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Encyclopedia > Presbyterian Church in Canada

The Presbyterian Church in Canada is the name of a Christian church, of Protestant, of presbyterian, and reformed theology and polity, serving in Canada under this name since 1875. As a noun, Christian is an appellation and moniker deriving from the appellation Christ, which many people associate exclusively with Jesus of Nazareth. ... A church building (or simply church) is a building used in Christian worship. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It also refers to the study of other religious topics. ... 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Its roots in Canada can be traced back both to Scottish settlers and French Huguenots, and the first presbyterian churches formed in the late 1500s and early 1600s, following such European protestant reformation theologians such as John Calvin, and John Knox. Travel guide to Scotland from Wikitravel Transport in Scotland Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... Theology is literally rational discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, rational discourse). By extension, it also refers to the study of other religious topics. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a prominent French Christian theologian during the Protestant Reformation and is the namesake of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism. ... John Knox (1505, 1513 or 1514 – 1572) was a Scottish religious reformer who played the lead part in reforming the Church in Scotland in a Presbyterian manner. ...


In 1925, many Canadian Presbyterians joined with the Methodist Church of Canada, and Congregationalists to form the United Church of Canada; the term "Continuing Presbyterians" was then used, until the legal rights to using the name Presbyterian Church in Canada were again permitted in 1939. 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... St. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Contents


Background and roots

In 1759, Great Britain gained full control of the French colony of New France, at the Plains of Abraham outside of the walled Citadelle of Quebec, there was a Scottish Battalion, the 78th Fraser Highlanders, complete with a Presbyterian chaplain, named Reverend Robert MacPherson. This group eventually became the roots of St. Andrew's Church in Quebec City. 1759 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... New France (French: la Nouvelle-France) describes the area colonized by France in North America during a period extending from the exploration of the Saint Lawrence River by Jacques Cartier in 1534 to the cession of New France to the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1763. ... The Battle of the Plains of Abraham, fought September 13, 1759, was a decisive battle during the French and Indian War, the U.S. name for the North American phase of the Seven Years War. ... View of the fortifications of the Citadelle, with the Parliament Building behind The Citadelle - the French name is used both in English and French - is a military installation and official residence located atop Cap Diamant, adjoining the Plains of Abraham in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. ... St. ... Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (Gift of God shall make prosper) Area: 547. ...


In the colony of Nova Scotia the Presbyterians were initially Reformed settlers of Germanic roots, and started St. Andrew's in Lunenburg in 1753; they joined Church of Scotland Nova Scotia Synodin 1837. In Truro, First United Church (Presbyterian until 1925) was founded in 1760 by Scottish settlers. St. James Presbyterian Church was formed in 1925 by the minority that did not join the United Church. In Halifax, St. Matthew's, dates back to 1749 as a "Dissenting Protestant Worship House", and adhered to Presbyterian polity at a later date; The Presbyterian Church of St. David is another 1925 "Minority Group" from within downtown Halifax congregations including St Matthew's, and celebrates its 80th Anniversary in 2005, meeting in the former Grafton Street Methodist (1869) building, acquired in their early days. | TotalArea = 55,283 | LandArea = 53,338 | WaterArea = 1,946 | PercentWater = 3. ... Lunenburg NS Lunenburg is a small town on the South Shore of Nova Scotia, Canada at 44. ... The Church of Scotland (C of S, also known informally as The Kirk; until the 17th century officially the Kirk of Scotland) is the Christian national church of Scotland. ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ... A street in Truro, with Truro Cathedral in the background. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Travel guide to Scotland from Wikitravel Transport in Scotland Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in... Please read first: This article is about the Nova Scotia community. ... 1479 Barrington Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia. ... Events While in debtors prison, John Cleland writes Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure). ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After the departure of the Thirteen American Colonies from British North America, there was an increase in population within the Canadas, divided in 1791 into Upper Canada (now called Ontario) and Lower Canada (now called Quebec), including most of the previously populated areas of the New France colony, and within the Maritimes, including Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island. Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 colonies. ... By 1763, British North America included 19 British colonies and territories on the continent of North America. ... Upper Canada Village in Morrisburg, Ontario Upper Canada is an early name for the land at the upstream end of the Saint Lawrence River in early North America – the territory south of Lake Nipissing and north of the St. ... Lower Canada was a British colony in North America, at the downstream end of the Saint Lawrence River in the southern portion of the modern-day province of Quebec. ... New France (French: la Nouvelle-France) describes the area colonized by France in North America during a period extending from the exploration of the Saint Lawrence River by Jacques Cartier in 1534 to the cession of New France to the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1763. ... | TotalArea = 55,283 | LandArea = 53,338 | WaterArea = 1,946 | PercentWater = 3. ... Motto: Spem reduxit (Hope was restored) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Fredericton Largest city Saint John Lieutenant Governor Herménégilde Chiasson Premier Bernard Lord (PC) Area 72 908 km² (8th) • Land 71 450 km² • Water 1 458 km² (2. ... Motto: Parva Sub Ingenti (The small under the protection of the great) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Charlottetown Largest city Charlottetown Lieutenant-Governor J. Léonce Bernard Premier Pat Binns (PC) Area 5,660 km² (13th) • Land 5,660 km² • Water 0 km² (0%) Population (2004) â...


Some of the early Canadian Presbyterians were United Empire Loyalists of Scots descent, and others came directly from Scotland, such as in the 1773 arrival of "The Hector" in Pictou, Nova Scotia. United Empire Loyalists is the name given to the portion of British Loyalists who resettled in British North America and other British Colonies as an act of fealty to King George III after the British defeat in the American Revolutionary War. ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Pictou is a small town on the northern coast of Nova Scotia, Canada, located in Pictou County. ...


