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Encyclopedia > Powerslam

A Powerslam is a professional wrestling body slam move in which the wrestler performing the slam falls face-down on top of his/her opponent. The use of the term "powerslam" usually refers to the front powerslam and the scoop powerslam. For the NES video game, see Pro Wrestling (video game). ... Body Slam redirects here. ...

Contents

Variations

Emerald Flowsion

This is a sitout side powerslam in which the wrestler lifts the opponent up on his left shoulder like in a Front powerslam. The wrestler wraps his right arm around the opponent's neck, and the left arm around the opponent's torso. The wrestler then sits down while flipping the opponent forward to the right side of him, driving the opponent neck and shoulder first into the mat.


The move was named by Mitsuharu Misawa but the term is strictly wasei-eigo: "エメラルドフロウジョン (Emeraludo Furoujon)". Emerald Frosion is the most common English name, as it's the closest to the pronunciation. Other attempts to translate the name include "Emerald Fusion" and "Frozen Emerald". Misawa has also used a variation, called Emerald Flowsion Custom, where he lifts his opponent upside down like in a Vertical suplex, turns him 180° while still keeping the headlock, places his left arm around the opponent's torso, and sits down leaning to his right, driving the opponent vertically down to the mat on his neck and shoulders. Mitsuharu Misawa ) is a Japanese professional wrestler. ... Wasei-eigo (和製英語 wasei eigo, lit. ... The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ...


Inverted sitout side powerslam

Also known as an Inverted emerald flowsion, the attacking wrestler lifts the opponent up onto one of their shoulders, facing upwards. From this position, the attacking wrestler then sits down and simultaneously flips the opponent forwards and downwards, slamming them down to the ground face-first to one side of the wrestler.


Falling slam

Also known as a front powerslam or reverse fallaway slam. Facing the opponent, the wrestler reaches between the opponent's legs with one arm and reaches around their back from the same side with the other arm. The wrestler lifts the opponent up so they are horizontal across the wrestler's body then falls forward to slam the victim against the mat back-first. Mark Henry uses this move as a finisher, calling it the World's Strongest Slam. Henry often precedes it by raising the opponent up even further before dropping down for added impact. Body Slam redirects here. ... Mark Gordon Henry[1] (born June 12, 1971 in Silsbee, Texas) is an American professional wrestler currently signed to World Wrestling Entertainment performing on its SmackDown! brand. ...


The Boogeyman used an inverted variation known as the Boogeyslam. In it, he first chokes the opponent, then he would hold an opponent's back against his chest so that they are facing away from him, and then fall forward, slamming the opponent down to the mat chest first. Martin (Marty) Wright (born October 31, 1964)[1] better known by his ring name The Boogeyman, is an American professional wrestler. ...


Fireman's carry powerslam

The wrestler lifts the opponent across his/her shoulders in a fireman's carry, grabs his/her right leg then pushes it up, positions his torso across the other wrestler's abdomen, and falls forward, slamming the opponent down on their back in a front powerslam. The most notable users of this move are John Cena, who calls it the FU, and Taiyo Kea (the TKO 34th). Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... John Felix Anthony Cena, Jr. ... Maunukea Mossman is an American professional wrestler better known under his stage name Taiyo Kea. ...


Front powerslam

This is the most common powerslam, and is often referred to as just a powerslam. This move sees an attacking wrestler reach between an opponent's legs with one arm and reach around that opponent's back from the same side with his/her other arm before then lifting this opponent up over their shoulder. From this position the attacking wrestler falls forward to slam the opponent against the mat back-first. Wrestlers often run forward as they slam in what is often called a running powerslam or an Oklahoma Slam (in reference to "Dr. Death" Steve Williams). The running version was used as a finisher by Davey Boy Smith and has most recently been adopted as a finisher by his son D.H. Smith and Bobby Lashley. Another professional wrestler with the real name Steve Williams is better known as Stone Cold Steve Austin. ... David Boy (Davey Boy) Smith (November 28, 1962 – May 18, 2002) was an English professional wrestler. ... Harry Smith (born August 2, 1985 His birthdate either appears to be 1985 or 1986 but accoording to his myspace profile he is 22 which would make him born in 1985. ... Franklin Roberto Bobby Lashley (born July 16, 1976)[2] is an American professional wrestler and former Collegiate amateur wrestler. ...


