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Encyclopedia > Prime Minister of Australia
Prime Minister of Australia

Incumbent:
Kevin Rudd
Style: The Honourable
Appointed by: Michael Jeffery
as Governor-General of Australia
First : Sir Edmund Barton
Formation: 1 January 1901

The Prime Minister of Australia is the head of government of the Commonwealth of Australia, holding office on commission from the Governor-General. The office of Prime Minister is, in practice, the most powerful political office in Australia. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957), is the leader of the federal Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament. ... The prefix The Honourable or The Honorable ( or formerly The Honble) is a title of quality attached to the names of certain classes of persons. ... This article is about the Governor-General of Australia. ... The Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia is the representative of Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia. ... Sir Edmund Barton, GCMG, QC (18 January 1849 – 7 January 1920), Australian politician and judge, was the first Prime Minister of Australia and a founding justice of the High Court of Australia. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The head of government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ... The Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia is the representative of Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia. ...


Barring exceptional circumstances, the Prime Minister is always the leader of the political party with majority support in the House of Representatives. The only case where a Senator was appointed Prime Minister was that of John Gorton, who subsequently resigned his Senate position and was elected as a member of the House of Representatives. Political parties in Australia lists political parties in Australia. ... Type Lower house Speaker of the House David Hawker, Liberal since November 16, 2004 Members 150 Political groups ALP (85) Liberal Party (53) National Party (10) Last elections 24 November 2007 Meeting place Parliament House, Canberra, ACT Web site House of Representatives Entrance to the House of Representatives Judicial High... Sir John Grey Gorton GCMG AC CH (9 September 1911 – 19 May 2002), Australian politician, was the 19th Prime Minister of Australia. ...


The current Prime Minister of Australia is Kevin Rudd.[1] Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957), is the leader of the federal Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament. ...

Contents

Appointment

Prime Minister of Australia, Kevin Rudd, with his Cabinet (65th Australian ministry) and Governor-General Michael Jeffery, 2007.

The Prime Minister is appointed by the Governor-General under section 64 of the Australian Constitution. This empowers the Governor-General to appoint Ministers of the Crown, and requires such ministers to be members of the House of Representatives or the Senate, or become members within three months of the appointment. Before being sworn in as a minister, a person must first be sworn in as a member of the Federal Executive Council if they are not already a member. Membership of the Federal Executive Council entitles the member to the title "the Honourable" (usually abbreviated to "the Hon") for life, barring exceptional circumstances. The senior members of the Executive Council constitute the Cabinet. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 504 pixelsFull resolution‎ (840 × 529 pixels, file size: 80 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Prime Minister Kevin Rudd and his ministry posing with the Governor General after being sworn in. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 504 pixelsFull resolution‎ (840 × 529 pixels, file size: 80 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Prime Minister Kevin Rudd and his ministry posing with the Governor General after being sworn in. ... The Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900 (in full, An Act to constitute the Commonwealth of Australia) is the primary constitutional text of the Commonwealth of Australia. ... A minister or a secretary is a politician who heads a government ministry or department (e. ... The Federal Executive Council is the formal body holding executive authority under the Australian Constitution. ... The Cabinet of Australia (whose members also serve in the Executive Council of Australia) is the council of senior ministers, responsible to parliament. ...


The Prime Minister is, like other ministers, normally sworn in by the Governor-General and then presented with the commission (Letters patent) of office. When defeated in an election, or on resigning, the Prime Minister is said to "hand in the commission" and actually does so by returning it to the Governor-General. In the event of a Prime Minister dying in office, or becoming incapacitated, the Governor-General can terminate the commission. Ministers hold office "during the pleasure of the Governor-General" (s. 64 of the Constitution), so theoretically, the Governor-General can dismiss a minister at any time, by notifying them in writing of the termination of their commission; however, his or her power to do so except on the advice of the Prime Minister is heavily circumscribed by convention. Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as...


Despite the importance of the office of Prime Minister, the Constitution does not mention the office by name. The conventions of the Westminster system were thought to be sufficiently entrenched in Australia by the authors of the Constitution that it was deemed unnecessary to detail them. The Houses of Parliament, also known as the Palace of Westminster, in London. ...


If a government cannot get its appropriation (budget) legislation passed by the House of Representatives, or the House passes a vote of "no confidence" in the government, the Prime Minister is bound by convention to resign immediately. The Governor-General's choice of replacement Prime Minister will be dictated by the circumstances.


Following a resignation in other circumstances, or the death of a Prime Minister, the Governor-General will generally appoint as Prime Minister the person voted by the governing party as their new leader. There have been three notable exceptions to this:

