FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Power (international)
The Politics series:

The main articles Politics, sometimes defined as the art and science of government. ...

Democracy
Elections
Political parties

In the context of international relations and diplomacy, power (sometimes clarified as international power, national power, or state power) is the ability of one state to influence or control other states. States with this ability are called powers, middle powers, regional powers, great powers (sometimes capitalized), major powers, superpowers, and hyperpowers. This is a list of politics articles available for every country. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and appeal to a wider international audience, this article may require cleanup. ... Political science is a social science discipline that deals with the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behavior. ... Political philosophy is the study of the fundamental questions about the state, government, politics, property, law and the enforcement of a legal code by authority: what they are, why they are needed, what makes a government legitimate, what rights and freedoms it should protect and why, what form it should... An ideology is an organized collection of ideas. ... The history of democracy traces back from its origins in prehistoric times to its reemergance from the 17th century to the present day. ... Direct democracy comprises a form of democracy and theory of civics wherein sovereignty was lodged in the assembly of all citizens. ... Representative democracy is a form of democracy founded on the exercise of popular sovereignty by the peoples representants. ... Participatory democracy is a broadly inclusive term for many kinds of consultative decision making which require consultation on important decisions by those who will carry out the decision. ... Soviet democracy is a form of democracy in which workers elect representatives in the organs of power called soviets (councils). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Liberal democracy History of democracy Representative democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Elections Elections by country Elections by calender Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by ideology Representative... Voting is a method of decision making wherein a group such as a meeting or an electorate attempts to gauge its opinion—usually as a final step following discussions or debates. ... A voting system is a process that allows a group of individuals to choose between a number of options, and determines the preferred or winning option based on the number of votes each option receives. ... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... Elections by country gives information on elections. ... This electoral calendar lists the national/federal direct elections in the countries listed in the list of countries. ... A political party is an organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... This is a list of political parties around the world. ... This is a list of political parties around the world by ideology. ... This is an overview of the ideologies of parties. ... International Relations (IR), a branch of political science, is the study of foreign affairs of and relations among states within the international system, including the roles of states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... The United Nations, with its headquarters in New York City, is the largest international diplomatic organization. ... A state is an organized political community, occupying a territory, and possessing internal and external sovereignty, which successfully claims the monopoly on the use of force. ... Middle power is a term used in the field of international relations to describe states that are not superpowers or great powers, but still have some influence internationally. ... A regional power is a term used in the field of international relations to describe a state with power and influence that allows it to have a certain element of control over its geogaphical region. ... A major power is a term that encompasses those countries or political entities that cannot be regarded as superpowers, and yet have substantial influence on other states. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... A hyperpower is a powerful country that is vastly stronger than any potential rival. ...


Entities other than states sometimes acquire a similar ability to influence and control states; most often, these are multinational corporations with financial assets surpassing those of smaller nations, but organisations such as the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank have also displayed international power. The Catholic Church and the Hanseatic League are well known historical examples. A multinational corporation (MNC) or multinational enterprise (MNE) or transnational corporation (TNC) is a corporation/enterprise that manages production establishments or delivers services in at least two countries. ... United Nations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... WTO Logo The World Trade Organization (WTO) is an international, multilateral organization, which sets the rules for the global trading system and resolves disputes between its member states, all of whom are signatories to its about 30 agreements. ... The logo of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is the international organization entrusted with overseeing the global financial system by monitoring exchange rates and balance of payments, as well as offering technical and financial assistance when asked. ... Logo of the World Bank The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, in Romance languages: BIRD), better known as the World Bank, is an international organization whose original mission was to finance the reconstruction of nations devastated by WWII. Now, its mission has expanded to fight poverty by means... The name Catholic Church can mean a visible organization that refers to itself as Catholic, or the invisible Christian Church, viz. ... Carta marina of Baltic Sea (1539). ...

Contents


Recent history

The Great Powers are usually taken to be those nations or political entities that, through their great economic and military strength, are the arbiters of world diplomacy, and whose opinions must be taken into account by other nations before effecting initiatives. Characteristically, they have the ability to intervene militarily almost anywhere, and they also have soft, cultural power, often in the form of economic investment in less developed portions of the world. One of the most influential doctrines in history is that all humans are divided into groups called nations. ... Economics (deriving from the Greek words οίκω [okos], house, and νέμω [nemo], rules hence household management) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants. ... Soft power is a term used in international relations theory to describe the ability of a political body, such as a state, to indirectly influence the behavior or interests of other political bodies through cultural or ideological means. ...


