FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > President of Argentina
Argentina

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Argentina
Image File history File links COA_of_Argentina. ... This article is about the political institutions and political parties of Argentina. ...



Other countries · Atlas
 Politics Portal
view  talk  edit

The President of Argentina (full title: President of the Argentine Nation, Spanish: Presidente de la Nación Argentina) is the head of state of Argentina. Under the national Constitution, the President is also the chief executive of the federal government and Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces. Néstor Kirchner, full name Néstor Carlos Kirchner Ostoić (born 25 February 1950), is the President of Argentina, sworn in on May 25, 2003. ... Cristina Elisabet Fernández de Kirchner (born February 19, 1953 as Cristina Elisabet Fernández), usually known as Cristina Kirchner, is an Argentine politician from the Justicialist Party. ... The National Congress ( Spanish: Congreso de la Nación Argentina) is the legislative branch of the government of Argentina. ... The Argentine Senate is the upper house of parliament in Argentina. ... The Chamber of Deputies is the lower house of the National Congress, Argentinas parliament. ... This article lists political parties in Argentina. ... The Justicialist Party (Spanish: Partido Justicialista, PJ) is a Peronist political party in Argentina, and the largest component of the Peronist movement. ... The Radical Civic Union (in Spanish, Unión Cívica Radical, UCR) is a political party in Argentina. ... This articles gives information on voting, elections and election results in Argentina. ... Argentina held national parliamentary elections on Sunday, 23 October 2005. ... Argentina will hold national presidential and legislative elections on 28 October 2007 to elect a president and for the Argentine Congress. ... The Supreme Court of Argentina (in Spanish, Corte Suprema de Justicia de la Nación) is the highest court of law of the Argentine Republic. ... Argentina is subdivided in 23 provinces (Spanish: provincias, singular - provincia) and 1 federal district (capital federal). ... Departments (Spanish: departamentos) form the second level of administrative division in the provinces of Argentina. ... This article deals with the diplomatic affairs, foreign policy and international relations of Argentina. ... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... For the comedy film of the same name, see Head of State (film). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Constitution of Argentina The Constitution of Argentina is one of the primary sources of law in Argentina. ... The head of government is the chief officer of the executive branch of a government, often presiding over a cabinet. ... This article is about the political institutions and political parties of Argentina. ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... Alternate cover US 1979 and 2002 reissue cover, also known as paint spatter cover For the military meaning, see Armed forces. ...


Through Argentine history, the office of the Head of State has undergone many changes, both in its title as in its features and powers. The current President is Néstor Kirchner, who was inaugurated in his office on May 25, 2003. Upon the end of his term, his wife, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner will assume the presidential office on Monday December 10, 2007. She declared victory on Sunday, October 28, 2007. Néstor Kirchner, full name Néstor Carlos Kirchner Ostoić (born 25 February 1950), is the President of Argentina, sworn in on May 25, 2003. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cristina Elisabet Fernández de Kirchner (born February 19, 1953 as Cristina Elisabet Fernández), usually known as Cristina Kirchner, is an Argentine politician from the Justicialist Party. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Contents

Features of the office

Requirements

Outgoing President Néstor Kirchner during his inauguration
Presidential flag of Argentina.

