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Encyclopedia > Prime Minister of New Zealand
Prime Minister of New Zealand

Incumbent:
Helen Clark
Style:
Appointed by: Anand Satyanand
as Governor-General of New Zealand
First : Henry Sewell
As Colonial Secretary
Formation: 7 May 1856
New Zealand

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
New Zealand
Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 496 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2300 × 2780 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other persons named Helen Clark, see Helen Clark (disambiguation). ... Anand Satyanand with Dame Silvia Cartwright Wikinews has news related to: New Governor-General of New Zealand announced Anand Satch[1] Satyanand, PCNZM (born 22 July 1944 in Auckland) is the Governor-General of New Zealand. ... The Governor-General of New Zealand is the representative of the Sovereign in right of New Zealand (currently, Queen Elizabeth II). ... Henry Sewell (1807 - 1879) was a prominent 19th century New Zealand politician. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_New_Zealand. ... Politics of New Zealand takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic monarchy. ...








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The Prime Minister of New Zealand is New Zealand's head of government consequent on being the leader of the party or coalition with majority support in the Parliament of New Zealand. Since 5 December 1999, the Prime Minister has been Helen Clark of the Labour Party. New Zealand is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm, with Queen Elizabeth II as its reigning monarch, since February 6, 1952. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... The Governor-General of New Zealand is the representative of the Sovereign in right of New Zealand (currently, Queen Elizabeth II). ... Anand Satyanand with Dame Silvia Cartwright Wikinews has news related to: New Governor-General of New Zealand announced Anand Satch[1] Satyanand, PCNZM (born 22 July 1944 in Auckland) is the Governor-General of New Zealand. ... The Executive Council of New Zealand is the body which provides the formal basis for the Cabinet. ... The New Zealand Cabinet functions as the policy and decision-making body of New Zealand governments executive branch. ... For other persons named Helen Clark, see Helen Clark (disambiguation). ... A legislatureis a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to ratify laws. ... The Parliament of New Zealand consists of the Queen of New Zealand and the New Zealand House of Representatives and, until 1951, the New Zealand Legislative Council. ... The New Zealand House of Representatives is the legislature of New Zealand. ... In New Zealand the Speaker of the House of Representatives is the individual who chairs the countrys legislative body, the New Zealand House of Representatives (often also referred to as Parliament). The Speaker fulfils a number of important functions in relation to the operation the House, which is based... Margaret Wilson could also refer to a writer, or a tennis player Margaret Wilson (20th May 1947 - ), a New Zealand politician, currently serves as Speaker of the New Zealand House of Representatives. ... The Official Opposition in New Zealand is usually the largest political party or coalition which is not a member of the ruling government. ... The Leader of the Opposition in New Zealand is the politician who, at least in theory, leads the Opposition bloc in the New Zealand Parliament. ... For the American politician, see John A. Key. ... Members of New Zealands House of Representatives, commonly called Parliament, normally gain their parliamentary seats through nationwide general elections, or (less frequently) in by-elections. ... In New Zealand, an electorate is a voting district for Parliamentary elections. ... Referendums (or referenda) are held only occasionally by the government of New Zealand. ... In the law, the judiciary or judicial system is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ... The Supreme Court of New Zealand is the highest court of appeal in New Zealand, having formally come into existence at the beginning of 2004, and sitting for the first time on 1 July 2004. ... The Chief Justice of New Zealand is the senior judge of the High Court of New Zealand, and presides over the Supreme Court of New Zealand. ... The Right Honourable Dame Sian Seerpoohi Elias, GNZM, (born March 12, 1949) is the Chief Justice of New Zealand, and is therefore the most senior member of the countrys judiciary. ... The Court of Appeal of New Zealand, located in Wellington, is New Zealand’s principal intermediate appellate court. ... The High Court of New Zealand was established in 1841 and known as the Supreme Court until 1980. ... Region is the formal term for the top tier of local government in New Zealand. ... Territorial authorities is the formal term for the second tier of local government in New Zealand, below regional councils. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... The following is a list of New Zealand politicians, both past and present. ... New Zealand national politics feature a pervasive party system. ... This page lists a number of articles relating to issues, ideas, and events in New Zealand politics. ... Apirana Ngata, perhaps the most prominent Māori politician Māori politics is the politics of the Māori people, who were the original inhabitants of New Zealand and who are now the countrys largest minority. ... New Zealand’s foreign policy is oriented chiefly toward developed democratic nations and emerging Pacific economies. ... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... The head of government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ... The Parliament of New Zealand consists of the Queen of New Zealand and the New Zealand House of Representatives and, until 1951, the New Zealand Legislative Council. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... For other persons named Helen Clark, see Helen Clark (disambiguation). ... The New Zealand Labour Party is a New Zealand political party. ...


