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Encyclopedia > Potash
Potash

Potash (or carbonate of potash) is an impure form of potassium carbonate (K2CO3). Potash Source: US Government File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Potash Source: US Government File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... General Name, symbol, number potassium, K, 19 Chemical series alkali metals Group, period, block 1, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 39. ... Ball-and-stick model of the carbonate ion, CO32− For other meanings, see Carbonate (disambiguation) In chemistry, a carbonate is a salt or ester of carbonic acid. ...


Potash has antiquity in the manufacture of glass and soap and as a fertilizer. The name comes from the English words pot and ash, referring to its discovery in the water-soluble fraction of wood ash. “Ancient” redirects here. ... This article is about the material. ... A collection of decorative soaps used for human hygiene purposes. ... Spreading manure, an organic fertilizer Fertilizers (also spelled fertilisers) are compounds given to plants to promote growth; they are usually applied either via the soil, for uptake by plant roots, or by foliar feeding, for uptake through leaves. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... cast-iron iron enamel stainless steel The cooking pan is a type of food preparation utensil commonly found in the kitchen which includes many more specific cooking vessels such as saucepans and frying pans (or fry pans). ... // Ash may refer to: Ash, the incombustible solid remains of a fire, the residual debris produced by incineration. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... H2O and HOH redirect here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Solution. ... Fractional distillation is the separation of a mixture of compounds by their boiling point, by heating to high enough temperatures. ...


The term has become somewhat ambiguous due to the substitution in fertilizers of cheaper potassium salts, such as potassium chloride (KCl) or potassium oxide (K2O), to which the same common name is now sometimes also applied. In addition, potassium hydroxide (KOH) is commonly called caustic potash, an additional source of confusion. Look up substitution in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... General Name, symbol, number potassium, K, 19 Chemical series alkali metals Group, period, block 1, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 39. ... This article is about common table salt. ... The chemical compound potassium chloride (KCl) is a metal halide composed of potassium and chlorine. ... General Name, symbol, number potassium, K, 19 Chemical series alkali metals Group, period, block 1, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 39. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... Potassium oxide is a compound of potassium and oxygen used mainly as a intermediate in inorganic synthesis. ... General Name, symbol, number potassium, K, 19 Chemical series alkali metals Group, period, block 1, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 39. ... General Name, symbol, number oxygen, O, 8 Chemical series nonmetals, chalcogens Group, period, block 16, 2, p Appearance colorless (gas) pale blue (liquid) Standard atomic weight 15. ... The chemical compound potassium hydroxide, (KOH) sometimes known as caustic potash, potassa, potash lye, and potassium hydrate, is a metallic base. ... General Name, symbol, number potassium, K, 19 Chemical series alkali metals Group, period, block 1, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 39. ... Hydroxide is a polyatomic ion consisting of oxygen and hydrogen: OH− It has a charge of −1. ...


The element potassium derives its English name from potash. A number of chemical compounds containing potassium use the word potash in their traditional names: General Name, symbol, number potassium, K, 19 Chemical series alkali metals Group, period, block 1, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 39. ...

potash fertilizer potassium oxide, K2O
caustic potash or potash lye potassium hydroxide, KOH
carbonate of potash, salts of tartar, or pearlash   potassium carbonate, K2CO3
chlorate of potash potassium chlorate, KClO3
muriate of potash potassium chloride, KCl
nitrate of potash or saltpeter potassium nitrate, KNO3
sulfate of potash potassium sulfate, K2SO4