  • When Prime Minister Joseph Lyons, leader of the United Australia Party (UAP), died suddenly in April 1939, the Governor-General Lord Gowrie called on Sir Earle Page to become caretaker Prime Minister. Page was the leader of the smaller party in the governing coalition, the Country Party. He held the office for three weeks until the UAP elected a new leader, Robert Menzies.
  • In August 1941, Menzies resigned as Prime Minister. The UAP was so bereft of leadership at this time that the Country Party leader Arthur Fadden was invited to become Prime Minister, although the Country Party was the smaller of the two coalition parties. The government depended on support from two independents, who two months later voted against Fadden's budget and brought the government down, paving the way for John Curtin to be appointed as Labor Prime Minister.
  • In December 1967, Prime Minister Harold Holt led the Liberal Party in a governing coalition with the smaller Country Party. The Deputy Liberal leader, and Holt's presumed successor, was William McMahon. The Leader of the Country Party, John McEwen, was the Deputy Prime Minister. Holt disappeared while swimming on 17 December, and on 19 December was declared presumed dead. McEwen announced that (for reasons he would never explain publicly) his party would not continue in coalition with the Liberals if it were under the leadership of William McMahon. Given that the election of McMahon as Liberal leader would destroy the coalition and destabilise the Parliament, the Governor-General, Lord Casey, commissioned John McEwen to form a coalition government, but his appointment was made on the basis that the new Liberal leader, when elected, would replace him. McEwen agreed to this so long as his formal commission made no mention of any time limit. McEwen was Prime Minister for 23 days, until the election of (then Senator) John Gorton.

There were some other cases where someone other than the leader of the majority party in the House of Representatives was Prime Minister: Joseph Aloysius Lyons (15 September 1879 – 7 April 1939), Australian politician, tenth Prime Minister of Australia. ... The United Australia Party or UAP was an Australian political party that was the political successor to the Nationalist Party of Australia. ... Brigadier-General Alexander Gore Arkwright Hore-Ruthven, 1st Earl of Gowrie, VC, GCMG, CB, DSO, PC (6 July 1872 – 2 May 1955), tenth Governor-General of Australia, was born in Windsor, Berkshire, the second son of the 8th Lord Ruthven of Freeland. ... Sir Earle Christmas Grafton Page GCMG, CH (August 8, 1880–December 20, 1961), Australian politician, was the eleventh Prime Minister of Australia. ... Sir Robert Gordon Menzies, KT, AK, CH, FRS, QC (20 December 1894 – 15 May 1978), Australian politician, was the twelfth and longest-serving Prime Minister of Australia, serving eighteen and a half years. ... Sir Arthur William Fadden GCMG (April 13, 1895–April 21, 1973), Australian politician and 13th Prime Minister of Australia, born at Ingham, Queensland, the son of a Presbyterian police officer. ... This article is about the Australian Prime Minister. ... Harold Edward Holt CH (5 August 1908 – presumed dead 17 December 1967) was an Australian politician who became the 17th Prime Minister of Australia in 1966. ... Sir William McMahon, GCMG, CH (23 February 1908 – 31 March 1988), Australian politician and 20th Prime Minister of Australia, was born in Sydney, New South Wales, where his father was a lawyer. ... Sir John McEwen (March 29, 1900 - November 20, 1980), Australian politician and 18th Prime Minister of Australia, was born at Chiltern, Victoria, where his father was a pharmacist. ... Richard Gardiner Casey, Baron Casey, KG, GCMG, CH, DSO, MC, PC (29 August 1890 - 17 June 1976), Australian politician and diplomat and 16th Governor-General of Australia, was born in Brisbane, Queensland. ... Sir John Grey Gorton GCMG AC CH (9 September 1911 – 19 May 2002), Australian politician, was the 19th Prime Minister of Australia. ...

  • Federation occurred on 1 January 1901, but elections for the first parliament were not scheduled until late March. In the interim, a caretaker government was necessary. In what is now known as the Hopetoun Blunder, the Governor-General Lord Hopetoun invited Sir William Lyne, the premier of the most populous state New South Wales, to form a government. Lyne was unable to do so, and returned his commission in favour of Edmund Barton, who became the first Prime Minister, and led the inaugural government into and beyond the 1901 federal election.
  • Stanley Bruce led his Nationalist-Country Party coalition government into the 1929 election, which was held on 12 October. Not only was his government defeated by the Labor Party under James Scullin, but Bruce was defeated personally in his own electorate of Flinders. While Bruce's membership of the parliament ended on election day, 12 October, he continued as caretaker Prime Minister for a further ten days until the election result was clear; his commission was terminated on 22 October and Scullin was sworn in as Prime Minister.
  • A similar fate befell former long-serving Prime Minister John Howard. On 24 November 2007, not only did his long-serving Liberal/National government lose the 2007 election to Labor's Kevin Rudd, but he lost his own seat of Bennelong. He remained Prime Minister for nine days until the swearing in of the Rudd government on 3 December 2007.
  • Most controversially of all, during the 1975 constitutional crisis, on 11 November 1975 Governor-General Sir John Kerr dismissed the Labor Party's Gough Whitlam as Prime Minister. Despite Labor holding a substantial majority in the House of Representatives, Kerr appointed the Leader of the Opposition, Liberal leader Malcolm Fraser as caretaker Prime Minister, conditional on the passage of the Whitlam government's Supply bills through the Senate and the calling of an election for both houses of Parliament. Fraser accepted these terms and immediately advised a double dissolution. An election was called for 13 December, which the Liberal Party won in its own right (although the Liberals governed in a coalition with the Country Party).