Article 89 of the Argentine Constitution establishes the requirements one must meet in order to become President. The President must be a natural-born citizen of the country, or have been born to Argentine citizens, in the case of being born abroad. The remaining requirements, the article establishes, are the same requirements for becoming a Senator. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1311x1999, 264 KB) Buenos Aires, 25/5/2003 (Agência Brasil - ABr) - O novo presidente da Argentina Néstor Kirchner, empossado hoje em cerimônia com a presença de vários presidentes latino-americanos. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1311x1999, 264 KB) Buenos Aires, 25/5/2003 (Agência Brasil - ABr) - O novo presidente da Argentina Néstor Kirchner, empossado hoje em cerimônia com a presença de vários presidentes latino-americanos. ... Néstor Kirchner, full name Néstor Carlos Kirchner Ostoić (born 25 February 1950), is the President of Argentina, sworn in on May 25, 2003. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (900 × 900 pixels, file size: 230 KB, MIME type: image/png) bandera presidencial de argentina, basado en Imagen:COA of Argentina. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (900 × 900 pixels, file size: 230 KB, MIME type: image/png) bandera presidencial de argentina, basado en Imagen:COA of Argentina. ... A natural-born citizen is a special term mentioned in the United States Constitution as a requirement for eligibility to serve as President or Vice President of the United States. ... The Argentine Senate is the upper house of parliament in Argentina. ...


Before the last constitutional amendment of 1994, another requirement was that the President had to be a baptized Roman Catholic, but it is no longer in force. The 1994 reform to the Argentine Constitution was approved on 22 August, as a result of the Olivos Pact between by that time president of Argentina Carlos Saúl Menem, and the former president and leader of the opposition Raúl Alfonsín. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ...


Presidential Elections

The current method for electing the President is by popular vote. The former method (established by the Constitution in 1853 and re-established by the amendment of 1957) was of election by means of an Electoral College. The amendment of 1949 established popular election for the first time, and the last amendment of 1994 re-established it. This article is about Electoral Colleges in general. ...


Presidential powers

Among the most important powers of the President, are the faculties of managing the country's foreign relations, present law proposals to Congress, appoint members of the Supreme Court and issue presidential decrees. The National Congress ( Spanish: Congreso de la Nación Argentina) is the legislative branch of the government of Argentina. ... The Supreme Court of Argentina (in Spanish, Corte Suprema de Justicia de la Nación) is the highest court of law of the Argentine Republic. ... Decree is an order that has the force of law. ...


Former faculties included appointing the full of the federal judiciary (amended in 1994) and appointing Roman Catholic bishops (a power which was resigned by the signing of a concordat with the Holy See in 1966). After the establishment of Buenos Aires as federal capital city in 1880, it was a power of the President to appoint the Mayor of the city. This power was lost when, in the constitutional amendment of 1994, it was established that the capital city's citizens would elect their own authorities, which was done in 1996 with the first Mayor election. Catholic Church redirects here. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... A concordat is an agreement between the pope and a government or sovereign on religious matters. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ...


Term duration

Under the last constitutional amendment (1994), the President serves for four years, with a possibility of reelection for one more term. Reelection is when someone runs for election after already being elected once, and already having served out their first term. ...


Under the original text of 1853, the President served for six years, with no possibility of reelection. In the 1949 amendment, reelection for an indefinite number of terms was enabled (and disabled again in the 1957 amendment), and the authorities from the 1966 military coup promulgated a resolution establishing terms of four years during the 1970s (terms which were never completed because of the political instability of those days).


There had also been cases where the departing president shortened the duration of his or her term by some months, to provide for a more "serene" departure, making the next elected president be inaugurated earlier in office. This happened in the transition from Raúl Alfonsín to Carlos Menem in 1989, and from Eduardo Duhalde to Néstor Kirchner in 2003. Raúl Ricardo Alfonsín (born 13 March 1927) is an Argentine politician, who was the President of Argentina from 10 December 1983 to 9 July 1989. ... Carlos Saúl Menem (born July 2, 1930) was President of Argentina from July 8, 1989 to December 10, 1999 for the Justicialist Party (Peronist) very infamous and criticized due corruption and his dubious handling of the investigations of the 1992 Israeli Embassy bombing and the 1994 bombing of the... Eduardo Alberto Duhalde Maldonado (born October 5, 1941) is a former president of Argentina. ... Néstor Kirchner, full name Néstor Carlos Kirchner Ostoić (born 25 February 1950), is the President of Argentina, sworn in on May 25, 2003. ...


