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Encyclopedia > Prime Minister of Canada
Canada

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Canada
Image File history File links National Flag of Canada / lUnifolié For more information, see Department of Canadian Heritage and Image_talk:Canada_flag_large. ... Canada is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm (see Monarchy in Canada) with a federal system of parliamentary government, and strong democratic traditions. ...


Executive (The Crown)
Sovereign (Queen Elizabeth II)

Governor General (Michaëlle Jean)
Queen's Privy Council for Canada
Prime Minister (Stephen Harper)
Cabinet
Throughout the Commonwealth Realms The Crown is an abstract concept which represents the legal authority for the existence of any government. ... The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada, proclaimed by Queen Elizabeth II in 1994. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The Governor General of Canada (French: Gouverneure générale du Canada or Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian Monarch, who is Canadas Head of State; Canada is one of sixteen Commonwealth realms, all of which share a single... Michaëlle Jean, CC, CMM, COM, CD, DUniv (honoris causa), D.Litt (honoris causa) , (born September 6, 1957, in Port-au-Prince, Haïti) is the current Governor General of Canada. ... The Privy Council Office as it appeared in the 1880s The Queens Privy Council for Canada (French: Conseil privé de la Reine pour le Canada) is the council of advisers to the Queen of Canada, whose members are appointed by the Governor General of Canada for life on the... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... The Cabinet of Canada (French: Cabinet du Canada or Conseil des ministres) plays an important role in the Government of Canada in accordance with the Westminster System. ...

Legislative (Parliament)
Senate

Speaker of the Senate
Government Leader in the Senate
Opposition Leader in the Senate
Canadian Senate divisions
House of Commons
Speaker of the House
Government House Leader
Official Opposition
Leader of the Opposition
Opposition House Leader
Shadow Cabinet
A legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) is Canadas legislative branch, seated at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario. ... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... The Speaker of the Canadian Senate (French: Président du Sénat) is the presiding officer of the Canadian Senate. ... The Leader of the Government in the Senate is a Canadian cabinet minister who leads the government side in the Canadian Senate and is chiefly responsible for promoting and defending the governments program in the Upper House. ... In Canada, the Leader of the Official Opposition in the Senate is the leader of the largest party in the Senate that is not in government. ... Representation in the Canadian Senate is divided into seats on a provincial basis. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... Current house speaker Peter Milliken In Canada the Speaker of the House of Commons (French: Président de la Chambre des communes) is the presiding officer of the lower house and is elected by fellow MPs. ... The Leader of the Government in the House of Commons (French: Leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes), more commonly known as the Government House Leader, is the Cabinet minister responsible for planning and managing the governments legislative program in the Canadian House of Commons. ... Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (French: LOpposition Loyale de Sa Majesté) in Canada is usually the largest parliamentary opposition party in the Canadian House of Commons that is not in government either on its own or as part of a governing coalition. ... The Leader of the Opposition (French: Chef de lOpposition) in Canada is the Member of Parliament in the Canadian House of Commons who leads Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (the body in Parliament recognized as the Official Opposition). ... In Canada each political party with representation in the House of Commons has a House Leader who is a front bench MP and an expert in parliamentary procedure. ... The outgoing Official Opposition Shadow Cabinet is listed below. ...

Elections
Parliamentary constituencies

Electoral system
Last election
The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) has two chambers. ... This is a list of Canadas 308 electoral districts (also known as ridings in Canadian English) as defined by the 2003 Representation Order, which came into effect on May 23, 2004. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ...

Judicial
Supreme Court

Chief Justice
Lower Courts of Appeal
Constitution
British North America Acts
Peace, Order and Good Government
Charter of Rights and Freedoms
The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      In law, the judiciary or judicial is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ... The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is the highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal in the Canadian justice system. ... The Right Hon. ... List of final courts of appeal in Canada. ... The British North America Acts 1867–1975 are a series of Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom dealing with the government of Canada, which was known as British North America until 1867. ... In Canada, the phrase peace, order and good government (in French, paix, ordre et bon gouvernement), called POGG for short, is often used to describe the principles upon which that countrys Confederation took place. ... The Charter, signed by Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau in 1981. ...

Provinces and territories Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ...

Lieutenant-Governors
Premiers
Legislatures
Politics of: AB | BC | MB | NB | NL
NT | NS | NU | ON | PE
QC | SK | YT

Regions
Political culture
Foreign relations In Canada, the lieutenant-governor (often without a hyphen[1], pronounced ), in French lieutenant-gouverneur/lieutenant-gouverneure (always with a hyphen), is the Canadian Monarchs, or Crowns, representative in a province, much as the Governor General is her representative at the national level. ... In Canada, a Premier is the head of government of a province. ... This is a list of the Legislative Assemblies of Canadas provinces and territories. ... Albertas first Legislature, Edmonton, 1906 The politics of Alberta are centred on a provincial government resembling that of the other Canadian provinces. ... Prior to 1903, there were no political parties in British Columbia, Canada, other than at the federal level. ... The Canadian province of Manitoba is governed by a unicameral legislature, the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba, which operates under the Westminster system of government. ... New Brunswick has a unicameral legislature with 55 seats. ... The politics of Northwest Territories have been centered around the struggle for responsible government and provincial rights. ... Nova Scotia is a parliamentary democracy. ... The Province of Ontario is governed by a unicameral legislature, the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, which operates in the Westminster system of government. ... The politics of Prince Edward Island are centred on a provincial government resembling that of the other Canadian provinces. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Politics of Saskatchewan are part of the Canadian federal political system along with the other Canadian provinces. ... // Canadian provinces and territories are normally grouped into the following regions (generally from west to east): Northern Canada (The North) Yukon Northwest Territories Nunavut Western Canada British Columbia Prairies Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba Eastern Canada Central Canada Ontario Quebec Atlantic Canada Maritimes New Brunswick Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia Newfoundland and... Canadian political culture is in some ways part of a greater North American and European political culture, which emphasizes constitutional law, freedom of religion, personal liberty, and regional autonomy; these ideas stemming in various degrees from the British common law and French civil law traditions, North American aboriginal government, and... // The British North American colonies which constitute modern Canada had little control over their foreign affairs. ...


