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Encyclopedia > Pride
Emotions
Basic

Anger
Disgust
Fear
Happiness
Sadness
Surprise
Image File history File links Gnome-globe. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Merge-arrows. ... For other uses, see Honour (disambiguation). ... Look up Emotion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Emotion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the emotion. ... A woman showing disgust. ... For other uses, see Fear (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Happiness (disambiguation). ... Sadness is a mood that displays feeling of disadvantage and loss. ... For other uses, see Surprise. ...

Others

Acceptance
Affection
Ambivalence
Annoyance
Apathy
Anxiety
Awe
Boredom
Compassion
Confusion
Contempt
Curiosity
Depression
Desire
Disappointment
Doubt
Ecstasy
Empathy
Envy
Embarrassment
Euphoria
Frustration
Gratitude
Grief
Guilt
Hatred
Hope
Horror
Hostility
Hunger
Hate
Hysteria
Interest
Jealousy
Loneliness
Lust
Paranoia
Pity
Pleasure
Pride
Rage
Regret
Remorse
Revenge
Shame
Wonder
For other uses, see Acceptance (disambiguation). ... For the change in vowel and consonant quality in Celtic languages, see Affection (linguistics). ... Look up ambivalence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Annoyance is an unpleasant mental state that is characterized by such effects as irritation and distraction from ones conscious thinking. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about state anxiety. ... Boring and Bored redirect here. ... Compassion is best described as an understanding of the emotional state of another; not to be confused with empathy. ... Look up Confusion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Confusion can have the following meanings: Unclarity or puzzlement, e. ... For other uses, see Contempt (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Depression. ... Look up desire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Disappointment is the emotion felt when a strongly held expectation of something desired is not met. ... This article is about the mental state. ... This article is about informal use of the term. ... Not to be confused with Pity, Sympathy, or Compassion. ... For other uses, see Envy (disambiguation). ... Embarrassment is an unpleasant emotional state experienced upon having a socially or professionally unacceptable act or condition witnessed by or revealed to others. ... Euphoria (Greek ) is a medically recognized emotional state related to happiness. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Gratitude (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Anticipatory Grief be merged into this article or section. ... “Guilty” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hate (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hope (disambiguation). ... Horror is the feeling of revulsion that usually occurs after something frightening is seen, heard, or otherwise experienced. ... Anger is a term for the emotional aspect of aggression, as a basic aspect of the stress response in animals whereby a perceived aggravating stimulus provokes a counterresponse which is likewise aggravating and threatening of violence. ... Hunger is a feeling experienced when the glycogen level of the liver falls below a threshold, usually followed by a desire to eat. ... For other uses, see Hate (disambiguation). ... Hysteria is a diagnostic label applied to a state of mind, one of unmanageable fear or emotional excesses. ... Jealous redirects here. ... Loneliness is an emotional state in which a person experiences a powerful feeling of emptiness and isolation. ... Lust is any intense desire or craving for self gratification. ... For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Empathy, Sympathy, or Compassion. ... Look up Pleasure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Regret is an intelligent (and/or emotional) dislike for personal past acts and behaviors. ... People feel remorse when reflecting on their actions that they believe are wrong. ... For other uses, see Revenge (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Shame (disambiguation). ...

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Depiction of Pride on the south porch of Chartres Cathedral

Pride is an emotion which refers to a strong sense of self-respect, a refusal to be humiliated as well as joy in the accomplishments of oneself or a person, group, nation or object that one identifies with, or to think of one's self as being better than anyone else. According to the Concise Oxford Dictionary, Proud comes from late Old English prud, probably from Old French prude "brave, valiant" (11th century), from Latin prode "advantageous, profitable", from prodesse "be useful". The sense of "having a high opinion of oneself", not in French, may reflect the Anglo-Saxons' opinion of the Norman knights who called themselves "proud", like the French knights preux. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 756 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1512 × 1200 pixel, file size: 415 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pride Cathedral of... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 756 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1512 × 1200 pixel, file size: 415 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pride Cathedral of... The Cathedral of Chartres (Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres, French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Chartres), located in Chartres, about 50 miles (80 km) from Paris, is considered one of the finest examples in all France of the Gothic style of architecture. ... In psychology, self-esteem or self-worth is a persons self-image at an emotional level; circumventing reason and logic. ... Humiliation is literally the act of being made humble, or reduced in standing or prestige. ... Look up joy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Concise Oxford Dictionary (COD) is probably the best-known smaller Oxford dictionaries. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of modern Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300. ...