The title "Prime Minister" had made its first formal appearance in the 1873 Schedule of the Civil List Act, but originally the Prime Minister was entitled Colonial Secretary or First Minister. This was formally changed in 1869 to "Premier". However, this title too did not last, being informally changed by Richard Seddon to "Prime Minister" in 1901 during his tenure in office, due to New Zealand's self-exclusion from the Federation of Australia[1]. Following the declaration of New Zealand as a Dominion in 1907, the term "Prime Minister" has been used exclusively. Richard John Seddon (1845 - 1906), sometimes known as King Dick, was the longest serving Prime Minister of New Zealand. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The federation of Australia was the process by which the six separate British colonies of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia formed a federation. ... For alternative meanings, see New Zealand (disambiguation). ...


The Prime Minister is supported by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, their official residence is Premier House, Tinakori Road, Wellington. The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet of New Zealand (often known by its acronym, DPMC) is the department charged with supporting the Prime Minister of New Zealand and their Cabinet. ... Premier House is in Wellington, New Zealand ...


Responsibilities and powers

Contents

The role of the Prime Minister is not formally defined, being based on constitutional convention rather than specific legislation. According to these conventions, the Prime Minister is leader of Cabinet (itself a body existing by convention), and takes a co-ordinating role. The New Zealand Cabinet functions as the policy and decision-making body of New Zealand governments executive branch. ...


The Prime Minister is regarded by convention as "first among equals". He or she does indeed hold the most senior post in the administration, but is also required to adhere to any decisions taken by Cabinet. The actual ability of a Prime Minister to give direct orders is surprisingly limited; most of the position's power comes about through other means, such as: First among Equals could refer to Primus inter pares, a political concept or First Among Equals, a novel by Jeffrey Archer ...

  • The ability to set the Cabinet agenda, thereby controlling what issues will be discussed.
  • The ability to appoint and dismiss ministers. The extent to which this power can be exercised varies between different parties; the Labour Party, for example, places most of this responsibility in the hands of the Caucus, leaving the Prime Minister only with the power to choose which portfolios a minister is given. Furthermore, the MMP electoral system has complicated this, as the Prime Minister may have to consult with another party leader.
  • The influence a Prime Minister is likely to have as leader of the dominant party. These powers may give him or her more direct control over subordinates than is attached to the Prime Minister's role itself.
  • The power gained simply from being central to most significant decision-making, and from being able to comment on and criticise any decisions taken by other ministers.

The Prime Minister can call elections by notifying the Governor-General to dissolve Parliament. The Governor-General may reject this advice should an alternative government exist, but so far none have done so. The New Zealand Labour Party is a New Zealand political party. ... A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ... In 1993 New Zealand adopted Mixed Member Proportional as its electoral system after many years of first-past-the-post. ... The Governor-General of New Zealand is the representative of the Sovereign in right of New Zealand (currently, Queen Elizabeth II). ... The New Zealand House of Representatives is the legislature of New Zealand. ...


The post of Prime Minister is, like other ministerial positions, an appointment by the Governor-General "during the Queen's pleasure". However, the convention has long since been established that the Prime Minister must have and retain the support of a majority of Members of Parliament. Historically, this has meant that the Prime Minister is the parliamentary leader of the largest political party in the House of Representatives. A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The New Zealand House of Representatives is the legislature of New Zealand. ...


The Prime Minister also indirectly holds the power to appoint and recall the Governor-General. By constitutional convention, only the Prime Minister has the right to tender advice to the Sovereign on nominations for the office, and so in effect the Prime Minister may appoint the Governor-General. The Prime Minister may also advise the Queen to recall (dismiss) the Governor-General, so long as the Prime Minister has the support of the House of Representatives, although this power has never been exercised by a Prime Minister in New Zealand (three of the first Governors, however, were recalled).