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The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. The office is not outlined in any of the documents that constitute the written portion of the Constitution of Canada; executive authority is formally vested in the Canadian Sovereign and exercised on his or her behalf by the Governor General. The prime ministership is part of Canada's constitutional convention tradition. The Canadian office was initially modeled after the job as it existed in the mother country at time of confederation; and the British prime ministership, although fully developed by 1867, was not formally integrated into the British Constitution until 1905 - hence, its absence from the document that created "one dominion under the name of Canada." Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... A minister or a secretary is a politician who heads a government ministry or department (e. ... Bold text The Canada wordmark, used by most agencies of the Canadian federal government. ... The Constitution of Canada is the supreme law in Canada. ... Under the doctrine of the separation of powers, the executive is the branch of a government charged with implementing, or executing, the law. ... The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada, proclaimed by Queen Elizabeth II in 1994. ... The Governor General of Canada (French: Gouverneure générale du Canada or Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian Monarch, who is Canadas Head of State; Canada is one of sixteen Commonwealth realms, all of which share a single... A constitutional convention is an informal and uncodified procedural agreement that is followed by the institutions of a state. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Constitution of the United Kingdom is uncodified, consisting of both written and unwritten sources. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ...

Stephen Harper, Current Prime Minister of Canada.

The Prime Minister is almost invariably the leader of the political party that holds the largest number of seats in the Canadian House of Commons. According to Canadian protocol, all prime ministers are styled "Right Honourable" ("Très Honorable", in French) for life. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 459 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1532 × 2000 pixel, file size: 383 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The permission for use of this work has been archived in the Wikimedia OTRS system. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 459 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1532 × 2000 pixel, file size: 383 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The permission for use of this work has been archived in the Wikimedia OTRS system. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Political parties Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... The Right Honourable (abbreviated The Rt Hon. ...


Stephen Harper is the current Prime Minister. He was appointed by Governor General Michaëlle Jean (per constitutional convention) as the 22nd Prime Minister of Canada, on February 6, 2006. He is the leader of the Conservative Party, which won 124 of 308 seats in the last federal election. Of the total 308 seats, 124 is a plurality (a majority would be 155 seats) so Prime Minister Harper leads a minority government - that is, there are more MPs seated on the opposition benches to the left of the Speaker of the House of Commons than on the government benches to the right of the Speaker. Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... The Governor General of Canada (French: Gouverneure générale du Canada or Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian Monarch, who is Canadas Head of State; Canada is one of sixteen Commonwealth realms, all of which share a single... Michaëlle Jean, CC, CMM, COM, CD, DUniv (honoris causa), D.Litt (honoris causa) , (born September 6, 1957, in Port-au-Prince, Haïti) is the current Governor General of Canada. ... A constitutional convention is an informal and uncodified procedural agreement that is followed by the institutions of a state. ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... A Canadian federal election (more formally, the 39th general election) will occur on January 23, 2006. ...

Contents

Qualifications and selection

Further information: Canadian politics

The Prime Minister, along with the other ministers of the Cabinet, is formally appointed by the Governor General on behalf of the Queen. However, by constitutional convention designed to maintain stability in government, the Governor General will almost always call on the leader of the party which holds the most seats in the House of Commons to form a government.[1] System of government Canada is a constitutional monarchy as a Commonwealth Realm (see Monarchy in Canada) with a federal system of parliamentary government, and strong democratic traditions. ...


The Prime Minister may be any Canadian Citizen of voting age (18 years). It is customary for the Prime Minister to also be a sitting member of the House of Commons, although two Prime Ministers have governed from the Senate: Sir John Joseph Caldwell Abbott and Sir Mackenzie Bowell. (Both men, in their roles as Government Leader in the Senate, succeeded Prime Ministers who died in office in the 1890s; Canadian convention has since evolved toward the appointment of an interim leader in such a scenario.) One Prime Minister, William Lyon Mackenzie King, having lost his own seat in a general election while his party retained a plurality in the House of Commons, briefly governed from the hallway, until he won a by-election a few weeks later. Canadian citizenship is obtained by birth in Canada (other than as a child of a foreign diplomat), by birth abroad, when at least one parent is a Canadian citizen, or can be granted to a permanent resident who lives in Canada for three out of four years before applying for... A voting age is a minimum age established by law that a person must attain in order to be eligible to vote in a public election. ... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... The Honourable Sir John Joseph Caldwell Abbott, PC , QC , KCMG , BCL , DCL (March 12, 1821 – October 30, 1893) was the third Prime Minister of Canada from June 16, 1891 to November 24, 1892. ... Sir Mackenzie Bowell, PC , KCMG (December 27, 1823 – December 10, 1917) was the fifth Prime Minister of Canada from December 21, 1894 to April 27, 1896. ... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no... An interim leader, in Canadian politics, is a party leader who is appointed by the partys legislative caucus or the partys executive to temporarily act as leader when there is a gap between the resignation or death of a party leader and the election of his or her... Not to be confused with William Lyon Mackenzie, Mackenzie Kings grandfather. ...


