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Encyclopedia > Premier League
Premier League
Country  England
Confederation UEFA
Founded 20 February 1992
Number of teams 20
Relegation to The Championship
Level on pyramid Level 1
Domestic cup(s) FA Cup
Carling Cup
UEFA cup(s) Champions League
UEFA Cup
Intertoto Cup
Current champions Manchester United (2007–08)
Website Premier League home page
Premier League 2007–08

The Premier League, colloquially known as The Premiership or internationally the EPL, is an English professional league for football clubs. At the top of the English football league system, it is the country's primary football competition. The Premier League is currently contested by 20 clubs, operating a system of promotion and relegation with The Football League. Seasons run from August to May, with teams playing 38 games each. It is currently sponsored by Barclays Bank, and known as the Barclays Premier League. A list of professional sports leagues: // A1 Grand Prix (Official Page) British Touring Car Championship (Official Site) CASCAR (Canada) (Official Page) Champ Car World Series, formerly CART (Official Page) DTM - German Touring Car Masters (Official Page) Formula One, Grand Prix racing (Official Site) FIA GT Championship (Official Site) IRL (Indy... The Premiership on ITV (abbreviated as The Premiership) was ITV Sports flagship football show, from 2001 to 2004, devoted to the English Premier League after they won a lucrative multi-million pound deal to show highlights from the FA Premier League. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Union Européenne de Football Association or Union of European Football Associations in English, almost always referred to by the acronym UEFA (pronounced (you-AY-fuh) or (oo-Ay-fuh) or ), is the administrative and controlling body for European football. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... In many sports leagues around the world (with North American and Australian professional leagues being the most notable exceptions), relegation (or demotion) means the mandated transfer of the least successful team(s) of a higher division into a lower division at the end of the season. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... A league system is a hierarchy of leagues in a sport that teams (usually) can be promoted or relegated between, depending on finishing positions or playoffs. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... The Football League Cup, commonly known as the League Cup, is an English football competition. ... UEFA Champions League, which replaced the European Champions Cup, is a seasonal club football competition organised by UEFA since 1992 for the most successful football clubs in Europe. ... The UEFA Cup (also known as European Cup 3, CE3 or C3) is a football competition for European club teams, organized by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). ... The UEFA Intertoto Cup, also abbreviated as UI Cup, is a summer football competition for European clubs that have not qualified for one of the two major UEFA competitions, the Champions League and the UEFA Cup. ... MUFC redirects here. ... The 2007–08 Premier League season (known as the Barclays Premier League for sponsorship reasons) is the sixteenth since its establishment. ... Image File history File links Soccerball_current_event. ... The 2007–08 Premier League season (known as the Barclays Premier League for sponsorship reasons) is the sixteenth since its establishment. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... The English football league system, otherwise known as the football pyramid, is a series of interconnected leagues for club football in England (although for historical reasons a small number of Welsh clubs also compete). ... In many sports leagues around the world (with North American and Australian professional leagues being the most notable exceptions), relegation (or demotion) means the mandated transfer of the least successful team(s) of a higher division into a lower division at the end of the season. ... The Football League is a league competition featuring professional football clubs from England and Wales. ... Corporate sponsorship of major English football competitions dates back to the early 1980s. ... Barclays Bank headquarters One Churchill Place, Canary Wharf Barclays plc (LSE: BARC, NYSE: BCS, TYO: 8642 ) is the fourth largest bank in the United Kingdom. ...


The competition formed as the FA Premier League on 20 February 1992 and the first games were played on 15 August that year, following the decision of clubs in the Football League First Division to break away from The Football League to take advantage of a lucrative television rights deal; The Football League had served as England and Wales' primary football competition since 1888. Since then, the Premier League has become the world's most watched sporting league[1] and the most lucrative football league, with combined club revenues of around £1.4 billion in 2005–06, which is expected to rise to around £1.8 billion for 2007–08, primarily due to rising media revenues.[2] The league is a corporation with the 20 clubs acting as shareholders. is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the day of the year. ... From 1889 until 1992, this was the highest division overall of organized football in England. ... The Football League is a league competition featuring professional football clubs from England and Wales. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... A shareholder or stockholder is an individual or company (including a corporation) that legally owns one or more shares of stock in a joint stock company. ...


A total of 40 clubs have competed in the Premier League, but only four have won the title: Manchester United, Blackburn Rovers, Arsenal, and Chelsea. The current Premier League champions are Manchester United, who won their tenth title in the 2007–08 season, the most of any Premier League team. The following is a list of teams who have played in the FA Premier League at any time following its formation in 1992. ... MUFC redirects here. ... Blackburn Rovers Football Club are an English Premier League football club based in the town of Blackburn, Lancashire. ... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are an English professional football club based in Holloway, north London. ... Chelsea Football Club (also known as The Blues or previously The Pensioners) are an English professional football club based in west London. ... The 2007–08 Premier League season (known as the Barclays Premier League for sponsorship reasons) is the sixteenth since its establishment. ...

Contents

History

Origins

The 1980s had marked a low point for English football. Stadiums were crumbling, supporters endured poor facilities, hooliganism was rife, and English clubs were banned from European competition following the events at Heysel in 1985.[3] The Football League First Division, which had been the top level of English football since 1888, was well behind leagues such as Italy's Serie A and Spain's La Liga in attendances and revenues, and several top English players had moved abroad.[4] However, by the turn of the 1990s the downward trend was starting to reverse; England had been successful in the 1990 FIFA World Cup, reaching the semi-finals. UEFA, European football's governing body, lifted the five-year ban on English clubs playing in European competitions in 1990 and the Taylor Report on stadium safety standards, which proposed expensive upgrades to create all-seater stadiums, was published in January of that year.[5] Football hooliganism (sometimes described as the English Disease) is hooliganism by football club supporters. ... The Heysel Stadium disaster occurred due to football hooliganism in which a retaining wall of the Heysel Stadium in Brussels collapsed on May 29, 1985 during a football match between Liverpool F.C. from England and Juventus F.C. from Italy. ... This article is about the Italian football league. ... (Professional Football League), commonly known as the Primera División or simply La Liga, is the top professional football league in Spain. ... The Union Européenne de Football Association or Union of European Football Associations in English, almost always referred to by the acronym UEFA (pronounced (you-AY-fuh) or (oo-Ay-fuh) or ), is the administrative and controlling body for European football. ... The Taylor Report is a document, whose development was overseen by Lord Justice Taylor, concerning the aftermath and causes of the Hillsborough disaster in 1989. ...


Television money had also become much more important; the Football League received £6.3million for a two-year agreement in 1986, but when that deal was renewed in 1988, the price rose to £44m over four years.[6] The 1988 negotiations were the first signs of a breakaway league; ten clubs threatened to leave and form a "super league", but were eventually persuaded to stay.[7] As stadiums improved and match attendance and revenues rose, the country's top teams again considered leaving the Football League in order to capitalise on the growing influx of money being pumped into the sport.


