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Encyclopedia > Prince

The term prince, from the Latin root princeps, is used for a member of the highest ranks of the aristocracy or the nobility. Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The Latin word Princeps (plural: principes) means the first. This article is devoted to a number of specific historical meanings the word took, by far the most important of which follows first. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The term aristocracy refers to a form of government where power is hereditary, and split between a small number of families. ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ...


The title is given only to males and has several fundamentally different meanings, of which one is generic to the word, and several types of titles. The female equivalent is a princess. Princess is the feminine form of prince (from Latin princeps, meaning principal citizen). ...

Contents

Historical background

Cicero attacks Catilina in the Senate of the Roman empire.

The Latin word prīnceps (older Latin *prīsmo-kaps, literally "first taker"), was established as the title of the more-or-less informal leader of the Roman senate some centuries before Christ, the princeps senatus. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (962x600, 100 KB)Painting by Cesare Maccari (1840-1919), Cicero Denounces Catiline. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (962x600, 100 KB)Painting by Cesare Maccari (1840-1919), Cicero Denounces Catiline. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The Roman Senate (Latin: Senatus) was the main governing council of both the Roman Republic, which started in 509 BC, and the Roman Empire. ... The princeps senatus (plural principes senatus) was the leader of the Roman senate. ...


Emperor Augustus established the formal position of monarch on the basis of principate, not dominion. He also tasked his grandsons as summer rulers of the city when most of the government were on holiday in the country or attending religious rituals, and, for that task, granted them the title of princeps. The Principate is, according to its etymological derivation from the Latin word princeps, meaning chief or first, the political regime dominated by such a political leader, whether or not he is formally head of state and/or head of government. ... A dominion, often Dominion, is the territory or the authority of a dominus (a lord or master). ...


The title has, next to its generic use, two basic meanings:

  • as a a substantive title, that are titles of princes who are reigning monarchs and in some cases heads of their noble house.
  • as a courtesy title, that are titles of princes that are members of a royal or a highly noble family, sharing their title with several relatives in similar position.

In many other languages besides English, there are at least two separate words for these two distinct notions. A substantive title is a title of nobility or royalty actually held, usually alone, by someone which they gained through either grant or inheritance, as opposed to one given or loaned to them either as a courtesy title, or gained through marriage. ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... A courtesy title is a form of address in the British peerage system used for wives, children, and other close relatives of a peer. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Prince as a generic word for ruler

The original but least common use of the title is as a generic term (descriptive, not formal), one originating in the application of the Latin term princeps, from Roman, more precisely Byzantine law and the classical system of government that was the European feudal society. I.e. the emperor, or generalized the ruler. In this sense, it can in principle be used for any reigning monarch, hereditary or elective, regardless of his title and protocolary rank. The Latin word Princeps (plural: principes) means the first. This article is devoted to a number of specific historical meanings the word took, by far the most important of which follows first. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law Roman law is the legal system of ancient Rome. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... Lady Justice or Justitia is a personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system (particularly in Western art). ... A monarch (see sovereignty) is a type of ruler or head of state. ...

Example: The early Renaissance title of Niccolò Machiavelli's book Il Principe attests and exemplifies the use of the word prince in this meaning, as a sovereign ruler of a society.

The word prince did not come into official, or formalized, use in Europe until quite late, i.e some three-to-four centuries ago. All medieval rulers had other, particular or more formalized titles in use, either in their native language or in Latin. The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli (May 3, 1469 – June 21, 1527) was an Italian political philosopher, musician, poet, and romantic comedic playwright. ... Il Principe (The Prince) is a political treatise by the Florentine public servant and political theorist Niccolò Machiavelli. ...


All findings of the title prince used for a lord of a territory before the 13th century are either translations of native titles to Latin or the term used in a more general sense than as the formal only title of the potentate in question. A Lord (Laird in some Scottish contexts) is a male who has power and authority. ...


Most of the medieval feudal magnates that now or then are accorded the prince title, have actually formally then been Lord of an estate that is defined as a principality. Almost all lands described as medieval principalities in feudal societies, have been so-called allodial properties, i.e not under feudal obligations but inalienably the landowner's inheritable real-estate. A Lord (Laird in some Scottish contexts) is a male who has power and authority. ... A principality is a monarchical feudatory or sovereign state, ruled or reigned over by a Monarch with the title of prince or princess (a synonym is princedom) or (in the widest sense) a Monarch with another title within the generic use of the term prince. ... Allodial land, or allodium, is literally land which has no lord. ...


This explanation for origins of French principalities has been supplied by heraldic and genealogical research [1]. An example of this has been the title of Prince of Dombes. Such principalities tended to be small. Presumably, Monaco is an example of such a principality that has survived to today, by existing as a sovereign state. Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... Genealogy is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ...


The use of the term prince was then more like a common title given to different kinds of official titles for different kinds of feudal territories. All local rulers of feudal societies, from the level of count upwards, were regarded as princes in this sense. This is attested by even today, surviving styles for e.g counts, margraves and dukes that are high and noble princes (cf. Royal and noble styles). A count is a nobleman in most European countries, equivalent in rank to a British earl, whose wife is also still a countess (for lack of an Anglo-Saxon term). ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... Margrave is the English and French form (recorded since 1551) of the German title Markgraf (from Mark march and Graf count) and certain equivalent nobiliary (princely) titles in other languages. ... A duke is a nobleman, historically of highest rank and usually controlling a duchy. ... This page will detail the various styles used by royalty and nobility in Europe, in the final form arrived at in the nineteenth century. ...


From 16th century onwards, European monarchs quite widely granted such abstract titles that were not linked to the power of government of an actual county or territory. This led to official recognition that ancient dynasties of the Holy Roman Empire were much more true rulers, reigning lords, than the new class of persons being holder of equivalent title of honour. The extent of the Holy Roman Empire in c. ... Honorary title or title of honor is a title bestowed upon individuals or organizations as an award in recognition of their merits. ...