Contents

Potassium oxide is a compound of potassium and oxygen used mainly as a intermediate in inorganic synthesis. ... The chemical compound potassium hydroxide, (KOH) sometimes known as caustic potash, potassa, potash lye and potassium hydrate, is a metallic base. ... The chemical compound potassium hydroxide, (KOH) sometimes known as caustic potash, potassa, potash lye and potassium hydrate, is a metallic base. ... The chemical compound potassium hydroxide, (KOH) sometimes known as caustic potash, potassa, potash lye, and potassium hydrate, is a metallic base. ... Potassium carbonate is a white salt, soluble in water (insoluble in alcohol), which forms a strongly alkaline solution. ... Potassium carbonate is a white salt, soluble in water (insoluble in alcohol), which forms a strongly alkaline solution. ... Potassium carbonate is a white salt, soluble in water (insoluble in alcohol), which forms a strongly alkaline solution. ... Flash point Not flammable Related Compounds Other cations Lithium carbonate, sodium carbonate, caesium carbonate Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Potassium carbonate is a white salt, soluble in water (insoluble in alcohol), which forms... Potassium chlorate is a compound containing potassium, chlorine and oxygen. ... R-phrases R9, R22, R51/53 S-phrases S2, S13, S17, S46, S61 Flash point none Related Compounds Other anions Potassium bromate Potassium iodate Other cations Ammonium chlorate Sodium chlorate Related compounds Potassium chloride Potassium hypochlorite Potassium chlorite Potassium perchlorate Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in... The chemical compound potassium chloride (KCl) is a metal halide composed of potassium and chlorine. ... The chemical compound potassium chloride (KCl) is a metal halide composed of potassium and chlorine. ... The chemical compound potassium nitrate is a naturally occurring mineral source of nitrogen. ... R-phrases   S-phrases   Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... R-phrases   S-phrases   Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... Potassium sulfate (K2SO4) (also known as potash of sulfur) is a white crystalline salt soluble in water. ... Potassium sulfate (K2SO4) (also known as potash of sulfur) is a non-flammable white crystalline salt which is soluble in water. ...

Potash production and trade

History

Up until the 20th century, potash was one of the most important industrial chemicals in Europe. It was refined from the ashes of broadleaved trees and produced primarily in the forested areas of Europe, Russia, and North America. The first U.S. patent was issued in 1790 to Samuel Hopkins for an improvement "in the making Pot ash and Pearl ash by a new Apparatus and Process." (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... The United States patent law is a first-to-invent patent legal framework in contrast to all other national patent laws. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Samuel Hopkins ( December 9, 1743 – 1818 ) was an American inventor from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ...


Potash production provided late-18th and early-19th century settlers in North America a way to obtain badly needed cash and credit as they cleared their wooded land for crops. To make full use of their land, excess wood, including stumps, needed to be disposed. The easiest way to accomplish this was to burn any wood not needed for fuel or construction. Ashes from hardwood trees could then be used to make lye, which could either be used to make soap or boiled down to produce valuable potash. Hardwood could generate ashes at the rate of 60 to 100 bushels per acre (500 to 900 m³/km²). In 1790, ashes could be sold for $3.25 to $6.25 per acre ($800 to $1500/km²) in rural New York State – nearly the same rate as hiring a laborer to clear the same area. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Beech is a typical temperate zone hardwood For the record label, see Hardwood Records. ... The chemical compound potassium hydroxide, (KOH) sometimes known as caustic potash, potassa, potash lye, and potassium hydrate, is a metallic base. ... A table of weights from the secretaries of the different states, showing the no. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the state. ...


To create potash, take an open-bottomed barrel, and place it on a stone base with a groove cut into it, which will direct the resulting liquid into another container. Then place a layer of straw at the bottom, covered by a layer of sticks. This filter layer will prevent the ashes from contaminating the solution. Then fill the barrel with wood-ashes and pour water over it. The water will leach out the potash into the receptacle. This product will be of variable quality. Historically, it was measured by seeing how high an egg would float in the solution. The liquid may be boiled away to give a black, impure potash.