Foundation

In the 1991 close season, a proposal for the establishment of a new league was tabled that would bring more money into the game overall. The Founder Members Agreement, signed on 17 July 1991 by the game's top-flight clubs, established the basic principles for setting up the FA Premier League.[8] The newly formed top division would have commercial independence from the Football Association and the Football League, giving the FA Premier League license to negotiate its own broadcast and sponsorship agreements. This was considered necessary so that English clubs could once again compete with and beat the best of Europe, while attracting the best talent in the world, something which in 1991 seemed practically unthinkable.[9] is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... Broadcasting is the distribution of audio and/or video signals which transmit programs to an audience. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 1992 the First Division clubs resigned from the Football League en masse and on 27 May 1992 the FA Premier League was formed as a limited company working out of an office at the Football Association's then headquarters in Lancaster Gate.[4] This meant a break-up of the 104-year-old Football League that had operated until then with four divisions; the Premier League would operate with a single division and the Football League with three. There was no change in competition format; the same number of teams competed in the top flight, and promotion and relegation between the Premier League and the new First Division remained on the same terms as between the old First and Second Divisions. is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... A limited company by shares (limited or Ltd. ... Lancaster Gate is a mid-nineteenth century development in the Bayswater district of west central London, immediately to the north of Kensington Gardens. ...


The 22 inaugural members of the new Premiership were Arsenal, Aston Villa, Blackburn Rovers, Chelsea, Coventry City, Crystal Palace, Everton, Ipswich Town, Leeds United, Liverpool, Manchester City, Manchester United, Middlesbrough, Norwich City, Nottingham Forest, Oldham Athletic, Queens Park Rangers, Sheffield United, Sheffield Wednesday, Southampton, Tottenham Hotspur, and Wimbledon. Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are an English professional football club based in Holloway, north London. ... Aston Villa redirects here. ... Blackburn Rovers Football Club are an English Premier League football club based in the town of Blackburn, Lancashire. ... Chelsea Football Club (also known as The Blues or previously The Pensioners) are an English professional football club based in west London. ... Coventry City Football Club, otherwise known as the Sky Blues owing to the traditional colour of their strip, is an association football club based in Coventry, England. ... Crystal Palace Football Club is an English professional football team based in the London Borough of Croydon. ... Everton Football Club is an English football club located in the city of Liverpool. ... Ipswich Town Football Club (also known as Ipswich, The Blues, Town or The Tractor Boys) are an English professional football club based in Ipswich, Suffolk. ... Leeds United Association Football Club are an English professional football club based in Leeds, West Yorkshire. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... Manchester City Football Club is an English professional football club based in the city of Manchester. ... MUFC redirects here. ... Middlesbrough Football Club (commonly known as Boro) are an English football club based in Middlesbrough. ... Norwich City Football Club (also known as The Canaries) is an English professional football club based in Norwich, Norfolk. ... Nottingham Forest Football Club are an English professional football club based at The City Ground in West Bridgford a suburb of Nottingham, England. ... Oldham Athletic Association Football Club are an English football team currently playing in Football League One. ... Queens Park Rangers Football Club is an English football club, based at Shepherds Bush in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham in West London. ... Sheffield United Football Club is a professional English football club based in the city of Sheffield, South Yorkshire. ... SWFC redirects here. ... Southampton Football Club is a professional English football team, nicknamed The Saints and based in the city of Southampton. ... Current season Tottenham Hotspur Football Club is an English professional football club which currently plays in the Premier League. ... This article refers to the original club from London which existed until 2003. ...


Establishment

See also: List of Premier League seasons

As of the end of the 2007–08 season, there had been 16 completed seasons of the Premier League. The league held its first season in 1992–93 and was originally composed of 22 clubs. The first ever Premiership goal was scored by Brian Deane of Sheffield United in a 2–1 win against Manchester United. Due to insistence by FIFA, the international governing body of football, that domestic leagues reduce the number of games clubs played, the number of clubs was reduced to 20 in 1995 when four teams were relegated from the league and only two teams promoted. On 8 June 2006, FIFA requested that all major European leagues, including Italy's Serie A and Spain's La Liga be reduced to 18 teams by the start of the 2007–08 season. The Premier League responded by announcing their intention to resist such a reduction.[10] Ultimately the 2007–08 season kicked off again with 20 teams. The league changed its name from the FA Premier League to simply the Premier League in 2007.[11] That same season saw the discussion over Game 39, a showpiece match played overseas.[12] This is a list of every Premier League season from the leagues foundation in 1992–93 to the end of the most recent completed season. ... This is a list of every Premier League season from the leagues foundation in 1992–93 to the end of the most recent completed season. ... This article described the FA Premier League 1992-93 season. ... Brian Deane (born February 7, 1968 in Leeds, Yorkshire, England) is an English footballer. ... Sheffield United F.C. are a football club in The Football League. ... This article is about the international association football organization. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Corporate structure

The Premier League is operated as a corporation and is owned by the 20 member clubs. Each club is a shareholder, with one vote each on issues such as rule changes and contracts. The clubs elect a chairman, chief executive, and board of directors to oversee the daily operations of the league.[13] The Football Association is not directly involved in the day-to-day operations of the Premier League, but has veto power as a special shareholder during the election of the chairman and chief executive and when new rules are adopted by the league.[14] A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... Chief Executive redirects here. ... Chairman of the Board redirects here. ...


The Premier League sends representatives to UEFA's European Club Forum, the number of clubs and the clubs themselves chosen according to UEFA coefficients. The European Club Forum is responsible for electing three members to UEFA's Club Competitions Committee, which is involved in the operations of UEFA competitions such as the Champions League and UEFA Cup.[15] In European football, the UEFA coefficients are statistics used for ranking and seeding teams in club and international competitions. ... UEFA Champions League, which replaced the European Champions Cup, is a seasonal club football competition organised by UEFA since 1992 for the most successful football clubs in Europe. ... The UEFA Cup (also known as European Cup 3, CE3 or C3) is a football competition for European club teams, organized by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). ...


