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Encyclopedia > Priam
King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora

In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. Modern scholars derive his name from the Luwian compound Priimuua, which means "exceptionally courageous".[1] Image File history File links DE003722. ... Image File history File links DE003722. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... For the 1997 film, see Trojan War (film). ... In Greek mythology, Laomedon was a Trojan king and father of Ganymedes, Priam, Astyoche, Lampus, Hicetaon, Clytius, Cilla, Aethylla, and Hesione. ... Luwian (sometimes spelled Luwiyan) is an Anatolian language known in three forms: (1) Cuneiform Luwian, (2) Hieroglyphic-Luwian and (3), the somewhat later Lycian. ...

Contents

Marriage and issue

See List of King Priam's children

Priam had a number of wives; his first was Arisbe, who had given birth to his son Aesacus, who met a tragic death before the advent of the Trojan War. Priam later divorced her in favor of Hecuba (or Hecebe), daughter of the Phrygian king Dymas. By his various wives and concubines Priam was the father of fifty sons and several daughters. Hector was Priam's eldest son by Hecuba, and heir to the Trojan throne. Paris, another son, was the cause of the Trojan War. Other children of Priam and Hecuba include the prophetic Helenus and Cassandra; Deiphobus; Troilus; Polites; Creusa, wife of Aeneas; Laodice, wife of Helicaon; Polyxena, who was slaughtered on the grave of Achilles; and Polydorus, his youngest son. The following is a list of the known children of the trojan king Priam. ... In Greek mythology, Arisbe was a daughter of Merops of Percote, a seer. ... Aesacus or Aisakos in Greek mythology was a son of King Priam of Troy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Phrygian can refer to: A person from Phrygia The Phrygian language This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... In Greek mythology, Dymas is the name of at least four characters. ... See List of King Priams children Hector brought back to Troy. ... Statue of Paris in the British Museum This article is about the prince of Troy. ... Helenus was a Trojan soldier in the Trojan War. ... For other uses, see Cassandra (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Deiphobus was a son of Priam and Hecuba. ... Troilus is a character in medieval and Renaissance versions of the legend of the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Polites referred to two different people. ... In Greek mythology, four people had the name Creusa. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... In Greek mythology, the name Laodice referred to different people but most importantly the wife of Telephus and the Queen of Mysia. ... In Greek mythology Helicaon is the son of Antenor and Theano. ... For the Christian Saint, please see Acts of Xanthippe, Polyxena, and Rebecca Polyxena dies by the hand of Neoptolemus on the tomb of Achilles. ... In Greek mythology, Polydorus referred to three different people. ...


Life

Priam was originally called Podarces and he kept himself from being killed by Heracles by giving him a golden veil embroidered by his sister, Hesione. After this, Podarces changed his name to Priam. This is an etymology based on priatos "ransomed"; the actual etymology of the name is probably not Greek, but perhaps Lydian in origin. In Greek mythology, Podarces was a son of Iphicles. ... Hercules, a Roman bronze (Louvre Museum) For other uses, see Heracles (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, the most prominent Hesione was a Trojan princess, daughter of King Laomedon of Troy, sister of Priam and second wife of King Telamon of Salamis. ... Lydian was an Indo-European language, one of the Anatolian languages, that was spoken in the city-state of Lydia in Anatolia, present day Turkey. ...


When Hector is killed by Achilles, Achilles treats the body with disrespect and refuses to give it back. Zeus sends the god Hermes to escort King Priam, Hector’s father and the ruler of Troy, into the Achaean camp. Priam tearfully pleads with Achilles to take pity on a father bereft of his son and return Hector’s body. He invokes the memory of Achilles’ own father, Peleus. Deeply moved, Achilles finally relents and returns Hector’s corpse to the Trojans. Both sides agree to a temporary truce, and Hector receives a hero’s funeral. Achilles further goes on to give Priam leave to hold a proper funeral for Hector complete with funeral games. He promises that no Greek will engage in combat for 11 days, but on the 12th day of peace, the mighty war between the Greeks and the Trojans, would resume See List of King Priams children Hector brought back to Troy. ... The Wrath of Achilles, by François-Léon Benouville (1821–1859) (Musée Fabre) In Greek mythology, Achilles (also Akhilleus or Achilleus) (Ancient Greek: ) was a hero of the Trojan War, the central character and greatest warrior of Homers Iliad, which takes for its theme, not the War... Peleus consigns Achilles to Chirons care, white-ground lekythos by the Edinburgh Painter, ca. ...