The federation of Australia was the process by which the six separate British colonies of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia formed a federation. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Hopetoun Blunder was a political and constitutional crisis immediately prior to the Federation of the British colonies in Australia. ... Missing image Lord Linlithgow John Adrian Louis Hope, 1st Marquess of Linlithgow, 7th Earl of Hopetoun (25 September 1860 - 29 February 1908), first Governor-General of Australia, was born at Queensferry, Linlithgowshire, Scotland, on 25 September 1860, the eldest son of the sixth Earl of Hopetoun. ... Sir William Lyne Sir William John Lyne (6 April 1844 - 3 August 1913), Australian politician, was Premier of New South Wales and a member of the first federal ministry. ... List of Premiers of New South Wales Before the 1890s there was no formal party system in New South Wales. ... NSW redirects here. ... Sir Edmund Barton, GCMG, QC (18 January 1849 – 7 January 1920), Australian politician and judge, was the first Prime Minister of Australia and a founding justice of the High Court of Australia. ... Federal elections for the inaugural Parliament of Australia were held in Australia on March 29 and March 30, 1901 following Federation and the establishment of the Commonwealth of Australia. ... Stanley Melbourne Bruce, 1st Viscount Bruce of Melbourne, CH, MC, FRS, PC (15 April 1883–25 August 1967), Australian politician and diplomat, was the eighth Prime Minister of Australia. ... The Nationalist Party of Australia was an Australian political party formed in 1917 from a merger of pro-conscription members of the Labor Party (who had been operating under the banner National Labor after their earlier split with the Labor party) with the Commonwealth Liberal Party. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on October 12, 1929. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ALP redirects here. ... James Henry Scullin (September 18, 1876 – January 28, 1953), Australian Labor politician and ninth Prime Minister of Australia. ... The Division of Flinders is an Australian Electoral Division in Victoria. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ... The 2007 general election for the Parliament of Australia is expected to take place in November or early December, with 33 to 68 days notice. ... Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957), is the leader of the federal Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament. ... The Division of Bennelong is an Australian Electoral Division in New South Wales. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The secretary of the Governor-General, David Smith, announcing the dissolution of Parliament on November 11th, 1975. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir John Robert Kerr, AK, GCMG, GCVO (24 September 1914 – 24 March 1991), 13th Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New South Wales and 18th Governor-General of Australia, dismissed the Labor government of Gough Whitlam on 11 November 1975, marking the climax of one of the most significant... Edward Gough Whitlam, AC, QC (born 11 July 1916), known as Gough Whitlam (, pronounced Goff), is an Australian former politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia. ... This article is about the modern Australian political party. ... This article is about the former prime minister of Australia; for the Western Australian public servant, see Malcolm Fraser (surveyor). ... Look up supply in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Type Upper house President Alan Ferguson, Liberal since 14 August 2007 Members 76 Political groups Coalition (39) ALP (28) Green (4) Democrat (4) FFP (1) Last elections 9 October 2004 Meeting place Parliament House, Canberra, ACT Web site Senate Entrance to the Senate Judicial High Court Lower Courts Constitution State... This article deals with elections to the Australian Parliament. ... Federal elections were held in Australia on December 13, 1975. ... The National Party of Australia is an Australian political party. ...

Powers

Most of the Prime Minister's powers derive from his or her position as the head of the Cabinet. In practice, the Federal Executive Council will act to ratify all decisions made by the Cabinet, and in practice, decisions of the Cabinet will always require the support of the Prime Minister. The powers of the Governor-General - to grant Royal Assent to legislation, to dissolve and prorogue Parliament, to call elections, and to make appointments - are exercised on the advice of the Prime Minister. // The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which a constitutional monarch completes the legislative process of lawmaking by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ...


The power of the Prime Minister is subject to a number of limitations. If the Prime Minister is removed as leader of his or her party, or if the government they lead loses a vote of no-confidence in the House of Representatives, they must resign the office or be dismissed by the Governor-General. The Prime Minister's party will normally have a majority in the House of Representatives, and party discipline is exceptionally strong in Australian politics, so the passage of government-proposed legislation through the House is mostly a formality. Attaining the support of the Senate can be more difficult, since there the government will often lack an absolute majority. A Motion of No Confidence, also called Motion of Non Confidence is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. ...


Prime Ministerial salary and benefits

Salary

Prime Ministerial pay history
Date established Salary
2 June 1999 $289,270
6 September 2006 $309,270
1 July 2007 $330,300

The Prime Minister is the highest-paid member of parliament. is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Ministerial salary is expressed as an additional percentage on top of the basic parliamentary salary. The Remuneration Tribunal's Report Number 1 of 2006[2] confirms the Prime Minister's additional salary as 160% of his parliamentary salary, ie. he earns in total 260% of the salary of an ordinary parliamentarian.


Benefits

The Royal Australian Air Force's 34 Squadron transports the Prime Minister within Australia and overseas by specially converted Boeing Business Jets and smaller Challenger aircraft. The aircraft contain secure communications equipment as well as office, conference room and sleeping compartments. The call-sign for the aircraft is "Envoy". The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the Air Force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ...


The Prime Minister's official residence is The Lodge in Canberra, but not all Prime Ministers choose to make use of it. Jim Scullin preferred to live at the Hotel Canberra (now the Hyatt Hotel); Ben Chifley lived in the Kurrajong Hotel; and John Howard made Kirribilli House in Sydney his primary residence, using The Lodge only whenever he was in Canberra on official business. The official residences are fully staffed and catered for both the Prime Minister and his family. A considerable amount of official entertaining is conducted at these residences. This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ... James Henry Scullin (September 18, 1876 – January 28, 1953), Australian Labor politician and ninth Prime Minister of Australia. ... The Hotel Canberra is in Yarralumla, near Lake Burley Griffin and Parliament House. ... Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ... The eastern side of Kirribilli House, as seen from a commuter ferry. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ...