Competition format and sponsorship

Competition

There are 20 clubs in the Premier League. During the course of a season, which lasts from August to May, each club plays the others twice, once at their home stadium and once at that of their opponents, for a total of 38 games. Teams receive three points for a win and one point for a draw. No points are awarded for a loss. Teams are ranked by total points, then goal difference, and then goals scored. At the end of each season, the club with the most points is crowned champion. If points are equal, the goal difference and then goals scored determine the winner. If still equal, teams are deemed to occupy the same position. If there is a tie for the championship, for relegation, or for qualification to other competitions, a play-off match at a neutral venue decides rank.[16] The three lowest placed teams are relegated into the Football League Championship and the top two teams from the Championship, together with the winner of play-offs involving the third to sixth placed Championship clubs, are promoted in their place.[17] In sports such as ice hockey and soccer, goal difference (that is, goals scored less goals conceded) is often the first tie-breaker used to rank teams which finish a competition with an equal number of points. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... The Football League Championship Playoffs are a series of playoff matches contested by the teams finishing from 3rd to 6th in the Coca Cola Football League Championship table. ...


Qualification for European competitions

The top four teams in the Premiership qualify for the UEFA Champions League, with the top two teams directly entering the group phase. The third and fourth placed teams enter the competition at the third qualifying round and must win a two-legged knockout tie in order to enter the group phase. The fifth placed team automatically qualifies for the UEFA Cup, and the sixth and seventh placed teams can also qualify, depending on what happens in the two domestic cup competitions. If the FA Cup winners and runners-up both finish in the top five of the Premier League, the FA Cup's UEFA Cup spot goes to the sixth placed team in the League. If the League Cup is won by a team that has already qualified for Europe, the League Cup's UEFA Cup spot also goes to the next highest placed team in the League (unlike the FA Cup spot, it is never transferred to the losing finalist).[18] The highest placed team that has not qualified for the UEFA Cup is allowed the opportunity to compete in the UEFA Intertoto Cup, provided they have applied to enter the Intertoto Cup in the next season. This provides another means of getting into the UEFA Cup, as winners of all eleven third-round Intertoto Cup ties qualify for that tournament. UEFA Champions League, which replaced the European Champions Cup, is a seasonal club football competition organised by UEFA since 1992 for the most successful football clubs in Europe. ... The UEFA Cup (also known as European Cup 3, CE3 or C3) is a football competition for European club teams, organized by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... The Carling Cup Trophy The Football League Cup, commonly known as the League Cup, is an English football competition. ... The UEFA Intertoto Cup, also abbreviated as UI Cup, is a summer football competition for European clubs that have not qualified for one of the two major UEFA competitions, the Champions League and the UEFA Cup. ...

Bolton Wanderers and Fulham compete in the FA Cup.

An exception to the usual European qualification system happened in 2005, when Liverpool won the UEFA Champions League, but did not finish in a Champions League qualification position in that season's Premier League. UEFA gave special dispensation for Liverpool to enter the Champions League, giving England five qualifiers.[19] UEFA subsequently ruled that the defending champions of the trophy qualify for the competition the following year regardless of their domestic league placing. However, for those associations with four participants in the Champions League, this means that if the Champions League winner falls outside of its domestic league's top four, it will qualify at the expense of the fourth-ranked team in the league. Image File history File linksMetadata Fulham_on_the_attack. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Fulham_on_the_attack. ... Bolton Wanderers Football Club is an English professional football club based in Lostock, in the Borough of Bolton, England. ... Current season Fulham Football Club are an English football team based in Fulham, in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... Although they were the champions of Europe, Liverpool FCs domestic performance meant the team had finished outside the top four of the Premiership (the requirement for entry to the Champions League) and therefore unable to defend their title. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ...


The Premiership was recently promoted to second in the UEFA rankings of European leagues based on their performances in European competitions over a five year period, behind Spain's La Liga and now above Italy's Serie A.[20] The top three leagues in Europe are currently allowed to enter four teams into the Champions League. The UEFA president Michel Platini, had proposed taking one place from the Premier League's quota, and allocating this place to the FA Cup winners. This proposal though, was rejected in a vote at a UEFA Strategy Council meeting.[21] (Professional Football League), commonly known as the Primera División or simply La Liga, is the top professional football league in Spain. ... This article is about the Italian football league. ... Michel François Platini (born June 21, 1955) is a French former football manager and midfielder, and current president of the UEFA (Union of European Football Associations). ...


In the same meeting that Platini's suggestion that FA Cup winners should qualify for the Champion's League rather than the UEFA Cup was rejected, it was however agreed upon that the third-placed team in the Premier League would receive automatic qualification for the group stages, rather than entry into the Third Qualifying Round as at present, while the fourth-placed team would enter a redesigned two tiered qualification round against a team from a higher ranked nation than they had previously been under the old rules. This was part of Platini's plan to increase the amount of teams qualifying directly into the Group Stage, while simultaneously increasing the number of teams from lower-ranked nations in the competition proper.[22]


Sponsorship

Since 1993, the Premier League has been sponsored. The sponsor has been able to determine the league's sponsorship name. The list below details who the sponsors have been and what they called the competition:

  • 1993–2001: Carling (FA Carling Premiership)
  • 2001–2004: Barclaycard (Barclaycard Premiership)
  • 2004–2010: Barclays (Barclays Premiership (2004–2007) then Barclays Premier League (2007–2010))[23]

For other uses, see Carling (disambiguation). ... Barclaycard logo Barclaycard is a global credit provider (credit cards and loans) owned by Barclays plc in the UK. The Barclaycard was the first credit card introduced in the UK, coming into service in 1966. ... The Barclays Group is based in One Churchill Place, Canary Wharf Barclays plc (LSE: BARC, NYSE: BCS, TYO: 8642 ) is a global financial services provider and sportswear consultancy operating in Europe, the United States, the Middle East, Latin America, Australia, Asia and Africa. ...

Finances

See also: List of Premier League football club owners

The Premier League is the most lucrative football league in the world, with total club revenues of over £1.4 billion in 2005–06 season according to Deloitte, making it 40% above its nearest competitor: Italy's Serie A.[24] Revenues have increased to approximately £1.8 billion in the 2007–08 season,[25] when new media rights deals started. Based on November 2007 exchange rates, £1.8 billion converts to a gross annual league revenue of about US$3.7 billion. For the past few seasons, the Premier League's gross revenue (£1.4bn) has been the fourth highest for any sports league worldwide, behind the annual revenues of the three most popular North American major sports leagues (the National Football League, Major League Baseball and the National Basketball Association), but ahead of the National Hockey League. Deloitte & Touche (also referred to as Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, and branded as Deloitte. ... This article is about the Italian football league. ... USD redirects here. ... North American redirects here. ... The term major professional sports league is used to describe the most important and well regarded leagues in the biggest professional sports in a country or region. ... NFL redirects here. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... NBA redirects here. ... NHL redirects here. ...