Inverted front powerslam

See Inverted powerbomb A Powerbomb is a professional wrestling move in which an opponent is lifted up (usually so that they are sitting on the wrestlers shoulders) and then slammed back-first down to the mat. ...


Gorilla press powerslam

The move, also known as a Military press powerslam, is similar to a gorilla press slam. The wrestler lifts his/her opponent up over his/her head with arms fully extended (as in the military press used in weight lifting), then drops his/her opponent up over his/her shoulder into an over the shoulder position and then (runs and) falls forward to slam the opponent against the mat back-first. Body Slam redirects here. ... Weightlifting is a sport where competitors attempt to lift heavy weights mounted on steel bars. ...


Oklahoma Stampede

The wrestler reaches between the opponent's legs with one arm and around the opponent's back from the same side with his other arm. The wrestler lifts the opponent up over his shoulder, and runs towards the ring corner, slamming the opponent back first to the turnbuckles. The wrestler keeps the hold and slams the opponent to the opposite corner as well. The wrestler then runs to the middle of the ring and falls down forward, driving the opponent down to the mat back first. This move was popularized, innovated and named by "Dr. Death" Steve Williams. Another professional wrestler with the real name Steve Williams is better known as Stone Cold Steve Austin. ...


One-armed slam

Popularized by The Big Boss Man and dubbed the Boss Man Slam, this slam sees the attacker catch an oncoming opponent with one arm hooked under their arms and fall to their knees, slamming the opponent to the mat back first, all in one fluid motion. This move is often confused with the spinning side slam, which the Boss Man used later in his career, also referring to it as the Boss Man Slam. Raymond (Ray) Traylor (May 2, 1962 – September 22, 2004) was an American professional wrestler. ...


Scoop powerslam

The second most common version of a powerslam which is often referred to as just a powerslam sees an attacking wrestler place one arm between an opponent's legs, and reach over the opponent's shoulder with the other arm before then spinning the opponent over onto their back while keeping the opponent horizontal across their body at all times. As the opponent falls to the mat the attacking wrestler will continue to fall face-down on top of them in a lateral press pinning position. This powerslam is usually performed on a charging opponent, using the opponent's own momentum to power the throw. This article is about the pinfall (or pin) as it is defined in professional wrestling. ...


Suplex powerslam

Also known as a Jackhammer slam or a Power-Plex, the wrestler applies a front face lock, throws the opponent's near arm over the wrestler's shoulder, and then grabs his/her tights to lift him/her up straight in the air (as in a standard vertical suplex). When the wrestler begins to drop the opponent to the mat the wrestler will twist to fall face-down on top of the opponent. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ...


This move was innovated by Jaguar Yokota, a Japanese female wrestler. The move was popularized worldwide and is almost always associated with Goldberg, who dubbed it the Jackhammer. Another version of this move sees a wrestler use the standard vertical suplex to lift the opponent into the air and place him/her over the attacker's shoulder before performing a running powerslam. Rimi Yokota is a Japanese professional wrestler and later wrestling trainer, who wrestled under the name Jaguar Yokota. ... For other persons named Bill Goldberg, see Bill Goldberg (disambiguation). ...


