FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Prekmurje" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Prekmurje
The municipalities of Slovenia in Prekmurje
The municipalities of Slovenia in Prekmurje

Prekmurje is the easternmost region of Slovenia. It borders Hungary to the north-east, Austria to the north-west, Croatia to the south and the Slovenian region of Styria to the south-west. Image File history File links Obcine-Prekmurje. ... Lower Styria (Slovenian Spodnja Å tajerska, German Untersteiermark, Latin Styria) is made up of the southern third of the former Duchy of Styria and is a region in northeastern Slovenia. ...

Contents

Name

It is named after the Mura River, which separates it from the rest of Slovenia (a literal translation from Slovenian would be Over-Mura). In Hungarian, the region is known as Muravidék. Mura (German Mur) is a river in Central Europe, a subsidiary of the bigger Drava and subsequently Danube. ...


Geography

The region is flat in the south near the Mura River and its smaller tributary the Ledava, and hilly in the north (Goričko).


The capital city of the region is Murska Sobota. Other towns include Lendava, Dobrovnik, Turnišče, Beltinci, Črenšovci. Murska Sobota is a town and municipality in northeastern Slovenia, located near the river Mura (hence the name) in the region of Prekmurje, being its regional capital. ... Area: 123. ... Area: 31,1 km² Population  - males  - females 1. ... Area: 23,8 km² Population  - males  - females 3. ... Area: 62. ... Area: 33,7 km² Population  - males  - females 4. ...


Population

The majority of the inhabitants of the region are ethnic Slovenians. There is also a sizable Hungarian minority in the region, as well as a large number of Roma. Tzigane redirects here; for the composition by Maurice Ravel, see Tzigane (Ravel). ...


History

During the history, the region belonged to many states: the Roman Empire, the Kingdom of the Ostrogoths, the Kingdom of the Lombards, the Kingdom of the Avars, the Frankish Empire, the Balaton Principality (9th century), the Kingdom of Hungary (until 1526), the Habsburg Monarchy (1526-1918), the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (1918-1929), Yugoslavia (1929-1991), and since 1991, it is part of an independent Slovenia. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article deals with the continental Ostrogoths. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... The Eurasian Avars were a nomadic people of Eurasia who established a state in the Danube River area of Europe in the early 6th century. ... The Frankish Empire was the territory of the Franks, from the 5th to the 10th centuries, from 481 ruled by Clovis I of the Merovingian Dynasty, the first king of all the Franks. ... Map of the main part of the Balaton principality (parts of the Dudleb County, of the Ptuj County and the whole former Principality of Etgar are not shown on this map) The Balaton Principality (also called Pannonian or Transdanubian Principality, in Slovak: Blatenské kniežatstvo, in Bulgarian: Blatensko Knezevstvo, in... The Kingdom of Hungary (Hungarian: Magyar Királyság) is the name of a multiethnic kingdom that existed in Central Europe from 1000 to 1918. ... The Habsburg Monarchy, often called Austrian Monarchy or simply Austria, are the territories ruled by the Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg, and then by the successor House of Habsburg-Lorraine, between 1526 and 1867/1918. ... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in Latin, Југославија in Cyrillic, English: Land of the South Slavs) describes four political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ...


During the Roman rule, the region was part of the province of Pannonia. Although, the earlier Slavic settlements existed in the area, the ancestors of modern Slovenians moved from eastern Alps and settled in Prekmurje after Franks defeated Avars during the reign of Charlemagne. In the 9th century, this area was part of the Slavic state known as the Balaton Principality. The center of this state was in the city of Blatnograd near the Balaton lake. In the 10th century, the area was conquered by the Hungarians and was included into Hungarian state. The region was part of the Vas County of the Kingdom of Hungary between 11th century and 1526. Position of the Roman province of Pannonia Pannonia is an ancient country bounded north and east by the Danube, conterminous westward with Noricum and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... The west face of the Petit Dru above the Chamonix valley near the Mer de Glace. ... For other uses, see Franks (disambiguation). ... The Eurasian Avars were a nomadic people of Eurasia who established a state in the Danube River area of Europe in the early 6th century. ... A portrait of Charlemagne by Albrecht Dürer that was painted several centuries after Charlemagnes death. ... Map of the main part of the Balaton principality (parts of the Dudleb County, of the Ptuj County and the whole former Principality of Etgar are not shown on this map) The Balaton Principality (also called Pannonian or Transdanubian Principality, in Slovak: Blatenské kniežatstvo, in Bulgarian: Blatensko Knezevstvo, in... Lake Balaton - Landsat satellite photo Lake Balaton (Slovak Blatenské jazero, meaning approximately muddy lake, probable origin of the name; German Plattensee), located in Hungary, is the largest lake of Central Europe with a surface area of 592 km². Its length is 77 kilometres and the width ranges from 4 to... The Kingdom of Hungary (Hungarian: Magyar Királyság) is the name of a multiethnic kingdom that existed in Central Europe from 1000 to 1918. ... VAS is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, as described below: Vaccine Associated Sarcoma Value-added service, a telecommunications industry concept Vermont Astronomical Society Virtual address space, a feature of modern operating systems Visual Analogue Scale VAS Records is a record company based in St. ... The Kingdom of Hungary (Hungarian: Magyar Királyság) is the name of a multiethnic kingdom that existed in Central Europe from 1000 to 1918. ...


Since 1526, Prekmurje was part of the Habsburg Monarchy. In 1687, Vas County was restored, and with the small interruption from 1849 to 1867, the region belonged to this county until 1918. Since 1918, Prekmurje was part of the newly formed Serb-Croat-Slovene Kingdom, which was renamed to Yugoslavia in 1929. Between 1918 and 1922, region belonged to the Maribor county, between 1922 and 1929 to the Maribor oblast, and between 1929 and 1941 to the Drava Banovina. It was occupied by Hungary from 1941 to 1944 in Second World War, and after the war it became part of Slovenia, which was one of the newly formed republics of Yugoslavia. The Habsburg Monarchy, often called Austrian Monarchy or simply Austria, are the territories ruled by the Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg, and then by the successor House of Habsburg-Lorraine, between 1526 and 1867/1918. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in Latin, Југославија in Cyrillic, English: Land of the South Slavs) describes four political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Area: 147. ... Area: 147. ... Map showing Yugoslav banovinas in 1929 (The Drava Banovina is coloured yellow, on the top left part of the map) The Drava Banovina or Drava Banate (Slovenian and Croatian: Dravska banovina) was a province (banovina) of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia between 1929 and 1941. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in Latin, Југославија in Cyrillic, English: Land of the South Slavs) describes four political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ...


Cuisine

The speciality of the region is prekmurska gibanica, sometimes humorously translated as "Over-Mura Moving Cake", which is a facetious translation, the root likely meaning 'turned' or 'wrapped'. Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject: Prekmurska gibanica Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub | Slovenian culture ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Case Studies Database (2500 words)
The present case study explores its implementation in the Prekmurje region which is home to a minority settlement of ethnic Hungarians.
The great majority of those lived in the autochthonous settlement area in the border region of Prekmurje: 7128 persons or 84% of all Hungarians in Slovenia; in the northern part, 59% of the population is Hungarian, and in the southern part, 48% of the population.
Prekmurje is an ethnically-mixed territory and institutionally regulated Slovene-Hungarian bilingual area in the north-eastern part of Slovenia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m