In terms of world football, the Premier League clubs are some of the richest in the world. Deloitte, who annually release figures on club revenues through its "Football Money League", listed eight Premier League clubs in the top 20 for the 2005–06 season.[26] No other league has more than four clubs in this table, and while La Liga rivals Real Madrid and F.C. Barcelona take up two of the top 3 places, no other Spanish clubs are listed in the top 20. Premier League teams have dominated the list for many years, and even topped the list for almost a decade until the 2004–05 season. After the Premier League's new TV deal went into effect, the league-wide increase in revenues is expected to increase the Premier League clubs' standing in the list, and there is a possibility that a Premier League club will be top of the list.[26][27] The Deloitte Football Money League is a ranking of football clubs by income. ... (Professional Football League), commonly known as the Primera División or simply La Liga, is the top professional football league in Spain. ... Real Madrid Club de Fútbol is a Spanish sports club most widely known for its professional football team based in Madrid. ... FC Barcelona, also known as Barça, is a sports club in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain with sections in many different sports. ...


Another significant source of regular income for Premier League clubs remains their revenue from stadium attendances, which, with the 2005–06 average attendance of 34,364 for league matches, is the fourth highest of any domestic professional sports league in the world, ahead of Serie A and La Liga, but behind the German Bundesliga. This represents an increase of over 60% from the average attendance of 21,126 recorded in the league's first season (1992–93).[28] However, during the 1992–93 season the capacities of most stadiums were reduced as clubs replaced terraces with seats in order to meet the Taylor Report's 1994–95 deadline for all-seater stadiums.[29][30] The 2005–06 figure, however, is lower than the Premier League's record average attendance of 35,464, set during the 2002–03 season.[31] The table below lists domestic professional sports leagues from around the world by total attendances for the last completed season for which data is available. ... The Taylor Report is a document, whose development was overseen by Lord Justice Taylor, concerning the aftermath and causes of the Hillsborough disaster in 1989. ... All-seater is a terminology applied to sports stadiums in which every spectator must be seated. ...


Media coverage

United Kingdom and Ireland

See also: English football on television
A 2004 match between Manchester United and Tottenham Hotspur

Television has played a major role in the history of the Premier League. The money from television rights has been vital in helping to create excellence both on and off the field. The League's decision to assign broadcasting rights to BSkyB in 1992 was at the time a radical decision, but one that has paid off. At the time pay television was an almost untested proposition in the UK market, as was charging fans to watch live televised football. However, a combination of Sky's strategy, the quality of Premier League football and the public's appetite for the game has seen the value of the Premier League's TV rights soar.[6] English football has been screened on television since 1937, and since the establishment of the Premier League in 1992, it has become a very lucrative industry. ... Image File history File links Ruud. ... Image File history File links Ruud. ... MUFC redirects here. ... Current season Tottenham Hotspur Football Club is an English professional football club which currently plays in the Premier League. ... British Sky Broadcasting (BSkyB — formerly two companies, Sky Television and BSB) is a company that operates Sky Digital, a subscription television service in the UK and the Republic of Ireland. ...


The Premier League sells its television rights on a collective basis. This is in contrast to some European Leagues, including Serie A and La Liga, in which each club sells its rights individually, leading to a much higher share of the total income going to the top few clubs. The money is divided into three parts:[32] half is divided equally between the clubs; one quarter is awarded on a merit basis based on final league position, the top club getting twenty times as much as the bottom club, and equal steps all the way down the table; the final quarter is paid out as facilities fees for games that are shown on television, with the top clubs generally receiving the largest shares of this. The income from overseas rights is divided equally between the twenty clubs.


The first Sky television rights agreement was worth £191 million over five seasons.[33] The next contract, negotiated to start from the 1997–98 season, rose to £670 million over four seasons.[33] The third contract was a £1.024 billion deal with BSkyB for the three seasons from 2004–05 to 2006–07. The league brought in £320 million from the sale of its international rights for the three-year period from 2004–05 to 2006–07. It sold the rights itself on a territory-by-territory basis.[34] Sky's monopoly was broken from August 2006 when Setanta Sports was awarded rights to show two out of the six packages of matches available. This occurred following an insistence by the European Commission that exclusive rights should not be sold to one television company. Sky and Setanta paid a total of £1.7 billion, a two-thirds increase which took many commentators by surprise as it had been widely assumed that the value of the rights had levelled off following many years of rapid growth. Setanta also hold rights to a live 3 pm match solely for Irish viewers. The BBC has retained the rights to show highlights for the same three seasons (on Match of the Day) for £171.6 million, a 63% increase on the £105 million it paid for the previous three year period.[35] Radio Telefís Éireann broadcast the highlights in Ireland. Sky and BT have agreed to jointly pay £84.3 million for delayed television rights to 242 games (that is the right to broadcast them in full on television and over the internet) in most cases for a period of 50 hours after 10 pm on matchday.[36] Overseas television rights fetched £625 million, nearly double the previous contract.[37] The total raised from these deals is more than £2.7 billion, giving Premiership clubs an average media income from league games of £45 million a year from 2007 to 2010. They also receive smaller amounts from media rights for the domestic cups and in some cases substantial amounts from media rights for European matches. Setanta Sports (pronounced ) is an international sports broadcaster, operating 12 channels in 24 countries. ... Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... For the Doctor Who novel, see Match of the Day (Doctor Who). ... Radio Telefís Éireann[1] (RTÉ; IPA: ,  ) is the Public Service Broadcaster of the Republic of Ireland. ... BT Group plc (formerly British Telecommunications plc) which trades as BT (pronounced Bee tee) (also previously as British Telecom and is still commonly known as such amongst the general public) is the privatised UK state telecommunications operator. ...


The TV rights agreement between the Premier League and Sky has faced accusations of being a cartel, and a number of court cases have arisen as a result. An investigation by the Office of Fair Trading in 2002 found BSkyB to be dominant within the pay TV sports market, but concluded that there were insufficient grounds for the claim that BSkyB had abused its dominant position.[38] In July 1999 the Premier League's method of selling rights collectively for all member clubs was investigated by the UK Restrictive Practices Court, who concluded that the agreement was not contrary to the public interest.[39] The Office of Fair Trading or OFT is a UK statutory body established by the Fair Trading Act 1973, which enforces both consumer protection and competition law, acting as the UKs economic regulator. ...


Worldwide

Promoted as "The Greatest Show On Earth", the Premier League is the world's most popular and most watched sporting league, followed worldwide by over half a billion people in 202 countries,[40] generally on networks owned and/or controlled by NewsCorp, which owns a large portion of BSkyB and thus the primary UK and Ireland TV rights. In the United States coverage is shared between Fox Soccer Channel and Setanta Sports North America; NewsCorp sometimes buys pitch-side advertising boards with the Fox Soccer Channel logo replacing that of Sky. 1211 Avenue of the Americas (Sixth Avenue), where News Corporation is based News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: , LSE: NCRA) is an American media conglomerate company and the third worlds largest. ... Fox Soccer Channel is a United States digital cable network, owned by News Corporation, that specializes in soccer. ... Setanta Sports North America is an television channel launched in 2005 by the Irish sports broadcaster Setanta Sports. ...


