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Encyclopedia > Priest
Roman Catholic priest, Fr. (now Saint) Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer, founder of Opus Dei, celebrating Mass

A priest or priestess is a person having the authority or power to perform and administer religious rites; and in particular, rites of sacrifice to, and propitiation of the deity or deities. Their office or position is the priesthood, a term which may also apply to such persons collectively. The most understandable definition of priest - to most people - is a person who holds an office in a religion. ... Priestess is a stoner rock/metal band from Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Escriva_at_Mass. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Escriva_at_Mass. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ... Saint Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer (Thursday, January 9, 1902 – Thursday, June 26, 1975), (also known as Jose María or Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer y Albas, born José María Mariano Escriba Albas) was a Spanish Catholic priest and founder of the Prelature of the Holy Cross and... For other uses, see Opus Dei (disambiguation). ...

Priestess from Crete, dated 1600 BC

Priests and priestesses have been known since the earliest of times and in the simplest societies (see oracle and shaman). They exist in some branches of Christianity, Shintoism, Hinduism, and many other religions, as well, and are generally regarded as having good contact with the deities of the religion to which he or she ascribes, often interpreting the meaning of events, performing the rituals of the religion, and to whom other believers often will turn for advice on spiritual matters. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (802x1216, 245 KB) Snake goddess from the Palace of Knossos, Crete. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (802x1216, 245 KB) Snake goddess from the Palace of Knossos, Crete. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... (Redirected from 1600 BC) Centuries: 18th century BC - 17th century BC - 16th century BC Decades: 1650s BC 1640s BC 1630s BC 1620s BC 1610s BC - 1600s BC - 1590s BC 1580s BC 1570s BC 1560s BC 1550s BC Events and trends Egypt: End of Fourteenth Dynasty The creation of one of... Consulting the Oracle by John William Waterhouse, showing eight priestesses in a temple of prophecy An oracle is a person or persons considered to be the source of wise counsel or prophetic opinion; an infallible authority, usually spiritual in nature. ... The shaman is an intellectual and spiritual figure who is regarded as possessing power and influence on other peoples in the tribe and performs several functions, primarily that of a healer ( medicine man). The shaman provides medical care, and serves other community needs during crisis times, via supernatural means (means... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Shinto ) is the native religion of Japan and was once its state religion. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages[1]) is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Look up deity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In many (but not all) religions, being a priest or priestess is a full-time assignment, ruling out any other career. In other cases it is an auxiliary role. For example in early Icelandic history the chieftains were entitled goði, a word which meant "priest", but as in the saga of Hrafnkell Freysgoði, this consisted merely of offering periodic sacrifices to the Norse gods and goddesses, and it was not a full time occupation, nor did it involve any special training or ordination. In some religions, priesthood is a position inherited in familial lines. // Thule as Tile on the Carta Marina by Olaus Magnus. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The first page of Hrafnkels saga from ÁM. 156, fol. ...


The term, priestess, often is used for women officiating in ancient religious temples and oracles and in some cultures would have preceded priests until later traditions emerged. Women officiating in modern Paganism, Neopagan religions such as Wicca, and various Polytheistic Reconstructionism faiths are referred to as priestesses, however, in Christian churches that ordain women, such as those of the Anglican Communion or the Christian Community, ordained women simply are called, priests. Those officiating in Judaism, both men and women, are called rabbi. Consulting the Oracle by John William Waterhouse, showing eight priestesses in a temple of prophecy An oracle is a person or persons considered to be the source of wise counsel or prophetic opinion; an infallible authority, usually spiritual in nature. ... Pagan and heathen redirect here. ... Neopaganism (sometimes Neo-Paganism, meaning New Paganism) is a heterogeneous group of religions which attempt to revive ancient, mainly European pre-Christian religions. ... For other uses, see Wicca (disambiguation). ... Romuva Spring JorÄ— festival in Kulionys, Lithuania in 2006. ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ... The Christian Community (German: Die Christengemeinschaft) is a worldwide Movement for Religious Renewal. ...

Contents

In Judaism

In Judaism, the Kohanim (singular כּהן kohen, plural כּהנִים kohanim, whence the family names Cohen, Cahn, Kahn, Kohn, Kogan, etc.) are hereditary priests through paternal descent. These families are from the tribe of the Levi'im (Levites) (whence the family names Levy, Levi, Levin, Lewin, Lewis, etc.), and are traditionally accepted as the descendants of Aaron. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Cohen (disambiguation) Position of the kohens hands and fingers during the Priestly Blessing A kohen (or cohen, Hebrew כּהן, priest, pl. ... In the Jewish tradition, a Levite (לֵוִי Attached, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ) is a member of the Hebrew tribe of Levi. ... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Aaron (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), or Aaron the Levite (flourished about 1200 B.C.), was, according to biblical accounts, one of two brothers who play a unique part in the history of the Hebrew people. ...