If the prime minister should fail to win his or her seat, a junior Member of Parliament in a safe seat would typically resign to permit a by-election to elect that leader to a seat. However, if the leader of the governing party is changed shortly before an election is due and the new leader is not a Member of Parliament, he or she will normally await the general election before running for a seat. For example, John Turner was briefly prime minister in 1984 without being a member of the House of Commons; he would ironically win his seat in the general election that swept his party from power. The official residence of the prime minister is 24 Sussex Drive in Ottawa, Ontario. All prime ministers (with the exception of Kim Campbell) have lived there since Louis St. Laurent in 1951. The prime minister also has a secondary residence at Harrington Lake in Gatineau Park near Ottawa. A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The Right Honourable John Napier Turner ,CC,PC (born June 7, 1929) was the seventeenth Prime Minister of Canada from June 30, 1984 to September 17, 1984. ... Side View of 24 Sussex Drive 24 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, is the official residence of the Prime Minister of Canada. ... Motto: Advance Ottawa/Ottawa en avant Location of the City of Ottawa in the Province of Ontario Coordinates: Country Canada Province Ontario Established 1850 as Town of Bytown Incorporated 1855 as City of Ottawa Amalgamated January 1, 2001 Government  - Mayor Larry OBrien  - City Council Ottawa City Council  - Representatives 8... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area [1] Ranked... Avril Phaedra Douglas Campbell, PC, QC, LL.B, LL.D (h. ... Louis Stephen St. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... The Harrington Lake estate is both the name of the official country retreat of the Prime Minister of Canada and of the land which surrounds it. ... Gatineau Park is a federal park in western Quebec near the city of Gatineau, Quebec, Canada. ... Motto: Advance Ottawa/Ottawa en avant Location of the City of Ottawa in the Province of Ontario Coordinates: Country Canada Province Ontario Established 1850 as Town of Bytown Incorporated 1855 as City of Ottawa Amalgamated January 1, 2001 Government  - Mayor Larry OBrien  - City Council Ottawa City Council  - Representatives 8...


In earlier years, it was tradition that the Sovereign bestow a knighthood on each new Canadian prime minister. As such, several carry the prefix "Sir" before their name (of the first eight prime ministers, only Alexander Mackenzie refused knighthood). After the Nickle Resolution of 1919, it was against policy for the Sovereign to grant titles to Canadians; the last prime minister knighted was Sir Robert Laird Borden, who was in power when the Nickle Resolution was passed. In addition one prime minister, Richard Bennett, was created a viscount after his retirement and the widow of Sir John A. Macdonald was created a baroness. A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ... Alexander Mackenzie, PC (January 28, 1822 – April 17, 1892), a writer, was the second Prime Minister of Canada from November 7, 1873 to October 9, 1878. ... The Nickle Resolution, adopted by the Canadian House of Commons on 22 May 1919, marked the earliest attempt to establish a Canadian government policy forbidding the British, and, later, Canadian, Sovereign from granting knighthoods, baronetcies, and peerages to Canadians, and set the precedent for later policies prohibiting Canadians from accepting... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Right Honourable Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC , KC , GCMG , DCL , LL.D (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... Richard Bedford Bennett, 1st Viscount Bennett, PC , KC, LL.B (July 3, 1870 – June 26, 1947) was the eleventh Prime Minister of Canada from August 7, 1930 to October 23, 1935. ... A viscount is a member of the European nobility whose comital title ranks usually, as in the British peerage, above a baron, below an earl (in Britain) or a count (his continental equivalent). ... [Blah blah blacksheep have you any wool? Yes sir yes sir three bags full!] Categories: Canadian people stubs | 1836 births | 1920 deaths | Spouses of the Prime Ministers of Canada ... Baroness could refer to: Female equivalent of Baron. ...


Mandate

Sir John A. Macdonald, first Prime Minister of Canada (1867–1873, 1878–1891).

A prime minister does not have a fixed term of office. A general election for every seat in the House of Commons must be called no more than five years after the most recent general election; the time limit may be exceeded only in case of war or insurrection. The prime minister typically asks the governor general to issue a writ of election during the government's third or fourth year in office. Image File history File linksMetadata Johnamacdonald. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Johnamacdonald. ... Sir John Alexander Macdonald, GCB, KCMG, PC, QC, DCL, LL.D was born on January 11, 1815 in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) has two chambers. ... Insurrection could refer to: * in a general sense, it means Rebellion * it is also a title of a Star Trek film, see Star Trek: Insurrection ... A writ of election is a writ issued by the government ordering the holding of a special election for a governmental office. ...


Otherwise, by constitutional convention, the governor general cannot refuse a request to issue a writ of election unless dissolving Parliament would itself contravene the constitution. The last time it was necessary to refuse a prime minister's request to call an election was 1926 (see the King-Byng Affair). Mackenzie King requested a dissolution of Parliament. ...


In general, a majority government is in power three to five years before a new general election is called. A minority government typically calls a new general election at the first opportunity when it appears able to win a majority of seats. Otherwise, it is unusual for minority governments to last more than two years owing to their vulnerability to votes of non-confidence. For example, in 1979–1980, Joe Clark was prime minister in a minority Progressive Conservative government only six months before his government lost a motion of non-confidence and had to call another election. The new Liberal majority government took office in 1980 just nine months after the Clark government had taken office in 1979. In the Westminster System, a majority government is one in which the government enjoys an absolute majority of seats in the legislature or Parliament. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ...