Different sets of Great Powers have existed in history, but after 1815, the Concert of Europe formalized France, the United Kingdom, Russia, Austria, and Prussia as the five powers. Of these, the first three had colonial empires outside Europe. Austria was called an empire in a former sense, that of a monarch ruling over kings. Prussia was a newcomer, rising through Frederick the Great's militaristic grand strategy. After the First World War, at the Paris Peace Conference, 1919 four Great Powers were readily recognised: the British Empire (including its Dominions), the United States, France and Italy. The status of Japan requires qualification. They were not part of the Big Four, but were accorded two votes like the Big Four. Their position was highlighted by their race equality proposal, which touched on a number of issues including their status as a Great Power. Although this proposal was defeated as first the British and then the Americans caved into the Australian defence of the White Australia Policy, their successful retention of Shandong and the German islands in the Pacific north of the equator indicated that they had attained the position of a non-white Great Power. Again, after the Second World War in 1945, the United States, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, France and the Republic of China were formalised as the five powers with permanent seats and veto power in the UN Security Council. Clearly, shifts in great power status tend to follow wars. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: History For other senses of this word, see history (disambiguation). ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it easier to understand, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Prussia, 1701-1918 The word Prussia (Old Prussian: PrÅ«sa, German: Preußen, Polish: Prusy, Lithuanian: PrÅ«sai, Latin: Borussia) has had various (often contradictory) meanings: The land of the Baltic Prussians (in what is now parts of southern Lithuania, the Kaliningrad... Frederick the Great Frederick II of Prussia (Friedrich der Große, Frederick the Great, January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was the Hohenzollern king of Prussia 1740–86. ... Grand strategy is military strategy considered at the level of the movement and use of an entire nation state or empires resources. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The Paris Peace Conference of 1919 was an conference, organized by the victors of the World War I for negotiating the peace treaties between the Allied and Associated Powers and the defeated Central Powers. ... The British Empire was, at one time, the foremost global power, and the most extensive empire in the history of the world. ... This is a page about Dominions of the British Empire/Commonwealth. ... This badge from 1906 shows the use of the expression White Australia at that time The White Australia Policy is a popular term which refers to the policies once held by all governments and all mainstream political parties in Australia based on excluding non-white people from immigrating to the... Shandong (Simplified Chinese: 山东; Traditional Chinese: 山東; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-tung) is a coastal province of eastern Peoples Republic of China. ... National motto: ? Official language English? Capital Saipan Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 78 (United States) 1,779 km² Negligible Population  - Total  - Density 132,929 (1980) N/Akm² GDP  - Total  - GDP/head N/A Currency US Dollar Time zone UTC: ? Independence UN trusteeship administered by the US Internet TLD none? Calling code... Colored and Colored People (or Colored Folk in the plural sense) are North American terms that were commonly used to describe people of African Ancestry. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Vice President Annette Lu Premier Su Tseng-chang Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ...


Great powers are also often associated with the projection of military power through a particular technology, such as Dreadnoughts or nuclear weapons. A mere large, defensive infantry army, such as the Chinese would have been able to raise during the age of European dominance is not able to project power overseas. Even the U.S. Army and its blockading navy during the Civil War was insufficient at a time when the United States did not have armored ocean-going battleships. Wealth could be a military factor. Britain could not raise a large army quickly, but was able to fund allies to raise them for it during the Napoleonic Wars. Six ships and one submarine of the Royal Navy have borne the name HMS Dreadnought in the expectation that they would dread nought but God. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the northern states, popularly referred to as the U.S., the Union, the North, or the Yankees; and the seceding southern states, commonly referred to as the Confederate States of America, the CSA, the Confederacy...


The Congress of Berlin, a peace treaty to a comparatively minor war, included Turkey and Italy at the status of those mentioned in the Concert of Europe. International meetings, which developed during the second half of the nineteenth century, also serve to indicate Great Power status in the absence of peace treaties after wars, such as the different Berlin Conference. The Congress of Berlin was a meeting of the European Great Powers and the Ottoman Empires leading statesmen in Berlin in 1878. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it easier to understand, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Berlin Conference of 1884–85 regulated European colonization and trade in Africa. ...