The current Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, has a staff at the Lodge consisting of a senior chef and an assistant chef, a child carer, one senior house attendant, and two junior house attendants. At Kirribilli House in Sydney, there is one full-time chef and one full-time house attendant.[3] The eastern side of Kirribilli House, as seen from a commuter ferry. ...


In June 2007, businessman and former President of the Liberal Party in Victoria, Michael Kroger, announced that he and other Australian businessmen, a group dubbed the "Melbourne Lodgers", were examining properties in Melbourne for the Prime Minister to use as a residence while in that city. Despite Kroger's political affiliation, he maintained that if bought, the residence would be offered for the use of all Prime Ministers regardless of party affiliation. Chief on the list was Stonnington Mansion in the suburb of Malvern.[4] Michael Norman Kroger is a businessman and a powerbroker within the Victorian division of the Liberal Party of Australia. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... Stonnington Mansion Stonnington Mansion (also known as Stonington Mansion or House) is a private residence and former Government House located in the Melbourne suburb of Malvern. ... Malvern is a suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ...


Prime Ministers continue to have benefits after leaving office, such as free office space, the right to hold a Life Gold Pass and budgets for office help and staff assistance. The Life Gold Pass entitles the holder to travel within Australia for "non-commercial" purposes at government expense.


Former Prime Ministers continue to be important national figures, and in some cases go on to successful post-prime ministerial careers. Some notable examples have included: Edmund Barton, who was a judge of the High Court; George Reid, who was High Commissioner to the United Kingdom; and Arthur Fadden, who was Treasurer under another Prime Minister. Sir Edmund Barton, GCMG, QC (18 January 1849 – 7 January 1920), Australian politician and judge, was the first Prime Minister of Australia and a founding justice of the High Court of Australia. ... High Court entrance The High Court of Australia is the final court of appeal in Australia, the highest court in the Australian court hierarchy. ... For other persons named George Reid, see George Reid (disambiguation). ... Sir Arthur William Fadden GCMG (April 13, 1895–April 21, 1973), Australian politician and 13th Prime Minister of Australia, born at Ingham, Queensland, the son of a Presbyterian police officer. ...


History

The first Prime Minister of Australia, Edmund Barton (sitting second from left), with his Cabinet, 1901.

Since the framers of the Australian constitution from the beginning intended it to largely follow the Westminster system, the office of Prime Minister has existed since the inauguration of the Commonwealth on 1 January 1901. The Barton Ministry This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Barton Ministry This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Houses of Parliament, also known as the Palace of Westminster, in London. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Many political scientists have held that the Australian system of government was consciously devised as a blend or hybrid of the Westminster and the United States systems of government, especially since the Australian Senate is a powerful upper house like the U.S. Senate; this notion is expressed in the nickname "Washminster system". The ability of upper houses to block supply also features in the parliaments of most Australian states. Judicial High Court Lower Courts Constitution State and territory governments Executive Governors and Administrators Premiers and Chief Ministers Legislative Parliaments and Assemblies State electoral systems ACT - NSW - NT - Qld. ... This article describes the government of the United States. ... The Houses of Parliament, also known as the Palace of Westminster, in London. ... The Parliaments of the Australian states and territories are legislative bodies within the federal framework of the Commonwealth of Australia. ...


List of Prime Ministers

Below is a list of Prime Ministers of Australia by name, date assumed office, date left office, political party, total time in office and state represented in Parliament. The state(s) represented in parliament is not necessarily the one with which the person had the strongest association; the most extreme example being Bob Hawke who was born in South Australia, spent his formative years in Western Australia, worked in and represented Victoria and retired to New South Wales.


The parties shown are those to which the Prime Ministers belonged at the time they held office. Several Prime Ministers belonged to parties other than those given before and after their prime ministerships.


For a list showing further details, see List of Prime Ministers of Australia. The current (25th) Prime Minister of Australia, John Howard (sitting, fifth from left), with his Cabinet, 1999 The office of Prime Minister is in practice the most powerful political office in the Commonwealth of Australia. ...

