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Encyclopedia > Pratt Institute
Pratt Institute

Motto: Be True To Your Work And Your Work Will be True To You
Established 1887
Type: Private
President: President Thomas F. Schutte
Faculty: 899
Undergraduates: 3,070
Postgraduates: 1,607
Location Brooklyn, NY, USA
Campus: Urban
25 acres (10 hectares)
Colors: black and gold
Mascot: the Cannoneer
Affiliations: Pratt at Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Delaware College of Art and Design
Website: www.pratt.edu

Pratt Institute is a specialized, private college in New York City with campuses in Manhattan and Brooklyn, as well as in Utica, New York. Pratt is one of the leading art schools in the United States and offers programs in art, architecture, fashion design, illustration, design, digital arts, creative writing, library science, and other areas. Pratt is a member of the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design (AICAD), a consortium of thirty-six leading art schools in the United States. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... This article is about the state. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Utica, New York is a city in the state of New York, and the county seat of Oneida County. ... Illustration by Jessie Willcox Smith. ... AICAD logo. ...


Charles Pratt (1830-1891) was an early pioneer of the natural oil industry in the United States. He was founder of Astral Oil Works in the Greenpoint section of Brooklyn, New York. He joined with his protégé Henry H. Rogers to form Charles Pratt and Company in 1867. Both companies became part of John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil in 1874. Charles Pratt Charles Pratt (2 October, 1830 - 4 May, 1891) was a United States capitalist, businessman and philanthropist. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Oil industry brings to market what is currently considered the lifeblood of nearly all other industry, if not industrialized civilization itself. ... Astral Oil Works was founded in the Greenpoint section of Brooklyn, New York by Charles Pratt. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... Henry Huttleston Rogers (January 29, 1840 – May 19, 1909) was a United States capitalist, businessman, industrialist, financier, and philanthropist. ... Charles Pratt and Company was formed in Brooklyn, New York in the United States by Charles Pratt and Henry H. Rogers in 1867. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... John Davison Rockefeller, Sr. ... Standard Oil was a predominant integrated oil producing, transporting, refining, and marketing company. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Pratt is credited with recognizing the growing need for trained industrial workers in a changing economy. In 1886, he founded and endowed the Pratt Institute, which opened in Brooklyn in 1887. Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ...

The Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NY
Higgins Hall center section rebuilt by Steven Holl
Charles Pratt, Founder

On October 17, 1887, twelve young people climbed the stairs of the new "Main" building and began to fulfill the dream of Charles Pratt as the first students at Pratt Institute. Image File history File links Prattold. ... Image File history File links Prattold. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x620, 53 KB) Summary Higgins hall by steven holl Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x620, 53 KB) Summary Higgins hall by steven holl Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Charlesmorrispratt. ... Image File history File links Charlesmorrispratt. ...


Charles Pratt, one of eleven children, was born the son of a Massachusetts carpenter in 1830. He managed to scrape a few dollars together and spend three winters as a student at Wesleyan Academy, and is said to have lived on a dollar a week at times. In Boston, he joined a company specializing in paints and whale oil products. When he came to New York, he worked for a similar company and expanded the interest to Astral Oil. When the company split, Charles Pratt owned the oil business and turned it into the most successful such company in Brooklyn, eventually merging with Standard Oil.


Charles Pratt's fortunes increased and he became a leading figure in Brooklyn, serving his community and his profession. A philanthropist and visionary, he supported many of Brooklyn's major institutions including the Adelphi Academy and the building of Emmanuel Baptist Church.


He always regretted, however, his own limited education and dreamed of founding an institution where pupils could learn trades through the skillful use of their hands. This dream was realized when Pratt Institute opened its doors over 100 years ago. Only four years after the opening, Charles Pratt died, leaving the job of guiding the Institute through its early years to his sons, Charles Millard Pratt and then Frederic B. Pratt, before the position passed to Frederic's son, Charles Pratt. Charles Millard Pratt (November 2, 1855 - 1935) was an American oil industrialist and philanthropist. ... Frederic Bayley Pratt (22 February 1865 - 3 May 1945) was the president of Brooklyns Pratt Institute for 44 years, from 1893-1937. ...