The position of a Kohen's hands when he raises them to bless a Jewish congregation

During the times of the two Jewish Temples in Jerusalem, they were responsible for daily and special Jewish holiday offerings and sacrifices within the temples known as the korbanot. Download high resolution version (800x800, 58 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (800x800, 58 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Cohen (disambiguation) Position of the kohens hands and fingers during the Priestly Blessing A kohen (or cohen, Hebrew כּהן, priest, pl. ... The Priestly Blessing, (in Hebrew: Birkat Kohanim, ברכת כהנים) is a Jewish ceremony and prayer recited during certain specific Jewish services. ... The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash and meaning literally The Holy House) was located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ... A Jewish holiday or Jewish Festival is a day or series of days observed by Jews as holy or secular commemorations of important events in Jewish history. ... Korban (קרבן) (plural: Korbanot קרבנות) in Judaism, is commonly called a religious sacrifice or an offering in English, but is known as a Korban in Hebrew because its Hebrew root K [a] R [o] V (קרב) (or K [o] R...


Since the demise of the Second Temple, and therefore the cessation of the daily and seasonal temple ceremonies and sacrifices, Kohanim in traditional Judaism (Orthodox Judaism and to some extent, Conservative Judaism) have continued to perform a number of priestly ceremonies and roles such as the Pidyon HaBen (redemption of a first-born son) ceremony and the Priestly Blessing, and have remained subject, particularly in Orthodox Judaism, to a number of special rules including restrictions on marriage, ritual purity, and other requirements. Orthodox Judaism regards the Kohanim as being held in reserve for a future restored Temple. In all branches of Judaism, Rabbis do not perform a priestly role in the sense of special roles in propitiation, sacrifice, or sacrament. Rather, a Rabbi's principle religious function is to serve as an authoritative judge and expositor of Jewish law. Rabbis have also generally come to perform clerical and social leadership roles such as congregational leadership and pastoral counseling, Judaism does not, however, reserve such roles to rabbis. A stone (2. ... The position of a Kohens hands when he raises them to bless a Jewish congregation A Kohen (or Cohen, Hebrew priest, pl. ... Orthodox Judaism is the formulation of Judaism that adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonised in the Talmudic texts (Oral Torah) and as subsequently developed and applied by the later authorities known as the Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim. ... This article is about Conservative (Masorti) Judaism in the United States. ... Pidyon HaBen (Hebrew: פדיון הבן) is the redemption of the first-born, a ritual in Judaism. ... The Priestly Blessing, (in Hebrew: Birkat Kohanim, ברכת כהנים) is a Jewish ceremony and prayer recited during certain specific Jewish services. ... A drawing of Ezekiels Visionary Temple from the Book of Ezekiel 40-47 Since the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE, religious Jews have prayed that God will allow for the rebuilding of a Third Temple. ... For the town in Italy, see Rabbi, Italy. ... Halakha (Hebrew: הלכה; also transliterated as Halakhah, Halacha, Halakhot and Halachah with pronunciation emphasis on the third syllable, kha), is the collective corpus of Jewish religious law, including biblical law (the 613 mitzvot) and later talmudic and rabbinic law as well as customs and traditions. ...


In Christianity

Two different Greek words have traditionally been translated into English as priest (Greek was the language in which the New Testament was composed, hence its importance in understanding early Christian practice). Both words occur in the New Testament, which draws a distinction not always observed in English. The first, presbyteros (πρεσβυτερος), Latin presbyter, is traditionally translated priest and the English word priest is indeed etymologically derived from this word; literally, however, this word means elder, and is used in neutral and non-religious contexts in Greek to refer to seniority or relative age. It is the term used in Catholicism and Orthodoxy to refer to one given the sacrament of Holy Orders in that degree. This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Presbyter in the New Testament refers to a leader in local Christian congregations, a synonym of episkopos, which has come to mean bishop. ... Not to be confused with Entomology, the scientific study of insects. ...