Early Clergy represented many strands of reformed theology, and were educated in Scotland, Ireland, and the United States. Initial attempts at forming native Presbyteries were futile. American influences in the Canadas, came first from Dutch Reformed missionaries from New York State, and later American Presbyterians from many different Presbyterian groupings. A presbytery can be the residence of one or more presbyters, priests, or religious elders; or an area of a church or cathedral reserved for priests; or the collective college of priests in a diocese, archdiocese, or prelature; or the local unit in the polity of a Presbyterian church, consisting... The Dutch Reformed Church or Netherlands Reformed Church (in Dutch: Nederlandse Hervormde Kerk (NHK)) is a denomination of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ...


Congregations were eventually formed in many communities (initially in townships over towns), and usually after a lengthy periods without any supply from Clergy (in the Red River Settlement in Manitoba, it took thirty years); in many cases, family worship consisted of devotions and catechisms. The Red River Colony was a colonization project set up by Thomas Douglas, 5th Earl of Selkirk in 1811 on 300 000 km² of land granted to him by the Hudsons Bay Company under what is referred to as the Selkirk Concession. ...


Two events led to the early departure of American support of Canadian Churches; The War of 1812 (1812-14), and the 1837 Rebellions in Upper and Lower Canada; the latter resulted in political reform, and responsible government; Upper Canada became Canada West, Lower Canada Canada East in 1841, until 1867. In southern Ontario, there was once a Stamford Presbytery; their last congregation, located near Milton, Ontario closed in 1951, and Stamford Church in Niagara Falls joined the PCC in 1936. The War of 1812 was a conflict fought on land in North America and at sea around the world between the United States and United Kingdom from 1812 to 1815. ... (Redirected from 1837 Rebellions) The Rebellions of 1837 were a pair of Canadian armed uprisings that occurred in 1837 in response to frustrations in political reform and ethnic conflict. ... Responsible government is a system of government that embodies the principle of parliamentary accountability which is the foundation of the Westminster system of parliamentary democracy. ... take you to calendar). ... 1867 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Milton (2004 population 47,500) is a town in southern Ontario, Canada, about 40 km west of Toronto on Highway 401, and is the western terminus for GO Transits Milton Line commuter train and bus corridor. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... The Horseshoe Falls, one of the three Niagara Falls. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In the Maritimes (now the Provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island), the original Scots Presbyterians were from two branches of the Seccesionist (United Presbyterian Church of Scotland), and prior to their union in 1817 that created the Synod of Nova Scotia, there was the Associate Presbytery of Truro, erected in 1786, and the Presbytery of Pictou, erected in 1795. There were still Church of Scotland congregations and Ministers that remained outside this group, before its erection in Nova Scotia in 1825. The United Presbyterian Church of Scotland (1847-1900) was a Scottish Presbyterian denomination. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ...


In 1811, Rev. Thomas McCulloch formed the Pictou Academy, which was the first educational school that aided in the training of Ministers. Some of the graduates travelled back to Scotland to continue their training. This led McCulloch to Halifax to teach, where Dalhousie University was eventually formed; From another academy in West River, Pictou County, (1848), led also to Halifax as Presbyterian College (Halifax), later Pine Hill Seminary (United Church), that since 1971, is now part of the Atlantic School of Theology. Dalhousie University is a university located in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... West River - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Pictou County is a county in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Atlantic School of Theology (AST) is an ecumenical university which provides graduate level theological education and research, and in formation for Christian ministries, lay and ordained, in church and society, primarily in Atlantic Canada. ...


In the Canadas, The United Presbytery of the Canadas was formed in 1818, as a looser arrangement of Clergy supported by other groups. By 1839, this United Synod (at one time there were three Presbyteries) was absorbed by The Presbyterian Church of Canada in Connection with the Established Church of Scotland,+ erected into a Synod by the parent Church in 1831, bolstered with Missionaries supplied from The Glasgow Missionary Society. In 1834, This group also began to receive a number of United Synod clergy and congregations, which led to the aforementioned union with the Auld Kirk by 1840. 1831 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1831, the United Associate Synod in Scotland (after 1847, the United Presbyterian Church of Scotland) agreed to send Missionaries to the Canadas; three were appointed, and arrived in 1832. On Christmas Day 1834, a Canadian Synod was erected in the newly-incorporated city of Toronto, that also included congregations and at least one minister from the United Synod of the Canadas. They later started their own Toronto congregation in 1838. and a Theological College in London, Canada West in 1844. The United Presbyterian Church of Scotland (1847-1900) was a Scottish Presbyterian denomination. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength City of Toronto, Ontario, Canadas Location. ... 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Motto: Nickname: The Forest City City of London, Ontario, Canada location. ...


In Toronto, the United Synod of Canada congregation (formed in the Town of "York" in 1820), and their minister Rev. James Harris withdrew in 1834, remaining "independent" until 1844, when they joined with Free Church dissenters from the Church of Scotland's St. Andrew's Toronto (formed in 1830) to create Knox Presbyterian Church, Toronto. Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength City of Toronto, Ontario, Canadas Location. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... St. ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Knox Presbyterian Church, Toronto Knox Presbyterian Church, 630 Spadina Avenue, Toronto, Ontario is a Presbyterian church in downtown Toronto, Canada. ...



The unity in the Church of Scotland Canada Synod following the United Synod merger was short-lived, but provided the opportunity to establish a Theological College, Queen's College, in Kingston, Canada West in 1841 ; Queen's Theological College (United Church) is now part of Queen's University. Kingston, Ontario, with a population of approximately 146,8381 people, is located in the Quebec City-Windsor Corridor at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, where the lake runs into the St. ... take you to calendar). ... Queens University, or simply Queens, is a coeducational, non-sectarian university located in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, on the edge of Lake Ontario. ...