A prime minister is required to resign only when an opposition party wins a majority of seats in the House. If the prime minister's party wins a plurality, he or she normally stays in office. (A prime minister may resign in this circumstance, but there is no requirement to do so.) If the prime minister's party wins a minority while an opposition party wins a plurality (i.e., more seats than any other party but less than a majority), the prime minister can attempt to remain in office by forming a coalition with other minority parties. This, however, is almost never done in Canada. In the Westminster System, a majority government is one in which the government enjoys an absolute majority of seats in the legislature or Parliament. ...


If a governing party loses a motion of non-confidence, the prime minister — and, thus, the government — may resign, thereby allowing another party to form the government. But as this is practical only if no party in the House has a majority, the convention in Canada is to immediately ask the governor general to call a general election. ...


If a general election gives an opposition party a plurality of seats, the incumbent prime minister can continue to try to form the government, but this has not been done at the federal level since 1925, although it remains an option under the constitution. The normal practice in this situation is for the prime minister to resign and for the governor general to appoint as prime minister the leader of the new largest party in the House of Commons. A plurality, relative majority or simple majority is the largest share of something, which may or may not be considered a majority, i. ...


Role and authority

William Lyon Mackenzie King, 10th Prime Minister (19211926; 1926–1930; 19351948).

Since the prime minister is, in practice, the most powerful member of the Canadian government, he or she is sometimes erroneously referred to as Canada's head of state. The Canadian head of state is Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, who is represented by the Governor General of Canada. The prime minister is the head of government. The office of Prime Minister of Canada is not mentioned in the Canadian Constitution. In modern-day Canada, however, his/her prerogatives are largely the duties to which the constitution refers to as the job of the Governor General (who acts mostly as a figurehead). The function, duties, responsibilities, and powers of the Prime Minister of Canada were established at Confederation, modeled upon the existing office of the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Over time, the role of the Prime Minister of Canada has evolved, mainly gaining power over the years. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Not to be confused with William Lyon Mackenzie, Mackenzie Kings grandfather. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Queen Elizabeth II, is the Head of State of 16 countries including: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Jamaica, New Zealand and the Bahamas, as well as crown colonies and overseas territories of the United Kingdom. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada, proclaimed by Queen Elizabeth II in 1994. ... The Governor General of Canada (French: Gouverneure générale du Canada or Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian Monarch, who is Canadas Head of State; Canada is one of sixteen Commonwealth realms, all of which share a single... The Head of Government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ... The Constitution of Canada is the supreme law in Canada. ... In politics, a figurehead, by metaphor with the carved figurehead at the prow of a sailing ship, is a person who holds an important title or office yet executes little actual power. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ...


The prime minister plays a prominent role in most legislation passed by the Canadian Parliament. The majority of Canadian legislation originates in the Cabinet of Canada, which is a body selected by the prime minister, and appointed by the Governor General, largely from the ranks of his party's MPs. The Cabinet must have "unanimous" consent on all decisions they make, but in practice whether or not unanimity has been achieved is decided by the prime minister.

Pierre Trudeau, 15th Prime Minister (19681979, 19801984).

As the Monarch or Governor General almost always follows the advice of his or her ministers, the Prime Minister (and the PMO) essentially controls the appointments of the following positions: Image File history File linksMetadata Trudeau80s. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Trudeau80s. ... For other uses, see Pierre Elliott Trudeau (disambiguation). ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ...

As to the Prime Minister's broad de facto authority over the Canadian military, see Canadian Forces. The Cabinet of Canada (French: Cabinet du Canada or Conseil des ministres) plays an important role in the Government of Canada in accordance with the Westminster System. ... The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is the highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal in the Canadian justice system. ... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... In Commonwealth countries a Crown corporation is a state-controlled company or enterprise (a public corporation). ... The Transportation Safety Board (Bureau de la sécurité des transports du Canada) is the Canadian agency responsible for maintaining transportation safety in Canada. ... The Business Development Bank of Canada is a crown corporation financial institution wholly owned by the Government of Canada. ... The Governor General of Canada (French: Gouverneure générale du Canada or Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian Monarch, who is Canadas Head of State; Canada is one of sixteen Commonwealth realms, all of which share a single... A Lieutenant Governor or Lieutenant-Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... The Canadian Forces (French: Forces canadiennes), abbreviated as CF (French: FC), are the combined armed forces of Canada. ...

Brian Mulroney, 18th Prime Minister (1984–1993).

Former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau is credited with consolidating power in the Office of the Prime Minister (PMO), although the evolution can be seen throughout Canadian history. The PMO consists of the Prime Minister's political and administrative staff hired solely at the PM's discretion. By coordinating communication with the other agents in policy arenas, as well as with the central party apparatus, the PMO can wield considerable influence. This may have the positive effect of a productive parliament, which in turn provides a valid criticism of centralized power in majority governments and the PMO. Brian Mulroney File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Brian Mulroney File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Pierre Elliott Trudeau (disambiguation). ... In Canada, the Office of the Prime Minister is one of the most powerful parts of the government. ...