The second word, hiereus ('ιερeuς), Latin sacerdos, refers to priests who offer sacrifice, such as the priesthood of the Jewish Temple, or the priests of pagan gods. The New Testament Epistle to the Hebrews draws a distinction between the Jewish priesthood and that of Christ; it teaches that the sacrificial atonement by Jesus Christ on Calvary has made the Jewish priesthood redundant. Thus, for Christians, Christ himself is uniquely hiereus. Roman Catholics, the Orthodox and many Anglicans (especially Anglo-Catholics) therefore, believe that priests and bishops share in the one priesthood of Christ through the sacrament of Holy Orders, and are empowered to offer the one sacrifice of Jesus in the Eucharist which, as the Book of Hebrews says, is offered "once for all" (Hebrews 10:10), being identical with the very sacrifice of the Cross: the Mass, or Divine Liturgy, as the Eucharistic celebration is known, is therefore literally a re-presentation (making present again) of Christ's single sacrifice. According to this theology, Christ himself is both the Priest and the Sacrifice. The priest does not offer Christ again in sacrifice; but rather, in the Eucharist, the Church mystically enters into that same sacrifice that was made once for all on Golgotha. Only in this sense is the priest also a sacerdos (sacrificer), and so the term appears in works of theology but is not the usual term now used for the office. These faiths teach that through the offering of the Eucharist, the priest who celebrates and the congregation which is present participate in Christ's redemptive work, for themselves, for the good of the Church, and for the whole world. Pagan and heathen redirect here. ... The Epistle to the Hebrews (abbr. ... This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ... For other uses, see Atonement (disambiguation). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Golgotha redirects here. ... The terms Anglo-Catholic and Anglo-Catholicism describe people, groups, ideas, customs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise continuity with Catholic tradition. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... The Epistle to the Hebrews (abbreviated Heb. ... A reliquary in the form of an ornate Christian Cross Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope... Calvary (Golgotha) was the hill outside Jerusalem on which Jesus was crucified. ...


At some point in the late first century or early second century of the Christian era, Greek-speaking Christians began using hierós 'holy (person)' to refer first to bishops, and then by extension to the presbyters under them, but still drawing a distinction between the Jewish priesthood, pagan priesthoods, and the one priesthood of Christ. The Didache, for example, refers to "prophets" (13:3) as "high priests" (and later stating, in 15:2, that "bishops" are functionally equivalent to prophets, thus extending the term "priest" to them as well). The Letter of Clement of Rome to the Corinthians, written in the late First Century CE, draws an analogy between the ministry of the Jewish priests and Christian bishops. The usual term for bishop, however, is episcopus, the Latin word from which the English "bishop" is derived, and which is itself derived from the Greek word επίσκοπος (epískopos) for "overseer" or "supervisor." In Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy, Catholicism, Anglicanism, and associated Churches, the terms "presbyter" and "priest" (both words are ultimately derived from LL presbyter, Gk πρεσβύτερος presbýteros "elder, priest") are thus virtually interchangeable (although bishops, obviously, are also included in this concept of priesthood). Priests, like deacons, are clergymembers and can only be ordained by a bishop. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... The Didache (, Koine Greek for Teaching[1]) is the common name of a brief early Christian treatise ( 70–160), containing instructions for Christian communities. ... ... ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to... “Catholic Church” redirects here. ... Anglicanism commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, the churches that are in full communion with the see of Canterbury. ... Independent Catholic Churches are, by and large, very small Churches, some of them consisting of one congregation, that claim valid Apostolic Succession of their bishops, though these are often dismissed in mainstream Catholic, Orthodox and Anglican circles as episcopi vagantes (wandering bishops). // The actual beginnings of the independent Catholic Churches... Vulgar Latin (in Latin, sermo vulgaris) is a blanket term covering the vernacular dialects of the Latin language spoken mostly in the western provinces of the Roman Empire until those dialects, diverging still further, evolved into the early Romance languages — a distinction usually assigned to about the ninth century. ... Greek ( IPA: or simply IPA: — Hellenic) has a documented history of 3,500 years, the longest of any single language in the Indo-European language family. ... Deacon is a role in the Christian Church which is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ...