In June 1844, the Synod met in Kingston, and parallelled the situation that had affected the Scottish Assembly in 1843, when a large group also withdrew, and formed a Free Church of Scotland Canadian Synod. By the following September, most of the Theological Students at Queen's had joined the Free Church, proceeded to Toronto and began Knox College; they had merged with the aforementioned United Presbyterian Church of Scotland college in 1861, that had moved to Toronto from London in 1853. Knox College has concluded their 160th Anniversary over the 2004-2005 academic year. 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Kingston, Ontario, with a population of approximately 146,8381 people, is located in the Quebec City-Windsor Corridor at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, where the lake runs into the St. ... 1843 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Knox College, 59 St. ... The United Presbyterian Church of Scotland (1847-1900) was a Scottish Presbyterian denomination. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Motto: Nickname: The Forest City City of London, Ontario, Canada location. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


In the Maritime Provinces, colonies were set up in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and on Cape Breton Island. As in both Upper Canada and Lower Canada, there were various groups organizing congregations. The effects of the 1843 disruption in the Church of Scotland was felt in Nova Scotia; the colonial ministers were either invited back to congregations in Scotland, or they sided with the Free Church in Nova Scotia and elsewhere. The formal structure of the Church of Scotland was affected for a number of years. Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada Cape Breton Island (French: île du Cap-Breton, Scottish Gaelic: Eilean Cheap Breatuinn, Mikmaq: Unamakika), almost always just Cape Breton, is a large island on the Atlantic coast of North America. ... Upper Canada Village in Morrisburg, Ontario Upper Canada is an early name for the land at the upstream end of the Saint Lawrence River in early North America – the territory south of Lake Nipissing and north of the St. ... Lower Canada was a British colony in North America, at the downstream end of the Saint Lawrence River in the southern portion of the modern-day province of Quebec. ... 1843 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Travel guide to Scotland from Wikitravel Transport in Scotland Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in...


In 1860, a year before a union occurred in the Canadas, The Presbyterian Church of the Lower Provinces,+ was created by the merger of Free Church and United Presbyterian Church congregations in Nova Scotia, including Cape Breton, and Prince Edward Island, and in 1866, they were joined by their compatriots in New Brunswick. 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ...


In June 1861, the Canada Presbyterian Church+ was formed with the merger of the Canadian Synods of the Free Church of Scotland and the United Presbyterian Church . This became the dominant Presbyterian grouping in the Canadas, growing in cities, towns, villages, and even into The United States, including Illinois (Chicago, a French Community at St. Anne, and a Gaelic-speaking congregation in Elmira) and border cities in Michigan, and New York State, as well as into the Canadian Northwest Territories with Rev. John Black to the Red River Settlement at Kildonan, and Rev. James Nisbet to Prince Albert. Robert Jamieson was sent by the inaugural Synod of the Canada Presbyterian Church from the York Mills and Fisherville charge near Toronto (The latter Church is now located in Toronto's Black Creek Pioneer Village, adjacent to a Manse from the oldest 1817 Toronto area congregation located in Richmond Hill) to the British Columbia colony, where he started congregations in New Westminster, Nanaimo, and in the Fraser Valley. After 1875, he joined with the Church of Scotland, until the Canadian Pacific Railway reached Burrard's Inlet (later Vancouver) in 1885, they rejoined (along with other congregations) the Presbyterian Church in Canada, and a British Columbia Synod was formed later. 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State Other U.S. States Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich (D) Senators Richard Durbin (D) Barack Obama (D) Official language(s) English Area 149,998 km² (25th)  - Land 143,968 km²  - Water 6,030 km² (4. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... State nickname: The Wolverine State, The Great Lakes State Other U.S. States Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Governor Jennifer Granholm (D) Senators Carl Levin (D) Debbie Stabenow (D) Official language(s) English de-facto Area 96,889 mi² / 250,941 km² (11th)  - Land 56,855 mi² / 147,255 km²... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Kildonan is a provincial electoral division in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... James Nisbet was born in Scotland in 1823, and emigrated to the New World in 1844. ... Downtown Prince Albert Prince Albert is the third-largest city (after Saskatoon and Regina) with a population of just over 41 000 as of 2001, in the province of Saskatchewan, Canada. ... Hoggs Hollow is a neighbourhood in Toronto, Ontario, Canada which is located in a depression in the land centred on the intersection of Yonge Street and York Mills Avenue/Wilson Avenue. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength City of Toronto, Ontario, Canadas Location. ... Black Creek Pioneer Village is an historic site in Toronto, Ontario, just west of York University and southeast of the Jane and Finch intersection. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Richmond Hill (population 159,864 as of June 30, 2004) is a town in York Region north of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Splendour without diminishment) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Area 944,735 km² (5th) • Land 925,186 km² • Water 19,549 km² (2. ... The Pattullo Bridge (centre) connects New Westminster (left) with Surrey (right) across the Fraser River. ... Nanaimo (2004 pop. ... 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR; AAR reporting marks CP, CPAA, CPI), known as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996, is a Canadian Class I railway operated by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited. ... Members of Parliament Libby Davies, Ujjal Dosanjh, David Emerson, Hedy Fry, Stephen Owen Members of the Legislative Assembly Gordon Campbell, David Chudnovsky, Adrian Dix, Colin Hansen, Jenny Kwan, Lorne Mayencourt, Wally Oppal, Gregor Robertson, Shane Simpson, Carole Taylor Mayor Sam Sullivan City Manager Judy Rogers Governing Body Vancouver City Council... 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. ...