By the end of the Cold War and the era of globalization other nations began to attain international recognition as great power or future great powers. Brazil and India are examples of such nations. Clockwise from top: United States President John F. Kennedy and Soviet General Secretary Nikita Khrushchev meet in a 1961 summit held in Vienna; East German border guards at the Berlin Wall; the first Soviet nuclear weapon Joe 1 is tested; American soldiers land in Vietnam during the Vietnam War; Sputnik... Globalization (or globalisation) refers to the worldwide phenomenon of technological, economic, political and cultural exchanges, brought about by modern communication, transportation and legal infrastructure as well as the political choice to consciously open cross-border links in international trade and finance. ...


Since the end of the World Wars, the term Great Power has been split up into a number of definite categories. The term Superpower was used to define a nation with overwhelming power over the rest of the world, this term was initially used to describe the United States and Soviet Union. The term Major power (or sometimes Global Power) has also been used to describe nations with great power, yet not as overwhelming as that of a superpower. This system forms a type of hierarchy for powerful nations. There have been two World Wars, now more commonly known as World War I or First World War (from 1914 to 1918), and World War II or Second World War (from 1939 to 1945). ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... A major power is a term that encompasses those countries or political entities that cannot be regarded as superpowers, and yet have substantial influence on other states. ... The top global powers usually have relatively high military budgets, reflecting their powerful military capabilities. ...


Theory

In the field of political theory, Niccolò Machiavelli theorized early and influentially on the mechanisms of gaining and retaining political power in his work The Prince, published posthumously in 1532. Political science is a social science discipline that deals with the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behavior. ... Machiavelli, c. ... Political power is a type of power held by a person or group in a society. ... One of the covers of the book The fame of Niccolò Machiavelli rests mainly on his political treatise Il Principe (The Prince), originally called De Principatibus (About Principalities) written around 1513, but not published until 1532, five years after his death. ... Events May 16 - Sir Thomas More resigns as Lord Chancellor of England. ...


Power is usually defined as the ability to impose one's will on others, or to pursue one's goals at the expense of others' interests. Power can be exercised through violence or through coercion, the threat of force, or through treaties and diplomacy. Violence refers to acts of aggression and abuse which causes or intends to cause criminal injury or harm to persons, and (to a lesser extent) animals and property. ... Coercion is the practice of compelling a person to act by employing threat of harm (usually physical force, sometimes other forms of harm). ...


In Western thought, the power of a state is generally thought of in qualitative terms; however, in the current political thinking of the People's Republic of China, national power can be measured quantitatively using an index known as comprehensive national power. The term Western world or the West can have multiple meanings depending on its context. ... Qualitative is an important qualifier in the following subject titles: Qualitative identity Qualitative marketing research Qualitative method Qualitative research THE BIG J This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... A quantitative property is one that exists in a range of magnitudes, and can therefore be measured. ... Comprehensive National Power (CNP) is a concept which is important in the contemporary political thought of the Peoples Republic of China and refers to the general power of a nation-state. ...


State power is often divided into hard power (military power) and soft power (economic or cultural or persuasive power). Hard power is a concept which is mainly used in realism in international relations and refers to national power which comes from military and economic means. ... Soft power is a term used in international relations theory to describe the ability of a political body, such as a state, to indirectly influence the behavior or interests of other political bodies through cultural or ideological means. ...


Foreign policy and power

In International Relations there are two types of diplomatic power; hard power and soft power. "The expression 'soft power' was coined by Joe Nye, a professor from Harvard. 'Soft power' or co-optive power means influencing political developments by means other than 'hard power' – i.e., through debates on cultural values, dialogues on ideology, the attempt to influence through good example and the appeal to commonly accepted human values." Soft power means using diplomacy, dissemination of information, analysis, propaganda and cultural programming to achieve political ends. On the other hand, the expression "hard power" or command power refers to war-ready armed forces or the ability to change what others do through coercion.


Other pertinent concepts include behavioural power, which is the ability of a nation to obtain favorable policy outcomes, and resource power, which is the possession of strategic resources.