Once the umbrelle term of prince was generally utilized, the concept of adding a prefix, a tradition that stems from the Holy Roman Empire, got invented to denote those old, territory-owning titles and distinguish them from the honorific titles. E.g., the German title of gefürsteter Graf (princely count) is known to have existed in the 18th century, and may have been used earlier. Look up prefix in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


These prefixes were not new grants, but rather an explication of existing positions and status by new terminology. Princely counts (including the various gefürstete margraves, landgraves, counts palatine, etc) soon started to use the title Fürst (prince) more than they used the less impressive-sounding "count". Thus, a new, class of nobility was created, that ranked clearly above newly created counts and marquesses, and just under the level of dukes. The title "duke" was not similarly augmented; it had not suffered much lessening of prestige, as the title was not given in bulk. In the 19th century, however, dukes holding or in direct line of sucession to autocratic power tended to assume the title archduke or grand duke. Fürst (plural Fürsten) is a German title of nobility, usually translated into English as Prince; however this translation can be misleading, since a Fürst usually ranks below a Duke. ... Look up Archduke in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The title of Grand Duke (Latin, Magnus Dux; German, Großherzog, Russian, Великий князь) used in Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic countries, is ranked in honour below King but higher than a sovereign Duke (Herzog) or Prince (Fürst). ...


The following parts of this article are only concerned with the usages as a formal nobiliary (or analogous) title. A title is a prefix or suffix added to a persons name to signify either veneration, an official position or a professional or academic qualification. ...


Prince as a courtesy title

Prince of the blood

Louis II of Bourbon, Prince of Condé, was a first prince of the blood during his lifetime (painted by Joost van Egmont).

The courtesy title of prince was often given to a prince of the blood. That is a general term for a male member of a ruling house of a monarchy. Further distinctions within this category can exist from country to country and from time period to time period, e.g. First Prince of the Blood in France. Image File history File links Grandconde. ... Image File history File links Grandconde. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


In some monarchies, e.g. the kingdom of France, this appellation is a specific title in its own right, of more restricted use. There the notion of prince du sang is restricted to paternal royal descendants. Depending on national tradition, the appellation may have restricted scope or not, often no further than one or two generations after the monarch and / or the line of succession, or it may be allowed to run into very high numbers, as is often the case in oriental dynasties. The borders of modern France closely align with those of the ancient territory of Gaul, inhabited by Celts known as Gauls. ...


Generally, when such a prince succeeds to the throne as ruling or least titular monarch, he stops being styled a titular prince. This goes for Kings, Emperors, Grand Dukes or one of many other ruler-styles, usually of higher rank, except in the case of a ruler styled prince of a particular principality (see below). The same principle applies, mutatis mutandis when a courtesy princess becomes a queen regnant. A monarch (see sovereignty) is a type of ruler or head of state. ... An emperor is a (male) monarch, usually the sovereign ruler of an empire or another type of imperial realm. ... The title of Grand Duke (Latin, Magnus Dux; German, Großherzog, Russian, Великий князь) used in Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic countries, is ranked in honour below King but higher than a sovereign Duke (Herzog) or Prince (Fürst). ... In Latin, mutatis mutandis means upon changing what needs to be changed, where what needs to be changed is usually implied by a prior statement assumed to be understood by the reader. ... Cleopatra is one of the most well-known queens regnant A queen regnant (plural queens regnant) is a female monarch who possesses all the monarchal powers that a king would have without regard to gender. ...


The female equivalent of a courtesy title of prince is princess. But then this title is also generally used for the spouse of any prince, of the blood, or of a principality, and also the daughter of any monarch. Regardless of birth rank, marriage to a prince(ss) generally means accession to the ruling house, but often the princely style is subject to an explicit conferral by the Monarch or a political authority with in say in the succession, e.g. certain parliaments, which may be delayed, withheld or even reversed. Inversely, the husband of a born princess is in many monarchies not as readily styled prince, although it certainly occasionally happened.


In these systems, a courtesy title of prince can be given to:

  • Other members of the royal family, also in the order of succession, although more distant and styled Royal Highness.
  • The husband of a reigning queen is usually titled prince or prince consort. However for wives of Monarchs, the title is usually a female variation on his, the same as used in case a female can mount the throne, such as queen or empress.

But in cultures which allow the ruler to have several wives, e.g. four in Islam and / or official concubines, for these women sometimes collectively referred to as harem there are often specific rules determining their hierarchy and a variety of titles, which may distinguish between those whose offspring can be in line for the succeesion or not, or specifically who is mother to the heir to the throne. A monarch (see sovereignty) is a type of ruler or head of state. ... An order of succession is a formula or algorithm that determines who inherits an office upon the death, resignation, or removal of its current occupant. ... Members of the British Royal Family This article is about the monarchy-related concept. ... A monarch (see sovereignty) is a type of ruler or head of state. ... A prince consort, generally speaking, is the husband of a Queen regnant, unless he himself is a king. ... Coming from the Arab tradition, the harîm حريم (compare haram) is the part of the household forbidden to male strangers. ...