Side slam

This move is commonly and incorrectly referred to as an ura-nage slam, or simply ura-nage. This name is an incorrect Americanization of the name for ura-nage, which, translated directly from the Japanese, means, literally, "throw to behind". It has erroneously been translated as "reverse side throw", which is incorrect; the word "ura" means "behind".[citation needed]


The wrestler stands face to face with the opponent, slightly to their side. The wrestler tucks his head under the opponent's near arm, reaches across the opponent's chest and around their neck with his near arm, and places his other arm against their back. The wrestler then lifts the opponent up and falls forward, either flat on their chest or their knees, slamming the opponent down to the mat back first. This move is very closely associated with The Rock who popularized the move as the Rock Bottom, although he would sometimes use a variation which sees him hook his opponent's leg in order to lift them easier. Booker T is also a practitioner of this move; his variation is called the Book End, although a noticeable difference is that Booker falls to his knees while The Rock falls chest-first and uses his hand to stop his face from impacting the mat (similar to the form of doing a one handed push up while slamming the opponent down to the mat). Dwayne Douglas Johnson[6] (born May 2, 1972)[4], better known by his former ring name The Rock, is an American actor and former professional wrestler. ... Robert Booker Tio Huffman[2] (born March 1, 1965)[2], better known by his wrestling personas Booker T and King Booker, is an American professional wrestler. ...


The wrestler can also stay standing and just body slam the opponent down to the mat. Body Slam redirects here. ...


Matt Hardy uses a variation in which he locks both hands together behind the opponent's back, lifts them up, and swings forward into a seated position while slamming the opponent down, calling it the Side Effect. Takeshi Rikio has innovated a high lifting variation where he wraps one of his arms around one thigh and one arm around the waist of the opponent, lifts him up, and them slams him down. This variant is known as the Musou Impact. The word Musou (pronounced: mu-soh), when translated literally, means "Without Parallel" or "Unmatched". Matthew Moore Matt Hardy (born September 23, 1974)[2] is an American professional wrestler, currently working for World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) on their SmackDown![1] brand, where he is one half of the WWE Tag Team Champions along with his onscreen rival, Montel Vontavious Porter. ... Takeshi Rikio or Takeshi Rikioh, is a Japanese professional wrestler, who works for Pro Wrestling NOAH. // Career Takeshi Rikio was initially a sumo wrestler, but was soon spotted by All-Japan Pro Wrestling. ...


Back suplex side slam

In this Elevated Side Slam the wrestler stands behind the opponent, puts his head under one of the opponent's arms, and lifts them onto his shoulder. The wrestler then pushes the opponent upwards, before it is turned into a side slam so the victim is dropped from an elevated position.


Sidewalk slam

The wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the victim, facing in the same direction, and reaches around the victim's torso with his/her near arm across the victim's chest and under both arms and places the other arm under the victim's legs. The wrestler then lifts him/her up, bringing his/her legs off the ground and falls down to the mat in a sitting position, slamming the victim into the mat back-first.


Spinning side slam

Also referred to as a Scrapbuster Slam, the wrestler stands side-to-side and slightly behind with the victim, facing in the opposite direction, and reaches around the victim's torso with one arm across the victim's chest and under both arms. The wrestler then lifts him/her up with one arm as he/she swings the victim 180° to the opposite side, while the wrestler faces the same direction, then falls onto the opponent slamming the victim onto the mat back-first. The Big Boss Man used this move as a finisher, as well as a non-spinning, one-armed version, both known as the Boss Man Slam. Raymond (Ray) Traylor (May 2, 1962 – September 22, 2004) was an American professional wrestler. ... A Powerslam is a professional wrestling body slam move in which the wrestler performing the slam falls face-down on top of his/her opponent. ...


In another version of this move, which is performed against a charging opponent, the wrestler uses the victim's own momentum to power the throw and can see the wrestler with the victim in the air spinning back round nearly 360° before dropping him to the mat. "The Monster" Abyss calls this variation the Black Hole Slam. This article is about momentum in physics. ... Christopher J. Chris Parks [3][4] (born October 4, 1973), better known by his ring name Abyss, is an American professional wrestler currently working for 1 Pro Wrestling. ...


Standing moonsault side slam

Often erroneously described as a moonsault ura-nage slam, this move sees an attacking wrestler stand slightly behind and facing the side of a standing opponent. The wrestler then reaches under the near arm of the opponent, across the chest of the opponent and under their far arm, while placing his/her other hand on the back of the opponent to hold them in place. The wrestler then performs a backwards somersault (Moonsault) while holding the victim, driving the opponent into the mat back-first.