Within the last fifty years, a convention has also developed of appointing a Deputy Prime Minister. The Deputy typically holds important ministerial portfolios and becomes Acting Prime Minister in the absence or incapacitation of the Prime Minister. The Deputy is commonly a member of the same party as the Prime Minister, but not necessarily so; in coalition Governments, the parliamentary leader of a support party may be offered the post. A Deputy Prime Minister is a member of a nations cabinet who can take the position of acting Prime Minister when the real Prime Minister is temporarily absent. ...


History of the office

The exact origins of the office of Prime Minister are disputed. Use of the words "prime minister" as a descriptive term date back to the 1st Parliament, where they are applied to James FitzGerald and Thomas Forsaith. FitzGerald and Forsaith had no official titles, however, and New Zealand had not yet obtained self-rule. As such, they are not usually considered Prime Ministers in any substantive sense. The 1st New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... James Edward FitzGerald (1818 - 1896) was a New Zealand politician. ... Thomas Spencer Forsaith was a New Zealand politician. ...


The first person to be formally appointed to a position of leadership was Henry Sewell, who formed a government at the beginning of the Second Parliament. Despite his formal leadership role, however, his only actual title was Colonial Secretary. His successor, William Fox, was also given a formal leadership role, but was not Colonial Secretary. It was not until Frederick Weld, the sixth person appointed to formal leadership, that a substantive leadership title – Premier – appeared. Weld's successor, Edward Stafford, briefly changed the title to First Minister but it was soon afterwards restored to Premier by William Fox. From that point, Premier became the usual designation. Towards the end of the nineteenth century the term Prime Minister arose as a common alternative to Premier and Richard Seddon used the title almost exclusively. Seddon's successor, William Hall-Jones, was officially appointed Prime Minister rather than Premier. The title "Prime Minister" has been used ever since. Henry Sewell (1807 - 1879) was a prominent 19th century New Zealand politician. ... The 2nd New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand. ... Sir William Fox, KCMG served as Premier of New Zealand on four occasions in the 19th century, while New Zealand was still a colony. ... Sir Frederick Aloysius Weld, GCMG (1823–1891), , was a New Zealand politician and a governor of various British colonies. ... There have been two well-known people by the name of Edward Stafford. ... Richard John Seddon (1845 - 1906), sometimes known as King Dick, was the longest serving Prime Minister of New Zealand. ... William Hall-Jones (1851-1936) was Prime Minister of New Zealand from June 1906 until August 1906. ...


Assuming that Sewell is counted as the first Prime Minister, thirty-seven people have held the office since it was established. Some of these people have held it on several different occasions, with the record for maximum number of times being shared between William Fox and Harry Atkinson (both of whom served four times). The longest that anyone has served in the office is thirteen years, a record set by Richard Seddon. The first holder of the office, Henry Sewell, led the country for the shortest total time; his only term lasted only thirteen days (the shortest term actually belonged to Harry Atkinson, whose third term lasted only seven days, but Atkinson served longer than Sewell in total). The youngest to hold office was Edward Stafford, who was 37 years old when he became Premier in 1856. The oldest was Walter Nash, who was 75 years old in 1957. Sir William Fox, KCMG served as Premier of New Zealand on four occasions in the 19th century, while New Zealand was still a colony. ... Harry Albert Atkinson served as Premier of New Zealand on four separate occasions in the late 19th century. ... Richard John Seddon (1845 - 1906), sometimes known as King Dick, was the longest serving Prime Minister of New Zealand. ... Henry Sewell (1807 - 1879) was a prominent 19th century New Zealand politician. ... There have been two well-known people by the name of Edward Stafford. ... Sir Walter Nash, GCMG, CH (12 February 1882–4 June 1968) served as Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1957 to 1960 and was also highly influential in his role as Minister of Finance. ...


New Zealand is also one of the few countries in the world to have had two female heads of government, and one of only two countries to have two female heads of government directly succeed the other. The head of government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ...


Time line


See also

The Prime Minister of New Zealand is most senior officer in the Government of New Zealand. ... The following is a list of Prime Ministers of New Zealand ranked by their total term in office (multiple terms are added together to give the total term in office). ...