Roman Catholic and Orthodox

Roman Catholic priest LCDR Allen R. Kuss (USN) aboard USS Enterprise

The most significant liturgical acts reserved to priests in these traditions are the administration of the Sacraments (known as the "Sacred Mysteries" by Eastern Christians), including the celebration of the Mass or Divine Liturgy (the terms for the celebration of the Eucharist in the Western and Eastern traditions, respectively), and the Sacrament of Penance, also called Confession. The sacraments of Anointing of the Sick (Unction) and Confirmation or Chrismation are also administered by priests, though in the Western tradition Confirmation is most often celebrated by a bishop. In the East, Chrismation is performed by the priest immediately after Baptism, and Unction is normally performed by several priests (ideally seven), but may be done by one if necessary. In the West, Holy Baptism can be celebrated by anyone and Matrimony may be witnessed by a deacon, but most often these are also normally administered by a priest. In the East, Holy Baptism and Marriage (which is called "Crowning") may only be performed by a priest. If a person is baptized in extremis (i.e., when in fear of immediate death), only the actual threefold immersion together with the scriptural words (Matthew 28:19) may be done by a layperson or deacon. The remainder of the rite, and Chrismation, must still be done by a Priest, if the person survives. The only sacrament which may only be celebrated by a bishop is that of Ordination (cheirotonia, "Laying-on of Hands"), or Holy Orders. Priesthood in the Catholic Church is the second of the three orders of ordained ministry, Bishop, Priest and Deacon. ... Atlantic Ocean (Oct. ... Atlantic Ocean (Oct. ... In the Royal Navy, United States Navy and United States Coast Guard, a lieutenant commander (lieutenant-commander or Lt Cdr in the RN) is a commissioned officer superior to a lieutenant and inferior to a commander. ... A liturgy is the customary public worship of a religious group, according to their particular traditions. ... In Christian belief and practice, a sacrament is a rite that mediates divine grace, constituting a sacred mystery. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... The Divine Liturgy is the common term for the Eucharistic service of the Byzantine tradition of Christian liturgy. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... In criminal proceedings, a confession is a document in which a suspect admits having committed a crime. ... This article is about the practice of confession in the Modern confessional in the Church of the Holy Name, Dunedin, New Zealand. ... Extreme Unction, part of The Seven Sacraments (1445) by Roger van der Weyden. ... See Reform Judaism article about its Confirmation ceremony. ... Chrismation is the name given in Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Eastern_rite Catholic churches to the sacrament known as confirmation in the Latin Rite Catholic churches. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Baptism in early Christian art. ... Marriage is a governmentally, socially, or religiously recognized interpersonal relationship, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract. ... Ordination is the process in which clergy become authorized by their religious denomination and/or seminary to perform religious rituals and ceremonies. ...

In these traditions, only men who meet certain requirements may become priests. In Roman Catholicism the canonical minimum age is twenty-five. Bishops may dispense with this rule and ordain men up to one year younger. Dispensations of more than a year are reserved to the Holy See (Can. 1031 §§1, 4.) A Catholic priest must be incardinated by his bishop or his major religious superior in order to engage in public ministry. In Orthodoxy, the normal minimum age is thirty (Can. 9 of Neocaesarea) but a bishop may dispense with this if needed. In neither tradition may priests marry after ordination. In the Roman Catholic Church, they must be celibate and there are special rules for married clergy converting from certain other Christian confessions. Married men may become priests in Eastern Orthodoxy and the Eastern Catholic Churches but in neither case may they marry after ordination even if they become widowed. It is also important to note that candidates for the episcopacy are only chosen from among the celibate. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 853 KB)Clerical clothing, Vienna, Austria, 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 853 KB)Clerical clothing, Vienna, Austria, 2005. ... “Catholic Church” redirects here. ... Clerical clothing is non-liturgical clothing worn exclusively by clergy. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Canon law is the term used for... Incardinated This term is used in the Catholic Church term to describe the jurisdiction a Priest receives from his Bishop, that allows him to practice in public ministry. ... Clerical celibacy is the practice of various religious traditions in which clergy, monastics and those in religious orders (female or male) adopt a celibate life, refraining from marriage and sexual relationships, including masturbation and impure thoughts (such as sexual visualisation and fantasies). ... The Eastern Catholic Churches are autonomous particular Churches in full communion with the Pope of Rome. ...