# Name Took office Left office Party Total Time In Office State Represented in Parliament
1 Edmund Barton 01901-01-01 1 January 1901 01903-09-24 24 September 1903 Protectionist 2 years, 8 months, 24 days New South Wales
2 Alfred Deakin 01903-09-24 24 September 1903 01904-04-27 27 April 1904 Protectionist 0 years, 7 months, 4 days Victoria
3 Chris Watson 01904-04-27 27 April 1904 01904-08-18 18 August 1904 Labor 0 years, 3 months, 21 days New South Wales
4 George Reid 01904-08-18 18 August 1904 01905-07-05 5 July 1905 Free Trade 0 years, 10 months, 18 days New South Wales
- Alfred Deakin 01905-07-05 5 July 1905 01908-11-13 13 November 1908 Protectionist 3 years, 4 months, 9 days Victoria
5 Andrew Fisher 01908-11-13 13 November 1908 01909-06-02 2 June 1909 Labor 0 years, 6 months, 21 days Queensland
- Alfred Deakin 01909-06-02 2 June 1909 01910-04-29 29 April 1910 Commonwealth Liberal 0 years, 10 months, 28 days Victoria
- Andrew Fisher 01910-04-29 29 April 1910 01913-06-24 24 June 1913 Labor 3 years, 1 month, 26 days Queensland
6 Joseph Cook 01913-06-24 24 June 1913 01914-09-17 17 September 1914 Commonwealth Liberal 1 year, 2 months, 25 days New South Wales
- Andrew Fisher 01914-09-17 17 September 1914 01915-10-27 27 October 1915 Labor 1 year, 1 month, 11 days Queensland
7 Billy Hughes 01915-10-27 27 October 1915 01923-02-09 9 February 1923 Labor/Nationalist 7 years, 3 months, 14 days New South Wales, Victoria
8 Stanley Bruce 01923-02-09 9 February 1923 01929-10-22 22 October 1929 Nationalist 6 years, 8 months, 14 days Victoria
9 James Scullin 01929-10-22 22 October 1929 01932-01-06 6 January 1932 Labor 2 years, 2 months, 16 days Victoria
10 Joseph Lyons 01932-01-06 6 January 1932 01939-04-07 7 April 1939 United Australia 7 years, 3 months, 2 days Tasmania
11 Sir Earle Page 01939-04-07 7 April 1939 01939-04-26 26 April 1939 Country 0 years, 0 months, 20 days New South Wales
12 Robert Menzies 01939-04-26 26 April 1939 01941-08-28 28 August 1941 United Australia 2 years, 4 months, 4 days Victoria
13 Arthur Fadden 01941-08-28 28 August 1941 01941-10-07 7 October 1941 Country 0 years, 1 month, 9 days Queensland
14 John Curtin 01941-10-07 7 October 1941 01945-07-05 5 July 1945 Labor 3 years, 8 months, 29 days Western Australia
15 Frank Forde 01945-07-06 6 July 1945 01945-07-13 13 July 1945 Labor 0 years, 0 months, 8 days Queensland
16 Ben Chifley 01945-07-13 13 July 1945 01949-12-19 19 December 1949 Labor 4 years, 5 months, 7 days New South Wales
- Sir Robert Menzies 01949-12-19 19 December 1949 01966-01-26 26 January 1966 Liberal 16 years, 1 month, 8 days Victoria
17 Harold Holt 01966-01-26 26 January 1966 01967-12-19 19 December 1967[5] Liberal 1 year, 10 months, 23 days Victoria
18 John McEwen 01967-12-19 19 December 1967 01968-01-10 10 January 1968 Country 0 years, 0 months, 23 days Victoria
19 John Gorton 01968-01-10 10 January 1968 01971-03-10 10 March 1971 Liberal 3 years, 2 months, 0 days Victoria
20 William McMahon 01971-03-10 10 March 1971 01972-12-05 5 December 1972 Liberal 1 year, 8 months, 25 days New South Wales
21 Gough Whitlam 01972-12-05 5 December 1972 01975-11-11 11 November 1975 Labor 2 years, 11 months, 7 days New South Wales
22 Malcolm Fraser 01975-11-11 11 November 1975 01983-03-11 11 March 1983 Liberal 7 years, 4 months, 0 days Victoria
23 Bob Hawke 01983-03-11 11 March 1983 01991-12-20 20 December 1991 Labor 8 years, 9 months, 10 days Victoria
24 Paul Keating 01991-12-20 20 December 1991 01996-03-11 11 March 1996 Labor 4 years, 2 months, 20 days New South Wales
25 John Howard 01996-03-11 11 March 1996 02007-12-03 3 December 2007 Liberal 11 years, 8 months, 23 days New South Wales
26 Kevin Rudd 02007-12-03 3 December 2007 Incumbent Labor Currently in Office Queensland