There are checks on the prime minister's power. Cabinet or caucus revolts will bring down a sitting prime minister quickly, and even the threat of caucus revolts can persuade and/or compel a prime minister to resign the office as happened to Jean Chrétien in 2003. The prime minister is also restricted by the effectively anemic Senate. The Senate can delay and impede legislation, which occurred when Brian Mulroney introduced the Goods and Services Tax (GST). In many cases, the conflicts arose primarily because the Senate was dominated by members appointed by previous governments. The aforementioned Prime Ministers proceeded to shift the Senate in their favour with a flurry of senate appointments to ensure the smooth passage of legislation. The Cabinet of Canada (French: Cabinet du Canada or Conseil des ministres) plays an important role in the Government of Canada in accordance with the Westminster System. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... The Canadian Goods and Services Tax (GST) (Taxe sur les produits et services, TPS) is a multi-level value-added tax introduced in Canada on January 1, 1991, by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and finance minister Michael Wilson. ...


As well, as executive power is formally vested in the Canadian Monarch and "exercised" by the Governor General as the vice-regal, either body has the power to oppose a Prime Minister's will. Senator and constitutional expert Eugene Forsey stated that a "Governor General must take all steps necessary to thwart the will of a ruthless prime minister." This power of the Governor General was last used by Lord Byng against Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King in what is known as the King-Byng Affair of 1926. Some, such as the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Larry Zolf, also speculated whether (former) Governor General Adrienne Clarkson would refuse a recommendation from Prime Minister Jean Chrétien to dissolve Parliament in 2002.[2] Near the end of her time as Governor General, Clarkson stated: "My constitutional role has lain in what are called 'reserve powers:' making sure that there is a prime minister and a government in place, and exercising the right 'to encourage, to advise, and to warn' [...] Without really revealing any secrets, I can tell you that I have done all three."[3] The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada, proclaimed by Queen Elizabeth II in 1994. ... The Governor General of Canada (French: Gouverneure générale du Canada or Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian Monarch, who is Canadas Head of State; Canada is one of sixteen Commonwealth realms, all of which share a single... A viceroy is somebody who governs a country or province as a substitute for the monarch. ... Hon. ... Julian Hedworth George Byng Field Marshal Julian Hedworth George Byng, 1st Viscount Byng of Vimy, GCB, GCMG, MVO (11 September 1862–6 June 1935) was a career British Army officer who served with distinction during World War I with the British Expeditionary Force in France, in the Battle of Gallipoli... Not to be confused with William Lyon Mackenzie, Mackenzie Kings grandfather. ... Mackenzie King requested a dissolution of Parliament. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), a Canadian crown corporation, is the country’s national public radio and television broadcaster. ... Larry Zolf (born July 19, 1934) is a retired Canadian journalist and commentator. ... Adrienne Louise Clarkson (née Poy) (Chinese: ; pinyin: , Hakka: Ńg Pên-kî, Cantonese: Ng5 Bing1 zi1), PC, CC, CMM, COM, CD, LL.D (born February 10, 1939) is an accomplished Canadian journalist. ... Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien, usually known as Jean Chrétien, PC, QC, BA, BCL, LLD (h. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


According to the CBC, in 2004, the Prime Minister of Canada had an annual salary in excess of $280,000 (CAD). [4] Half of the Prime Minister's salary is due to the fact that he/she is a Member of Parliament, and the other half is because he/she is Prime Minister.


Criticisms of the Prime Minister's Office

In recent times, a few Canadians and some members of Parliament have begun to question the powers the Canadian Constitution confers on the prime minister. In particular, their goal is to find ways to change the decayed role of elected members of the House of Commons, to create a Parliamentary committee to review appointments to the Supreme Court, and the need to abolish or radically restructure the appointed Senate. A 2001 book, The Friendly Dictatorship, by national affairs columnist Jeffrey Simpson, pointed out the potential dangers by detailing what he argues to be near absolute power vested in the prime minister. The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) is Canadas legislative branch, seated at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario. ... The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is the highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal in the Canadian justice system. ... Jeffrey Simpson, The Globe and Mails national affairs columnist, has won all three of Canadas leading literary prizes -- the Governor Generals Award for non-fiction book writing, the National Magazine Award for political writing, and the National Newspaper Award for column writing. ...


The main case given in favour of Prime Ministerial power has to do with the federal structure of the nation. Canada is one of the most decentralized of the world's federations, and provincial premiers have a great deal of power. Constitutional changes must be approved by the provincial premiers, and they must be consulted for any new initiatives in their areas of responsibility, which include many important sectors such as health care and education. In light of regional forces such as the Quebec sovereignty movement, some have argued there is a need for a national counterbalance to these pressures. The Quebec sovereignty movement is a political movement aimed at attaining independent statehood (sovereignty) for the Canadian province of Quebec. ...


List of Canadian Prime Ministers

This is a list of Prime Ministers of Canada since Confederation. ...

Living former Prime Ministers

Five Prime Ministers in an official portrait taken during an event by the National Archives of Canada in 1994. Pictured from left to right are Trudeau (died in 2000), Turner, Campbell, Chrétien, and Clark. Brian Mulroney is absent.

There are six living former Prime Ministers of Canada. In order from most recent they are: Image File history File linksMetadata Trudeau-Turner-Campbell-Chretien-Clark. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Trudeau-Turner-Campbell-Chretien-Clark. ...