In later literature

Priam's Treasure which Schliemann claimed to have found at Troy.

In the sack of Troy, Priam was brutally murdered by Achilles's son Neoptolemus (also known in the Aeneid as Pyrrhus), in a scene memorialized both in Virgil's Aeneid and Shakespeare's Hamlet. In said stories, Neoptolemus stormed into the palace of Priam and proceeded to make his way to Priam's chamber. After killing Polites, one of the many sons of Priam, Neoptolemus stabbed Priam in the side with his sword and inserted the blade up to the hilt. In Hamlet Shakespeare particularly mentions Pyrrhus (Neoptolemus) pausing before killing Priam (i.e. killing him deliberately in cold blood). Image File history File links Priams_treasure. ... Image File history File links Priams_treasure. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Heinrich Schliemann (January 6, 1822 - December 26, 1890) was a German archaeologist, born at Neu Buckow, in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, the son of a poor pastor. ... Looting (which derives via the Hindi lut from Sanskrit lung, to rob), sacking, plundering, or pillaging is the indiscriminate taking of goods by force as part of a military or political victory, or during a catastrophe or riot, such as during war,[1] natural disaster,[2] or rioting. ... Neoptolemus killing Priam In Greek mythology, Neoptolemus, also Neoptólemos or Pyrrhus, was the son of the warrior Achilles and the princess Deidamea. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos): is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE (between 29 and 19 BCE) that tells the legendary story... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos): is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE (between 29 and 19 BCE) that tells the legendary story... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Hamlet and Horatio in the cemetery by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ...


In the Prose Edda, Snorri Sturluson claimed that Priam was the ancestor of a race that migrated to Scandinavia and served as a basis for the Aesir. The Younger Edda, known also as the Prose Edda or Snorris Edda is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. ... Snorri Sturluson (1178 – September 23, 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet and politician. ... Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe which includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ... The Aesir (Old Norse Æsir, singular Áss, feminine Ásynja, feminine plural Ásynjur) are the principal pantheon of gods in Norse mythology. ...


In popular culture

Peter O'Toole plays Priam in the 2004 movie Troy as a good king and father, who is killed by Agamemnon in the gardens of Troy during the sacking towards the movie's end. Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932, accepted but presumed date[5]) is an eight-time Academy Award-nominated Irish actor. ... Troy is an Oscar-nominated movie released on May 14, 2004 about the Trojan War, as described in Homers Iliad, Virgils Aeneid, and other Greek myths. ... The so-called Mask of Agamemnon. Discovered by Heinrich Schliemann in 1876 at Mycenae. ...


In Dark Mirror, a Star Trek novel taking place in the Mirror Universe, Priam has a much darker fate - as he is begging for the release of Hector's body for the burial rites, Achilles kills him in cold blood. Dark Mirror may refer to: Dark Mirror (Star Trek novel) Syphon Filter: Dark Mirror, a 2006 PlayStation Portable video game. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... In the Star Trek television series, the Mirror Universe is an alternate reality. ...


He is referenced in the movie Scream 2. Scream 2 is a 1997 film, the second part of the Scream trilogy. ...