To complicate matters, the style His Royal Highness, a prefix normally accompanying the title of a dynastic prince, of royal or imperial rank, that is, can be awarded separately (as a compromise or consolation prize, in some sense). Look up prefix in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Although the definition above is the one that is most commonly understood, there are also different systems. Depending on country, epoch and translation other meanings of prince are possible. In political geography and international politics a country is a geographical entity, a territory, most commonly associated with the notions of state or nation. ... A calendar era is the year numbering system used by a calendar. ... Look up translate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Over the centuries foreign-language titles such as Italian principe, French prince, German Fürst, Russian kniaz, etc., are often translated as prince in English. Kniaz’ or knyaz (князь in Russian and Ukrainian; cneaz in Romanian fem. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Many princely styles and titles are used in various monarchies, often changing with a new dynasty, even altered during one's rule, especially in conjunction with the style of the ruler. Indeed, various princely titles are derived from the ruler's, such as (e)mirza(da), khanzada, nawabzada, sahibzada, shahzada, sultanzada (all using the Persian patronymic suffix -zada, or son, descendant, or (maha)rajkumar from (Maha)Raja and Kolano ma-ngofa 'son of the ruler' on Tidore, again patronymic; or even from a unique title, e.g. mehtarjao. Mirza Sayeef Mirza exists in the united states. ... Khan (sometimes spelled as xan, han, Polish chan) is a title meaning ruler in Mongolian and Turkish. ... A Nawab was originally the provincial governor or viceroy of a province or region of the Mughal empire. ... Sahib (the female form is sahiba), from Arabic, originally friend, companion, from sahiba he accompanied, is a Hindi and Bengali word meaning sir, master or, primarily, lord. ... A sultan (Arabic: سلطان) is an Islamic title, with several historical meanings. ... Dr. Rajkumar (Kannada:ಡಾ. ರಾಜ್‌ಕುಮಾರ್‌, Real Name: Singanalluru Puttaswamayya Muthuraju Kannada:ಸಿಂಗನಲ್ಲೂರು ಪುಟ್ಟಸ್ವಾಮಯ್ಯ ಮುತ್ತುರಾಜು, April 24, 1929—April 12, 2006) was the most popular actor in Kannadas film industry. ... A Raja (Sanskrit ) is a king, or princely ruler from the Kshatriya / Rajput lineages. ... Chitral, or Chitrāl, is the name of a town (35° 53 N; 71° 48 E), valley, river, district, and former princely state in the Malakand Division of the Northwest Frontier Province of Pakistan. ...


However, often such style is used in a way that may surprise as not apparently logical, such as adopting a style for princes of the blood which is not pegged to the ruler's title, but rather continues an old tradition, asserts genealogical descendency from and / or claim of political succession to a more lofty monarchy, or simply is assumed 'because we can'.


Specific titles

Carlos María de los Dolores de Borbón y Austria-Este was an Infante of the kingdom of Spain during his lifetime.

In some monarchic dynasties, a very specific title is used, sometimes officially, such as Infante in Spain and Portugal. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Carlos de Bourbon, Duke of Madrid (1848 - 1909) was the Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain, and later the Legitimist claimant to the throne of France. ... In the Spanish and former Portuguese monarchies, Infante (masc. ...


This can be a style in existence for a princely - at least originally - feudal entity, possibly still nominally linked to one, Archduke in the Habsburg empire, Grand Prince (often rendered, less correctly, as Grand Duke) in tsarist Russia. See also Porphyrogenetos. Look up Archduke in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The title Grand Prince (Latin, Magnus Princeps; German, Großfürst, Finnish Suuriruhtinas, Swedish Storfurste, Lithuanian Didysis kunigaikÅ¡tis, Russian Великий князь Velikii kniaz) ranks in honour below Emperor and Tsar but higher than a sovereign Prince (Fürst) or Royal Prince. ... The title of Grand Duke (Latin, Magnus Dux; German, Großherzog, Russian, Великий князь) used in Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic countries, is ranked in honour below King but higher than a sovereign Duke (Herzog) or Prince (Fürst). ... The Byzantine Empire had a complex system of aristocracy and bureaucracy. ...


Other titles are unique to one dynasty, even though the ruler's title is not, such as Moulay (French form; also Mulay in English) in the Sherifian sultanate (now kingdom ruled by a Malik) of Morocco,


On the other hand, an existing style can be used without retaining any of its intrinsic qualities, e.g. Sultan for ordinary members of the Ottoman dynasty (ruler mainly styled Padishah) Sultan (Arabic: سلطان) is an Islamic title, with several historical meanings. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–65) Edirne (1365–1453) Constantinople (İstanbul, 1453–1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish (official); spoken languages include Abkhazian, Adyghe, Albanian, Arabic, Aramaic, Armenian, Azerbaijani... History of Islamic monarchies Padishah, Badishah, or Badshah is a very prestigious title derived from the Persian word Pādishāh, which is based on the better-known title Shāh King, assumed by several Islamic monarchs, notably these rulers, the first three commanding major Muslim empires: The Shahanshah of...


Yet a style can be reserved for members of the dynasty meeting specific criteria, e.g. French Emperor Napoléon I Bonaparte created the style Prince français ('French prince') for the princes of his house in line for the imperial succession, which excluded notable his adoptive stepson Eugène de Beauharnais, who meanwhile was Prince de Venise in chief of Napoleon's other realm, Italy. Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Eugène Rose de Beauharnais (September 3, 1781 - February 21, 1824) was the first child and only son of Joséphine de Tascher de la Pagerie and Alexandre, Vicomte de Beauharnais. ... Crown Princess redirects here, for the ship, see Crown Princess (ship). ...


Sometimes a specific title is commonly used by various dynasties in a region, e.g. Mian in various of the Punjabi princely Hill States (lower Himalayan region in British India) This article is about Pakistan nobility. ... The term hill states means states in a hilly area. ...


Some monarchies also commonly awarded some of their princes of the blood various lofty titles, some of which were reserved for royalty, other also open to the most trusted commoners and/or the highest nobility, as in the Byzantine empire (e.g. Protosebastos reserved). Painting of Emperor Basil II, exemplifying the Imperial Crown handed down by Angels. ...


Independently of such traditions, some dynasties more or less frequently awarded apanages to princes of the blood, typically carrying a feudal type title (often as such of lower protocollary rank than their birth rank) and some income. The system of appanage has greatly influenced the territorial construction of France and explains the flag of many provinces of France. ...

  • For the often specific terminology concerning a probable future successor, see Crown Prince and links there.