The Premier League is particularly popular in Asia, where it is the most widely distributed sports programme.[41] In the People's Republic of China, matches attract television audiences between 100 million and 360 million, more than any other foreign sport.[42] Due to this popularity, the league has held three pre-season tournaments in Asia, the only Premier League affiliated tournaments ever to have been held outside England. In July 2003, the FA Premier League Asia Cup was held in Malaysia, featuring three Premiership clubs, Chelsea, Newcastle United and Birmingham City, and the Malaysia national team.[43] In 2005 the Asia Trophy featured a similar format, held in Thailand and featuring the Thailand national team competing against three English clubs — Everton, Manchester City and Bolton Wanderers, the last of which won the trophy.[44] In 2007, the Barclays Asia Trophy was held in Hong Kong and featured Liverpool, Portsmouth, Fulham and the Hong Kong FA Cup winning team, South China. For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... First international  Korea Republic 3 - 2 Malaya (Singapore; April 13, 1953) Biggest win Malaya 15 - 1 Philippines  (Jakarta, Indonesia; August 27, 1962) Biggest defeat  Japan 13 - 0 Malaysia (Tokyo, Japan; September 27, 1997) World Cup Appearances 0 times (First in -) Best result - AFC Asian Cup Appearances 3 (First in 1976... First international South Vietnam 3 - 1 Thailand (South Vietnam; Date Unknown, 1956?) Biggest win Thailand 10 - 0 Brunei (Bangkok, Thailand; May 24, 1971) Biggest defeat Great Britain 9 - 0 Thailand (Melbourne, Australia; November 26, 1956) AFC Asian Cup Appearances 5 (First in 1972) Best result Third place, 1972 The Thailand... Barclays Asia Trophy 2007 The Barclays Asia Trophy 2007 (Traditional chinese: 柏克萊亞洲錦標賽) is a four-team soccer tournament that will be competed by South China, being the winner of Hong Kongs FA Cup, Liverpool F.C., Portsmouth F.C. and Fulham F.C. at the 40,000-capacity Hong Kong... Hong Kong FA Cup is a competition for Hong Kong First Division League teams. ... South China Athletic Association (SCAA, Traditional Chinese: ) is a Hong Kong football team under the football division of local sports club South China Athletic Association. ...


The FA has faced difficulty fighting internet copyright infringement. In an effort to stop the broadcasting of streams of live games on the net they have hired NetResult, a company that specialises on protecting trademark rights online. The BBC reported that NetResult, on behalf of the Premier League, emailed a warning to 101greatgoals.blogspot.com, an independent website that links to youtube videos, that forced its temporary closure.[45] For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


Criticisms

Widening gap between lower leagues

One of the main criticisms leveled at the Premier League is the increasing gulf between the Premiership and the Football League. Since its split with the Football League, many established clubs in the Premier League have managed to distance themselves from their counterparts in lower leagues. Owing in large part to the disparity in revenue from television rights between the leagues,[46] many newly promoted teams have found it difficult to avoid relegation in their first season in the Premier League. In every season except 2001–02 (Blackburn Rovers, Bolton Wanderers and Fulham) at least one Premier League newcomer has been relegated back to the Football League. In 1997–98 all three promoted clubs were relegated at the end of the season.[47] Since the FA Premier League began at the start of the 1992–93 season, its members have received larger amounts of money in TV rights than their Football League counterparts. ... The Football League is a league competition featuring professional football clubs from England and Wales. ... This article describes the FA Premier League 2001-02 season. ... Blackburn Rovers is an English Premier League football club based in the town of Blackburn, Lancashire. ... Bolton Wanderers F.C. is an English professional football club. ... Current season Fulham Football Club are an English football team based in Fulham, in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. ... The FA Premier League 1997-98 season saw Arsenal lift their first league title since 1991, and also become only the second team to win the double of the FA Cup and league title twice. ...


The Premier League distributes a small portion of its television revenue to clubs that are relegated from the league in the form of "parachute payments". Starting with the 2006–07 season, these payments are in the amount of £6.5 million over the club's first two seasons in lower leagues, although this is set to rise to £11.2 million per year for clubs relegated in 2007–2008.[46] Designed to help teams adjust to the loss of television revenues (the average Premier League team receives £45 million while the average Football League Championship club receives £1 million[46]), critics maintain that the payments actually widen the gap between teams that have reached the Premiership and those that have not,[48] leading to the common occurrence of teams "bouncing back" soon after their relegation. The 2006-07 FA Premier League season, the fifteenth since its establishment, started on August 19, 2006. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... Since the FA Premier League began at the start of the 1992–93 season, its members have received larger amounts of money in TV rights than their Football League counterparts. ...


"Big Four" dominance

Another major criticism is the development of the so-called "Big Four" clubs.[49] In the past 13 seasons only three different clubs have won the Premier League title—Manchester United (eight times), Arsenal (three times) and Chelsea (twice). Blackburn Rovers are the only other team to have won the title in the Premier League's history. In addition, Manchester United have not finished outside the top three since the formation of the Premier League, with Arsenal finishing inside the top five in all but two seasons, while Liverpool, without an English league title since the pre-Premier League era, have not finished lower than fifth since 1999. In recent years, the success of these clubs has led to these four teams being increasingly referred to as the "Big Four". The Big Four clubs have finished in the first four positions respectively for the last three seasons. Therefore they have all qualified for the last four seasons of the Champions League and receive the financial benefits of such qualification. The benefits include increased revenue and this is believed to have widened the gap between the Big Four clubs and the rest of the Premier League.[49] In May 2008, Newcastle United manager Kevin Keegan said the Big Four's dominance threatened the division, saying, "This league is in danger of becoming one of the most boring but great leagues in the world."[50] Following Keegan's comments, Premier League chief executive Richard Scudamore defended the league, saying, "There are a lot of different tussles that go on in the Premier League depending on whether you're at the top, in the middle or at the bottom that make it interesting."[51] Joseph Kevin Keegan, OBE (born 14 February 1951 in Armthorpe, Doncaster, England)[1] is a former footballer, former England national team coach and the current manager of Newcastle United. ... Richard Scudamore is currently Chief Executive of the F.A. Premier League, a position he has held since October 1999. ...