Traditionally an innovator in education, the Fashion Design department evolved out of a unique program started in 1888 when Pratt's Women's Department offered courses in fashion design and needle craft. This made Pratt the first college to offer a degree in fashion design in the United States. In 1971, the fashion program moved to the School of Art and Design, a change that has enabled the departments to offer interdisciplinary studies with other creative design areas.


Evan Douglis is the Chairperson of Undergraduate Architecture at Pratt Institute.


The motto of the Institute is:


Be True To Your Work And Your Work Will Be True To You

Contents

Presidents

  1. Charles Pratt (1830-1891), president from 1887-1891
  2. Charles Millard Pratt (1835-1935), 1891-1893
  3. Frederic B. Pratt (1865-1945), 1893-1937
  4. Charles Pratt (1892-?), 1937-1953
  5. Francis H. Horn, 1953-1957
  6. Robert Fisher Oxnam (1915-1974), 1957-1960
  7. James Britt Donovan (1916-1970), 1968-1970
  8. Richardson Pratt Jr (1923-2001) (gt-grandson of Charles Pratt), 1972-1990
  9. Warren F. Ilchman (1933-), 1990-1993
  10. Thomas F. Schutte (1936-), 1993 to present

Charles Pratt Charles Pratt (2 October, 1830 - 4 May, 1891) was a United States capitalist, businessman and philanthropist. ... Charles Millard Pratt (November 2, 1855 - 1935) was an American oil industrialist and philanthropist. ... Frederic Bayley Pratt (22 February 1865 - 3 May 1945) was the president of Brooklyns Pratt Institute for 44 years, from 1893-1937. ... Charles Pratt Charles Pratt (2 October, 1830 - 4 May, 1891) was a United States capitalist, businessman and philanthropist. ...

Campus

Pratt Institute is a closed campus with four public entrances, two of which close in the evening hours. The main gate on Willoughby Avenue is guarded by a security post 24 hours a day. Buildings on campus include the Library, Dekalb Hall, ISC Building, Main Building, North Hall, East Building, Student Union, Memorial Hall, Machinery Building, Chemistry Building, Engineering Building, Pratt Studios, Steuben Hall, and the ARC building. There is also on campus housing for faculty. Off campus building includes the newly renovated Higgins Hall which contains all the Architecture studios.


Residence Halls

All residence hall students are provided with a bed (twin extra-long), a drafting table, a chair and a dresser. Students residing in a dorm on campus are required to be on a mandatory meal plan (Stabile, Cannonner, ELJ and Pantas), while those off campus are able to sign-up for an optional meal plan (Willoughby and Grand Avenue).


Cannoneer Court

Cannoneer Court, or "The Can" was designed by famed architecture firm SOM in 1986 and constructed using a then-unique form of modular construction. Each individual dorm room was constructed off-site and then set into place like building blocks. It accommodates 94 students between two hallways. This traditional corridor style residence houses students in double rooms. Bathrooms are communal. The building has a lounge and work area as well as a garden courtyard. The rooms are air conditioned and carpeted. Although it was meant for temporary housing in 1986, this building still stands today for use as freshman housing as well as late acception students and transfers. The first floor of this two-floor building is used as Graduate Fine Arts studios.


Esther Lloyd-Jones Hall

Esther Lloyd Jones Hall is named for a trend-setter in modern American higher education. ELJ accommodates students single and double rooms. ELJ is comprised primarily upperclassmen continuing students; vacancies for new transfer and graduate students sometimes do occur.