This move can also be performed off the top rope and is known as a moonsault side slam, or solo Spanish fly in reference to the Spanish fly double team move. Aerial techniques are used in professional wrestling to show off the speed and agility of a wrestler. ... The double-team manuvers in professional wrestling are executed by two wrestlers instead of one and typicaly are used by tag teams in tag team matches. ...


Swinging side slam

Also known as the Wind-up slam, the move sees a wrestler facing his opponent, reaching between the opponent's legs with one arm and reaching around the back from the same side with the other arm. The wrestler next lifts the opponent up so they are horizontal across the wrestler's body. The attacker then spins in a circle while swinging the lower half of the opponent's body out and around until one arm is across the opponent's chest and under one or both arms. The wrestler falls forward, slamming the victim into the mat back-first.


Variations of the move can have the wrestler hold the opponent up over his shoulder and throwing the opponent round from that position, while another variation of the move sees a wrestler hang the opponent across both the attacker's shoulders and throw out the legs behind them so the victim swings back round to drop in a position.


Ura-nage

Also known as a sambo suplex or side suplex. The wrestler stands face to face with the opponent, slightly to their side. The wrestler tucks his head under the opponent's near arm, and reaches across the opponent's chest and around their neck with his near arm. The wrestler then simultaneously lifts the opponent up, turns 180° and falls backwards, bringing the opponent over him and slamming them down to the mat back first. The name ura-nage (or uranage) is incorrectly but commonly used to refer to a regular side slam and though the name in fact comes from a Judo throw, that throw resembles a Saito suplex more than the professional wrestling ura-nage. This article is about the martial art and sport. ... The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ...


Tamon Honda uses a variation where he locks the opponent into a Arm triangle choke, and then slams the opponent with the ura-nage. He calls this variation the Rolling Olympic Hell. Hayabusa used a variation where he did not fall backwards, but instead brought the opponent over his head while standing and turning 180°, and then fell forward, slamming the opponent down, similar to a side slam. He called this variation the H Edge. Tamon Honda is a Japanese professional wrestler who currently works for Pro Wrestling NOAH. // Career Honda represented Japan in three Olympic Games in freestyle amaresu in 1984, 1988 and 1992. ... Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... Eiji Ezaki is a former Japanese professional wrestler better known as the masked Hayabusa (Falcon/Phoenix), who competed primarily for Atsushi Onitas Frontier Martial Arts promotion. ...


Vertical suplex side slam

In this elevated side slam variation, the wrestler grabs a front facelock on the opponent and wraps their arm over the wrestlers neck. The wrestler then lifts the opponent upside down, as in a vertical suplex. The wrestler moves his arm from around the opponent's neck, and as the victim falls back down, he/she is placed into a side slam position and dropped to the mat. Matt Morgan used the move in the WWE, as well as in NJPW, fans dubbing it the Mount Morgan Drop. Currently, Hirooki Goto uses the move, calling it the Shouten. Professional wrestling holds include a number of set moves and pins used by competitors to immobilize their opponents or lead to a submission. ... The Big Show performs a Vertical suplex on JBL during a house show. ... Matthew Thomas Matt Morgan (born September 10, 1976) is an American professional wrestler, currently working for Total Nonstop Action Wrestling. ... Hirooki Gotō , born June 25, 1979 in Kuwana, Mie) is a Japanese professional wrestler. ...


See also

Body Slam redirects here. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Powerslam - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1673 words)
A Powerslam is a professional wrestling body slam move in which the wrestler performing the slam falls face-down on top of his/her opponent.
The use of the term "powerslam" usually refers to the front powerslam and the scoop powerslam.
This is a sitout side powerslam in which the wrestler lifts the opponent up on his right shoulder like in a Front powerslam.
WWE - TNM Circuit (5531 words)
Kurt Angle uses a powerslam on Mick Foley.
Kurt Angle nails Mick Foley with a powerslam.
Kurt Angle nails Mick Foley with a gutwrench suplex.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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