Pride is also one of the seven deadly sins, in some termonology it is said to be the worst of the seven.

Contents

Religious references

Buddhism

In Buddhism, Pride is seen as illogical as no one person or thing can be better or worse than something or someone else.


Judaism

  • Judaism, using Pride in the sense of hubris or arrogance, denounces it - the phrase "Pride goes before a fall" is a paraphrase of a passage from the book of Proverbs, in the Old Testament. Many more verses of the Tanakh/Old Testament speak of Pride and arrogance. "Blessed is that man that makes the Lord his trust, and looks not to the proud, nor to those that turn aside to lies." (Psalm 40:4) "Talk no more exceeding proudly, nor let arrogancy come out of your mouth: for the Lord is a God of knowledge, and by him actions are weighed." (I Sam. 2:3)

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the supervillain, see Barry Hubris. ... Look up Arrogance in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Pride comes before the fall. ... The Book of Proverbs is one of the books of the Ketuvim of the Tanakh and of the Writings of the Old Testament. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... For the musical collective, see Tanakh (band). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism...

Hinduism

In Hinduism, Ravana, an evil king who was killed by Rama, avatar of Vishnu, exhibited the sins of Pride and Lust. Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... A depiction of Ravana, Hindu rakshasa King of Lanka In Hinduism, Ravana (Devanagari: रावण, Telugu: రావణాసురుడు IAST ; sometimes transliterated as Raavana or Ravan or Revana) is the principal antagonist of Rama in the Hindu epic, the Ramayana. ... Rama ( in IAST, in Devanāgarī) or Ramachandra is a legendary or historical king of ancient India. ... This article is about the concept in Hindu philosophy. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ... Lust is any intense desire or craving for self gratification. ...


Christianity

In Christianity, Pride (also Vanity or arrogance) is the essentially competitive and excessive belief in one's own abilities that interferes with the individual's recognition of the grace of God, or the worth which God sees in others; for example: "In his Pride the wicked does not seek Him; in all his thoughts there is no room for God." (Psalm 10:4) Pride is also one of the seven deadly sins. (Pride, envy, lust, wrath, sloth, gluttony and greed) Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... For other uses, see Vanity (disambiguation). ... In Christianity, divine grace refers to the sovereign favour of God for humankind — especially in regard to salvation — irrespective of actions (deeds), earned worth, or proven goodness. ... For other uses, see Cardinal sin (disambiguation). ...

  • According to Sebastien Michaelis, humans are seduced by Pride by the great demon Belial, who is also known as The Lord of Arrogance.
  • Saint Thomas Aquinas wrote that "inordinate self-love is the cause of every sin." In this he followed St. Gregory.[1][2]

A woodcarving of Belial and some of his followers from Jacobus de Teramos book Buche Belial (1473) Belial (also Belhor, Baalial, Beliar, Belias , Beliall, Beliel; from Hebrew בְּלִיַּ֫עַל ; also named Matanbuchus, Mechembuchus, Meterbuchus in older scripts) is an evil being in Jewish apocrypha, and also a term used to characterise... Aquinas redirects here. ... Pope Saint Gregory I or Gregory the Great (ca. ... For other uses, see Cardinal sin (disambiguation). ... Superbia is a city-state in DC Comics continuity. ...

Taoism

In Taoism, according to the Tao Te Ching, Pride and Greed are human errors. Taoism (or Daoism) is the English name referring to a variety of related Chinese philosophical traditions and concepts. ... The Tao Te Ching (道德經, Pinyin: D Jīng, thus sometimes rendered in recent works as Dao De Jing; archaic pre-Wade-Giles rendering: Tao Teh Ching; roughly translated as The Book of the Way and its Virtue (see dedicated chapter below on translating the title)) is an ancient Chinese scripture... For other uses, see Greed (disambiguation). ...


Islam

In Islam, Pride is also forbidden. According to a narration from Muhammad, he said: "He in whose heart there is as much as a grain of arrogance will not enter paradise," and a man remarked: "A man likes his garment to be beautiful and his sandals to be beautiful." Then Muhammad replied: "God, Most High, is beautiful and likes beauty; arrogance is disdaining what is true and despising people." (Sahih Muslim). For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ...