The Canadian Presbyterian Church started a second Theological College, The Presbyterian College, Montreal in 1867 (Charter granted 1865). Both Knox College and The Presbyterian College, Montreal remained with the Presbyterian Church in Canada after Church Union in 1925. The Presbyterian College/Le College Presbyterien, 3495 University Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, is a Theological College of the Presbyterian Church in Canada, and is affiliated with McGill University through their Faculty of Divinity. ... 1867 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Knox College, 59 St. ... St. ...


In 1867, the Church of Scotland's bodies in the Maritmes merged to become; The Synod of the Presbyterian Church of the Maritime Provinces of British North America.+ 1867 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1869, the Canada Presbyterian Church added another level to its growing Church structure--their Annual Synod became a General Assembly, and four smaller, regional Synods were formed; Montreal, serving both Quebec and Eastern Ontario, Toronto, Hamilton, and London, with a few congregations in the USA. 1869 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The term general assembly can refer to The largest unit of organisation in the polity of a (national) Presbyterian church, containing several synods or presbyteries. ...


The first Moderator of the General Assembly of the Canada Presbyterian Church, Rev. William Ormiston, then of Central C.P.C. in Hamilton, Ontario, sent out letters at the end of his term (he was moving to serve a Dutch Reformed Church in New York City) for these groups to hold a conference of all strands of Presbyterianism in the new Dominion of Canada. This conference was held in Montreal in September 1870, and led these four groups to a basis of Union, which in June 1874 saw both the Canada Presbyterian Church's General Assembly and Church of Scotland Canada Synod meet in Ottawa, where the proceedings and final preparations and delegations met in the nearby Knox (CPC) and St. Andrew's (Church of Scotland) congregations. Motto: Together Aspire - Together Achieve Area: 1,117. ... The Dutch Reformed Church or Netherlands Reformed Church (in Dutch: Nederlandse Hervormde Kerk (NHK)) is a denomination of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin. ... New York City, officially named the City of New York, is the most populous city in the United States, and the most densely populated major city in North America. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1874 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Church of Scotland (C of S, also known informally as The Kirk; until the 17th century officially the Kirk of Scotland) is the Christian national church of Scotland. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Advance Ottawa/Ottawa en avant City of Ottawa, Ontario, Canadas Location. ... Knox Presbyterian at 120 Lisgar Street Knox Presbyterian Church is a Presbyterian Church in Ottawa, Canada. ... St. ...


The Presbyterian Church in Canada 1875-1925

On Tuesday June 15 1875, the four Canadian Presbyterian churches; 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ...

  • The Canada Presbyterian Church, (June 1861),
  • The Presbyterian Church of Canada in Connection with the Established Church of Scotland, (1831),
  • The Synod of the Presbyterian Church of the Maritime Provinces of British North America , (1867), and
  • The Presbyterian Church of the Lower Provinces, (1866),

representing many of the parallel events and controversies within the Church of Scotland joined together to form; The Presbyterian Church in Canada, in Montreal's Victoria Hall; Ice Hockey enthusiasts will be interested to note that the first Stanley Cup was awarded in this very building in 1893. The Church of Scotland (C of S, also known informally as The Kirk; until the 17th century officially the Kirk of Scotland) is the Christian national church of Scotland. ... City motto: Concordia Salus (Latin: Well-being through harmony) Province Quebec Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area  - % water 500. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Stanley Cup is inscribed with the names of all the players on the teams that have won it. ... 1893 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Although there were a number of Church of Scotland congregations, mainly from the Maritimes, as well as St. Andrew's Montreal, and a few others in Glengarry County Ontario, that resisted this union; many of these eventually entered the PCC into the early 20th Century; In 1918, The Church of St. Andrew and St. Paul, Montreal was created with the merger of this prime congregation, the last so affiliated in Canada with the Church of Scotland; In 1932, they moved onto Sherbroke Street, and celebrated their bicentenary in 2002. The Church of Saint Andrew and St Paul is a Presbyterian church in downtown Montreal, Quebec. ... Categories: Stub | Ontario counties and regions ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Area 1,076,395 km² (4th) • Land 917,741 km² • Water 158,654 km² (14. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The Church of Saint Andrew and St Paul is a Presbyterian church in downtown Montreal, Quebec. ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) is a leap year starting on a Friday. ... 2002 (MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


As a united group, the PCC consolidated and grew all across Canada in both the established areas, and expanded into newly settled parts.

  • The Synod of the Maritime Provinces (renamed Atlantic in the 1960s) comprised the former domain of the two "Lower Provinces" groups. Their Synod meetings are known as "The Little Assembly"
  • The Synod of Montreal and Ottawa replaced the CPC's Montreal Synod; this name was changed in the 1950s to Quebec and Eastern Ontario.
  • The Synod of Toronto and Kingston took in the former CPC Toronto Synod, as well as adding the CPC Kingston Presbytery from Montreal. This Synod later added northeastern Ontario, and the name was altered in 2005 to: The Synod of Central, Northeastern Ontario, and Bermuda.
  • The Synod of Hamilton and London merged two CPC Synods into one, London and Hamilton, although those congregations that went into the United Church of Canada in 1925, found themselves once again in separate Hamilton and London Conferences (a Methodist term). It was renamed the Synod of Southwestern Ontario in 1997.