Confusingly, there are instances where a title suggests close kinship but actually only expresses a similar position in the line of succession, e.g. Filius Augusti 'son of the Augustus' in the Roman Tetrarchy. Furthermore, terms of kinship are sometimes used as a protocollary style, even for biologically unrelated digitaries, not unlike the practice of members of the clergy being addressed as 'father' and addressing laymen as 'my son/daughter', or even several ecclesiastical titles originally meaning father (notably Pope, Abbot, partially Patriarch) or brother (e.g. Fra). A Crown Prince or Crown Princess is the heir or heiress apparent to the throne in a royal or imperial monarchy. ... The Tetrarchs, a porphyry sculpture sacked from a Byzantine palace in 1204, Treasury of St. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope of Rome... Abbots coat of arms The word abbot, meaning father, has been used as a Christian clerical title in various, mainly monastic, meanings. ... For other senses, see Patriarch (disambiguation). ...


Prince as a substantive title

Other princes derive their title not from their heraditory or dynastic position as such, but from their claim to a unique and personal title of formal princely rank, one named after a specific and historical principality, but not connected to any practical claim as sovereign of a state, even if they belong to one. A principality is a monarchical feudatory or sovereign state, ruled or reigned over by a Monarch with the title of prince or princess (a synonym is princedom) or (in the widest sense) a Monarch with another title within the generic use of the term prince. ... Look up sovereign in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Prince as a reigning monarch

A prince or princess who is the head of state of a territory that has a monarchy as a form of government is a reigning prince. Queen Elizabeth II, is the Head of State of 16 countries including: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Jamaica, New Zealand and the Bahamas, as well as crown colonies and overseas territories of the United Kingdom. ... “Kingdom” redirects here. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A form of government is a colloquial term that refers to the set of political institutions by which a state is organized in order to exert its powers over a political community. ... A reigning prince is the head of state in a principality. ...


Nominal principalities

If the state that is governed by such a prince carries no other specific, formal name, their domain, typically smaller than a full sized kingdom, is called a principality. This can be a regular, independant and sovereign nation. Protocolary, these princes rank below a grand duke. For related meanings see also Monarch (disambiguation) A monarchy, (from the Greek monos archein, meaning one ruler) is a form of government that has a monarch as Head of State. ... A principality is a monarchical feudatory or sovereign state, ruled or reigned over by a Monarch with the title of prince or princess (a synonym is princedom) or (in the widest sense) a Monarch with another title within the generic use of the term prince. ... The title of Grand Duke (Latin, Magnus Dux; German, Großherzog, Russian, Великий князь) used in Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic countries, is ranked in honour below King but higher than a sovereign Duke (Herzog) or Prince (Fürst). ...


Currently the last sovereign cases, all tiny states in Europe, are:

In the same tradition some self-proclaimed monarchs of so-called micronations establish themselves as virtual princes: The micronation of Sealand Micronations – sometimes also referred to as a cybernations, fantasy countries, model countries, and new country projects – are entities that resemble independent nations or states but which are unrecognized by world governments or major international organisations. ...

Paddy Roy Bates, also known as Roy of Sealand (born c. ... For other meanings see Sealand (disambiguation). ...

Generic use

The term prince has also been used to describe, in languages like English for lack of a more specific word for this concept, the head of any feudal or vassal state of lower — generally peerage — rank ruling in his own right, not in a mere gubernatorial capacity. For example, it has been used as a synonym for duke or count at times. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste. ... A duke is a nobleman, historically of highest rank and usually controlling a duchy. ... A count is a nobleman in most European countries, equivalent in rank to a British earl, whose wife is also still a countess (for lack of an Anglo-Saxon term). ...


In German, such a prince is specifically called Fürst (capitals obligatory for German nouns), and there are equivalents in most languages and countries that know the tradition of the Holy Roman Empire and where this was called Kleinstaaterei. The title was used for the head of state, and the title of Prinz was used for cadet members of reigning royal or princely families, and also for the cadets of some mediatized families, and did not imply any sovereignty whatsoever. Fürst (plural Fürsten) is a German title of nobility, usually translated into English as Prince; however this translation can be misleading, since a Fürst usually ranks below a Duke. ... The extent of the Holy Roman Empire in c. ... Kleinstaaterei, a German word for the occurence of (many) petty states is a polyvalent term, mainly used for the internal state of Germany (and neighbouring regions) during the Holy Roman Empire, especially in its late phase, when it was officially known as Heiliges Römisches Reich Deutscher Nation. ... The term prince, from the Latin root princeps, is used for a member of the highest ranks of the aristocracy or the nobility. ... Mediatized (from Mediatization) refers to a formerly souvereign non-eccelesiastic principality within the Holy Roman Empire that has has lost its immediate souvereignty (Reichsunmittelbarkeit = Imperial immediacy) within the Empire and been incorporated into another realm -- an event with wide application in Germany in 1803 (Reichsdeputationshauptschluss), following Napoleons victory over...


The female equivalents are Fürstin and Prinzessin.


Princes as representants of a reigning monarch

Various monarchies provide for different modes in which princes of the dynasty can temporarily or permanently share in the style and / or office of the Monarch, e.g. as Regent or Viceroy. Regent, from the Latin, a person selected to administer a state because the ruler is a minor or is not present or debilitated. ... A viceroy is a royal official who governs a country or province in the name of and as representative of the monarch. ...


Tthough these offices must not be reserved for members of the ruling dynasty, in some traditions they are, possibly even reflected in the style of the office, e.g. prince-lieutenant in Luxembourg repeatedly filled by the Crown prince before the grand duke's abdication, or in form of consortium imperii. A Crown Prince or Crown Princess is the heir or heiress apparent to the throne in a royal or imperial monarchy. ... Consortium imperii is a Latin word dating from the Roman dominate, denoting the sharing of imperial authority between two or more emperors, hence designated as consors imperii imperium - either as equals or in subordination (the junior is then often designated heir and successor). ...


Some monarchies even have a practice in which the Monarch can formally abdicate in favor of his heir, and yet retain a kingly title with executive power, e.g. Maha Upayuvaraja (Sanskrit for Great Joint King in Cambodia), though sometimes also conferred on powerful regents who exercised executive powers. Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ...