Objectivism

Pride is one of the three Objectivist values, by which an individual perfects his virtues. It is the result of productiveness, which is free principled work to create value and meaning for your life. The Objectivist ethics is a subset of the Objectivist philosophy formulated by Ayn Rand. ... As commonly used, individual refers to a person or to any specific object in a collection. ... The Objectivist theory of Value, as proposed by Ayn Rand, explains the worth of goods and services as a relationship between intrinsic, observable attributes in nature, human knowledge of such attributes, and how such attributes can satisfy the subjective needs of humans. ...


Pride is seen as positive, the correct life-affirming attitude to have, as it celebrates one's achievements and promoted selfworth.


Nietzsche

Nietzsche saw Pride as an example of the previous, master set of morals that has been replaced with slave moralities. In this, Pride was good, because it acknowledges the good and the noble, rejecting the weak and insipid. Without pride we will remain subservient. Friedrich Nietzsche, 1882 Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 - August 25, 1900) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... Master-Slave Morality is the theme of some of Friedrich Nietzsches works, in particular the first essay of On the Genealogy of Morals. ...


Social references

In Germany "national pride" ("Nationalstolz") is often associated with the former Nazi regime. Strong displays of national pride are therefore considered poor taste by many Germans. There is an ongoing public debate about the issue of German patriotism. The World Cup in 2006, held in Germany, saw a wave of patriotism sweep the country in a manner not seen for many years. Although many were hesitant to show such blatant support as the hanging of the national flag from windows, as the team progressed through the tournament, so too did the level of support across the nation. By the time the semi-final against Italy came around, the level of national pride and unity was at its highest throughout the tournament, and the hosting of the World Cup is seen to have been a great success for Germany as a nation.[citation needed] Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... Defence of the fatherland is a commonplace of patriotism: The statue in the courtyard of École polytechnique, Paris, commemorating the students involvement in defending France against the 1814 invasion of the Coalition. ... The 2006 FIFA World Cup was the 18th staging of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international association football world championship tournament. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... First international Switzerland 5 - 3 Germany (Basel, Switzerland; 5 April 1908) Biggest win Germany 16 - 0 Russia (Solna, Sweden; July 1, 1912) Biggest defeat England amateur 9 - 0 Germany (Oxford, England; 16 March 1909) World Cup Appearances 16 (First in 1934) Best result - Winners, 1954, 1974, 1990 European Championship Appearances...


Secondary pride

Secondary pride is a little-known but often felt variant of pride. The pride people feel for what their ancestors, children, or country has done is classified as secondary or vicarious pride.[citation needed]


Other

The national motto of the United States Virgin Islands is "United in Pride and Hope".


The well-known English maxim, "Pride goes before a fall," is itself an adaptation of Proverbs 16:18. The Book of Proverbs is one of the books of the Ketuvim of the Tanakh and of the Writings of the Old Testament. ...


References

  1. ^   "Pride". Catholic Encyclopedia. (1913). New York: Robert Appleton Company. 
  2. ^ Online Library of Liberty - QUESTION CLXII.: OF PRIDE. - Aquinas Ethicus: or, the Moral Teaching of St. Thomas, vol. 2 (Summa Theologica - Secunda Secundae Pt.2)

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Not to be confused with New Catholic Encyclopedia. ...