Sir Edmund Barton, GCMG, QC (18 January 1849 – 7 January 1920), Australian politician and judge, was the first Prime Minister of Australia and a founding justice of the High Court of Australia. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... The Protectionist Party was a political party in Australia from the 1880s until 1909. ... Alfred William Deakin (3 August 1856 – 7 October 1919), Australian politician, was a leader of the movement for Australian federation and later second Prime Minister of Australia. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Protectionist Party was a political party in Australia from the 1880s until 1909. ... For other uses, see Chris Watson (musician). ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... For other persons named George Reid, see George Reid (disambiguation). ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... The Free Trade Party was a political party in Australia from the 1880s until 1909. ... Alfred William Deakin (3 August 1856 – 7 October 1919), Australian politician, was a leader of the movement for Australian federation and later second Prime Minister of Australia. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Protectionist Party was a political party in Australia from the 1880s until 1909. ... Andrew Fisher at the naming of Canberra ceremony, 1913 Andrew Fisher (29 August 1862 - 22 October 1928), Australianpolitician and fifth Prime Minister of Australia, was born in Crosshouse, a mining village near Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Alfred William Deakin (3 August 1856 – 7 October 1919), Australian politician, was a leader of the movement for Australian federation and later second Prime Minister of Australia. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Commonwealth Liberal Party, usually called The Fusion, was a political movement active in Australia shortly after federation. ... Andrew Fisher at the naming of Canberra ceremony, 1913 Andrew Fisher (29 August 1862 - 22 October 1928), Australianpolitician and fifth Prime Minister of Australia, was born in Crosshouse, a mining village near Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For the actor Joe Cook see Joe Cook (actor). ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Commonwealth Liberal Party, usually called The Fusion, was a political movement active in Australia shortly after federation. ... Andrew Fisher at the naming of Canberra ceremony, 1913 Andrew Fisher (29 August 1862 - 22 October 1928), Australianpolitician and fifth Prime Minister of Australia, was born in Crosshouse, a mining village near Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Rt Hon Billy Hughes William Morris Billy Hughes (September 25, 1862 - October 28, 1952), Australian politician, was the seventh Prime Minister of Australia, the longest-serving member of the Australian Parliament, and one of the most controversial figures in Australian political history. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Nationalist Party of Australia was an Australian political party formed in 1917 from a merger of pro-conscription members of the Labor Party (who had been operating under the banner National Labor after their earlier split with the Labor party) with the Commonwealth Liberal Party. ... Stanley Melbourne Bruce, 1st Viscount Bruce of Melbourne, CH, MC, FRS, PC (15 April 1883–25 August 1967), Australian politician and diplomat, was the eighth Prime Minister of Australia. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Nationalist Party of Australia was an Australian political party formed in 1917 from a merger of pro-conscription members of the Labor Party (who had been operating under the banner National Labor after their earlier split with the Labor party) with the Commonwealth Liberal Party. ... James Henry Scullin (September 18, 1876 – January 28, 1953), Australian Labor politician and ninth Prime Minister of Australia. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph Aloysius Lyons (15 September 1879 – 7 April 1939), Australian politician, tenth Prime Minister of Australia. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United Australia Party or UAP was an Australian political party that was the political successor to the Nationalist Party of Australia. ... Sir Earle Christmas Grafton Page GCMG, CH (August 8, 1880–December 20, 1961), Australian politician, was the eleventh Prime Minister of Australia. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Party of Australia is an Australian political party, originally called the Country Party, adopting the name of National Country Party in 1975 and adopting its present name in 1982. ... Sir Robert Gordon Menzies, KT, AK, CH, FRS, QC (20 December 1894 – 15 May 1978), Australian politician, was the twelfth and longest-serving Prime Minister of Australia, serving eighteen and a half years. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... The United Australia Party or UAP was an Australian political party that was the political successor to the Nationalist Party of Australia. ... Sir Arthur William Fadden GCMG (April 13, 1895–April 21, 1973), Australian politician and 13th Prime Minister of Australia, born at Ingham, Queensland, the son of a Presbyterian police officer. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... The National Party of Australia is an Australian political party, originally called the Country Party, adopting the name of National Country Party in 1975 and adopting its present name in 1982. ... This article is about the Australian Prime Minister. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Francis Michael Forde (18 July 1890 – 28 January 1983) was an Australian politician and the 15th Prime Minister of Australia. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Robert Gordon Menzies, KT, AK, CH, FRS, QC (20 December 1894 – 15 May 1978), Australian politician, was the twelfth and longest-serving Prime Minister of Australia, serving eighteen and a half years. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the modern Australian political party. ... Harold Edward Holt CH (5 August 1908 – presumed dead 17 December 1967) was an Australian politician who became the 17th Prime Minister of Australia in 1966. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the modern Australian political party. ... Sir John McEwen (March 29, 1900 - November 20, 1980), Australian politician and 18th Prime Minister of Australia, was born at Chiltern, Victoria, where his father was a pharmacist. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Party of Australia is an Australian political party, originally called the Country Party, adopting the name of National Country Party in 1975 and adopting its present name in 1982. ... Sir John Grey Gorton GCMG AC CH (9 September 1911 – 19 May 2002), Australian politician, was the 19th Prime Minister of Australia. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... This article is about the modern Australian political party. ... Sir William McMahon, GCMG, CH (23 February 1908 – 31 March 1988), Australian politician and 20th Prime Minister of Australia, was born in Sydney, New South Wales, where his father was a lawyer. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the modern Australian political party. ... Edward Gough Whitlam, AC, QC (born 11 July 1916), known as Gough Whitlam (, pronounced Goff), is an Australian former politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the former prime minister of Australia; for the Western Australian public servant, see Malcolm Fraser (surveyor). ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the modern Australian political party. ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... For other persons named Paul Keating, see Paul Keating (disambiguation). ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the modern Australian political party. ... Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957), is the leader of the federal Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Graphical timeline


Living former Prime Ministers

There are five living former Prime Ministers: Gough Whitlam (1972-75), Malcolm Fraser (1975-83), Bob Hawke (1983-91), Paul Keating (1991-96) and John Howard (1996-2007). Gough Whitlam is the oldest living former Australian Prime Minister, and Paul Keating is the youngest. Edward Gough Whitlam, AC, QC (born 11 July 1916), known as Gough Whitlam (, pronounced Goff), is an Australian former politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia. ... This article is about the former prime minister of Australia; for the Western Australian public servant, see Malcolm Fraser (surveyor). ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... For other persons named Paul Keating, see Paul Keating (disambiguation). ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ...