Titular princes

Titular Princes from within the royal family

One type of prince belongs in both the genealogical royalty and the territorial princely styles. A number of nobiliary territories, carrying with them the formal style of prince, are not or no longer actual political, administrative, principalities, but are maintained as essentially honorary titles and are awarded traditionally or occasionally) to princes of the blood, as an appanage. The system of appanage has greatly influenced the territorial construction of France and explains the flag of many provinces of France. ...


This is done in particular for the heir to the throne, creating a de facto primogeniture, who is often awarded a particular principality in each generation, so that it becomes synonymous with the first in line for the throne, even if there is no automatic legal mechanism to do so. De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


Examples of such titles are:

Some states have an analogous tradition, where they confer another princely title, such as the British royal duchies to various other royal princes, and (again, through de facto primogeniture). A Crown Prince or Crown Princess is the heir or heiress apparent to the throne in a royal or imperial monarchy. ... Motto  2(French) God and my right Anthem God Save the Queen 3 United Kingdom() – on the European continent() – in the European Union() [] Location of the British overseas territories Capital London Largest conurbation (population) Greater London Urban Area Official languages English (de facto)4 Government and  -  Monarch Elizabeth II  -  Prime... The Prince of Wales Feathers. This Heraldic badge of the Heir Apparent is derived from the ostrich feathers borne by Edward, the Black Prince. ... Prince Charles may refer to: Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, current heir-apparent to the British throne Any of the previous British royals named Charles, Prince of Wales The former Belgian regent, Prince Charles of Belgium This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... A Crown Prince or Crown Princess is the heir or heiress apparent to the throne in a royal or imperial monarchy. ... Prince of Orange is a title of nobility, originally associated with the principality of Orange in southern France. ... Prince Willem-Alexander, Prince of Orange, (Willem-Alexander Claus George Ferdinand Prins van Oranje, Prins der Nederlanden, Prins van Oranje-Nassau, Jonkheer van Amsberg, born April 27, 1967) is the eldest son of Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands and is the heir apparent to the Dutch throne, with the style... A Crown Prince or Crown Princess is the heir or heiress apparent to the throne in a royal or imperial monarchy. ... HRH The Prince of Asturias The title Prince of Asturias is given to the heir apparent to the Spanish throne, and the earlier kingdom of León. ... Felipe, Prince of Asturias (Felipe Juan Pablo Alfonso de Todos los Santos de Borbón y de Grecia) born January 30, 1968), is the third child of King Juan Carlos and Queen Sofía of Spain. ... A Crown Prince or Crown Princess is the heir or heiress apparent to the throne in a royal or imperial monarchy. ... The title of Dauphin de Viennois was a hereditary title of the descendants of Guigues IV, Comte dAlbon, who was nicknamed le Dauphin from the dolphin on his coat of arms. ... Juan Carlos I, King of Spain (baptized as Juan Carlos Alfonso Víctor María de Borbón y Borbón-Dos Sicilias) was born on January 5, 1938 in Rome and is the reigning King (Rey de España) and head of state of Spain. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


Both systems may concur, as in Belgium, where Prince of Liège is one of the traditional titles for royal sons, alongside the title of Duke of Brabant, the highest title, being handed down through primogeniture if it is not yet taken. The title of Count of Flanders is similarly used for the next in the succession order. Coat of arms of Dukes of Brabant The Duchy of Brabant was formally erected in 1183/1184. ... The counts of Flanders ruled over the county of Flanders from the 9th century. ...


Titular Princes from outside the royal family

France and the Holy Roman Empire

Coat of arms of Otto, prince of Bismarck (Holy Roman Empire).

In several countries of the European continent, e.g. in France, prince can be an aristocratic title of someone having a high rank of nobility in chief of a geographical place, but no actual territory, and without any necessary link to the royal family, which makes comparing it with e.g. the British system of royal princes difficult. An example of this is: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Continental Europe, also referred to as mainland Europe or simply the Continent, is the continent of Europe, explicitly excluding European islands and, at times, peninsulas. ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... Members of the British Royal Family This article is about the monarchy-related concept. ...

  • Princess of Polignac: Winnaretta Singer (French title)
  • Prince of Mercoeur (French title)
  • prince of Tingry (French title)

The kings of France started to bestow the aristocracy with these princely titles from 16th century onwards. The title was placed between marquess and duke in rank. Counties were raised to princedoms, then some princedoms to duchies. Winnaretta Singer [1] (8 January 1865-26 November 1943), Princess Edmond de Polignac, was an important musical patron, lesbian, and heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune. ...


This can even occur in a monarchy within which an identical but real and substantive feudal title exists, such as Fürst in German. An example of this is:

  • Otto von Bismarck was called Prince of Bismarck in the empire of reunited Germany, under the Hohenzollern dynasty.

Spain and France “Bismarck” redirects here. ...

Coat of arms of the princes of Waterloo (the Netherlands).

In other cases, such titular princedoms are created in chief of an event, such as a treaty of a victory. An example of this is: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

  • The Spanish minister Manuel Godoy was created Principe de la Paz or Prince of Peace by his king for negotiating the 1795 double peace-treaty of Basilea, by which the revolutionary French republic made peace with Prussia and with Spain.
  • The triumphant generals who led their troops to victory received a so called victory title. Especially Napoleon I Bonaparte created many such titles, also dukedoms.

Poland and Russia Manuel de Godoy (May 12, 1767 – October 4, 1851) was a Spanish statesman. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A victory title is an honorific title adopted by a successful military commander to commemorate his defeat of an enemy nation. ... Napoleon I of France, by Jacques-Louis David. ... King William I of the Netherlands, born William Frederik of Orange-Nassau (The Hague, 24 August 1772 - Berlin, 12 December 1843), was the second King of the Netherlands (the first king was Louis I Napoleon Bonaparte). ... A victory title is an honorific title adopted by a successful military commander to commemorate his defeat of an enemy nation. ... The title Prince of Waterloo is retained by the Dukes of Wellington. ... Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... Napoleon I of France, by Jacques-Louis David. ... Many things bear the name Waterloo. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ...