Leo J. Pantas Hall

Designed by SOM in 1986, Leo J. Pantas domitory sits centrally located on campus. Students live in four-person suites, which consist of two double-rooms (two people in each double-room). Each suite has its own bathroom. Suites are single sex, but floors are coed. Each suite is responsible for the healthy upkeep of the common bathroom area. The building boasts a large work area in addition to a dramatic main lounge area with large screen TV and pool table. Its central location on campus makes it desirable to students, with its clock tower serving as a campus landmark.


Grand Avenue

Grand Avenue Residence is home to new and continuing graduate students. The building can accommodate 50 students in efficiency apartments (double and single) and private single rooms within two and three-bedroom apartments. A double efficiency is two students sharing a one-room apartment (with kitchen and bath). A single efficiency is one student in a private one room apartment (with kitchen and bath. A shared single is two or more students, each with their own private bedroom, sharing kitchen, bath and living room. The building is located one block from campus. Each living room is furnished with a sofa, club chair, coffee table, kitchen table and chairs.


Willoughby Hall

Willoughby Residence Hall is a former 16 (no 13th floor) story apartment co-op, and is the largest residence hall. It accommodates 800 undergraduate men and women. Very few apartments are now coed. In addition to the standard furniture, all apartments have a kitchen table, stove and refrigerator. All students assigned to double, triple and single spaces. The converted apartments consist of: at least one double or triple that occupies the former living room space of the apartment; at least one private single room that occupies the former bedroom space of the apartment. The number of students residing in a given apartment ranges from 2–6 students (depending upon the size of the converted apartment - one bedroom, two bedroom or three bedroom).


Stabile Hall

Vincent A. Stabile Hall opened in the Fall of 1999. Named for the donor and graduate of the Engineering School, Stabile Hall was designed for new undergraduate students. It houses 240 students in four person suites. Each suite consists of two double rooms with a shared bath. Suites are single sex, but floors are coed. With few exceptions, the room dimensions, not including the small entry foyer, are 12 x 12. Each suite is responsible for the healthy upkeep of the common bathroom area. There are kitchenettes located on each floor. The award-winning design of the building boasts a large common lounge with smaller work and lounge spaces on each floor all of which contribute to a vital living and working environment. A kitchenette is a cooking area in small apartments, hotel rooms, college dormitories, or office buildings. ...


Schools

  • School of Architecture
    • Department of Undergraduate Architecture
    • Department of Graduate Architecture
    • Department of Construction Management
    • Department of Facilities Management
    • Department of Graduate Architecture and Urban Design
    • Graduate Center for Planning and the Environment
  • School of Art and Design
    • Department of Foundation Art
    • Department of Art and Design Education
    • Department of Creative Arts Therapy
    • Department of Arts and Cultural Management
    • Department of Communications Design
    • Department of Graduate Communications/Packaging Design
    • Department of Digital Arts
    • Department of Design Management
    • Department of Fashion Design
    • Department of Fine Arts
    • Department of the History of Art & Design
    • Department of Industrial Design
    • Department of Interior Design
    • Department of Media Arts
    • Associate Degree Programs
  • School of Liberal Arts and Sciences
    • Department of English and Humanities
    • Department of Critical and Visual Studies
    • Intensive English Program
    • Department of Math and Science
    • Department of Social Science and Cultural Studies
    • Department of Writing for Performance, Publication and Media
  • School of Information and Library Sciences
  • Center for Continuing Education and Professional Studies