See also

  • Lions "Group Organization"
White Aryan Resistance member wearing a white pride t-shirt White pride is a slogan used primarily in the United States (though its usage has spread internationally) to promote the glorification of the heritage of persons of White-European racial identity[1]—though generally to the exclusion of homosexuals and... Black pride is a slogan used interchangeably to depict both the movement of and concept within politically active black communities, especially African Americans in the United States and secluding White communities. ... Asian pride is a slogan used by some Asian people who are proud of their heritage. ... Front line of Gay Pride parade in Paris, France; June 2005 Gay pride or LGBT pride refers to a world wide movement and philosophy asserting that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals should be proud of their sexual orientation and gender identity. ... This article is about narcissism as a word in common use. ... For other uses, see Cardinal sin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Vanity (disambiguation). ... An example of victory disease and its catastrophic results: Napoleons retreat from Moscow, painted by Adolph Northen in the 19th century Victory disease afflicts military commanders and armies who after victories, become weak and susceptible to defeat. ... For the medieval saint of the same name, see Saint Humility. ... Binomial name Panthera leo (Linnaeus, 1758) The Lion (Panthera leo) is a mammal of the family Felidae. ... Look up Emotion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Emotion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the emotion. ... A woman showing disgust. ... For other uses, see Fear (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Happiness (disambiguation). ... Sadness is a mood that displays feeling of disadvantage and loss. ... For other uses, see Surprise. ... Alertness is the the process of paying close and continuous attention. ... For other uses, see Acceptance (disambiguation). ... For the change in vowel and consonant quality in Celtic languages, see Affection (linguistics). ... Look up ambivalence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Angst (disambiguation). ... Annoyance is an unpleasant mental state that is characterized by such effects as irritation and distraction from ones conscious thinking. ... Anticipation is an emotion involving pleasure (and sometimes anxiety) in considering some expected or longed-for good event, or irritation at having to wait. ... This article is about state anxiety. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Resentment is an emotion, from ressentiment, a French word, meaning malice, anger, being rancorous. The English word has the sense of feeling bitter. ... Boring and Bored redirect here. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Compassion is best described as an understanding of the emotional state of another; not to be confused with empathy. ... For other uses, see Contempt (disambiguation). ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Severe confusion of a degree considered pathological usually refers to loss of orientation (ability to place oneself correctly in the world by time, location, and personal identity), and often memory (ability to correctly recall previous events or learn new materal). ... For other uses, see Depression. ... Disappointment is the emotion felt when a strongly held expectation of something desired is not met. ... This article is about the mental state. ... This article is about informal use of the term. ... Embarrassment is an unpleasant emotional state experienced upon having a socially or professionally unacceptable act or condition witnessed by or revealed to others. ... For other uses, see Emptiness (disambiguation). ... Enthusiasm (Greek: enthousiasmos) originally meant inspiration or possession by a divine afflatus or by the presence of a God. ... For other uses, see Envy (disambiguation). ... This article is about a feeling, for other meanings see epiphany (disambiguation). ... Euphoria (Greek ) is a medically recognized emotional state related to happiness. ... Fanaticism is an emotion of being filled with excessive, uncritical zeal, particularly for an extreme religious or political cause, or with an obsessive enthusiasm for a pastime or hobby. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gratification is the positive emotional response (happiness) to a fulfillment of desire. ... For other uses, see Gratitude (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Anticipatory Grief be merged into this article or section. ... “Guilty” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hate (disambiguation). ... Homesickness is generally described as a feeling of longing for ones familiar surroundings. ... For other uses, see Hope (disambiguation). ... Horror is the feeling of revulsion that usually occurs after something frightening is seen, heard, or otherwise experienced. ... Etymology: Late Latin humiliatus, past participle of humiliare, from Latin humilis low. ... Inspiration in artistic composition refers to an irrational and unconscious burst of creativity. ... Jealous redirects here. ... Look up Limerence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Loneliness is an emotional state in which a person experiences a powerful feeling of emptiness and isolation. ... For other uses, see Love (disambiguation). ... Lust is any intense desire or craving for self gratification. ... Melancholy redirects here. ... Panic is the primal urge to run and hide in the face of imminent danger. ... Patience, engraving by Hans Sebald Beham, 1540 Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: patience Patience is the ability to endure waiting, delay, or provocation without becoming annoyed or upset, or to persevere calmly when faced with difficulties. ... Not to be confused with Empathy, Sympathy, or Compassion. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Regret is an intelligent (and/or emotional) dislike for personal past acts and behaviors. ... People feel remorse when reflecting on their actions that they believe are wrong. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Righteous indignation is an emotion one feels when one gets angry over perceived mistreatment, insult, or malice. ... Look up Schadenfreude in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses, see Shame (disambiguation). ... In humans, shyness is the feeling of apprehension or lack of confidence experienced in regard to social association with others, e. ... ... Suffering, or pain in this sense,[1] is a basic affective experience of unpleasantness and aversion associated with harm or threat of harm in an individual. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia4U - Pride - Encyclopedia Article (227 words)
In Christian dogma, pride (or vanity) is excessive belief in one's own abilities, that interferes with the individual's recognition of the grace of God.
In English, the term "pride" also has a more positive sense referring to self-respect, refusal to be humiliated, and joy in one's accomplishments.
Even outside a religious environment, pride may constitute a weakness in an individual, since somebody who is proud is likely to be far more affected by public humiliation or defeat than somebody who is humble.
Pride - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (566 words)
Pride refers to a strong sense of self-respect, a refusal to be humiliated as well as joy in the accomplishments of oneself or a person, group, or object that one identifies with.
In Christianity, pride (or vanity or arrogance) is the essentially competitive and excessive belief in one's own abilities that interferes with the individual's recognition of the grace of God, or the worth which God sees in others.
The pride people feel for what their ancestors, children, or country has done is classified as secondary or vicarious pride.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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