Succession

The Constitution establishes in Article 88 that in case of death, resignation or destitution of the President, the office is exercised by the Vice-President for the rest of the term. In the case there is no Vice-President, the Congress decides on the succession. A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ...


The current succession mechanism is established by law of Congress, and establishes that the Provisional President of the Senate assumes as acting head of the executive branch, and in a few days the Congress assembles and elects a more permanent successor. It is also decided by Congress whether the elected President exercises the office for the rest of the term, or if early elections are called.


Presidential symbols and residence

The. most important presidential symbols are the presidential sash and the presidential cane. The sash symbolizes continuity of the office, as the departing President takes it off and puts it on the inaugurating President, and has the colours of the Argentine flag. The cane symbolizes presidential power, and is a different cane for each holder of the office, usually manufactured by a prestigious goldsmith, although it is common for a President to choose to be inaugurated with the same cane of an illustrious former President. A presidential sash is a cloth sash worn by the presidents of many nations in the world. ... A goldsmith creating a new ring A goldsmith is a metalworker who specializes in working with precious metals, usually to make jewelry. ...

La Casa Rosada (The "Pink House")

The presidential figure is associated with two famous residences: the Casa Rosada ("Pink House") and the Residencia Presidencial de Olivos ("Olivos Presidential Residence"). The Casa Rosada is the effective seat of government, located at the address of Balcarce 50, in the city of Buenos Aires centre. The Quinta, located in Olivos, province of Buenos Aires, is the residence of the President and his or her family. Image File history File links CasaRosada3. ... Image File history File links CasaRosada3. ... The Casa Rosada La Casa Rosada (Spanish for the Pink House), officially known as the Casa de Gobierno (Government House), is the official seat of the executive branch of the government of Argentina. ... The Casa Rosada La Casa Rosada (Spanish for the Pink House), officially known as the Casa de Gobierno (Government House), is the official seat of the executive branch of the government of Argentina. ... For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... Olivos is a locality of Vicente López in the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. ... The Buenos Aires province (IPA: , Spanish: Provincia de Buenos Aires) is the wealthiest and most populated province of Argentina. ...


Some newer presidential symbols, which do not yet qualify as traditional, are the presidential planes and helicopter. The most famous presidential airplane, known as "Tango 01" (a simile of U.S. Air Force One, owes its name to the denomination of T (pronounced tango in the NATO alphabet) for Transport, which creates an interesting word-game for the Argentine classical Tango music, known all over the world. The presidential helicopter is the usual mean of transport for the daily trip between the Quinta de Olivos and the Casa Rosada, and the other way round. The Agrupación Aérea Presidencial (Spanish for Presidential Air Group) is the Head of State Air Transport Unit of Argentina. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... For the current aircraft, see Boeing VC-25. ... FAA radiotelephony phonetic alphabet and Morse code chart. ... Tango is a style of music that originated among European immigrant populations of Argentina and Uruguay. ...


History of the Head of State office

Pre-autonomous government

The origins of Argentina as a nation can be traced to 1776, when the territory of the country was separated, by the Spanish King decision, from the existing Viceroyalty of Peru, creating the new Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata. The Head of State continued to be the King, but it was represented locally by the designated Viceroy. These Viceroys where seldom natural-born in the country, so this period if considered of colonial dependence to Spain. The Spanish monarchy, referred to as the Crown of Spain (Corona de España) in the Spanish Constitution of 1978, is the office of the King or Queen of Spain. ... Created in 1542, the Viceroyalty of Peru (in Spanish, Virreinato del Perú) contained most of Spanish-ruled South America until the creation of the separate viceroyalties of New Granada (now Colombia, Ecuador, Panamá and Venezuela, the last-named previously in the Viceroyalty of New Spain) in 1717 and Río... Created in 1776, the Viceroyalty of La Plata (in Spanish, Virreinato del Río de la Plata) was the last and most shortlived viceroyalty created by Spain. ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... A viceroy is a royal official who governs a country or province in the name of and as representative of the monarch. ...