Anglican or Episcopalian

The role of a priest in the Anglican Church is largely the same as that stated above, save that Canon Law in almost every Province of Anglicanism restricts the administration of confirmation to the bishop, just as with ordination. Whilst Anglican priests who are members of religious orders must remain celibate, the secular clergy (bishops, priests, and deacons who are not monks or nuns) are entitled to marry before or after ordination. The Anglican Church, unlike the Roman Catholic or Orthodox traditions, has allowed the ordination of women as priests in some provinces since the late twentieth century. This practice remains controversial, however, and a number of provinces retain an all-male priesthood. As Anglicanism represents a broad range of theological opinion, its prebyterate includes priests who consider themselves no different in any respect from those of the Roman Catholic Church, and others who prefer to use the title presbyter in order to distance themselves from the more sacrificial theological implications which they associate with the word priest. Whilst priest is the official title of a member of the presbyterate in every Anglican province worldwide, the ordination rite of certain provinces (including the Church of England) recognizes the breadth of opinion by adopting the title The Ordination of Priests (also called Presbyters). See Reform Judaism article about its Confirmation ceremony. ... Ordination is the process in which clergy become authorized by their religious denomination and/or seminary to perform religious rituals and ceremonies. ... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ...


Dress

The dress of religious workers in ancient times may be demonstrated in frescoes and artifacts from the cultures. The dress is presumed to be related to the customary clothing of the culture, with some symbol of the deity worn on the head or held by the person. Sometimes special colors, materials, or patterns distinguishes celebrants, as the white wool veil draped on the head of the Vestal Virgins. Occasionally the celebrants at religious ceremonies shed all clothes in a symbolic gesture of purity. The retention of long skirts among many ranks of contemporary priests when they officiate may be interpreted to express the ancient traditions of the cultures from which their religious practices arose. Image of a Roman Vestal Virgin In Ancient Rome, the Vestal Virgins (sacerdos Vestalis), were the virgin holy priestesses of Vesta, the goddess of the hearth. ... A skirt is a traditionally feminine tube- or cone-shaped garment which is worn from the waist and covers the legs. ...

Some clergy and religious, such as these, who are Canons Regular of the Order of the Holy Cross and live in the Netherlands, wear distinctive clothing which distinguishes them from other clergy, whether secular or religious

In most Christian traditions, priests wear clerical clothing, a distinctive form of street dress. Even within individual traditions it varies considerably in form, depending on the specific occasion. In Western Christianity, the stiff white clerical collar has become the nearly universal feature of priestly clerical clothing, worn either with a cassock or a clergy shirt. The collar may be either a full collar or a vestigial tab displayed through a square cutout in the shirt collar. Eastern Christian priests mostly retain the traditional dress of two layers of differently cut cassock: the rasson (Greek) or podriasnik (Russian) beneath the outer exorasson (Greek) or riasa (Russian). If a pectoral cross has been awarded it is usually worn with street clothes in the Russian tradition, but not so often in the Greek tradition. Image File history File linksMetadata Kruisheren_1964_Canons_Regular_of_the_Order_Sanctae_Crucis. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Kruisheren_1964_Canons_Regular_of_the_Order_Sanctae_Crucis. ... The Canons Regular of the Order of the Holy Cross, commonly called Crosiers (a Crosier being a Cross), are a Roman Catholic religious order, of the type of Cans regular. ... Clerical clothing is non-liturgical clothing worn exclusively by clergy. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Western Christianity is a... On the right, an example of a Clerical collar. ... Clergy in Cassocks A Roman Catholic priest from Belgian Congo wearing the Roman cassock. ... A Clergy shirt is an item of clerical clothing worn by some members of the Christian clergy. ... Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions and churches which developed in Greece, Russia, Armenia, the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, northeastern Africa and southern India over several centuries of religious antiquity. ...


Distinctive clerical clothing is less often worn in modern times than formerly, and in many cases it is rare for a priest to wear it when not acting in a pastoral capacity, especially in countries that view themselves as largely secular in nature. There are frequent exceptions to this however, and many priests rarely if ever go out in public without it, especially in countries where their religion makes up a clear majority of the population. Pope John Paul II often instructed Catholic priests and religious to always wear their distinctive (clerical) clothing, unless wearing it would result in persecution or grave verbal attacks. Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of...


Christian traditions that retain the title of priest also retain the tradition of special liturgical vestments worn only during services. Vestments vary widely among the different Christian traditions. Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Methodists, Lutheran and Anglican Churches. ...


Assistant priest

An assistant priest is a priest in the Anglican and Episcopal churches who is not the senior member of clergy of the parish to which they are appointed, but is nonetheless in priests' orders; there is no difference in function or theology, merely in 'grade' or 'rank'. Some assistant priests have a "sector ministry", that is to say that they specialize in a certain area of ministry within the local church, for example youth work, hospital work, or ministry to local light industry. They may also hold some diocesan appointment part-time. In most (though not all) cases an assistant priest has the legal status of assistant curate, although it should also be noted that not all assistant curates are priests, as this legal status also applies to many deacons working as assistants in a parochial setting. From the Latin curatus (compare Curator), a curate is a person who is invested with the care, or cure (cura), of souls of a parish. ... Deacon is a role in the Christian Church which is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. ...