Notable Alumni

Sir Charles Edward Pollock (October 31, 1823 - November 21, 1897) was an English judge, one of the last Barons of the Court of the Exchequer and serjeants-at-law. ... David Ascalons Holocaust Memorial for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (1994), on the Susquehanna River, Harrisburg David Ascalons Totem, fabricated bronze sculpture at the Cherry Hill Public Library, Cherry Hill, New Jersey From a series of abstract stained glass windows for Beth El Congregation near Washington, DC The artist... An example of Ken Balds photo-realistic illustration style from the Dark Shadows newspaper comic strip. ... Joseph Roland Joe Barbera (March 24, 1911 – December 18, 2006) was an American animator, cartoon artist, storyboard artist, director, producer, and co-founder, together with William Hanna, of Hanna-Barbera. ... // Timothy D. Bellavia is an award winning childrens author, illustrator and educator with a M.F.A. from Pratt Institute. ... Gwendolyn B. Bennett (July 8, 1902–May 30, 1981) was an African American writer who contributed greatly to the Harlem Renaissance. ... William Devereux Byron, II (May 15, 1895 – February 27, 1941 a democrat, was a U.S. Congressman who represented the 6th congressional district of Maryland from January 3, 1939 to February 27, 1941. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Bernard Chang (born May 26, 1972 in Montreal, Canada) is an Asian-American artist/designer best known for his work in the comic book industry and entertainment design. ... Echo Chernik and Arlo Guthrie -Carnegie Hall 2005 Trek Bicycles poster celebrating Lance Armstrongs 5th Consecutive Le Tour de France win. ... Daniel Gillespie Clowes (born April 14, 1961 in Chicago, Illinois) is an Academy Award-nominated American author, screenwriter and cartoonist of alternative comic books, most notably Eightball (1989-present), an anthology of self-contained narratives and serialized graphic novels (one of which, Ghost World, was published separately in 1997. ... Roger Cook (born Rajie Cook, 1930) is an internationally known American graphic designer, photographer and artist. ... Jefferson Jeff Davis (6 May 1862 – 3 January 1913) was a Democratic United States Senator from Arkansas and also served as governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas. ... Joshua Davis is an American web designer and artist. ... Louis Delsarte (born September 1st, 1944 in Brooklyn, New York) is an African American artist who is known for what has sometimes been called his illusionistic [1] style. ... Lloyd Espenschied (27 April 1889 – June 1986) was an electrical engineer. ... Jules Feiffer (1958) Jules Feiffer (born January 26, 1929) is an American syndicated comic-strip cartoonist and author. ... Harvey Fierstein (born June 6, 1952) is a Tony Award-winning and Emmy Award-nominated American actor, playwright, and screenwriter. ... John Conant Flansburgh (born May 6, 1960) is an actor and musician from Brooklyn, New York (though born and raised in Lincoln, Massachusetts). ... This article is about the musical group. ... Richard T. Foster was a modernist architect who worked in the New York area, and also around Greenwich, Connecticut, often in partnership with Philip Johnson, including the rotating Glass House located in New Canaan, Connecticut. ... Eric Goldberg (born in 1955) is an American animator and film director. ... Bill Griffith (born William Henry Jackson Griffith in Brooklyn, NY 1944) is a popular cartoonist in the United States. ... Eva Hesse (January 11, 1936 - May 29, 1970), was a German-born American sculptor, known for her pioneering work in materials such as latex, fiberglass, and plastics. ... A promo shot of Terrence Dashon Howard Terrence Dashon Howard (sometimes billed as Terrance Howard, born March 11, 1969 in Cleveland, Ohio, USA) is an American actor, notable for appearing frequently in films of African American interest. ... Betsey Johnson (born August 10, 1942 in Wethersfield, Connecticut) is a fashion designer best known for her feminine and whimsical designs. ... Malcolm Jones III (born 1970, died 1996) was an American comics artist best known as an inker on The Sandman, where he added his illustrative line and textures to the work of pencillers such as Mike Dringenberg, Kelley Jones and Colleen Doran. ... Ellsworth Kelly (b. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... This article is about the superhero. ... For other uses, see Fantastic Four (disambiguation). ... Arnold Lobel Arnold Lobel (born May 22, 1933, died December 4, 1987) was a popular author of childrens books. ... Frog And Toad are the main characters in a series of childrens books easy readers written by Arnold Lobel. ... The cover of Patti Smiths first album, Horses, featured a Robert Mapplethorpe photo. ... Peter Max (born October 19, 1937 as Peter Finkelstein) is an American Pop artist. ... Marcus McLaurin (born Springfield, Massachusetts) is an American comic-book writer and editor best known for developing the landmark Marvel Comics miniseries Marvels by Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross. ... Morton Meskin (May 1916 - May 1995) was a prolific comic book artist who worked on many recognizable characters through the Golden Age of Comics, well into the Silver Age of Comics. ... Judith Sargent Murray Judith Sargent Murray (1751-1820) was an United States feminist, essayist, playwright, poet, and letter-writer. ... Martin Nodell (born 15 November 1915) is a cartoonist and commercial artist, best known as the creator of the comic book superhero Green Lantern. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... For the slang term for American soldiers in World War I and earlier, see doughboy. ... Norman Norell (born Norman David Levinson in 1900 in Noblesville, Indiana - died in New York, 1972) was an American fashion designer, known for his elegant suits and tailored silouhettes. ... The Sex Pistols by Roberto Parada Roberto Parada (1969 - ) is a freelance illustrator who has been creating paintings for major American magazines for the past 15 years. ... Beverly Pepper is a modern sculptor, and abstract painter. ... John Peterson was an American author of childrens books during the 20th century. ... Bob Powell (1961 - ) is a U.S. composer. ... Norman Norell (born Norman David Levinson in 1900 in Noblesville, Indiana - died in New York, 1972) was an American fashion designer, known for his elegant suits and tailored silouhettes. ... Paul Rand (born Peretz Rosenbaum, August 15, 1914 – November 26, 1996) was a well-known American graphic designer, best known for his corporate logo designs. ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... Robert Sabuda (b. ... Stefan Sagmeister (born 1962 in Vorarlberg, Austria) is a graphic designer and typographer currently based in New York City. ... Blue Moon by Nat Mayer Shapiro, acrylic on canvas Nat Mayer Shapiro (b. ... David Silverman (born on 15 March 1957 in New York City, New York) is an animator best known for directing numerous episodes of the animated TV series The Simpsons, where he would go on to be the supervising director of animation for several years, as well as animating on all... Jeremy Scott is a Missouri-born fashion designer. ... Patricia Lee (Patti) Smith (born December 30, 1946) is an American musician, singer, and poet. ... Dante Tomaselli (born October 29, 1969, in Paterson, New Jersey) is an Italian-American horror screenwriter,director, and score composer. ... William Van Alen (1883 - May 24, 1954) was best known as the architct in charge of New York Citys Chrysler Building. ... The Chrysler Building is an Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, located on the east side of Manhattan at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A cover for Flinch (Vertigo) by Kent Williams Kent Williams is an American painter, illustrator and comic book artist. ... Robert Wilson (born 4 October 1941) is an internationally acclaimed American avant-garde stage director and playwright who has been called [America]s — or even the worlds — foremost vanguard theater artist [1]. Over the course of his wide-ranging career, he has also worked as a choreographer, performer, painter... Robert Cummings (born January 12, 1965 in Haverhill, Massachusetts), better known as Rob Zombie, is an American musician, film director, and writer. ... Peter Zumthor (born 26 April 1943) is a Swiss architect. ...