Coat of arms of the princes Sanguszko-Lubartowicz (Poland).

In Poland specifically, the titles of prince dated either to the times before the Union of Lublin or were granted to Polish nobles by foreign kings, as the law in Poland forbade king from dividing nobility by granting them hereditary titles. For more information, see The Princely Houses of Poland. Pogon LItewska Coat of Arms This work is copyrighted. ... Pogon LItewska Coat of Arms This work is copyrighted. ... The Union of Lublin, painted by Jan Matejko The Union of Lublin (Lithuanian: Liublino unija; Belarusian: Лю́блінская ву́нія; Polish: Unia lubelska) - signed on July 1, 1569 in Lublin, united the Kingdom of Poland and the... The Princely Houses of Poland had some important qualities differentiating them from other princely houses in Europe. ...


In the Russian system, knyaz, translated as prince, is the highest degree of nobility, and sometimes, represents a mediatization of an older native dynasty which became subject to the Russian imperial dynasty. Rurikid branches used the knyaz title also after they were succeeded by the Romanovs as the Russian imperial dynasty. An example of this is: Kniaz’ or knyaz is a word found in some Slavic languages, denoting a nobility rank. ... Mediatization, defined broadly, is the annexation of one monarchy by another monarchy in such a way that the ruler of the annexed state keeps his or her noble title, and sometimes a measure of power. ... // For other uses, see Dynasty (disambiguation). ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... Rurik or Riurik (Russian: , Old East Norse Rørik, meaning famous ruler) (ca 830 – ca 879) was a Varangian who gained control of Ladoga in 862 and built the Holmgard settlement (Ryurikovo Gorodishche) in Novgorod. ... The House of Romanov (Рома́нов, pronounced ) was the second and last imperial dynasty of Russia, which ruled the country for five generations from 1613 to 1761. ...

Prince Grigori Aleksandrovich Potemkin (Russian: Григорий Александрович Потемкин) (September 13, 1739 (NS: September 24) – October 5, 1791 (NS: October 16)) was a Russian... His Serene Highness Prince Potemkin of Tauride Knyaz Grigori Alexandrovich Potyomkin (Potemkin) (Russian: Григо́рий Алекса́ндрович Потёмкин) (September 13, 1739 (NS: September 24) – October 5, 1791 (NS: October 16)) was a Russian general-field marshal, statesman, and favorite of Catherine II the Great. ...

The title of prince in various Western traditions and languages

In each case, the title is followed (when available) by the female form and then (not always available, and obviously rarely applicable to a prince of the blood without a principality) the name of the territorial associated with it, each separated by a slash. If a second title (or set) is also given, then that one is for a Prince of the blood, the first for a principality. Be aware that the absence of a separate title for a prince of the blood may not always mean no such title exists; alternatively, the existence of a word does not imply there is also a reality in the linguistic territory concerned; it may very well be used exclusively to render titles in other languages, regardless whether there is a historical link with any (which often means that linguistic tradition is adopted)


Etymologically, we can discern the following traditions (some languages followed a historical link, e.g. within the Holy Roman Empire, not their linguistic family; some even fail to follow the same logic for certain other aristocratic titles):


Romanic languages

  • Languages (mostly Romance) only using the Latin root princeps:
    • Latin (post-Roman): Princeps/*Princeps/*
    • English:Prince /Princess - Prince /Princess
    • French: Prince /Princesse - Prince /Princesse
    • Albanian: Princ /Princeshë - Princ /Princeshë
    • Catalan: Príncep /Princesa - Príncep /Princesa
    • Italian: Principe /Principessa - Principe /Principessa
    • Maltese: Princep /Principessa - Princep /Principessa
    • Monegasque: Principu /Principessa - Principu /Principessa
    • Portuguese: Príncipe /Princesa - Príncipe /Princesa
    • Rhaeto-Romansh: Prinzi /Prinzessa - Prinzi /Prinzessa
    • Romanian: Prinţ /Prinţesă - Principe /Principesă (but archaic forms Cneaz - Crai also exist)
    • Spanish: Príncipe /Princesa - Príncipe /Princesa

The Romance languages, a major branch of the Indo-European language family, comprise all languages that descended from Latin, the language of the Roman Empire. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ...

Celtic languages

    • Irish: Prionsa /Banphrionsa - Prionsa /Banphrionsa
    • Welsh: Twysog /Twysoges

Germanic languages

  • Languages (mainly Germanic) that use (generally alongside a princeps-derivate for princes of the blood) an equivalent of the German Fürst:
    • Danish: Fyrste /Fyrstinde - Prins /Prinsesse
    • Dutch: Vorst /Vorstin- Prins /Prinses
    • Estonian [Finno-Ugric family]: Vürst /Vürstinna - Prints /Printsess
    • German: Fürst /Fürstin - Prinz /Prinzessin
    • Icelandic: Fursti /Furstynja - Prins /Prinsessa
    • Luxembourgish: Fürst /Fürstin - Prënz /Prinzessin
    • Norwegian: Fyrste /Fyrstinne - Prins /Prinsesse
    • Swedish: Furste /Furstinna - Prins /Prinsessa