The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the 21st Prime Minister of Canada, succeeding Jean Chrétien on December 12, 2003. ... Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien, usually known as Jean Chrétien, PC, QC, BA, BCL, LLD (h. ... Avril Phaedra Douglas Campbell, PC, QC, LL.B, LL.D (h. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... John Turner, PC, CC, QC, MA, BCL, LLD (born June 7, 1929) was the seventeenth Prime Minister of Canada from June 30, 1984 to September 17, 1984. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ...

Prime Ministers in fiction

Movies

  • John A. Macdonald - in 1979 TV movie Riel, played by Christopher Plummer
  • Pierre Trudeau - in 2002 CBC mini series Trudeau, played by Colm Feore
  • Jean Chretien - in 2002 CBC mini series Trudeau, played by Guy Richer
  • Lester Pearson - in 2002 CBC mini series Trudeau, played by William Parsons
  • John Turner - in 2002 CBC mini series 'Trudeau, played by Karl Pruner
  • Pierre Trudeau - in 2005 CBC mini series Trudeau II: Maverick In The Making, played by Stephane Demers
  • John Diefenbaker - in 2006 CBC mini series Prairie Giant: The Tommy Douglas Story, played by Paul Gross
  • Mackenzie King - in 2006 CBC mini series Prairie Giant: The Tommy Douglas Story, played by Andy Jones
  • Stewart Collingwood - in 2004 sitcom Rideau Hall, played by Barry Flatman
  • Clark MacDonald - in 1995 film Canadian Bacon, played by American actor Wallace Shawn
  • Tom McLaughlin - in 2004 TV movie H2O, played by Paul Gross
  • (unknown name) simply called "the Prime Minister" - in 1992 film Buried on Sunday, played by Louis Del Grande

This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... CBC Television is the primary English language television service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... Colm Feore (born August 22, 1958, at Boston, Massachusetts) is an Canadian-American actor raised in Canada of Irish and Italian extraction. ... CBC Television is the primary English language television service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... CBC Television is the primary English language television service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, usually known as Lord Rosse, was a 19th-century Irish astronomer. ... CBC Television is the primary English language television service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... CBC Television is the primary English language television service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... CBC Television is the primary English language television service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... Paul Michael Gross (born 30 April 1959), is a Canadian actor, producer, director, singer and writer born in Calgary, Alberta. ... CBC Television is the primary English language television service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... Andrew Jordan Jones (born January 15, 1948) is a member of CODCO. Andy Jones was born in St. ... Rideau Hall is a Canadian television series broadcast since 2002 on CBC. It stars: Bette MacDonald, Fiona Reid, Jonathan Torrens, Joe Dinicol, and Rejean Cournoyer. ... Canadian Bacon is a 1995 comedy/satire, and the only fictional film written, directed and produced by Michael Moore. ... Wallace Shawn (born November 12, 1943), sometimes credited as Wally Shawn, is an American actor and playwright. ... DVD cover H2O was a Canadian political drama two-part miniseries that first aired on the CBC October 31, 2004. ... Paul Michael Gross (born 30 April 1959), is a Canadian actor, producer, director, singer and writer born in Calgary, Alberta. ... Buried on Sunday is a Canadian comedy film, released in 1992. ... Louis Del Grande is a Canadian television writer and actor. ...

Literature

Party Favours is a 1997 Canadian novel credited to the pseudonym Jean Doe, later revealed to be non-fiction writer and political strategist Warren Kinsella. ...

Prime Minister impersonators

Radio/TV parodies

Royal Canadian Air Farce (usually abbreviated to Air Farce) is a Canadian comedy troupe that starred in an eponymous radio show on CBC radio from 1973 to 1997, and currently star in a top-rated television show, broadcast on CBC Television. ... Roger Abbott (born July 10, 1946 in Birkenhead, England) is one of the stars of Royal Canadian Air Farce. ... Royal Canadian Air Farce (usually abbreviated to Air Farce) is a Canadian comedy troupe that starred in an eponymous radio show on CBC radio from 1973 to 1997, and currently star in a top-rated television show, broadcast on CBC Television. ... Don Ferguson was born on May 30, 1946 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada and is one of the stars of XPM and Royal Canadian Air Farce. ... Royal Canadian Air Farce (usually abbreviated to Air Farce) is a Canadian comedy troupe that starred in an eponymous radio show on CBC radio from 1973 to 1997, and currently star in a top-rated television show, broadcast on CBC Television. ... Craig Lauzon (born February 3, 1971 in Ottawa, Ontario) is a Canadian comedian, and member of the Royal Canadian Air Farce. ... Promotional image of Linda Cullen and Bob Robertson for the CBC radio show Double Exposure Double Exposure was a Canadian radio and television comedy series which mocked contemporary Canadian politics. ... Promotional image of Linda Cullen and Bob Robertson for the CBC radio show Double Exposure Double Exposure was a Canadian radio and television comedy series which mocked contemporary Canadian politics. ... Promotional image of Linda Cullen and Bob Robertson for the CBC radio show Double Exposure Double Exposure was a Canadian radio and television comedy series which mocked contemporary Canadian politics. ... Promotional image of Linda Cullen and Bob Robertson for the CBC radio show Double Exposure Double Exposure was a Canadian radio and television comedy series which mocked contemporary Canadian politics. ... Promotional image of Linda Cullen and Bob Robertson for the CBC radio show Double Exposure Double Exposure was a Canadian radio and television comedy series which mocked contemporary Canadian politics. ...