Manitoba, established as a Province in 1870, had been settled in The Red River-Selkirk Settlement, and had established a congregation in Kildonan in 1818; they waited 30 years for a Minister, John Black, supplied from the Free Church in Canada, after he served as a Missionary to the French in Canada East near Montreal. He was later joined by Rev. James Nisbet formerly of Oakville, Canada West, who then established a territorial outpost in Prince Albert now Saskatchewan) Northwest Territories. James Robertson, a minister from Oxford County, Ontario was first called (1873) to a congregation in Winnipeg, and in 1881 was appointed as Missions Superintendent, where he provided leadership and growth to new settlers, Student Ministers, Ordained Missionaries, and congregations. Manitoba College started in Kildonan in 1871, received support from both Canadian churches prior to 1875, and at the 1883 General Assembly, their Moderator, Rev. Dr. John Mark King (from St. James Square Church in Toronto) was called to become their first Principal. With the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway across Canada, development and settlement of the Western Canada began, from Manitoba, and by 1905, the Provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta were formed. A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... St. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Glorious and free) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Area 647,797 km² (8th) • Land 553,556 km² • Water 64,241 km² (14. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Red River Colony was a colonization project set up by Thomas Douglas, 5th Earl of Selkirk in 1811 on 300 000 km² of land granted to him by the Hudsons Bay Company under what is referred to as the Selkirk Concession. ... 1818 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... This article concerns the Free Church of Scotland 1843-1900, for the Free Church of Scotland existing from 1900 to the present day see Free Church of Scotland (post 1900). ... James Nisbet was born in Scotland in 1823, and emigrated to the New World in 1844. ... Oakville is the name of several towns in North America: Oakville, Ontario is the most well-known, with a population 150,000 Oakville, California is located in Napa County, California with a population of 300 Oakville, Manitoba Oakville, Maryland Oakville, Missouri is a unincorporated suburb of St. ... Downtown Prince Albert Prince Albert is the third-largest city (after Saskatoon and Regina) with a population of just over 41 000 as of 2001, in the province of Saskatchewan, Canada. ... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (From many peoples, strength) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Lynda M. Haverstock Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Area 651,036 km² (7th) • Land 591,670 km² • Water 59,366 km² (9. ... Oxford County, Ontario is a regional municipality and census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Motto: Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Area: 465. ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Manitoba College was a college that existed in Manitoba from 1871 to 1967, when it became one of the University of Winnipegs founding colleges. ... The Red River Colony was a colonization project set up by Thomas Douglas, 5th Earl of Selkirk in 1811 on 300 000 km² of land granted to him by the Hudsons Bay Company under what is referred to as the Selkirk Concession. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... St. ... The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR; AAR reporting marks CP, CPAA, CPI), known as CP Rail between 1968 and 1996, is a Canadian Class I railway operated by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

  • The Synod of Manitoba and the Northwest was formed in 1884, when the Presbytery of Manitoba (with Synodical powers) was divided into three Presbyteries.
  • The Synod of British Columbia was erected in 1890, including congregations in present day Alberta.

In 1905, when the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan were formed, separate Synods for each were created: Motto: Fortis et Liber (Strong and free) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Edmonton Largest city Calgary Lieutenant-Governor Norman Kwong Premier Ralph Klein (PC) Area 661,848 km² (6th) • Land 642,317 km² • Water 19,531 km² (2. ... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (From many peoples, strength) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Lynda M. Haverstock Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Area 651,036 km² (7th) • Land 591,670 km² • Water 59,366 km² (9. ...

  • The Synod of Manitoba was the new name, although Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario is the present name, noting the Presbytery of Superior (from 1884), comprising remaining congregations in Thunder Bay and Greenstone (formerly Geraldton); recently, congregations were closed in both Fort Frances and Atikokan.
  • The Synod of Saskatchewan covers the bounds of the province;
  • The Synod of Alberta ( and the Northwest was added in 1990).

With the deaths of King (1899) and Robertson (1901), their respective successors led in the cause of Church Union with other Protestant bodies, including Anglicans and Baptists, that culminated in the formation of the United Church of Canada with an almost unanimous grouping of the Methodist and Congregationalist Churches in Canada, on June 10 1925. Thunder Bay (48°23′N 89°15′W, time zone EST) is a city in and the seat of Thunder Bay District, Ontario, Canada. ... Greenstone is an amalgamated town in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Fort Frances, Ontario is a town, located in the northwestern part of Ontario, Canada. ... Atikokan (2001 population 3,632) is a township in Thunder Bay District in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Baptist churches are part of a Christian movement often regarded as an Evangelical, Protestant denomination. ... St. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...


1925 and since

Following years of debate, and postponement over World War I, voting on Canadian Church Union took place in the late months of 1924, and into 1925. World War I was primarily a European conflict with many facets: immense human sacrifice, stalemate trench warfare, and the use of new, devastating weapons - tanks, aircraft, machine guns, and poison gas. ...


On June 9, 1925, the group consisting of those Presbyterian congregations, and a number of Minority Groups which did not concur with Church Union into the United Church of Canada, met for Prayer just before Midnight in Knox Presbyterian Church (Toronto); not too far from College Street United Church, where the final sederunt of the 1925 General Assembly had concluded earlier in the day. Some 79 dissenting Commissioners, and others equally concerned about the future of their beloved Church, had come to resume the General Assembly of the "continuing" Presbyterian Church that night. They were led by Rev. Dr. David George MacQueen, a former Moderator (1912) and longtime minister (1887-1930) of First Church (1881) in Edmonton, Alberta, who presided as Moderator, and constituted the group into the "continuing" General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Canada. After adjourning early in the hours of June 10, they later reconvened as the General Assembly, and also met with others (including Women's Missionary Groups) into a Congress at St. Andrew's Church (Toronto); these two key Toronto congregations provided much of the input and support for the Presbyterian Church Association, in this fight against Church Union, and are still vital congregations today. Walter George Brown, another leading campaigner against union, was elected moderator in 1931. 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... St. ... Knox Presbyterian Church, Toronto Knox Presbyterian Church, 630 Spadina Avenue, Toronto, Ontario is a Presbyterian church in downtown Toronto, Canada. ... The modern College Street United College Street United Church is a United Church of Canada church at the corner of College and Bathurst Streets in Toronto, Canada. ... First Presbyterian Church, is a Presbyterian Church in Canada congregation in downtown Edmonton Alberta Canada. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Industry Integrity Progress Image:Abedm. ... St. ... For the major league baseball player, see Jumbo Brown Rev. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) is a common year starting on Thursday. ...