Great Powers throughout Modern History

Great Powers throughout Modern History
Country Dates Rise Downfall Notes
Austria/ Austria-Hungary 1526-1918 Battle of Mohács World War One Under the Hapsburg Monarchy.
China 1368-1842, 1978-present The founding of the Ming Dynasty. Economic Explosion. The First Opium War (1842) Under the Ming Dynasty and the Qing Dynastys. Today under People's Republic of China
Denmark 1568-1648 The start of the Eighty Years' War The Thirty Years' War -
France 1431-Present The Hundred Years War - Under the Valois Dynasty, the House of Bourbon, Napoleon, and multiple republics.
Germany 1871-Present German Unification - Under Hohenzollern Dynasty, Hitler, and now a republic.
England/ Great Britain/ United Kingdom 1169-Present Invasions of Ireland, Scotland, and Wales - Under multiple dynasties.
India 1990-Present Economic Explosion -
Italy 1861-1945 Italian Unification World War Two Under Savoy Monarchy and later Mussolini
Japan 1905-Present Russo-Japanese War - -
The Mughal Empire 1526-1739 Invasion of India Social and Religious Strife Pakistan, India, and Afghanistan
The Netherlands 1579-1697 Union of Utrecht French Invansions -
The Ottoman Empire 1453-1918 Conquer of Constantinople World War One Under Ottoman Dynasty
Poland-Lithuania 1385-1648 Union of Krewo The Deluge -
Portugal 1415-1581 Portuguese Colonization Spanish annexation -
Prussia 1763-1871 Seven Years' War German Unification Under Hohenzollern Dynasty
Russia/ The Soviet Union 1721-Present The Great Northern War - Under Romanov Dynasty, Communism, and now a federation
Spain 1469-1898 Unification of Spain and Spanish Colonization Spanish-American War Under Hapsburg Dynasty and Bourbon Dynastys
Sweden 1611-1721 The Ingrian War The Great Northern War -
The United States 1898-Present Spanish-American War - -

Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... The Battle of Mohács (Hungarian: mohácsi csata or mohácsi vész, Turkish: Mohaç Savaşı or Mohaç Meydan Savaşı) was fought on August 29, 1526 between the Hungarian army led by Louis II and the Ottoman army led by Suleiman the Magnificent. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... The Míng Dynasty (Chinese: 明朝; Hanyu Pinyin: ) was the ruling dynasty of China from 1368 to 1644. ... The First Opium War was fought between Great Britain and the Qing Empire in China from 1839 to 1842. ... The Míng Dynasty (Chinese: 明朝; Hanyu Pinyin: ) was the ruling dynasty of China from 1368 to 1644. ... The Qing Dynasty (Manchu: daicing gurun; Chinese: 清朝; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: ching chao), sometimes known as the Manchu Dynasty, was a dynasty founded by the Manchu clan Aisin Gioro, in what is today northeast China, expanded into China proper and the surrounding territories of Inner Asia, establishing the... The Eighty Years War, or Dutch Revolt, was the war of secession between the Netherlands and the Spanish king, that lasted from 1568 to 1648. ... The victory of Gustavus Adolphus at the Battle of Breitenfeld (1631) The Thirty Years War was fought between the years 1618 and 1648, principally on the territory of todays Germany, but also involving most of the major continental powers. ... A map of Europe in the 1430s, at the height of the Hundred Years War The Hundred Years War is the name modern historians have given to what was actually a series of related conflicts, fought over a 116-year period, between the Kingdom of England and France; beginning in... The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328-1589. ... The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... The unification of Germany can refer to: the 1871 formation of the German Empire under Otto von Bismarck. ... The Hohenzollern family originated in the area around the city of Hechingen in Swabia during the 11th century. ... Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945, standard German pronunciation in the IPA) was the Führer (leader) of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party) and of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my [birth]right) Englands location (dark green) within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom and England, see British Isles (terminology). ... Italian unification process Italian unification (called in Italian the Risorgimento, or Resurgence) was the political and social process that unified disparate countries of the Italian peninsula into the single nation of Italy between the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. ... German soldiers at the Battle of Stalingrad World War II was the most extensive and costly armed conflict in the history of the world, involving the great majority of the worlds nations, being fought simultaneously in several major theatres, and costing tens of millions of lives. ... The House of Savoy was a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Savoy, a region between Piedmont, Italy, France and French-speaking Switzerland. ... Benito Mussolini created a fascist state through the use of propaganda, total control of the media and disassembly of the working democratic government. ... Combatants Imperial Russia Empire of Japan Strength 500,000 Soldiers 400,000 Soldiers Casualties 25,331 Killed 146,032 Wounded 47,387 Killed 173,425 Wounded Greater Manchuria, Russian (outer) Manchuria is region to upper right in lighter Red; Liaodong Peninsula is the wedge extending into the Yellow Sea The... Extent of Mughal empire in the late 1600s: the Mughals ruled all but the southern tip of the subcontinent. ... The Netherlands (Dutch: Nederland) is the European part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands (Dutch: Koninkrijk der Nederlanden). ... The Union of Utrecht (Dutch: Unie van Utrecht) is a treaty signed on January 23, 1579 in Utrecht, the Netherlands, unifying the northern provinces of the Netherlands, until then under control of Spain. ... Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power (1683) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Söğüt (1299-1326), Bursa (1326-1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Ä°stanbul (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanl... Map of Constantinople. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Union of Krewo (or Union of Krevo) was a a political and dynastic agreement between Queen Jadwiga of Poland and Grand Prince Jagiello of Lithuania and the begining of the Polish-Lithuanian Union. ... Combatants Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and allies Sweden and allies Commanders Jan Kazimierz of Poland Charles X of Sweden Strength Casualties This article is about the history of Poland. ... The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Prussia, 1701-1918 The word Prussia (Old Prussian: PrÅ«sa, German: Preußen, Polish: Prusy, Lithuanian: PrÅ«sai, Latin: Borussia) has had various (often contradictory) meanings: The land of the Baltic Prussians (in what is now parts of southern Lithuania, the Kaliningrad... The Fifty Years War, sometimes referred to as the 87 year old war or the French and Indian War, (1754 and 1756–1763) pitted Great Britain, Prussia, and Hanover against France, Austria, Russia, Sweden, and Saxony. ... The unification of Germany can refer to: the 1871 formation of the German Empire under Otto von Bismarck. ... The Hohenzollern family originated in the area around the city of Hechingen in Swabia during the 11th century. ... The Great Northern War was the war fought between a coalition of Russia, Denmark-Norway and Saxony-Poland (from 1715 also Prussia and Hanover) on one side and Sweden on the other side from 1700 to 1721. ... The House of Romanov (Рома́нов, pronounced Ro-MAH-nof), the second and last royal dynasty of Russia, which ruled Muscovy and the Russian Empire for five generations from 1613 to 1762. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Combatants United States and Cuban rebel forces Spain Casualties 379 dead (U.S. only) Unknown The Spanish-American War took place in 1898, and resulted in the United States gaining control over the former colonies of Spain in the Caribbean and Pacific. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... This article or section should include material from France: Wars of Religion - Bourbon Dynasty The House of Bourbon dates from at least the beginning of the 13th century, when the estate of Bourbon was ruled by a Lord, vassal of France. ... The Ingrian War, which lasted from 1610 to 1617, was initiated by Sweden against Russia in a final attempt to put a Swedish count on the Russian throne, but ended with a large Swedish territorial gain in the Treaty of Stolbovo See also The De la Gardie Campaign Dymitriads Mikhail... The Great Northern War was the war fought between a coalition of Russia, Denmark-Norway and Saxony-Poland (from 1715 also Prussia and Hanover) on one side and Sweden on the other side from 1700 to 1721. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States and Cuban rebel forces Spain Casualties 379 dead (U.S. only) Unknown The Spanish-American War took place in 1898, and resulted in the United States gaining control over the former colonies of Spain in the Caribbean and Pacific. ...

Modern Power Hierarchy

Political analysis often personifies nation states as powers, discussing superpowers, great powers, second-order powers and "European powers", for example, with convenient simplicity as manifestations of Realpolitik. A nation-state is a specific form of state (a political entity), which exists to provide a sovereign territory for a particular nation (a cultural entity), and which derives its legitimacy from that function. ... Realpolitik (German: real (realistic, practical or actual) and Politik (politics)) is a term to describe or prescribe politics based on strictly practical rather than idealistic notions, and practiced without any sentimental illusions. ...