The most recently deceased Prime Minister is Sir John Gorton, who died on 19 May 2002. Sir John Grey Gorton GCMG AC CH (9 September 1911 – 19 May 2002), Australian politician, was the 19th Prime Minister of Australia. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


The greatest number of living former Prime Ministers at any one time was eight. This has occurred twice:

Seven former Prime Ministers were alive during the periods 18 November 1941 - 13 July 1945, and 30 July 1947 - 13 June 1951. is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Australian Prime Minister. ... Sir Arthur William Fadden GCMG (April 13, 1895–April 21, 1973), Australian politician and 13th Prime Minister of Australia, born at Ingham, Queensland, the son of a Presbyterian police officer. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chris Watson (musician). ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ... Francis Michael Forde (18 July 1890 – 28 January 1983) was an Australian politician and the 15th Prime Minister of Australia. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the actor Joe Cook see Joe Cook (actor). ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Prime Ministerial Births and Deaths

Seventeen Prime Ministers were born prior to the Federation of Australia, 1 January 1901. The earliest-born Prime Minister was Sir George Reid, born 25 February 1845. The federation of Australia was the process by which the six separate British colonies of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia formed a federation. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... George Reid is the name of two political figures: Sir George Reid was a Prime Minister of Australia. ...


The first person born after Federation to serve as Prime Minister was Sir William McMahon, born 23 February 1908. Sir William McMahon, GCMG, CH (23 February 1908 – 31 March 1988), Australian politician and 20th Prime Minister of Australia, was born in Sydney, New South Wales, where his father was a lawyer. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


The first person born after the First World War to serve as Prime Minister was Malcolm Fraser, born 21 May 1930. (Bob Hawke, who succeeded Fraser, was born 9 December 1929, and is the earliest-born of the Prime Ministers born after WWI.) Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... This article is about the former prime minister of Australia; for the Western Australian public servant, see Malcolm Fraser (surveyor). ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The first (and currently the only) person born after the Second World War to serve as Prime Minister, is the incumbent, Kevin Rudd, born 21 September 1957. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Kevin Michael Rudd (born 21 September 1957), is the leader of the federal Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition in the Australian Parliament. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ...


The only Prime Minister born during either of the world wars is Gough Whitlam, born 11 July 1916, during WWI. Edward Gough Whitlam, AC, QC (born 11 July 1916), known as Gough Whitlam (, pronounced Goff), is an Australian former politician and 21st Prime Minister of Australia. ...


The only two pairs of Prime Ministers who were born in the same year are:

Six Prime Ministers were born in the month of September, two more than the next most popular month August. The six were: John Gorton (9th September), Joseph Lyons (15th), James Scullin (18th), Kevin Rudd (21st), Ben Chifley (22nd) and Billy Hughes (25th). None were born in June, October or November. This article is about the Australian Prime Minister. ... Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ... Harold Edward Holt CH (5 August 1908 – presumed dead 17 December 1967) was an Australian politician who became the 17th Prime Minister of Australia in 1966. ... Sir John Grey Gorton GCMG AC CH (9 September 1911 – 19 May 2002), Australian politician, was the 19th Prime Minister of Australia. ... Joseph Aloysius Lyons (15 September 1879 – 7 April 1939), Australian politician, tenth Prime Minister of Australia. ... James Henry Scullin (September 18, 1876 – January 28, 1953), Australian Labor politician and ninth Prime Minister of Australia. ... For other persons named Billy Hughes, see Billy Hughes (disambiguation). ...


The only two Prime Ministers who shared the same birthday are Sir Edmund Barton and Paul Keating - both born 18 January (1849 and 1944 respectively). Sir Edmund Barton, GCMG, QC (18 January 1849 – 7 January 1920), Australian politician and judge, was the first Prime Minister of Australia and a founding justice of the High Court of Australia. ... For other persons named Paul Keating, see Paul Keating (disambiguation). ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The only two Prime Ministers who shared the same death day are James Scullin and Frank Forde - both died 28 January (1953 and 1983 respectively). Francis Michael Forde (18 July 1890 – 28 January 1983) was an Australian politician and the 15th Prime Minister of Australia. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The only two Prime Ministers who were born and died in the same month of the calendar were: Sir Edmund Barton (18 January 1849-7 January 1920), and Sir Arthur Fadden (13 April 1895-21 April 1973). Sir Arthur William Fadden GCMG (April 13, 1895–April 21, 1973), Australian politician and 13th Prime Minister of Australia, born at Ingham, Queensland, the son of a Presbyterian police officer. ...


The only case of a former Prime Minister dying on another Prime Minister's birthday was Sir Earle Page, who died 20 December 1961, the then-incumbent Sir Robert Menzies' 67th birthday. Sir Earle Christmas Grafton Page GCMG, CH (August 8, 1880–December 20, 1961), Australian politician, was the eleventh Prime Minister of Australia. ... Sir Robert Gordon Menzies, KT, AK, CH, FRS, QC (20 December 1894 – 15 May 1978), Australian politician, was the twelfth and longest-serving Prime Minister of Australia, serving eighteen and a half years. ...


Three Prime Ministers died in office - Joseph Lyons (1939), John Curtin (1945) and Harold Holt (1967). Holt's was a most unusual case - he disappeared while swimming, was declared presumed dead two days later, and his body was never recovered. It was not until almost 38 years later, in 2005, that he was officially declared by the Victorian Coroner to have drowned at the time of his disappearance. Harold Edward Holt CH (5 August 1908 – presumed dead 17 December 1967) was an Australian politician who became the 17th Prime Minister of Australia in 1966. ...