Premier League clubs

See also: List of Premier League clubs
See also: English football champions

A total of 40 clubs have played in the Premier League between 1992 and 2006. Two other clubs (Luton Town and Notts County) were signatories to the original agreement that created the Premier League, but were relegated prior to the inaugural Premiership season and have not subsequently returned to the top flight. For a list of all clubs past and present see List of FA Premier League clubs and an amalgamated table can be found at All-time FA Premier League table. For a list of winners and runners-up of the Premier League since its inception, and top scorers for each season, see English football champions. The English football champions are the winners of the highest league in English football, which is currently the Premier League. ... Luton Town Football Club are an English football team based in the town of Luton in Bedfordshire. ... Notts County Football Club is a football club based in Nottingham, England, and are the oldest of all the clubs that are now professional[1]. The team currently plays in Football League Two, of the Coca-Cola league section of the English football league system. ... The following is a list of teams who have played in the FA Premier League at any time following its formation in 1992. ... The All-Time FA Premier League Table is a cumulative record of all match results, points, and goals of every team that has played in the Premier League since its inception in 1992. ... The English football champions are the winners of the highest league in English football, which is currently the Premier League. ...


Seven clubs have been members of the Premiership for every season since its inception. This group is composed of Arsenal, Aston Villa, Chelsea, Everton, Liverpool, Manchester United, and Tottenham Hotspur.[52] Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are an English professional football club based in Holloway, north London. ... Aston Villa redirects here. ... Chelsea Football Club (also known as The Blues or previously The Pensioners) are an English professional football club based in west London. ... Everton Football Club is an English football club located in the city of Liverpool. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... MUFC redirects here. ... Current season Tottenham Hotspur Football Club is an English professional football club which currently plays in the Premier League. ...


Premier League members for 2008–09

The following 19 clubs will compete in the Premier League during the 2008–09 season. One other club will take the final 20th spot after the completion of the Championship playoffs. The 2008–09 Premier League season will be the seventeenth since its establishment. ... The Football League Championship Playoffs are a series of playoff matches contested by the teams finishing from 3rd to 6th in the Coca Cola Football League Championship table. ...

Club
Position
in 2007–08
First season in
top division
First season of
current spell in
top division
Last title
Arsenala,b 3rd 1904–05 1919–20 2003–04
Aston Villaa,b 6th 1888–89 1988–89 1980–81
Blackburn Roversa 7th 1888–89 2001–02 1994–95
Bolton Wanderers 16th 1888–89 2001–02 n/a
Chelseaa,b 2nd 1907–08 1989–90 2005–06
Evertona,b 5th 1888–89 1954–55 1986–87
Fulham 17th 1949–50 2001–02 n/a
Liverpoola,b 4th 1894–95 1962–63 1989–90
Manchester Citya 9th 1899–1900 2002–03 1967–68
Manchester Uniteda,b 1st 1892–93 1975–76 2007–08
Middlesbrougha 13th 1902–03 1998–99 n/a
Newcastle United 12th 1898–99 1993–94 1926–27
Portsmouth 8th 1927–28 2003–04 1949–50
Stoke City 2nd; Championship 1888–89 2008–09 n/a
Sunderland 15th 1890–91 2007–08 1935–36
Tottenham Hotspura,b 11th 1909–10 1978–79 1960–61
West Bromwich Albion 1st; Championship 1888–89 2008–09 1919–20
West Ham United 10th 1923–24 2005–06 n/a
Wigan Athletic 14th 2005–06 2005–06 n/a

a = Founding member of the Premier League
b = Played in every Premier League season The 2007–08 season is the 128th season of competitive football in England. ... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are an English professional football club based in Holloway, north London. ... Aston Villa redirects here. ... Blackburn Rovers Football Club are an English Premier League football club based in the town of Blackburn, Lancashire. ... This article describes the FA Premier League 2001-02 season. ... Bolton Wanderers Football Club is an English professional football club based in Lostock, in the Borough of Bolton, England. ... This article describes the FA Premier League 2001-02 season. ... Chelsea Football Club (also known as The Blues or previously The Pensioners) are an English professional football club based in west London. ... Everton Football Club is an English football club located in the city of Liverpool. ... Current season Fulham Football Club are an English football team based in Fulham, in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. ... This article describes the FA Premier League 2001-02 season. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... Manchester City Football Club is an English professional football club based in the city of Manchester. ... The FA Premier League 2002-03 season (often referred to as the 2002-03 Barclaycard Premiership, due to sponsorship rights) was the eleventh season of the competition. ... MUFC redirects here. ... Middlesbrough Football Club (commonly known as Boro) are an English football club based in Middlesbrough. ... The 1998-99 FA Premier League season will always be remembered as the season in which Manchester United won a unique treble of the Premiership title, FA Cup and European Cup. ... For the Australian club, see Newcastle United Jets. ... This article describes the FA Premier League 1993-94 season. ... Portsmouth Football Club is an English football club based in the south coast island city of Portsmouth. ... Arsenal captain Patrick Vieira lifting the trophy at Highbury The 2003-04 FA Premier League season was mainly contended between Arsenal, Chelsea and to some extent, Manchester United. ... Stoke City Football Club is a football club based in Stoke-on-Trent, England. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... The 2008–09 Premier League season will be the seventeenth since its establishment. ... Current season Sunderland Association Football Club is a professional association football team based in Sunderland, Tyne and Wear, in North-East England. ... The 2007-08 Premier League season will be the sixteenth since its establishment, and is set to start in August of 2007. ... Current season Tottenham Hotspur Football Club is an English professional football club which currently plays in the Premier League. ... West Bromwich Albion Football Club (also known as West Brom, The Baggies, Albion, The Albion, The Throstles or W.B.A.) are an English professional football club based in West Bromwich, West Midlands. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... The 2008–09 Premier League season will be the seventeenth since its establishment. ... Current season West Ham United Football Club is an English football club based in Upton Park, London Borough of Newham, East London, and have played their home matches at the 35,303 capacity Boleyn Ground stadium since 1904. ... Location of teams in the 2005-06 season The 2005-06 season of the FA Premier League began on August 13, 2005, and concluded on May 7, 2006. ... Wigan Athletic Football Club is a professional football team based in Wigan, Greater Manchester, England. ... Location of teams in the 2005-06 season The 2005-06 season of the FA Premier League began on August 13, 2005, and concluded on May 7, 2006. ...


Players

See also: List of foreign Premier League players

Premier League clubs have almost complete freedom to sign whatever number and category of players they wish. There is no team or individual salary cap, no squad size limit, no age restrictions other than those applied by general employment law, no restrictions on the overall number of foreign players, and few restrictions on individual foreign players — all players with EU nationality, including those able to claim an EU passport through a parent or grandparent, are eligible to play, and top players from outside the EU are able to obtain UK work permits. The only area where the Premiership's player registration rules are more restrictive than those of some other football leagues, such as those of those of Belgium and Portugal, is that academy level non-EU players have little access to English football.[53] This is a list of foreign players in Premier League. ...