If desired, the potash could be further refined by baking in a kiln to produce a less impure form of potassium carbonate, known as pearlash for its pearly white color. This step was commonly performed at a nearby ashery. The refined potash was in increasing demand in Europe for use in the production of glass and ceramic goods. American hardwoods, besides being more abundant, are said to have provided a higher yield of quality potash than European wood. In some parts, potash receipts became a common form of currency. Some settlers found potash production to be quite lucrative, resulting in faster deforestation than farming alone would have caused. Charcoal Kilns, California Gold Kiln, Victoria, Australia Hop kiln. ... Flash point Not flammable Related Compounds Other cations Lithium carbonate, sodium carbonate, caesium carbonate Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Potassium carbonate is a white salt, soluble in water (insoluble in alcohol), which forms... Potassium carbonate is a white salt, soluble in water (insoluble in alcohol), which forms a strongly alkaline solution. ... An ashery is a factory that converts hardwood ashes into lye, potash, or pearlash. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about the material. ... This article is about ceramic materials. ... This article is about the process of deforestation in the environment. ...


Modern era

Potash output in 2005

In 2005, Canada was the largest producer of potash with almost one-fourth of the world share followed by Russia and Belarus in Soligorsk, reports the British Geological Survey. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 351 pixelsFull resolution (1425 × 625 pixel, file size: 58 KB, MIME type: image/png)This bubble map shows the global distribution of potash output in 2005 as a percentage of the the top producer (Canada - 10,497,000 tonnes). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 351 pixelsFull resolution (1425 × 625 pixel, file size: 58 KB, MIME type: image/png)This bubble map shows the global distribution of potash output in 2005 as a percentage of the the top producer (Canada - 10,497,000 tonnes). ... Salihorsk is a city in Belarus, located in the Minsk voblast. ... The British Geological Survey is a publicly-funded body which aims to advance geoscientific knowledge of the United Kingdom landmass and its continental shelf by means of systematic surveying, monitoring and research. ...


Natural potash deposits can also be mined. The world's largest potash producer is the Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan. Many other areas, however, have the resources for potash production. It should be noted that unlike other producers, Israel's Dead Sea Works and Jordan's Arab Potash Company use solar evaporation pans in the Dead Sea to produce carnallite from which potassium chloride is produced. The Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan, today generally referred to as PotashCorp, is a Canadian corporation that is the worlds largest producer of potash. ... An aerial view of the evaporation ponds operated by the Dead Sea Works The Dead Sea Works (‎, Mifaley Yam HaMelakh) is a major industrial centre on the shores of the Dead Sea in Israel. ... Arab Potash is a company that is primarily involved in harvesting minerals from the Dead Sea. ... The Dead Sea (Hebrew: ‎, , Sea of Salt; Arabic: , , Dead Sea) is a salt lake between the West Bank and Israel to the west, and Jordan to the east. ... CarnalliteBold text ... The chemical compound potassium chloride (KCl) is a metal halide composed of potassium and chlorine. ...


External links

  • The Potash Trade in North America
  • Potash Production in Northern Sweden: History and Ecological Effects of a Pre-industrial Forest Exploitation
  • They Burned The Woods and Sold the Ashes
  • Henry M. Paynter, The First Patent, Invention & Technology, Fall 1990
  • World Agriculture and Fertilizer Markets Map
  • The First U.S. Patent issued was for potash
  • Popular Opposition to proposed potash mining in Udon Thani province, Thailand*
  • "Digging for Potash, Mining Companies Encounter An Iron Will" magazine article
  • Russia reaps rich harvest with potash

  Results from FactBites:
 
AmericanHeritage.com / THE FIRST U S. PATENT (1640 words)
Potash was a leading industrial alkali from antiquity until the close of the nineteenth century, when it was finally abandoned for most uses in favor of soda (sodium carbonate).
By the post-Revolutionary period potash manufacture had become a standard part of New England farming, and it was a critical source of cash to pay taxes and buy necessities in the depression years that followed the war.
The forest-based potash industry is now long gone, but it was essential in the early years of the nation, and Samuel Hopkins’s patent permitted it to thrive.
Potash (453 words)
Potash is a term that is applied to a group of water soluble potassium-containing minerals.
Potash is considered a source for one of the three primary plant nutrients, soluble potassium.
Potash is processed from potassium-bearing ores such as sylvanite, a mixture of sylvite (potash) and common salt.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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