Early autonomous government

With the Revolution in Buenos Aires on May 25, 1810, the first autonomous government, was formed by locals and was known as the Primera Junta. It was later known as the Junta Grande when representatives from the provinces joined it. These early attempts of self-government where succeeded by two triumvirates, and, although the first juntas had their President, the King of Spain was still regarded as Head of State (as independence had not yet been declared), and the executive power was not still in the hands of a single person. For other uses, see Buenos Aires (disambiguation). ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... An autonomous (subnational) entity is a subnational entity that has a certain amount of autonomy. ... The First Junta or Primera Junta was the first goverment that appeared in Argentina after the May Revolution. ... The Junta Grande was the executive government in Argentina, created by the First Junta. ... The term triumvirate is commonly used to describe a political regime dominated by three powerful political and/or military leaders. ...


This power began to be vested on one man when the figure of Director was created in the 1813 National Assembly. The different Directors became Head of State after Independence was declared in 1816, but they were not yet the head of a presidential system. A presidential system, also called a congressional system, is a system of government where an executive branch exists and presides (hence the term) separately from the legislature, to which it is not accountable and which cannot in normal circumstances dismiss it. ...


The Constitution of 1819

In 1819 the Congress assembled that had declared Independence, composed a Constitution. It established an executive figure, named Supreme Director, which was vested with presidential powers. This constitution was of unitarian style, and gave the Supreme Director the additional power of appointing the Governors of the provinces. This constitution, however, because of political circumstances, never came into force, and central power was dissolved, leaving the country as a federation of provinces. For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... A province is a territorial unit, almost always a country subdivision. ... A map displaying todays federations. ...


The Constitution of 1826

A new constitutional drafting attempt was made in 1826. This constitution was the first to create the figure of President, although this office retained the unitarian powers described in the 1819 attempt. This constitution came into force, resulting in the election of the first President, Bernardino Rivadavia. Due to problems related to the Argentina-Brazil War, Rivadavia resigned after a short time, and the office was dissolved shortly after. Bernardino de la Trinidad Gónzalez Rivadavia y Rivadavia (Buenos Aires May 20, 1780 - 1845) was the first president of Argentina, from February 8, 1826 to July 7, 1827. ... Combatants Brazilian Empire United Provinces of the Río de la Plata (present Uruguay and Argentina) Commanders Pedro I of Brazil Rodrigo Pinto Guedes Marquis of Barbacena Juan Antonio Lavalleja Bernardino Rivadavia Francis Drummond Carlos María de Alvear The Argentina-Brazil War (Portuguese: Guerra da Cisplatina; Spanish: Guerra del...


The Civil war

A civil war between unitarios (unitarians, i. e. Buenos Aires centralists) and federales (federalists) ensued in the following decades. In this period, there was no central authority, and the closest figure to that was the Chairman of Foreign Relations, a title often vested on the Governor of the Province of Buenos Aires. The last to bear this title was Juan Manuel de Rosas, who in the last years of his governorship was elected as Supreme Chief of the Confederation, gaining the effective rule of the rest of the country. Unitarists (Spanish Unitarios) was the name under which the liberal concept of a centralised government in Buenos Aires was known, during the years of civil war, short after the Declaration of Independence of Argentina in 1816, and opposed to the Federalism. ... Federales was the name under which the supporters of federalism in Argentina were known, opposing the Unitarios that pretended a centralised government of Buenos Aires Province, with no participation of the other provinces of the custom taxes benefits of the Buenos Aires port. ... General de Rosas Juan Manuel de Rosas (born Juan Manuel José Domingo Ortiz de Rozas y López de Osornio, 1793-1877) was a conservative Argentine politician who ruled Argentina from 1829 to 1852. ...