At the inception of the Premier League in 1992–93, just eleven players named in the starting line-ups for the first round of matches were 'foreign' (players hailing from outside of the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland).[54] By 2000–01, the number of foreign players participating in the Premiership was 36%. In the 2004–05 season the figure had increased to 45%. On 26 December 1999, Chelsea became the first Premier League side to field an entirely foreign starting line-up,[55] and on 14 February 2005 Arsenal were the first to name a completely foreign 16-man squad for a match.[56] No English manager has won the Premier League; the four managers to have won the title comprise two Scots (Sir Alex Ferguson (Manchester United, ten wins) and Kenny Dalglish (Blackburn Rovers, one win)), a Frenchman (Arsène Wenger, Arsenal, three wins) and a Portuguese (José Mourinho, Chelsea, two wins). This article described the FA Premier League 1992-93 season. ... The FA Premier League 2000-01 season was the third season running which ended with Manchester United as champions and Arsenal as runners-up. ... The 2004-05 season of the FA Premier League began in August 2004 and ended in May 2005. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the country. ... For other persons named Alex Ferguson, see Alex Ferguson (disambiguation). ... Kenneth Mathieson Dalglish MBE (born 4 March 1951 in Dalmarnock, Glasgow) is a former Scottish international football player. ... Motto: Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité Liberty, Equality, Fraternity Anthem: La Marseillaise France() – on the European continent() – in the European Union() Capital (and largest city) Paris Official languages French Demonym French Government Unitary semi-presidential republic  -  President Nicolas Sarkozy  -  Prime Minister François Fillon Formation  -  French State 843 French State Formed   -  Current... Arsène Wenger OBE[2] (born October 22, 1949 in Strasbourg) is a French football manager, in charge of Arsenal Football Club since 1997. ... José Mário dos Santos Félix Mourinho, GOIH (pron. ...


In response to concerns that clubs were increasingly passing over young British players in favour of signing less-expensive foreign players, in 1999, the Home Office tightened its rules for granting work permits to players from countries outside of the European Union.[57] Currently a non-EU player applying for the permit must have played for his country in at least 75% of its competitive 'A' team matches for which he was available for selection during the previous two years, and his country must have averaged at least 70th place in the official FIFA world rankings over the previous two years. If a player does not meet those criteria, the club wishing to sign him may appeal if they believe that he is a special talent and "able to contribute significantly to the development of the game at the top level in the UK."[53] The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ...


Over 260 foreign players compete in the league, and 101 players from England's domestic leagues competed in the 2002 FIFA World Cup in Korea and Japan. At the 2006 FIFA World Cup in Germany, the Premier League was the most represented league with more than eighty players in the competition, including 21 of the 23 players in England's squad. 2002 World Cup redirects here. ... For Korea as a whole, see Korea. ... 2006 World Cup redirects here. ... This article lists the confirmed national football squads for the 2006 FIFA World Cup tournament held in Germany, between June 9 and July 9, 2006. ...


As a result of the increasingly lucrative television deals, player wages rose sharply following the formation of the Premier League. In the first Premier League season the average player wage was £75,000 per year,[58] but subsequently rose by an average 20% per year for a decade,[59] peaking in the 2003–04 season, when the annual salary of the average Premier League player was £676,000.[60] Arsenal captain Patrick Vieira lifting the trophy at Highbury The 2003-04 FA Premier League season was mainly contended between Arsenal, Chelsea and to some extent, Manchester United. ...


The record transfer fee for a Premier League has been broken several times over the lifetime of the competition. Prior to the start of the first Premier League season Alan Shearer became the first British player to command a £3 million-plus transfer fee.[61] The record rose steadily in the Premier League's first few seasons, until Alan Shearer made a world record breaking £15 million move to Newcastle United in 1996.[61] This stood as a British record for four years until it was eclipsed by the £18 million Leeds paid West Ham for Rio Ferdinand.[61] Manchester United subsequently broke the record three times by signing Ruud van Nistelrooy, Juan Sebastián Verón and Rio Ferdinand.[62][63] As of 2007, the current record holder is Andriy Shevchenko, who joined Chelsea from AC Milan in May 2006. The exact figure of the transfer fee was not disclosed, but was reported as being around £30 million.[64] This is a list of the most expensive transfer fees paid - at that time - in football in the United Kingdom. ... Alan Shearer, OBE (born 13 August 1970 in Gosforth) is a retired professional English footballer who played as a striker for the England national team and Premiership clubs, Southampton, Blackburn Rovers and Newcastle United. ... Rio Gavin Ferdinand (born 7 November 1978 in Peckham, London) is an English footballer of mixed St Lucian,and Anglo-Irish descent. ... Rutgerus Johannes Martinius van Nistelrooy (originally spelled Van Nistelrooij) (born 1 July 1976 in Oss, North Brabant) is a Dutch footballer who plays as a centre forward for Real Madrid and the Dutch national team. ... Juan Sebastián Verón (born March 9, 1975 in La Plata) is an Argentine professional football player who plays as a midfielder. ... Andriy Mykolayovych Shevchenko (Ukrainian: , born 29 September 1976, Dvirkivschyna, Kiev Oblast) is a Ukrainian football striker who plays for Chelsea in the Premier League. ... AC Milan is an Italian football club. ...


Top scorers

All-time top scorers in the Premier League
(Premier League goals only)
Rank Player Goals
1 Alan Shearer 260
2 Andy Cole 187
3 Thierry Henry 174
4 Robbie Fowler 163
5 Les Ferdinand 149
6 Teddy Sheringham 146
7 Michael Owen[65] 136
8 Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink 127
9 Dwight Yorke[65] 123
10 Ian Wright 113
As of 12 May 2008 (Bold denotes players still in Premier League).[66]
Further information: Top Scorer (Golden Boot) by season, List of football players with a Premiership medal