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The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Diós), is... Jupiter et Thétis - by Jean Ingres, 1811. ... The Pleiade, or Oceanid, Electra of Greek mythology was one of the seven daughters of Atlas and Pleione. ... In Greek mythology, King Teucer (also Teucrus) was said to have been the son of the river Scamander and of the nymph Idaea. ... In Greek mythology, Dardanus (burner up) was a son of Zeus by Electra, daughter of Atlas, and founder of the city of Dardania on Mount Ida in the Troad. ... Batea (also spelled Bateia) is a figure in Greek mythology said to be the daughter or (less commonly) the aunt of King Teucer, ruler of a tribe known as the Teucrians (Teucri). ... Ilus is the name of several mythological/homeric persons associated directly or indirectly with Troy. ... The mythical King Erichthonius of Dardania and Batia (died c. ... In Greek mythology, King Tros of Dardania, son of Erichthonius from whom he inherited the throne and the father of three named sons: Ilus, Assaracus, and Ganymedes. ... Ilus is the name of several mythological/homeric persons associated directly or indirectly with Troy. ... In Greek mythology, Assaracus was the second son of King Tros of Dardania. ... In Greek mythology, Laomedon was a Trojan king and father of Ganymedes, Priam, Astyoche, Lampus, Hicetaon, Clytius, Cilla, Aethylla, and Hesione. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub ... In Greek mythology, Capys was a son of Assaracus and Aigesta or Themiste or Clytodora (daughter of Laomedon) and father of Anchises and so grandfather of Aeneas. ... Aeneas Bearing Anchises from Troy, by Carle van Loo, 1729 (Louvre) In Greek mythology, Anchises was a son of Capys and Themiste (daughter of Ilus, son of Tros) or Hieromneme, a naiad. ... For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... Latinus or Latinos in Greek mythology, in Hesiods Theogony, was the son of Odysseus and Circe who ruled the Tyrsenoi, that is the Etruscans, with his brothers Agrius and Telegonus. ... In Greek mythology, four people had the name Creusa. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... In Roman mythology, Lavinia was the daughter of Latinus and Amata. ... Ascanius Hunting the Stag of Silvia, by Claude Lorrain (1682). ... Silvius has several meanings: In Roman mythology, Silvius was the son of Aeneas and Lavinia. ... Aeneas Silvius was the third descndant of Aeneas and third king of Alba Longa, the site of Rome. ... Brutus of Troy, also of Britain (Welsh: Bryttys), was the legendary founding king of Britain and great grandson of Aeneas, according to Italy for the accidental killing of his natural father Silvius, Brutus liberated a group of Trojans living in slavery in Greece and led them forth, received a vision... Latinius Silvius was the fourth descendant of Aeneas and fourth king of Alba Longa (according to Livy). ... Alba in roman mythology is a son of Latinus Silvius and the fifth king of Alba Longa (Ovid, Metamorphoses, ХIV 612; Livy, І, 3). ... In Greek mythology, Capys was a son of Assaracus and Aigesta or Themiste or Clytodora (daughter of Laomedon) and father of Anchises and so grandfather of Aeneas. ... Capetus was a descendant of Aeneas. ... Tiberinus Silvius (the Tibers child born in the woods) was the ninth in the legendary king-list of the city Alba Longa in Lazio. ... Agrippa was a descendant of Aeneas and therefore a king of Alba Longa. ... Romulus Silvius was a descendant of Aeneas, and because of this a king of Alba Longa. ... Aventinus, one of the mythical kings of Alba Longa, who was buried on the Aventine Hill later named after him. ... In Roman mythology, King Procas of Alba Longa was the father of Amulius and Numitor. ... In Roman mythology, King Numitor of Alba Longa, son of Procas, was the father of Rhea Silvia. ... In Roman mythology, Amulius was the brother of Numitor and son of Procas. ... Rhea Silvia (also written as Rea Silvia), and also known as Ilia, was the mythical mother of the twins Romulus and Remus, who founded the city of Rome. ... In Greek mythology, Ares (Ancient Greek: , modern Greek Άρης [pron. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and a magical flower (or Jupiter). ... In Roman mythology, Hersilia was the wife of Romulus. ... This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ... This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law The King of Rome (Latin: rex, regis) was the chief magistrate of the Roman Kingdom. ...

References

  1. ^ Starke, Frank. "Troia im Kontext des historisch-politischen und sprachlichen Umfeldes Kleinasiens im 2. Jahrtausend". // Studia Troica, 1997, 7, 447-87.

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