The Constitution of 1853

In 1852 Rosas was deposed, and a constitutional convention was summoned. This new constitution, still in force to this date, established a national federal government, with the office of the President as is known today. The term was fixed to six years, with no possibility of reelection. The first elected President in this fashion was Justo José de Urquiza. After a brief dissolution of the office in 1860, the succession of Presidents ran smoothly into the 20th century, until it was interrupted by several coups d'état, creating a line of elected presidents mixed with de facto ones. Justo José de Urquiza y García (October 18, 1801 â€“ April 11, 1870) was an Argentine general and politician. ... Coup redirects here. ...


Military presidents

Beginning in 1930, and later in 1943, 1955, 1963, 1966 and 1976, different military coups deposed the current President, elected by constitutional means. In the cases of 1966 and 1976, federal government was undertaken by a military junta, where power was shared by the chiefs of the three armed forces. In 1963, government wasn't undertaken by the military, but by the President of the Senate, and in the other cases, and also after the dissolution of the Juntas previously mentioned, a military chief assumed under the title of President. A military junta is government by a committee of military leaders. ...


It is subject of debate whether these military presidents can be titled Presidents at all, as it raises issues about the legitimacy of their respective governments. The position of the current Argentine government is that military Presidents Leopoldo Fortunato Galtieri and Jorge Rafael Videla were explicitly not legitimate presidents. They, and their interim successors were denied the right to a presidential pension after the conclusion of their terms. The status of earlier military presidents, however, remains more uncertain. President Galtieri Leopoldo Fortunato Galtieri Castelli (July 15, 1926 - January 12, 2003) was an Argentinian general and dictator. ... Jorge Rafael Videla Redondo (born August 21, 1925 in Mercedes, Buenos Aires) was the de facto President of Argentina from 1976 to 1981. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Statistics