Athletics

The Pratt Cannoneers, a founding member of the Hudson Valley Athletic Conference (NCAA Division III), has varsity teams competing in men's basketball, soccer, cross-country, indoor/outdoor track, and tennis; as well as women's soccer, tennis, cross-country, indoor/outdoor track, and volleyball.


The men's basketball team has a storied tradition, including the 4th longest collegiate basketball rivalry in the nation between Pratt and Polytechnic University (Brooklyn, NY), with Pratt holding the overall record 78-59. The Cannoneers also took home a national collegiate championship title in 1901, and made four NAIA ('59, '60, '61, and '62) and two ECAC ('77,'79) post-season appearances. Former players included Ed Mazria ('62), who was drafted by the New York Knicks, and Anthony Heyward ('94), who currently tours with the And1 streetball team as "Half Man Half Amazing".


The women's cross-country team recently captured the 2006 HMWAC championship title and coach Dalton Evans won "Coach of the Year" honors. The men's cross-country team also has a championship title. The women's tennis team has won three HVWAC titles, including an appearance in the ECAC tournament.


In addition, there are intramural activities schedules throughout the year, ranging from individual (tennis and track & field) to team sports (soccer, basketball, volleyball, and touch football). Two premier student intramurals events include the fall classic Halloween Pratt Ratt Outdoor Obstacle Relay Race and the annual Mr. & Ms. Pratt All Thatt Fitness & Artistic Expression Pageant finale.


The Athletics Resource Center (A.R.C.) is home to the athletic department, and features the largest clear-span space in Brooklyn. It also hosts the annual Colgate Games, the nation's largest amateur track series for girls from elementary school through college.[1]


The school's mascot, "the Cannoneer", takes the name from the 19th century cannon which stands prominently near the main gate to the campus. Cast in bronze in Seville, Spain, the cannon bears the insignia of Philip the Fifth and was brought to Pratt from the walls of Morro Castle in Havana, Cuba in 1899.


Trivia

  • The library at Pratt Institute, opened in 1888 to serve not only students but the general public as well, was the first free public library in Brooklyn. The architect on the building was William Tubby of Brooklyn. The decoration in the building was done by the Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company.
  • The school had a radio station in the mid 1980s which broadcast on a limited-range signal. After students modified the broadcast tower, the FCC stepped in and shut it down. The station later re-emerged in 2001 as an internet-only station and continues to broadcast from http://www.prattradio.com.
  • Pratt has a closed-circuit television station, PRATT TV, located on channel 66 on campus. (Founded in 2000). Until recently, the channel was home to a blank VCR screen.
  • Pratt's Brooklyn campus is home to a number of cats which are known as the 'Pratt Cats'.
  • The school's colors are black and cadmium yellow deep.
  • The oldest continually functioning elevator in all of Brooklyn, installed in 1910, was located at Pratt's Main Building, until it was upgraded in October, 2004.
  • Pratt has the oldest continuously accredited library science school in the United States of America.

For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Born in Des Moines, Iowa, William Bunker Tubby graduated from Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute in 1875. ... Louis Comfort Tiffany (February 18, 1848 - January 17, 1933) was an American artist most famous for his Art Nouveau pieces in stained glass. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... FCC redirects here. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Daniel Gillespie Clowes (born April 14, 1961 in Chicago, Illinois) is an Academy Award-nominated American author, screenwriter and cartoonist of alternative comic books, most notably Eightball (1989-present), an anthology of self-contained narratives and serialized graphic novels (one of which, Ghost World, was published separately in 1997. ... Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ... For the film see Art School Confidential Art School Confidential is a four-page black-and-white comic by Daniel Clowes. ... For the original comic see Art School Confidential (comic) Art School Confidential. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Front cover of the 2006 Debbie Does Dallas Definitive Collectors Edition release from VCX. Debbie Does Dallas is a famous 1978 pornographic movie starring Bambi Woods and Christie Ford (appearing under the name of Misty Winter). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Good Shepherd is a nautical novel by CS Forester, the author of the novels about fictional Royal Navy officer Horatio Hornblower. ... Robert De Niro Robert De Niro, Jr. ... Law & Order: Special Victims Unit - Season 5 DVD Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (also known as Law & Order: SVU) is the first of three spin-offs of Law & Order (the other two being Law & Order: Criminal Intent and Law & Order: Trial by Jury; all series are presented on the NBC... For other uses, see Elevator (disambiguation). ...

References

Citation

  1. ^ Colgate Games homepage http://www.colgategames.com/index.htm

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Pratt Institute - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1630 words)
Pratt is one of the leading art schools in the United States and offers programs in art, architecture, fashion design, design, creative writing, library science, and other areas.
Charles Pratt, one of eleven children, was born the son of a Massachusetts carpenter in 1830.
The library at Pratt Institute, opened in 1888 to serve not only students but the general public as well, was one of the first public libraries to be opened in the United States.
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