States have always had variable levels of powers and a number of terms have been developed to describe this continuum.

  • A hyperpower is the dominating state in a unipolar world (e.g. The British Empire after 1815 and the United States today)
  • A superpower is a state that is greatly more powerful than almost all other countries, especially in a bipolar world (for example, the US and USSR during the Cold War)
  • A Major power is a state that can influence nations around the globe, but does not necessarily have overwhelming military or economic dominance (e.g. The United States and Soviet Union in post world war to pre-cold war period) {Sometimes also used to describe a state that was a "superpower" before the term originated during the Cold War}. Some modern day Major powers are also considered Potential Superpowers and have been widely perceived to have the capability of advancing to the stage of a Superpower.
  • A regional power that dominates other states in its region. Examples of regional powers today would be India in South Asia and Brazil in South America.
  • A middle power is a state that cannot dominate most other states, but does have some international influence (for example, Canada and Australia today). The term is, however, often used interchangeably with regional power.

The term great power is generally used to describe Superpowers before this categorizing of powers began. It generally is used to describe a leading power in a multipolar world. A hyperpower is a powerful country that is vastly stronger than any potential rival. ... The British Empire was, at one time, the foremost global power, and the most extensive empire in the history of the world. ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Clockwise from top: United States President John F. Kennedy and Soviet General Secretary Nikita Khrushchev meet in a 1961 summit held in Vienna; East German border guards at the Berlin Wall; the first Soviet nuclear weapon Joe 1 is tested; American soldiers land in Vietnam during the Vietnam War; Sputnik... A major power is a term that encompasses those countries or political entities that cannot be regarded as superpowers, and yet have substantial influence on other states. ... Currently, the United States of America is regarded as the worlds sole superpower — a term used to describe a country with a significant world-wide influence. ... A regional power is a term used in the field of international relations to describe a state with power and influence that allows it to have a certain element of control over its geogaphical region. ... South Asia or Southern Asia is a southern geopolitical region of the Asian continent comprising territories on and in proximity to the Indian subcontinent. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Middle power is a term used in the field of international relations to describe states that are not superpowers or great powers, but still have some influence internationally. ... In the context of international relations and diplomacy, power (sometimes clarified as international power, national power, or state power) is the ability of one state to influence or control other states. ...


Current Powers

These dates are approximate figures based on the years in which the respective countries showed the distinguishing characteristics of each of these categories.


Hyperpower

Main article: Hyperpower

A hyperpower is a powerful country that is vastly stronger than any potential rival. ...

Superpower

Main article: Superpower

This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...

Potential Superpowers

Main article: Potential Superpowers

Currently, the United States of America is regarded as the worlds sole superpower — a term used to describe a country with a significant world-wide influence. ...

Major powers

Main article: Major power

A major power is a term that encompasses those countries or political entities that cannot be regarded as superpowers, and yet have substantial influence on other states. ...

See also

International Power

Power Statuses (from lowest to highest) Middle power, Regional power, Great power, Major power, Superpower, Hyperpower
Potential superpowers China (Main Page),
India (Main Page),
European Union (Main Page)
Types of power Soft power, hard power, Political power, power (sociology), bases of power
Other Second superpower, BRIC

  Results from FactBites:
 
Power (international) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1209 words)
In the context of international relations and diplomacy, power (sometimes clarified as international power, national power, or state power) is the ability of one state to influence or control other states.
International meetings, which developed during the second half of the nineteenth century, also serve to indicate Great Power status in the absence of peace treaties after wars, such as the different Berlin Conference.
In Western thought, the power of a state is generally thought of in qualitative terms; however, in the current political thinking of the People's Republic of China, national power can be measured quantitatively using an index known as comprehensive national power.
International Power - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (243 words)
International Power plc is a leading independent electricity generating company with 16,642 MW (net) in operation and 1,729 MW (net) under construction.
International Power has power plants in operation or under construction in Australia, the United States of America, the United Kingdom, the Czech Republic, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Turkey, Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, Puerto Rico and Thailand.
International Power plc is an international power generator formed in 2001 by the demerger of National Power.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m