The "continuing Presbyterians" title remained until 1939. About 30% of the former Presbyterians remained separate from the United Church at the time of the divide, although debate still continues over the actual vote! 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In Western Canada, the losses, as well as many presbyteries and congregations, and missions, included all Theological Colleges:


In Winnipeg, Manitoba College, started in 1871 in Kildonan, and moved to Winnipeg in 1874, began their theological studies with the aforementioned appointment of Dr. King in 1883. It merged with Wesley College in 1938 to become United College, and is now part of the University of Winnipeg. Motto: Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Area: 465. ... The University of Winnipeg received its charter in 1967 but its roots date back more than 130 years. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Red River Colony was a colonization project set up by Thomas Douglas, 5th Earl of Selkirk in 1811 on 300 000 km² of land granted to him by the Hudsons Bay Company under what is referred to as the Selkirk Concession. ... Motto: Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Area: 465. ... 1874 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1883 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Wesley College was a college that existed in Manitoba from 1888 to 1967, when it became one of the University of Winnipegs founding colleges. ... The University of Winnipeg received its charter in 1967 but its roots date back more than 130 years. ...


In Vancouver, Westminster Hall (1908), was merged in 1927 with Ryerson College (Methodist) and the Congregational College of British Columbia to create United College, now part of Vancouver School of Theology (1971), located on the University of British Columbia (UBC) main campus. St. Andrew's Hall, part of the PCC's presence at UBC since 1956, formally joined with VST in 1984. Members of Parliament Libby Davies, Ujjal Dosanjh, David Emerson, Hedy Fry, Stephen Owen Members of the Legislative Assembly Gordon Campbell, David Chudnovsky, Adrian Dix, Colin Hansen, Jenny Kwan, Lorne Mayencourt, Wally Oppal, Gregor Robertson, Shane Simpson, Carole Taylor Mayor Sam Sullivan City Manager Judy Rogers Governing Body Vancouver City Council... The University of British Columbia (UBC) is a public university with its main campus located at Point Grey, in the University Endowment Lands of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and another smaller campus known as UBC Okanagan located in Kelowna, British Columbia. ...


In Edmonton, Alberta, Robertson College (1912) named after the aforementioned Missions Superintendent, merged with Alberta (Methodist) College to become St Stephen's College after 1925. It is located on the University of Alberta campus. In Saskatoon, the Presbyterian College, Saskatoon (1914), became St. Andrew's College in 1925. It is located on the University of Saskatchewan campus. In 2000, these latter colleges merged administratively, while remaining in both Saskatoon and Edmonton respectively, and become known as The College of St. Andrew's and St. Stephen's. Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Industry Integrity Progress Image:Abedm. ... University of Alberta on the south side of Edmonton The University of Alberta is situated along the south bank of the North Saskatchewan River in the heart of the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... For other uses see Saskatoon (disambiguation). ... 1914 (MCMXIV) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The University of Saskatchewan (U of S) is the largest education institution in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. ...


After 1925, the "rebuilding" was slowed in the 1930s by the Great Depression, and the Second World War. Following 1945, there was a time for expansion, with urban growth, and immigration, especially from Presbyterian strongholds as Scotland and Ireland, as well as Presbyterian and Reformed Church members from the Netherlands, Hungary, and more recently, Taiwan, Ghana, and Korea, where two separate "Han Ca" Korean Presbyteries (East and West) were erected in 1997. The Great Depression was a massive global economic recession (or depression) that ran from 1929 to approximately 1939. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Travel guide to Scotland from Wikitravel Transport in Scotland Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in... Korea refers to South Korea and North Korea together, which were a unified country until 1948. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Missions and International Partnerships

The Presbyterian Church in Canada has also had a international presence; as well as with congregations in Newfoundland, before their entry into Canadian Confederation in 1949, St Andrew's in Hamilton, Bermuda was affiliated with the Maritime churches from 1842 to 1963, when it's Presbyterial oversight was transferred to the West Toronto Presbytery, and many congregations have people from many other nations and cultures that have come to Canada. This is about the island in Canada. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday. ...


Foreign Missionaries, or more recently, International Partners, share the Witness around the world. Before 1875, Atlantic Canada sent John Geddie and the Gordon Brothers (George N. and James D., both martyred) from Prince Edward Island to the New Hebrides, now called Vanuatu in the South Pacific, John Morton to Trinidad, and later, partners into neighbouring Demerara, part of present-day Guyana. Motto: Parva Sub Ingenti (The small under the protection of the great) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Charlottetown Largest city Charlottetown Lieutenant-Governor J. Léonce Bernard Premier Pat Binns (PC) Area 5,660 km² (13th) • Land 5,660 km² • Water 0 km² (0%) Population (2004) â... Trinidad (Spanish, Trinity) is the largest of the 23 islands which make up the country of Trinidad and Tobago. ...


In 1871, The Canada Presbyterian Church sent George Leslie MacKay of Zorra Township, Oxford County, Ontario, to Formosa, which has been maintained to this date in connection with the Presbyterian Church in Taiwan. Fellow Oxford County native Jonathan Goforth initially went to Honan China, Dr. John Buchannan into India, James Scarth Gale went to Korea (sponsored by the YMCA), Japan saw Caroline Macdonald, "The White Angel of Tokyo" (YWCA), and after 1927, when Luther Lisgar Young and others partnered with The Korean Christian Church of Japan. Reverend Doctor George Leslie Mackay (偕叡理; POJ: Kai Sūi-lí, or 馬偕; POJ: Má-kai), D. D., the first modern missionary to northern Taiwan, was born in Zorra Township, Oxford County, Canada West (now Ontario), Canada, on 21 March 1844. ... Zorra is a township in south-western Ontario, Canada. ... Oxford County, Ontario is a regional municipality and census division of the Canadian province of Ontario. ... An issue of the Taiwan Church News, first published by Presbyterian missionaries in 1885. ... YMCAs in the United States and Canada use this logo. ... Neysa Moran McMein (1888-1949) Y.W.C.A. In Service for the Girls of the World, Poster, 1919 The YWCA (originally Young Womens Christian Association) is a world-wide organisation, founded in the UK in 1855. ...


