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Encyclopedia > Postal authority

A postal authority organises collection and delivery of domestic mail (US), or post (UK), within its area of control, or in the case of foreign mail, delivery to or receipt of mail from other postal authorities. It has been suggested that first class mail be merged into this article or section. ...


Payment for the service has been performed in many ways. Most commonly, since the introduction of postage stamps in the United Kingdom in 1840, and later in other countries, the sender buys a small label (i.e., a postage stamp) that he affixes to the letter or package. The label is "stamped" with the postmark of the local post office and, after sorting, the letter is taken to its destination and delivered to the recipient. Before postage stamps were introduced, it was generally the recipient who paid for the letter on delivery. There are other schemes in place such as "freepost" which is a variation of payment on delivery in that an organisation will issue pre-paid envelopes to its clients or customers in advance of them sending an order or a payment. This 1974 stamp from Japan depicts a Class 8620 steam locomotive. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... An example of a postmark A postmark is a postal marking made on a letter, package, postcard or the like indicating the (more or less precise) date and time that the item was delivered into the care of the postal service. ... Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ... Freepost is a postal service provided by various postal authorities, whereby a person sends mail without affixing postage, and the recipient pays the postage when collecting the mail. ...


History

In medieval times, posts were controlled by rulers and indeed a public post was almost unheard of. If a common person wanted to send a letter to someone in a distant town, he had to rely on a traveller to take it there, usually for a small fee. It might be possible, if the sender had sufficient influence, to have his letter delivered by a royal courier or perhaps by a merchant. Royal and merchant posts were usually delivered by parallel systems. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Merchants function as professionals who deal with trade, dealing in commodities that they do not produce themselves, in order to produce profit. ...


Monarchs of the time recognised the need to control all aspects of their domains and the transfer of information was certainly a prime concern. As a result, the so-called Royal Posts were established in most of the advanced countries such as England and France. The French King Louis XI (ruled 1461-1483), the notorious "Universal Spider", took a particular interest in the progress of his messages and established a system of staging posts, usually at inns or perhaps at remote farms, where his messengers could quickly exchange horses, leaving one in stable and taking a fresh one for the next stage of his journey. This reduced delivery times considerably. This article treats the generic title monarch. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... Louis XI the Prudent (French: Louis XI le Prudent) (July 3, 1423 – August 30, 1483), also informally nicknamed luniverselle aragne (old French for universal spider), or the Spider King, was King of France (1461–1483). ... Events February 2 - Battle of Mortimers Cross - Yorkist troops led by Edward, Duke of York defeat Lancastrians under Owen Tudor and his son Jasper Tudor, Earl of Pembroke in Wales. ... Events The São Tomé settlement is founded. ...


Merchant posts originated in Renaissance Italy and had spread throughout Europe by the end of the 16th Century. These posts were a natural adjunct to trading missions but in time they became independent of trade and regular delivery services were established. The Renaissance (French for rebirth, or Rinascimento in Italian), was a cultural movement in Italy (and in Europe in general) that began in the late Middle Ages, and spanned roughly the 14th through the 17th century. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ...


The royal and merchant posts were thus the earliest postal authorities. Gradually, the services were opened up to the public. In England, this was achieved in 1657 by means of a Post Office Act, which was consolidated by a subsequent Act of 1660 that established the famous Royal Mail. The main principle of this legislation was that the (General) Post Office which controlled the Royal Mail service was a state monopoly under the control of the Postmaster-General, an appointed government official. Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... Events January 8 - Miles Sindercombe, would-be-assassin of Oliver Cromwell, and his group are captured in London February - Admiral Robert Blake defeats the Spanish West Indian Fleet in a battle over the seizure of Jamaica. ... // Events January 1 - Colonel George Monck with his regiment crosses from Scotland to England at the village of Coldstream and begins advance towards London in support of English Restoration. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... A monopoly (from the Greek language monos, one + polein, to sell) is defined as a persistent market situation where there is only one provider of a product or service, in other words a firm that has no competitors in its industry. ... In the United Kingdom, the Postmaster General is a now defunct ministerial position. ...


The practice of "stamping" letters with a postmark was established at the outset to check on speed and reliability of delivery. Each letter handed to the Post Office at one of its many branches would be "stamped" with the date that the letter was handed in. In due course, the postmarks included the name of the receiving post office. An example of a postmark A postmark is a postal marking made on a letter, package, postcard or the like indicating the (more or less precise) date and time that the item was delivered into the care of the postal service. ... Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ... This article is about the postal marking. ... Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ...


England's Post Office was the first postal authority in the modern sense. The Penny Post which introduced postage stamps was also a British innovation in 1840. The British model of main and sub-post offices under a central government-controlled authority has spread worldwide, as has the use of postage stamps. Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ... The Penny Post is any one of several postal systems in which normal letters could be sent for one penny. ... This 1974 stamp from Japan depicts a Class 8620 steam locomotive. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... This 1974 stamp from Japan depicts a Class 8620 steam locomotive. ...


Variations

There are, however, different types of postal authority and stamps have been issued by:

  • national governments;
  • city, state, territorial, provincial or colonial authorities;
  • groups of countries with common issues under a combined postal authority;
  • occupation forces;
  • foreign post offices;
  • revolutionary regimes;
  • international organisations.

See also: Category:Compendium of postage stamp issuers In the latter part of the 19th and early part of the 20th century, a number of countries maintained post offices in foreign countries, arranged by treaty. ... An international organization (also called intergovernmental organization) is an organization of international scope or character. ...


Sources

  • Stanley Gibbons Ltd: various catalogues
  • Encyclopaedia of Postal Authorities
  • Stuart Rossiter & John Fowler (1991 reprint). World History Stamp Atlas. pub: Black Cat. ISBN 0-7481-0309-0. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mail - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3235 words)
Another important postal service was created in the Islamic world by the caliph Mu'awiyya; the service was called barid, by the name of the towers that were built in order to protect the roads by which couriers travelled.
The world-wide postal system comprising the individual national postal systems of the world's self-governing states is co-ordinated by the Universal Postal Union, which among other things sets international postage rates, defines standards for postage stamps and operates the system of International Reply Coupons.
In 1998, the U.S. Postal Service authorised the first tests of a secure system of sending digital franks via the Internet to be printed out on a PC printer, obviating the necessity to license a dedicated franking machine and allowing companies with smaller mail programs to make use of the option.
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