Players in the Premier League can compete for the informal competitions of Goal of the Month and Goal of the Season. Other titles players compete for include the top-scorer for a season. Former Blackburn Rovers and Newcastle United striker Alan Shearer holds the record for most Premiership goals with 260. Shearer finished among the top ten goal scorers in 10 out of his 14 seasons in the Premier League and won the top scorer title three times. During the 1995–96 season he became the first player to score 100 Premier League goals.[67] Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Alan Shearer, OBE (born 13 August 1970 in Gosforth) is a retired professional English footballer who played as a striker for the England national team and Premiership clubs, Southampton, Blackburn Rovers and Newcastle United. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Andrew (Andy) Alexander Cole (born 15 October 1971 in Nottingham) is an English footballer, who is one of the highest scoring players in English footballs history. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Thierry Daniel Henry (pronounced , born 17 August 1977) is a French football player. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Robert Bernard Robbie Fowler, born 9 April 1975 is an English footballer who currently plays for Championship side Cardiff City. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Leslie Les Ferdinand MBE (born December 18, 1966 in Paddington, London) is a former English footballer. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Edward Paul Sheringham MBE (born 2 April 1966 in Highams Park, London) is a veteran English professional footballer currently playing for Colchester United and the father of footballer Charlie Sheringham. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... For other persons named Michael Owen, see Michael Owen (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Jerrel Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink (born 27 March 1972 in Paramaribo, Suriname), usually known as Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink,[1] is a Dutch football striker, currently playing for Cardiff City. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Trinidad_and_Tobago. ... This article is about Dwight Yorke, the football player. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... For other persons named Ian Wright, see Ian Wright (disambiguation). ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The English football champions are the winners of the highest league in English football, which is currently the Premier League. ... Since the formation of the Premier League in 1992, only four teams have won the title - Manchester United, Arsenal, Chelsea and Blackburn Rovers. ... The Goal of the Month is a monthly competition on BBCs Match of the Day since the 1970/71 season, in honour of the best goal scored each month. ... The Goal of the Season is an annual competition and award given on BBCs Match of the Day, in honour of the most spectacular goal scored that season. ... This article is about association football players. ... Alan Shearer, OBE (born 13 August 1970 in Gosforth) is a retired professional English footballer who played as a striker for the England national team and Premiership clubs, Southampton, Blackburn Rovers and Newcastle United. ... The 1995-1996 season was the 116th season of competitive football in England. ...


Since the first Premier League season in 1992–93, 11 different players have won or shared the top scorers title. Thierry Henry won his third consecutive and fourth overall scoring title by scoring 27 goals in the 2005–06 season. This surpassed Shearer's mark of three titles which he won consecutively from 1994–95 through 1996–97. Other multiple winners include Michael Owen and Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink who have won two titles each. Andrew Cole and Alan Shearer hold the record for most goals in a season (34) — for Newcastle United and Blackburn Rovers respectively. Cole's record came in the 1993–94 season, while Shearer's came in 1994–95, both of which were 42-game seasons.[68] Shearer's mark of 31 goals from a 38-game season in 1995–96 was equalled in the 2007–08 season by Cristiano Ronaldo, a mark which surpassed the record of most goals by a midfielder in a season.[69] Thierry Daniel Henry (pronounced , born 17 August 1977) is a French football player. ... For other persons named Michael Owen, see Michael Owen (disambiguation). ... Jerrel Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink (born 27 March 1972 in Paramaribo, Suriname), usually known as Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink,[1] is a Dutch football striker, currently playing for Cardiff City. ... Andrew (Andy) Alexander Cole (born 15 October 1971 in Nottingham) is an English footballer, who is one of the highest scoring players in English footballs history. ... Cristiano Ronaldo dos Santos Aveiro, OIH (pron. ...


Manchester United became the first team to have scored 1,000 goals in this league after Cristiano Ronaldo scored, in a 4–1 defeat by Middlesbrough, in the 2005–06 season, having been the first team to have conceded a Premiership goal following the League's inception. Arsenal are the only other team to have reached the 1,000 goal mark. The highest-scoring match to date in the Premiership occurred on 29 September 2007 when Portsmouth defeated Reading 7–4.[70] Cristiano Ronaldo dos Santos Aveiro, OIH (pron. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Only two players have scored in each of the 16 Premiership seasons, Sheffield United player Gary Speed and Manchester United veteran Ryan Giggs, both former captains of the Wales national football team.[71] Gary Speed (born September 8, 1969 in Mancot) is a Welsh footballer, who plays in midfield. ... Ryan Joseph Giggs OBE[1] (born Ryan Joseph Wilson on 29 November 1973 in Ely, Cardiff) is a Welsh footballer currently playing for Manchester United in the English Premiership, and formerly for the Welsh national team prior to his retirement from international football on 2 June 2007. ... First international  Scotland 4 - 0 Wales (Glasgow, Scotland; 26 March 1876) Biggest win Wales 11 - 0 Ireland  (Wrexham, Wales; 3 March 1888) Biggest defeat  Scotland 9 - 0 Wales (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 March 1878) World Cup Appearances 1 (First in 1958) Best result Quarter-finals, 1958 The Wales national football team...


Women's Premier League

The National Division of the FA Women's Premier League is the Premiership's female counterpart. Most of its clubs are affiliated with Premiership and Football League sides; however, teams are semi-professional; no professional teams have existed since Fulham returned to semi-pro status in 2003.[72] The league comprises 12 clubs, operating a system of promotion and relegation with the Northern Division and Southern Division. The champions of each are promoted to the National Division, and the bottom two National Division clubs are relegated. The FA Womens Premier League is the major womens football competition in England. ... The FA Womens Premier League is the major womens football competition in England. ... Association football is the unofficial national sport of England. ... The Football League is a league competition featuring professional football clubs from England and Wales. ... Fulham WFC, also known as Fulham LFC, is a Ladies Football Club (LFC) formerly associated with Fulham Football Club. ... The FA Womens Premier League Northern Division is a league in the second-level in the womens football pyramid in England, along with the Southern divisions. ... The FA Womens Premier League Southern Division is a league in the second level in the womens football pyramid in England, along with the Northern division. ...


Since forming in 1993 the Women's Premier League has been dominated by Arsenal, who have won nine of the fifteen league titles.[73] The women's game has a much lower profile than that of the Premier League, with Women's Premier League teams typically playing matches at grounds owned by non-league men's clubs. Arsenal Ladies Football Club are an English womens football club affiliated with Arsenal FC. Founded in 1987, they are the most successful club in English womens football; the team have won the FA Womens Premier League nine times, the FA Womens Cup eight times, and the...


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Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC Sport is the sports division of the BBC. It became a fully dedicated division of the BBC in 2000. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
FA Premier League - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1426 words)
The FA Premier League (which, for sponsorship/legal reasons, is often referred to as the Barclays Premiership in the UK and the Barclays English Premier League internationally) is a league competiton for English Football clubs located at the top of the English football league system (above The Football League), making it England's main football competition.
The Premier League is particularly popular in Scandinavia, with ferry operators offering "football ferries" to Norwegian football fans wishing to see their favourite teams in action.
In 1992 the First Division Clubs resigned from the football league en masse and on 27th May 1992 the FA Premier League was formed as a limited company, which worked out of an office at the then Football Association's headquarters, Lancaster Gate.
Norwegian Premier League - definition of Norwegian Premier League in Encyclopedia (266 words)
It has two names in Norwegian: Eliteserien, which means "the league of the elite", and Tippeligaen, which means "the betting league" (it got this name because it was sponsored by Norsk tipping (Norwegian Betting); a bookmaking company).
The league is dominated by Rosenborg, who have won the title for last 13 years.
The winner of the league qualifies for the Champions League and the four highest ranked teams (including the winner) qualify for the Royal League.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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