose Books, Inc.. ISBN 0-446-53164-2. 

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Weblinks

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