No two former Prime Ministers have died in the same year. The former Prime Minister Stanley Bruce died in August 1967, the same year as the then-incumbent Harold Holt drowned. Stanley Melbourne Bruce, 1st Viscount Bruce of Melbourne, CH, MC, FRS, PC (15 April 1883–25 August 1967), Australian politician and diplomat, was the eighth Prime Minister of Australia. ...


Ages

The three youngest people when they first became Prime Minister were:

  • Chris Watson - 37
  • Stanley Bruce - 39
  • Robert Menzies - 44.

The three oldest people when they first became Prime Minister were:

  • John McEwen - 67
  • William McMahon - 63
  • Ben Chifley - 59 years 10 months (George Reid was 59 years 6 months).

The three youngest people to last leave the office of Prime Minister were:

  • Chris Watson - 37
  • Arthur Fadden - 46 years 5 months 22 days
  • Stanley Bruce - 46 years 6 months 7 days

The three oldest people to last leave the office of Prime Minister were:

  • Robert Menzies - 71
  • John Howard - 68
  • John McEwen - 67.

Post-Prime Ministerial longevity

Nine ex-Prime Ministers (Bruce, Cook, Fadden, Forde, Fraser, Gorton, Hughes, Watson, and Whitlam) have lived more than 25 years after leaving the office, and all but two of these survived longer than 30 years (Hughes lasted 29 years and 8 months; Fraser has lasted 25 years but is still living).


The longest-surviving was Stanley Bruce, who died 37 years and 10 months after leaving the Prime Ministership. Should Gough Whitlam live till 25 September 2013, he will exceed Bruce's record (he would then be 97 years old). Stanley Melbourne Bruce, 1st Viscount Bruce of Melbourne, CH, MC, FRS, PC (15 April 1883–25 August 1967), Australian politician and diplomat, was the eighth Prime Minister of Australia. ...


At the other extreme, excluding the three Prime Ministers who died in office and the most recent ex-incumbent John Howard, all but two ex-Prime Ministers survived more than ten years. The two exceptions were Ben Chifley - 1 year 6 months; and Alfred Deakin - 9 years 5 months. Joseph Benedict Chifley (22 September 1885 – 13 June 1951), Australian politician and 16th Prime Minister of Australia, was one of Australias most influential Prime Ministers. ... Alfred William Deakin (3 August 1856 – 7 October 1919), Australian politician, was a leader of the movement for Australian federation and later second Prime Minister of Australia. ...


References

  1. ^ Prime Minister of Australia - official website
  2. ^ of Report on Ministers of State - Salaries Additional to the Basic Parliamentary Salary
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ Elder, John, "A place to call home? Maybe, prime minister", The Age, 17 June 2007. Accessed 31 August 2007.
  5. ^ Harold Holt is now presumed to have drowned on 17 December (his body was never recovered), but his commission as Prime Minister was not officially withdrawn until 19 December.

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Prime Minister of Australia

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... The Ballarat Botanical Gardens Reserve covers an area of 40 hectares which is divided into 3 distinct zones. ... Australias second-highest ranked political post is the position of Deputy Prime Minister of Australia. ...

External links

  • Official website of the Prime Minister of Australia
  • Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet
  • Australia's Prime Ministers / National Archive of Australia
  • Biographies of Australia's Prime Ministers / National Museum of Australia
  • Classroom resources on Australian Prime Ministers
Political parties in Australia lists political parties in Australia. ... The Australian Democrats is an Australian political party which was formed in 1977 through a merger of the Australia Party and the Liberal Movement after principals of those minor parties secured the commitment of former Liberal minister Don Chipp as a high-profile leader[1]. The new party was based... The Australian Greens, commonly known as The Greens, is a Green Australian political party. ... ALP redirects here. ... The Family First Party (FFP/F1) is a political party in Australia, with policies that generally mirror socially conservative and family values. ... This article is about the modern Australian political party. ... The National Party of Australia is an Australian political party. ... Political parties in Australia lists political parties in Australia. ... The current (25th) Prime Minister of Australia, John Howard (sitting, fifth from left), with his Cabinet, 1999 The office of Prime Minister is in practice the most powerful political office in the Commonwealth of Australia. ... The current (25th) Prime Minister of Australia, John Howard (sitting, fifth from left), with his Cabinet, 1999 The office of Prime Minister is in practice the most powerful political office in the Commonwealth of Australia. ... This is a list of Australian Prime Ministers by state. ... Some Australian Prime Ministers have had military service. ... This is a list of Australian Prime Ministers by time in office. ... This article is intended to be a comprehensive list of all Prime Ministers, grouped by political party. ... Robert and Pattie Menzies in the 1940s The spouse of the Prime Minister of Australia is a position that has only been occupied by women to date, thus the spouse is usually known as the Prime Ministers wife. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Prime Minister of Australia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (822 words)
The Prime Minister's official residence is the Lodge in Canberra.
The Prime Minister is appointed by the Governor-General under section 64 of the Australian Constitution.
If the Prime Minister is removed as leader of his or her party, or if he or she loses a vote of no-confidence in the House of Representatives, he or she must resign the office or be dismissed by the Governor-General.
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