Slavic and Baltic languages

  • Slavic and (related) Baltic languages:
    • Belorussian: Tsarevich, Karalevich, Prynts /Tsarewna, Karalewna, Pryntsesa
    • Bulgarian: Knyaz /Knaginya, Tsarevich, Kralevich, Prints /Printsesa
    • Croatian, Serbian: Knez /Kneginja Kraljević/Kraljevna, Princ/Princeza
    • Czech: Kníže /Kněžna, Princ/Princezna
    • Latvian: Firsts /Firstiene - Princis /Princese
    • Lithuanian: Kunigaikštis /Kunigaikštiene - Princas /Princese
    • Macedonian: Knez /Knezhina, Tsarevich, Kralevich, Prints /Tsarevna, Kralevna, Printsesa
    • Polish: Książę /Księżna, Książę, Królewicz /Księżna, Królewna
    • Russian: Knyaz /Knyagina Knyazhnya, Tsarevich, Korolyevich, Prints /Tsarevna, Korolyevna, Printsessa
    • Slovak: Knieža /Kňažná, Kráľovič, Princ /Princezná
    • Slovene: Knez /Kneginja, Kraljevič, Princ /Kraljična, Princesa
    • Ukrainian: Knyaz /Knyazhnya, Tsarenko, Korolenko, Prints /Tsarivna, Korolivna, Printsizna

 Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup... The Baltic languages are a group of related languages belonging to the Indo-European language family and spoken mainly in areas extending east and southeast of the Baltic Sea in Northern Europe. ...

Other languages

  • other languages:
    • Finnish: Ruhtinas /Ruhtinatar - Prinssi /Prinsessa
    • Greek (Medieval, formal): Prigkips, Πρίγκηψ/Prigkipissa, Πριγκήπισσα
    • Greek (Modern, colloquial): Prigkipas, Πρίγκηπας/Prigkipissa, Πριγκήπισσα
    • Hungarian (Magyar): Herceg / Hercegnő
    • Turkish: Prens/Prenses

The title of prince in various Oriental and other traditions and languages

The above is essentially the story of European, Christian dynasties and other nobility, also 'exported' to their colonial and other overseas territories and otherwise adopted by rather westernized societies elsewhere (e.g. Haiti).


Applying these essentially western concepts, and terminology, to other cultures even when they don't do so, is common but in many respects rather dubious. Different (historical, religious...) backgrounds have also begot significantly different dynastic and nobiliary systems, which are poorly represented by the 'closest' western analogy.


It therefore makes sense to treat these per civilization.


Islamic traditions

  • Arabian tradition since the caliphate - in several monarchies it remains customary to use the title Sheikh (in itself below princely rank) for all members of the royal family. In families (often reigning dynasties) which claim descent from the Prophet Muhammad, this is expressed in either of a number of titles (supposing different exact relations): sayid, sharif; these are retained even when too remote from any line of succession to be a member of any dynasty.
  • Malay countries
  • In the Ottoman empire, the sovereign of imperial rank (incorrectly known in the west as (Great) sultan) was styled padishah with a host of additional titles, reflecting his claim as political successor to the various conquered states. Princes of the blood, male and female, were given the style sultan (normally reserved for Muslim rulers)
  • Persia (Iran) - Princes were referred to by the title Shahzadeh, meaning "descendant of the king". Since the word zadeh could refer to either a male or female descendant, Shahzadeh had the parallel meaning of "princess" as well.

A caliphate (from the Arabic خلافة or khilaafah), is the Islamic form of government representing the political unity and leadership of the Muslim world. ... For other uses, see Sheikh (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Muhammad, see Muhammad (name). ... History of Islamic monarchies Padishah, Badishah, or Badshah is a very prestigious title derived from the Persian word Pādishāh, which is based on the better-known title Shāh King, assumed by several Islamic monarchs, notably these rulers, the first three commanding major Muslim empires: The Shahanshah of... Sultan (Arabic: سلطان) is an Islamic title, with several historical meanings. ...

Far Eastern traditions

  • China

In ancient China, the title of prince developed from being the highest title of nobility (synonymous with duke) in the Zhou Dynasty, to five grades of princes (not counting the sons and grandsons of the emperor) by the time of the fall of the Qing Dynasty. // The King or Wang (Chinese: 王 or 國王; wáng) was the title of the Chinese head of state until the Qin dynasty. ... A duke is a nobleman, historically of highest rank and usually controlling a duchy. ... Boundaries of the Western Zhou Dynasty (1050 - 771 BC) in China The Zhou Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chou Ch`ao; 1122 BC to 256 BC (ref) followed the Shang (Yin) Dynasty and preceded the Qin Dynasty in China. ... The Qing Dynasty (Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ching chao; Manchu: daicing gurun; Mongolian: Манж Чин), occasionally known as the Manchu Dynasty, was the ruling Chinese Dynasties. ...

  • Japan

In Japan, the title of prince (kôshaku 公爵) was used as the highest title of kazoku (華族 Japanese modern nobility) before the present constitution. The title kôshaku, however, is more commonly translated as duke to avoid confusion with the royal ranks in the imperial household, shinnô (親王 (literally king of the blood) female;naishinnô (内親王 (literally queen(by herself) of the blood) and shinnôhi 親王妃 (literally consort of king of the blood)) or ô ( (literally king) female;nyoô (女王 (literally queen (by herself)) and ôhi (王妃 (literally consort of king)). The former is the higher title of a male member of the Imperial family and the latter is the lower. The kazoku (華族, lit. ...

A princely state or native state was a feudal monarchy in British India ruled by a hereditary ruler, who was nominally sovereign. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... The Principalía was the ruling class in the municipalities of Spanish Philippines composed of the Gobernadorcillo or the Municipal Captain who presided over it, the First Lieutenant, the former Municipal Captains or ex-Gobernadorcillos, the municipal judges, the newly formed cabezas de baranggay (cabezas reformados), and the awardees of...

African traditions

Except for the Arabized, Muslim North and some other monarchies that simply adopted Islamic practices, or in cases where a Western model was copied (e.g. Bokassa I's short-lived Central-African Empire in Napoleonic fashion), usually the styles, or even the systems, are completely independent or almost. The Central African Empire was the name of the Central African Republic when president Jean-Bédel Bokassa declared himself Emperor Bokassa in 1977. ...


The title of prince in religion

Saint Robert Cardinal Bellarmine was a prince of the Roman Catholic church during his lifetime.