Juan Domingo Perón (October 8, 1895 – July 1, 1974) was an Argentine general and politician, elected three times as President of Argentina and serving from 1946 to 1955 and from 1973 to 1974. ... Alejo Julio Argentino Roca Paz (July 17, 1843 - October 19, 1914) was an army general who served as President of Argentina from 12 October 1880 to 12 October 1886 and again from 12 October 1898 to 12 October 1904. ... Carlos Saúl Menem (born July 2, 1930) was President of Argentina from July 8, 1989 to December 10, 1999 for the Justicialist Party (Peronist) very infamous and criticized due corruption and his dubious handling of the investigations of the 1992 Israeli Embassy bombing and the 1994 bombing of the... Bernardino de la Trinidad Gónzalez Rivadavia y Rivadavia (Buenos Aires May 20, 1780 - 1845) was the first president of Argentina, from February 8, 1826 to July 7, 1827. ... Justo José de Urquiza y García (October 18, 1801 â€“ April 11, 1870) was an Argentine general and politician. ... Bartolomé Mitre Martínez (1821-1906) was an Argentine statesman, military figure, and author. ... Pedro Eugenio Aramburu Cilveti (May 21, 1903 – June 1, 1970) was a de facto president of Argentina from November 13, 1955 to May 1, 1958. ... General José Félix Benito Uriburu y Uriburu (1868 - 1932) was President of Argentina from September 6, 1930 to February 20, 1932. ... Reynaldo Benito Antonio Bignone Ramayón (born January 21, 1928) is a former Argentine general and the de facto president of the country from July 1, 1982 to December 10, 1983. ... President Perón giving a speech María Estela Martínez de Perón (born on February 4, 1931, in La Rioja, Argentina) better known as Isabel Martínez de Perón would become the third wife of Argentine President Juan Perón and serve as President of Argentina in... Luis Sáenz Peña Dávila (1822 - 1907) was President of Argentina from 12 October 1892 to 23 January 1895. ... Roque Sáenz Peña Lahitte (1851 - 1914) was President of Argentina from 12 October 1910 to 9 August 1914. ... Alejo Julio Argentino Roca Paz (July 17, 1843 - October 19, 1914) was an army general who served as President of Argentina from 12 October 1880 to 12 October 1886 and again from 12 October 1898 to 12 October 1904. ... Julio Argentino Roca (17 May 1873 – 1942) was an Argentine politician, son of General Julio Argentino Roca (former President of Argentina). ... Alejo Julio Argentino Roca Paz (July 17, 1843 - October 19, 1914) was an army general who served as President of Argentina from 12 October 1880 to 12 October 1886 and again from 12 October 1898 to 12 October 1904. ... Miguel Juárez Celman (1844 - 1909) was President of Argentina from 12 October 1886 to 6 August 1890. ... Juan Domingo Perón (October 8, 1895 – July 1, 1974) was an Argentine general and politician, elected three times as President of Argentina and serving from 1946 to 1955 and from 1973 to 1974. ... President Perón giving a speech María Estela Martínez de Perón (born on February 4, 1931, in La Rioja, Argentina) better known as Isabel Martínez de Perón would become the third wife of Argentine President Juan Perón and serve as President of Argentina in... Néstor Kirchner, full name Néstor Carlos Kirchner Ostoić (born 25 February 1950), is the President of Argentina, sworn in on May 25, 2003. ... Cristina Elisabet Fernández de Kirchner (born February 19, 1953 as Cristina Elisabet Fernández), usually known as Cristina Kirchner, is an Argentine politician from the Justicialist Party. ... Cristina Elisabet Fernández de Kirchner (born February 19, 1953 as Cristina Elisabet Fernández), usually known as Cristina Kirchner, is an Argentine politician from the Justicialist Party. ... Manuel A. Quintana y Sáenz de Gaona (1835 - 1906) was the President of Argentina from 12 October 1904 to 12 March 1906. ... Roque Sáenz Peña Lahitte (1851 - 1914) was President of Argentina from 12 October 1910 to 9 August 1914. ... Jaime Gerardo Roberto Marcelino María Ortiz Lizardi (September 24, 1886 – July 15, 1942) was President of Argentina from February 20, 1938 to June 27, 1942. ... Juan Domingo Perón (October 8, 1895 – July 1, 1974) was an Argentine general and politician, elected three times as President of Argentina and serving from 1946 to 1955 and from 1973 to 1974. ... Justo José de Urquiza y García (October 18, 1801 â€“ April 11, 1870) was an Argentine general and politician. ... Pedro Eugenio Aramburu Cilveti (May 21, 1903 – June 1, 1970) was a de facto president of Argentina from November 13, 1955 to May 1, 1958. ...

The office of Vice-President

In the original 1853 constitution, the figure of the Vice-President was established for the sole purpose of providing for an unexpected issue of succession in an unfinished term. In the amendment of 1994, the Vice-President, as in other countries, was given the additional title of President of the Senate, making his role a more legislative than executive one, with the power to vote in the case of a tie in the assembly. A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... The 1994 reform to the Argentine Constitution was approved on 22 August, as a result of the Olivos Pact between by that time president of Argentina Carlos Saúl Menem, and the former president and leader of the opposition Raúl Alfonsín. ... The President of the Senate is the title often given to the presiding officer, or chairman, of a senate. ...


See also

List of Heads of State (Presidents, Directors and Dictators, etc. ... The office of Vice-President of Argentina did not exist until it was created by the 1853 Constitution. ... This article is about the history of Argentina. ... This article is about the political institutions and political parties of Argentina. ...

External links

  • (Spanish) Official presidential website

  Results from FactBites:
 
President of Argentina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1789 words)
The President of Argentina (full title: President of the Argentine Nation, Spanish: Presidente de la Nación Argentina) is the head of state of Argentina.
The President must be a natural-born citizen of the country, or be son of Argentine citizens, in the case of being born abroad.
The Constitution establishes in Article 88 that in case of death, resignation or destitution of the President, the office is exercised by the Vice-President for the rest of the term.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m