See also

Bold text The Canada wordmark, used by most agencies of the Canadian federal government. ... Air transport for the Royal Family, Governor General, and executive of Canada is currently provided by the Canadian Forces Air Commands 437 Squadron; military helicopters; chartered civilian aircraft; and occasionally scheduled commercial flights. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Parliamentary Government
  2. ^ Zolf, Larry; CBC News Viewpoint: Boxing in a Prime Minister; June 28, 2002
  3. ^ CTV News: GG reflects on mandate during farewell address; September 14, 2005
  4. ^ CBC News Indepth: "Canadian Government"; September 28, 2004


Cabinet of Canada
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This is a list of Prime Ministers of Canada since Confederation. ... See also List of Prime Ministers of Canada Governors General of Canada timeline ... Sir John A. Macdonald Photo credit: William James Topley Cropped from original online at Library and Archives Canada / C-005332 [1] This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of Canada in order of time served in office as Prime Minister of Canada as of May 21, 2006. ... The following list indicates ridings represented by Canadian Prime Ministers during their term(s) of office. ... This is a list of the Prime Ministers of Canada by their birthplace. ... This is a list of Canadian Prime Ministers by longevity. ... This is a complete list of Canadian Prime Ministers by date of death. ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of Canada since Confederation in 1867, arranged in descending order of their age upon first taking office. ... Before 1951 the Prime Minister of Canada had no official residence and they lived in a variety of structures around Ottawa: John A. Macdonald 1867-1870 - A now demolished house at 63 Daly Street in Sandy Hill 1872-1873 - A now demolished house 195 Chapel St. ... This is a list of the Prime Ministers of Canada and their military service Sir John A. Macdonald - none Alexander Mackenzie - Militia (1866-1874) Sir John Joseph Caldwell Abbott - Militia (1866-?) Sir John Sparrow David Thompson - none Sir Mackenzie Bowell - Militia (1867-1872) Sir Charles Tupper - none Sir Wilfrid Laurier... Unlike in the United States, the spouse of the Prime Minister of Canada does not have a prominent role. ... This is a list of children of the Prime Ministers of Canada. ... The following is a list of the parents of the Prime Ministers of Canada: Category: ... Canadian Parliaments are the legislative bodies of the Government of Canada. ... List of Canadian Leaders of the Opposition 1 - George Brown was the unofficial leader of the Liberal Party during the 1867 election, but failed to win a seat in the House of Commons in the September 20th election. ... This is a list of Canadian political parties in order of time in power, since confederation, as determined by the party membership of the Prime Minister. ... Joint Premiers of the Province of Canada were the leaders of the Province of Canada, from the 1841 unification of Upper Canada and Lower Canada until Confederation in 1867. ... This is a list of Joint Premiers of the Province of Canada in order of time served in office as joint premier. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Canada. ... This is a list of Canada-related topics. ... Canada is a country of 32 million inhabitants that occupies the northern portion of the North American continent, and is the worlds second largest country in area. ... This is a brief timeline of the history of Canada. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... // Main article: Province of Quebec (1763-1791) In North America, Seven Years War officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Paris on February 10, 1763. ... // Confederation Main article: Canadian Confederation Fathers of Confederation meet in Quebec City In the 1860s, in the wake of the American Civil War, the British were concerned with possible American reprisals against Canada for Britains tacit support of the Confederacy. ... A Canadian WWI recruiting poster // World War I Main article: Military History of Canada during WWI On June 28, 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary was assassinated, setting off a chain of events leading to World War I. By August 4, Britain had declared war on Germany and, as... // The Second World War brought many changes to Canada; the government was necessarily more centralized during the war, and it remained so afterwards. ... // Main article: Great Flag Debate Diefenbaker was succeeded by Pearson in 1963, at a time of increasing political unrest in much of the Western world. ... // The New constitution Main article: Patriation In 1982 Britain passed the Canada Act, repatriating the Constitution of Canada. ... // Chretien years and the 1995 referendum Jean Chrétien became prime minister in the 1993 election, pledging to repeal the GST, which proved to be unfeasible due to the economic circumstances at the time. ... Canadian soldiers advancing behind a tank at the Battle of Vimy Ridge, one of Canadas greatest military victories. ... Canadian historians until the 1960s tended to focus on economic history, including labour history. ... The constitutional history of Canada begins with the 1763 Treaty of Paris, in which France ceded most of New France to Great Britain. ... Canada is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm (see Monarchy in Canada) with a federal system of parliamentary government, and strong democratic traditions. ... The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada, proclaimed by Queen Elizabeth II in 1994. ... The Governor General of Canada (French: Gouverneure générale du Canada or Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian Monarch, who is Canadas Head of State; Canada is one of sixteen Commonwealth realms, all of which share a single... The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) is Canadas legislative branch, seated at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario. ... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) has two chambers. ... The Court system of Canada is made up of many courts differing in levels of legal superiority and separated by jurisdiction. ... The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is the highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal in the Canadian justice system. ... The Coast Mountains are the westernmost range of the Pacific Cordillera, running along the south western shore of the North American continent, extending south from the Alaska Panhandle and covering most of coastal British Columbia. ... Ringrose Peak, Lake OHara, British Columbia, Canada The Canadian Rockies comprise the Canadian segment of the North American Rocky Mountains range. ... Map of the Canadian Prairie provinces, which include boreal forests, taiga, and mountains as well as the prairies (proper). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Northern Canada, defined politically Northern Canada is the vast northernmost region of Canada variously defined by geography and politics. ... Canadian Shield The Canadian Shield— also called the Precambrian Shield, Laurentian Shield, Bouclier Canadien (French), or Laurentian Plateau— is a large shield covered by a thin layer of soil that forms the nucleus of the North American craton. ... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... Central Canada, defined politically. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Appalachians in North Carolina The Appalachian Mountains (French: les Appalaches) are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... The four Canadian Atlantic provinces. ... The Maritime provinces. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This is a list of incorporated cities of Canada in alphabetical order by province. ... This is a list of the extreme communities in Canada. ... The Canadian National Parks system encompasses over forty protected areas, including National Parks, National Park Reserves and National Marine Conservation Areas. ... The flora of Canada is quite diverse, due to the wide range of ecoregions and environmental conditions present in Canada. ... // Canadian provinces and territories are normally grouped into the following regions (generally from west to east): Northern Canada (The North) Yukon Northwest Territories Nunavut Western Canada British Columbia Prairies Alberta Saskatchewan Manitoba Eastern Canada Central Canada Ontario Quebec Atlantic Canada Maritimes New Brunswick Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia Newfoundland and... The list of rivers in Canada is organized by drainage basin (new format) and province (old format to be removed). ... Banking in Canada is one of the most efficient and safest banking systems in the world. ... Headquarters Ottawa, Ontario ,Canada Established 1935 Governor David A. Dodge Central Bank of Canada Currency Canadian dollar ISO 4217 Code CAD Website www. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Loonie. ... This is a list of companies from Canada. ... Canadas health care system is a publicly funded health care system, with most services provided by private entities. ... Demographics of Canada, Data of FAO, year 2005 ; Number of inhabitants in thousands. ... The table below lists the 100 largest metropolitan areas in Canada by population, using data from the Canada 2001 Census[1] and the Canada 2006 Census. ... The urban areas identified below are defined by Statistics Canada with reference to continuous population density, ignoring municipal boundaries. ... The table below lists the 100 largest municipalities in Canada by population, using data from the Canada 2006 census for census subdivisions. ... The Canada 2001 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ... The Canada 2006 Census was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. ... Bonhomme, mascot of the Quebec winter carnival. ... The Gothic Revival Parliament Buildings are some of Canadas best known structures The architecture of Canada is, with the exception of that of the First Nations, closely linked to the techniques and styles developed in Europe and the United States. ... The following is a list of some important Canadian artists and groups of artists: Individuals Ran Andrews, 1956-, painter Robert Bateman, 1930-, painter Emily Carr, 1871-1945, painter Alex Colville, 1920-, painter Ken Danby, 1940-, painter Charles Daudelin, 1920-2001, sculptor and painter Paterson Ewen, 1925-2002, painter Marcelle Ferron... This is a list of well-known Canadians. ... Canadian national holidays (with provincial exceptions): Each province of Canada has its own provincial holiday or holidays. ... Skating on the Rideau Canal in Ottawa. ... Canadian literature may be divided into two parts, based on their separate roots: one stems from the culture and literature from France; the other from Britain. ... Canadian music includes pop and folk genres; the latter includes forms derived from England, France (particularly in Quebec), Ireland, Scotland, and various Inuit and Indian ethnic groups. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Celtic music is primarily associated with the folk traditions of Ireland, Scotland and Wales, as well as the popular styles derived from folk culture. ... The term classical music in this article refers to the western or European classical music tradition. ... Canadian hip hop developed much more slowly than the rock music scene. ... Canada has been a source of rock and roll music for decades, beginning with rockabilly singer Jack Scott in the 1950s. ... The Flag of Canada Canadian nationalism is a loose term which has been applied to ideologies of several different types which highlight and promote specifically Canadian interests over those of other countries, notably the United States. ... Cultural protectionism in Canada has, since the mid 20th century, taken the form of conscious, interventionist attempts on the part of various Canadian governments to promote Canadian cultural production and limit the effect of foreign, largely American, culture on the domestic audience. ... The contemporary theatre scene in Canada revolves around companies and summer festivals based at facilities in Canadian cities. ... Coat of Arms of Canada (since 1994) The Royal Coat of Arms of Canada (formally known as The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada) was proclaimed by King George V on November 21, 1921, as the Arms or Ensigns Armorial of the Dominion of Canada. ... This is a list of flags used in Canada. ... The National Flag of Canada, popularly known as the Maple Leaf and lUnifolié (French for the one-leaved), is a base red flag with a white square in its centre featuring a stylized, 11-pointed, red maple leaf. ... This is a list of the symbols of Canadian provinces and territories. ... There are many symbols reflecting Canadas status as a constitutional monarchy, including those of the Monarch, or the vice-regal representatives. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Prime Ministers of Canada
  • Official government Web site of the Office of the Prime Minister
  • primeministers.ca, Prime Ministers Online
  • Library of Parliament of Canada
  • Historians rank the Best and Worst Canadian Prime Ministers - 1997 Maclean's article
  • Maple Leaf Web: The Prime Minister & Cabinet

"CBC News In Depth: Canadian Government", CBC, 2004-09-28. Retrieved on 2007-03-17. [[ zh.elhits.com Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A cover of the Canadian magazine Macleans. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Prime Minister of Canada at AllExperts (1855 words)
If the prime minister should fail to win his or her seat, a junior Member of Parliament in a safe seat would typically resign to permit a by-election to elect that leader to a seat.
Since the prime minister is, in practice, the most powerful member of the Canadian government, he or she is sometimes erroneously referred to as Canada's head of state.
The prime minister is the head of government.The office of Prime Minister of Canada is not mentioned in the Canadian Constitution.
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