The corresponding term in the Roman Catholic Church is "parochial vicar" - an ordained priest assigned to assist the pastor (Latin: parochus) of a parish in the pastoral care of parishioners. Normally, all pastors are also ordained priests although occasionally an auxiliary bishop will be assigned that role.


See also

General

Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Catholic deacon...

Priestly offices of various religions and denominations

Extant

This page deals with the Hindu varnas. ... The Vedic priesthood is the collective term for the priests of the Vedic religion(similar to witch doctors of tribal africa). ... An archpriest is the title of a priest which has supervisory duties over a number of parishes. ... A hieromonk in Eastern Orthodoxy is a monk and the priest at the same time. ... In the broadest sense, a vicar (from the Latin vicarius) is anyone acting as a substitute or agent for a superior (compare vicarious). In this sense, the title is comparable to lieutenant. ... In the Community of Christ priesthood is Gods power and authority to minister in the church and to conduct Gods business on the earth. ... In the Latter Day Saint movement, priesthood is considered to be the power and authority of God, including the authority to act as a leader in the church and to perform ordinances (sacraments), and the apostolic power to perform miracles. ... The shaman is an intellectual and spiritual figure who is regarded as possessing power and influence on other peoples in the tribe and performs several functions, primarily that of a healer ( medicine man). The shaman provides medical care, and serves other community needs during crisis times, via supernatural means (means... A mobed or mobad is a Zoroastrian cleric of a particular rank. ...

Historical

This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... For other uses, see Druid (disambiguation). ... Image of a Roman Vestal Virgin In Ancient Rome, the Vestal Virgins (sacerdos Vestalis), were the virgin holy priestesses of Vesta, the goddess of the hearth. ... Alternate meanings: see Pontifex (disambiguation) In Ancient Rome, the Pontifex Maximus was the high priest of the collegium of the Pontifices, the most august position in Roman religion, open only to a patrician, until 254 BC, when a plebeian first occupied this post. ... Bust of a flamen, 3rd century, Louvre A flamen was a name given to a priest assigned to a state supported god or goddess in Roman religion. ... In ancient Greece and Anatolia a hierodule, from Greek hiero- holy and doule female slave, was a temple slave in the service of a specific deity, often with the connotation of religious prostitution. ...

Issues

Presbyterorum Ordinis, the Decree on the Ministry and Life of Priests, is one of the documents produced by the Second Vatican Council. ... The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, or Vatican II, was the twenty-first Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... In general religious use, ordination is the process by which one is consecrated (set apart for the undivided administration of various religious rites). ... A priest shortage describes the situation of a reduced number of priests in a certain area. ... In general, the term, Ritualism can be used to describe an outlook which places a great (or even exaggerated) emphasis on ritual. ... Sacerdotalism (from Latin sacerdos, priest, literally one who presents sacred offerings, sacer, sacred, and dare, to give) is a term applied (usually in a hostile sense) to the system, method, and spirit of a priestly order or class, under which the functions, dignity, and influence of the members of the...

Related

The priesthood of all believers is a Christian doctrine based on several passages of the New Testament. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A pastor is an... Clergy and other religious figures have generally represented a popular outlet for pop culture, although this has tapered in recent years. ...

External links

  • Description of the problem of Roman Catholic and Old Catholic reunion with respect to the female priesthood
  • [1] 1911 Britannica article on the priesthood

  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Priest (1511 words)
priest (sacerdos), and even a high-priest; he has chief control of the Divine worship (sacrorum antistes), is the president of liturgical meetings; he has the fullness of the priesthood, and administers all the sacraments.
priests to the cathedral church gradually became weaker, whereas it grew stronger in the case of those who served in the cathedral with the bishop (i.e.
priests to celebrate Mass at least on Sundays and holydays, while those who are charged with the care of souls are to celebrate as often as their office demands.
TOKYOPOP :: Leading the Manga Revolution for 10 Years and Beyond! :: (2815 words)
Priest is a dark and rich story that has caught the attention of countless tastemakers in America, from Hollywood execs and writers to designers and fine artists—not to mention a legion of fans.
He used to be a catholic priest in the Middle Ages where he we was a prosecutor in trials of heresy.
Priest is a series that keeps getting stronger with each volume with a story that goes into unexpected directions at the turn of a page.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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