References

  1. ^ Prime Minister: The Title "Premier". Te Ara - An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, 1966. Retrieved on 2007-08-27.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • New Zealand Prime Minister's official website
  • List of New Zealand Prime Ministers
Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_New_Zealand. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... // New Zealand Main Articles: Main article on New Zealand, New Zealand Wikiportal and Category:New Zealand Main Articles Māori History of New Zealand Politics of New Zealand Geography of New Zealand Māori culture Economy of New Zealand Demographics of New Zealand Culture of New Zealand New Zealand English... The history of New Zealand dates back at least seven hundred years to when it was discovered and settled by Polynesians, who developed a distinct Māori culture centred on kinship links and land. ... This is a timeline of the History of New Zealand. ... One of the few extant copies of the Treaty of Waitangi The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Tiriti o Waitangi) is a treaty signed on February 6, 1840 by representatives of the British Crown, and Māori chiefs from the North Island of New Zealand. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The military history of New Zealand spans several hundred years. ... This is a timeline of the History of New Zealands involvement with Antarctica. ... On November 2, 1868, New Zealand officially adopted a standard time to be observed nationally, and was perhaps the first country to do so. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... New Zealand has a total of nineteen marine reserves spread around the North and South Islands, and two on outlying island groups. ... Lake Wakatipu This is a list of lakes in New Zealand. ... This is a list of all waterways named as rivers in New Zealand. ... The following is a list of some of the more well known caves and caverns in New Zealand. ... A map showing the major cities and towns of New Zealand. ... This is a list of towns in New Zealand. ... The biodiversity of New Zealand, a large Pacific archipelago, is one of the most unusual on Earth, due to its long isolation from other continental landmasses. ... Politics of New Zealand takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic monarchy. ... New Zealand is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm, with Queen Elizabeth II as its reigning monarch, since February 6, 1952. ... The Parliament of New Zealand consists of the Queen of New Zealand and the New Zealand House of Representatives and, until 1951, the New Zealand Legislative Council. ... New Zealand national politics feature a pervasive party system. ... Members of New Zealands House of Representatives, commonly called Parliament, normally gain their parliamentary seats through nationwide general elections, or (less frequently) in by-elections. ... The Supreme Court of New Zealand is the highest court of appeal in New Zealand, having formally come into existence at the beginning of 2004, and sitting for the first time on 1 July 2004. ... New Zealand’s foreign policy is oriented chiefly toward developed democratic nations and emerging Pacific economies. ... The term Rogernomics, a portmanteau of Roger and economics, was created by analogy with Reaganomics to describe the economic policies followed by New Zealand Finance Minister Roger Douglas from his appointment in 1984. ... New Zealand receives two million tourists per year. ... This is a list of companies based in New Zealand. ... Communications in New Zealand are fairly typical for an industrialized nation. ... There is no one culture of New Zealand. ... Wharenui, Ohinemutu village, Rotorua. ... New Zealand English (NZE) is the English spoken in New Zealand. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... New Zealand claims as its own many writers, even those immigrants born overseas or those emigrants who have gone into exile. ... New Zealand music is a vibrant expression of the culture of New Zealand. ... Holidays in New Zealand can refer to publicly observed holidays or to a vacation period. ... A map showing the major cities and towns of New Zealand. ... For the first Duke of Wellington, see Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. ... For other uses, see Auckland (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in New Zealand. ... Hamilton (Kirikiriroa in Māori) is the centre of New Zealands fourth largest urban area, and is the countrys seventh largest city. ... Dunedin (ÅŒtepoti in Maori) is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the region of Otago. ... The T & G Building (Atkin & Mitchell, Wellington, 1936) Napier (Ahuriri in Māori) is an important port city in Hawkes Bay, New Zealand. ... Hastings is the administrative centre of the Hastings District in the Hawkes Bay Region of the North Island of New Zealand. ... Tauranga (population 109,100 — 2006 census) is the largest city of the Bay of Plenty region of the North Island of New Zealand. ... // New Zealand Main Articles: Main article on New Zealand, New Zealand Wikiportal and Category:New Zealand Main Articles Māori History of New Zealand Politics of New Zealand Geography of New Zealand Māori culture Economy of New Zealand Demographics of New Zealand Culture of New Zealand New Zealand English... Queen Elizabeth II wearing the sash and the star of the New Zealand Order of Merit, as well as the badges on her shoulder of the Order of New Zealand and the Queens Service Order. ... // Demographics of New Zealand, Data of FAO, year 2005 ; Number of inhabitants in thousands. ...

 
 

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