Some changes occurred after Church Union, as Goforth left Honan, to conclude his Asian Ministry in Manchuria, the aforementioned L.L. Young went from Korea into Japan. The later Pacific occupation by Japan, followed by Mao's "cultural revolution" in China, forced temporary and permanent departures from some Asian fields, including Taiwan, Japan, and Manchuria. Korea refers to South Korea and North Korea together, which were a unified country until 1948. ... A poster during the Cultural Revolution. ... Extent of Manchuria according to Definition 1 (dark red), Definition 3 (dark red + medium red) and Definition 4 (dark red + medium red + light red) Manchuria (Manchu: Manju, Simplified Chinese: 满洲; Traditional Chinese: 滿洲; pinyin: ) is name given to a vast territorial region in northeast Asia. ...


Since 1954, Nigeria, where Mary Slessor had pioneered a generation before with a Scottish Church, and whose story was well known in many Canadian congregations, opened the door for PCC service in Africa. Richard Fee, Moderator of the 130th General Assembly, held in Oshawa Ontario in June 2004, spent his early ministry in Nigeria, before assuming his Canadian role (1992-2005), first with Presbyterian World Service and Development, and now as General Secretary, Life and Mission Agency. Malawi, Ghana, Kenya, Mozambique, Cameroon, Lesotho, and the Indian Ocean Island of Mauritius are other African nations that have also been partnered with the PCC, which also serves in Central America (Guyana is also included here, having been an offshoot of the Mission to Trinidad started by Nova Scotian Rev. John Morton in 1865), and more recently, in Eastern Europe, since the 1990s. Mary Slessor Mary Slessor (2 December 1848 - 13 January 1915) was a Scottish missionary to Nigeria. ... The term general assembly can refer to The largest unit of organisation in the polity of a (national) Presbyterian church, containing several synods or presbyteries. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Trinidad (Spanish, Trinity) is the largest of the 23 islands which make up the country of Trinidad and Tobago. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Outside relations

The Presbyterian Church in Canada has also been involved with relations between other Christian Churches. The World Alliance of Reformed Churches was formed in 1875 (then known as the Alliance of the Reformed Churches holding the Presbyterian System), and was well represented by Canadians, who hosted the Fifth General Council in Toronto in 1892, as well as in Montreal in 1937, and Ottawa in 1982. The Presbyterian Church in Canada was a Charter Member of both the Canadian Council of Churches, and the World Council of Churches, in 1944 and 1948 respectively. The World Council of Churches held their Sixth Assembly in Vancouver, in August 1983. The World Alliance of Reformed Churches (WARC) is a fellowship of more than 200 churches with roots in the 16th-century Reformation. ... 1892 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Canadian Council of Churches/le conseil canadien des églises is an ecumenical Christian forum of churches in Canada. ... The World Council of Churches (WCC) is the principal international Christian ecumenical organization. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


There is also "observer status" with the Evangelical Fellowship of Canada, although several congregations and individuals are actively involved in this venture. The Evangelical Fellowship of Canada (EFC) is a national parachurch association of over 140 affiliated church denominations, ministry organizations, educational institutions, and 1,000 local church congregations. ...


Further Details (Polity)

At present there are about 1000 congregations across the country. As a result of early settlement, as well as post WWII urbanization, and resistance to the 1925 church union, Southern Ontario has the greatest number of Congregations, Presbyteries and Synods (listed above). 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... St. ... A congregation is a group of people gathered together. ... A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine or administration. ...


The General Assembly, held yearly since 1875 around the first week of June, has recently been held in a number of centres throughout Southern Ontario and Quebec. The number of delegates or Commissioners to the General Assembly is determined by one-sixth of the Ministers on the Presbytery Roll and an equal number of Elders being Commissioned, in rotation from every congregation or Pastoral Charge. There are also Young Adult Representatives, selected from every second Presbytery on the roll, and Student Representatives, representing the Theological Colleges. The term general assembly can refer to The largest unit of organisation in the polity of a (national) Presbyterian church, containing several synods or presbyteries. ... 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The term general assembly can refer to The largest unit of organisation in the polity of a (national) Presbyterian church, containing several synods or presbyteries. ... An elder refers to various Wikipedia topics. ...


Every decade, there is an attempt to hold the General Assembly in other parts of the Country: On June 5, 2005, First Presbyterian Church in Edmonton, was the location of the Opening of the 131st General Assembly of The Presbyterian Church in Canada; the Reverend Jean Morris, of Calgary, Alberta is the new Moderator of the General Assembly; her father, the Rev. Dr. J.J. Harrold Morris was moderator in 1989, and grew up in the First Congregation. 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... First Presbyterian Church, is a Presbyterian Church in Canada congregation in downtown Edmonton Alberta Canada. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1996, Charlottetown PEI, were the hosts, as was Vancouver BC, in both 1957 and 1989, Halifax NS, in 1971, and Calgary in 1948. The last Assembly held in Alberta in Edmonton 2005, and Cape Breton, Nova Scotia have invited the General Assembly to be held there in 2010. 1996 (MCMXCVI) is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Fortuna Non Mutat Genus (Circumstances Do Not Change Our Origin) City Symbol: Cape Breton Sloop Cape Breton Regional Municipality, Nova Scotia, Canadas Location. ... | TotalArea = 55,283 | LandArea = 53,338 | WaterArea = 1,946 | PercentWater = 3. ...