In states with an element of theocracy, this can affect princehood in several ways, such as the style of the ruler (e.g. with a secondary title meaning son or servant of a named divinity), but also the mode of succession (even reincarnation and recognition). The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Furthermore, certain religious offices may be considered of princely rank, and/or imply comparable temporal rights.


See Prince of the Church for the main Christian versions. Also in Christianity, Jesus Christ is sometimes referred to as the Prince of Peace, and Satan can be called the Prince of Darkness. The term Prince of the church is nowadays used nearly exclusively for Roman Catholic Cardinals. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Satan (disambiguation). ...


See also

Contrasting with heir presumptive, an heir apparent is one who cannot be prevented from inheriting by the birth of any other person. ... An Heir Presumptive (capitalised) is the person provisionally scheduled to inherit a throne, peerage, or other hereditary honor, but whose position can be displaced by the birth of an Heir Apparent or of a new Heir Presumptive with a better claim to the throne. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Prince Regent (or Prince Regnant, as a direct borrowing from French language) is a prince who rules a country instead of a sovereign, e. ... A prince consort, generally speaking, is the husband of a Queen regnant, unless he himself is a king. ... A princess consort is the female equivalent to a prince consort. ... King consort is a title given in some monarchies to the husband of a Queen regnant. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cleopatra is one of the most well-known queens regnant A queen regnant (plural queens regnant) is a female monarch who possesses all the monarchal powers that a king would have without regard to gender. ... Cleopatra is one of the most well-known queens regnant A queen regnant (plural queens regnant) is a female monarch who possesses all the monarchal powers that a king would have without regard to gender. ... A Crown Prince or Crown Princess is the heir or heiress apparent to the throne in a royal or imperial monarchy. ... The title Grand Prince (Latin, Magnus Princeps; German, Großfürst, Finnish Suuriruhtinas, Swedish Storfurste, Lithuanian Didysis kunigaikÅ¡tis, Russian Великий князь Velikii kniaz) ranks in honour below Emperor and Tsar but higher than a sovereign Prince (Fürst) or Royal Prince. ... In the Spanish and former Portuguese monarchies, Infante (masc. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Fils de France (Son of France in English) was the title given to the sons of the kings and dauphins of France. ... Petit-Fils de France, meaning Grandson of France, was the title given to the sons of Fils de France who were themselves the sons of the kings and dauphins of France. ... Monsieur means My Lord in French, and is now generally used as an honorific for all men, the equivalent to the English Mister. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The term Prince of the church is nowadays used nearly exclusively for Roman Catholic Cardinals. ... The word cardinal comes from the Latin cardo for hinge and usually refers to things of fundamental importance, as in cardinal rule or cardinal sins. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Prince-Bishop was the title given bishops who held secular powers, beside their inherent clerical power. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A principality is a monarchical feudatory or sovereign state, ruled or reigned over by a Monarch with the title of prince or princess (a synonym is princedom) or (in the widest sense) a Monarch with another title within the generic use of the term prince. ... A princely state is any state under the reign of a prince and is thus a principality taken in the broad sense. ... Auctoritas is the Latin origin of English authority. According to Benveniste [citation?], auctor (which also gives us English author) is derived from Latin augeó (to augment): The auctor is is qui auget, the one who augments the act or the juridical situation of another. ... The Dominate was the despotic last of the two phases of government in the ancient Roman Empire between its establishment in 27 BC and the formal date of the collapse of the Western Empire in AD 476. ... Potestas is a Latin word meaning power or faculty. ... Imperium can, in a broad sense, be translated as power. ... Fürst (plural Fürsten) is a German title of nobility, usually translated into English as Prince; however this translation can be misleading, since a Fürst usually ranks below a Duke. ... This is a list of British Princes from the accession of King George I in 1714. ... This is a list of British princesses from the accession of King George I in 1714. ... A grand duchy is a territory whose head of state is a Grand Duke or Grand Duchess. ... The title of Grand Duke (Latin, Magnus Dux; German, Großherzog, Russian, Великий князь) used in Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic countries, is ranked in honour below King but higher than a sovereign Duke (Herzog) or Prince (Fürst). ... A Grand Duchess is the wife of a Grand Duke or a woman who rules a Grand Duchy in her own right. ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... Royalty may refer to either: the royal family of a country with a monarchy royalties the payment made to the owner of a copyright, patent, or trademark, for the use thereof This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... Traditional ranks among European royalty, peers, and nobility are rooted in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. ...

Sources and references

  • Princely States in British India and talaqdars in Oudh
  • RoyalArk thorough on a limited number of dynasties
  • World Statesmen select the present state, often navigate within for a former polity

  Results from FactBites:
 
Princefams.com - Prince News and Pictures (2101 words)
I'm not expecting Prince to roll out a tour on the scale of those of his Purple Rain days, but considering it's been two decades since the release of Sign 'O' the Times (Paisley Park), a live rendition of the entire album would be quite nice.
Prince's last album 3121 (hence the ticket price tag) was a messy affair; a random sampling of 12 tracks from his unedited unconscious that mixed in every superfluous bell, whistle, clap and string at his disposal.
Prince Rogers Nelson was born in 1959 to John Nelson, a jazz pianist, and his wife Mattie, a backing singer.
Prince - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3201 words)
Indeed, various princely titles are derived from the ruler's, such as (e)mirza(da), khanzada, nawabzada, sahibzada, shahzada, sultanzada (all using the Persian patronymic suffix -zada, "son, descendant"; or (maha)rajkumar from (Maha)Raja and Kolano ma-ngofa 'son of the ruler' on Tidore, again patronymic; or even from a unique title, e.g.
Other princes (or the same, see below) derive their title not from their dynastic position as such (which must often be shared with brothers, etc), but from their claim to a unique title of formal princely rank, one named after a specific principality, not after the suzerain/sovereign state, even if they belong to one.
A prince or princess who is the head of state in a monarchy is a reigning prince.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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