There are Congregations, Missions, and Preaching Points in each Canadian Province, as well as the aforementioned St Andrew's Church in Hamilton, Bermuda. City Hall in Hamilton. ...


Communication

Communication has been an important role in the Presbyterian Church in Canada. Before 1875, every group had some sort of journal for communication, as well as active contributions in the mainstream press. 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


In January 1876, the Presbyterian Record, a merger of the Church of Scotland's The Presbyterian (since 1848), and the Canada Presbyterian Church's Record (and its predecessors in the United Presbyterian and Free Church), began operations that continue monthly (except August) to the present time. 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Presbyterian Record (inc. ...


There is also Glad Tidings, the publication of the Women's Missionary Society (formerly WMS Western Division) publishing since 1925, and the Presbyterian Message, from the Atlantic Missionary Society (formerly W.M.S. Eastern Division); and Presbyterian History, Newsletter of the Committee of History, has published regularly since 1957. 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Channels, a regular publication since 1983, is from the Renewal Fellowship Within the Presbyterian Church in Canada. 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


For the approved description please visit Presbyterian Church in Canada's overview.


External links

There is a congregational links page hosted by Knox College in Toronto. [1] Knox College, 59 St. ...


Synod Websites

Presbytery Websites

Sources

Presbyterians in Canada. Who we are. URL accessed on March 03, 2005. March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • Moir, John S. Enduring Witness. 1st Edition 1975 2nd Edition, 1987.
  • Bailey, T. Melville, The Covenant in Canada, 1975.
  • Bailey, T. Melville, Wee Kirks and Stately Steeples, History of the Presbytery of Hamilton, Ontario, 1990.
  • Bailey, T. Melville, and Palmer, William K., Schissler, J. Phillip, and Campbell C. Glenn, The Presbytery of Hamilton, 1837-1967.
  • Clifford, N. Keith, The Resistance to Church Union, 1982.
  • Congram, John D., This Presbyterian Church of Ours, 1995.
  • Fraser, Brian J., Church, college, and clergy; a history of theological education at Knox College 1844-1994, 1995.
  • Gregg, William, History of the Presbyterian Church in the Dominion of Canada, from the earliest days until 1834, 1885.
  • Gregg, William, Short History of the Presbyterian Church in the Dominion of Canada, 1892.
  • Klempa, William J (ed)., The Burning Bush and a Few Acres of Snow; The Presbyterian Contribution to Canadian Life and Culture, 1994.
  • Markell, H. Keith, The History of Presbyterian College, Montreal 1865-1986, 1986.
  • MacBeth, R. G. The Burning Bush in Canada, 1927.
  • MacKinnon, Archibald. History of the Presbyterian Church in Cape Breton, 1975.
  • MacMillan, Donald N. The Kirk in Glengarry. A History of the Presbytery of Glengarry, 1787-1984.
  • McNab, John, They Went Forth. 1933, revised 1955.
  • McNab, John, and MacKenzie, F. Scott, Our Heritage and Our Faith, 1950. (McNab, Our Priceless Heritage, MacKenzie, The Essence of Our Faith--75th Anniversary of the Presbyterian Church in Canada.
  • McNeill, John T. The Presbyterian Church in Canada, 1925.
  • Moir, John S., Early Presbyterianism in Canada, essays by John S. Moir, edited by Paul Laverdure, 2003.
  • Parker, Stuart C., Yet Not Consumed, A short account of the history and antecedents of the Presbyterian Church in Canada, 1947.
  • Scott, Ephraim, Church Union and the Presbyterian Church in Canada, 1928.
  • Smith, Neil G., Farris, Allen L., Markell, H. Keith (editors)., A Short History of the Presbyterian Church in Canada; Centennial Committee (Canada's), Committee on Church History, 1967.
  • Twentieth Century Fund, Historic Sketches of the Pioneer Work and the Missionary, Educational and Benevolent Agencies of The Presbyterian Church in Canada, 1903.
  • The Presbyterian Record (inc) Periodical. Specific Sources--Rev. Stephen Hayes, Article, October 2004, pp 27. Barry Cahill, letter, December 2004. pp 6.
  • Canadian Society of Presbyterian History, various papers 1975-2004.
  • Called to Witness, biographical sketches in four volumes:

Volume 1, 1977, Volume 2, 1980, (Edited by W. Stanford Reid) Volume 3, 1991, Volume 4, 1999. (Edited by John S. Moir).

  • Enkindled by the Word, Essays on Presbyterianism in Canada (Centennial Committee of the PCC), 1966.
  • Gifts and Graces, Profiles of Presbyterian Women, Volume 1 1999, Volume 2, 2002. (Edited by John S. Moir)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Presbyterianism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1298 words)
Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin.
In Ireland the Presbyterian Church was formed from the Church of Scotland and later became the Presbyterian Church in Ireland.
In Canada, the largest Presbyterian Denomination is the Presbyterian Church in Canada, about seventy percent of which merged in 1925 with the Methodist Church, Canada, and the Congregational Union of Canada to form the United Church of Canada.
Presbyterian Church in Canada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3526 words)
The Presbyterian Church in Canada is the name of a Christian church, of Protestant, of presbyterian, and reformed theology and polity, serving in Canada under this name since 1875.
In June 1861, the Canada Presbyterian Church+ was formed with the merger of the Canadian Synods of the Free Church of Scotland and the United Presbyterian Church.
The Presbyterian Church in Canada was a Charter Member of both the Canadian Council of Churches, and the World Council of Churches, in 1944 and 1948 respectively.
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