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Encyclopedia > Poseidon
Neptune in Copenhagen, Denmark.

In Greek mythology, Poseidon (Greek: Ποσειδῶν; Latin: Neptūnus) was the god of the sea, as well as of horses, and, as "Earth-Shaker," of earthquakes. The name of the sea-god Nethuns in Etruscan was adopted in Latin for Neptune in Roman mythology: both were sea gods analogous to Poseidon. Linear B tablets show that Poseidon was venerated at Pylos and Thebes in pre-Olympian Bronze Age Greece, but he was integrated into the Olympian gods as the brother of Zeus and Hades. Poseidon has many children. There is a Homeric hymn to Poseidon, who was the protector of many Hellenic cities, although he lost the contest for Athens to Athena. Poseidon was given a trident during the war of the Titans and the gods, in which he fought alongside his siblings. The war lasted ten years, after which the gods divided the earth among themselves by drawing lots. Zeus took the sky, Poseidon the sea and Hades the underworld. Although Poseidon, unlike Hades, had a throne on Mt. Olympus, he liked to stay underwater in his palace with his queen Amphitrite, the daughter of the Old Man of the Sea.Poseidon's symbols are the trident and the dolphin. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (927x933, 129 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Fishing ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (927x933, 129 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Fishing ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ... Poseidon usually refers to Poseidon, the god of the sea. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Genoese admiral Andrea Doria as Neptune, by Agnolo Bronzino. ... This article is about the body of water. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... In Etruscan mythology, Nethuns was the god of wells, later expanded to all water, including the sea. ... The Etruscans were a race of unknown origin from North Italy who were eventually integrated into Rome. ... Genoese admiral Andrea Doria as Neptune, by Agnolo Bronzino. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... This article is about the ancient syllabary. ... This article is about the Greek geographical feature and town. ... Thebes (Demotic Greek: Θήβα — Thíva; Katharevousa: — Thêbai or Thívai) is a city in Greece, situated to the north of the Cithaeron range, which divides Boeotia from Attica, and on the southern edge of the Boeotian plain. ... Mycenaean Greece, the last phase of the Bronze Age in ancient Greece, is the historical setting of the epics of Homer and much other Greek mythology. ... The Twelve Olympians, in Greek mythology, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... The anonymous Homeric Hymns are a collection of ancient Greek hymns. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, the Titanomachy, or War of the Titans (Greek: Τιτανομαχία), was the eleven-year series of battles fought between the two races of deities long before the existence of mankind: the Titans, fighting from Mount Othrys, and the Olympians, who would come to reign on Mount Olympus. ... This article refers to a mountain in Greece. ... Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Poseidon and Amphitrite In ancient Greek mythology, Amphitrite (not to be confused with Aphrodite) was a sea-goddess. ... In Greek mythology, the Old Man of the Sea was a primordial figure who could be identified by several names, Proteus or Nereus or Pontus. ...

Contents

Worship of Poseidon

Poseidon was a major civic god of several cities: in Athens, he was second only to Athena in importance; while in Corinth and many cities of Magna Graecia he was the chief god of the polis. In his benign aspect, Poseidon was seen as creating new islands and offering calm seas. When offended or ignored, he supposedly struck the ground with his trident and caused chaotic springs, earthquakes, drownings and shipwrecks. Sailors prayed to Poseidon for a safe voyage, sometimes drowning horses as a sacrifice. The History of Athens is one of the longest of any city in Europe and in the world. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... Magna Graecia around 280 b. ... A polis (πόλις, pronunciation pol-is) plural: poleis (πόλεις) is a city, a city-state and also citizenship and body of citizens. ... For other uses, see Trident (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chaos (disambiguation). ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... For other uses, see Ship (disambiguation). ...


According to Pausanias, Poseidon was one of the caretakers of the oracle at Delphi before Olympian Apollo took it over. Apollo and Poseidon worked closely in many realms: in colonization, for example, Delphic Apollo provided the authorization to go out and settle, while Poseidon watched over the colonists on their way, and provided the lustral water for the foundation-sacrifice. Xenophon's Anabasis describes a group of Spartan soldiers in 400-399 BCE singing to Poseidon a paean - a kind of hymn normally sung for Apollo. Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... The word Sibyl comes (via Latin) from the ancient Greek word sibylla, meaning prophetess. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... This article is about water that has been blessed. ... Xenophon, Greek historian Xenophon (In Greek , ca. ... The Persian Expedition, Penguin Classics edition of Xenophons Anabasis, translated by Rex Warner Anabasis Aνάβασις is the most famous work of the Greek writer Xenophon. ... For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... Paean, in Homer, was the Greek physician of the gods. ...


Like Dionysus, who inflamed the maenads, Poseidon also caused certain forms of mental disturbance. A Hippocratic text of ca 400 BCE, On the Sacred Disease[1] says that he was blamed for certain types of epilepsy. This article is about the ancient deity. ... In Greek mythology, Maenads [MEE-nads] were female worshippers of Dionysus, the Greek god of mystery, wine and intoxication. ... For other uses, see Hippocrates (disambiguation). ...

Temple of Poseidon at Cape Sounion, ca 440 BCE

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2048, 2753 KB) Summary Author: Frank van Mierlo The temple of Poseidon at Ak Sounion Greece. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2048, 2753 KB) Summary Author: Frank van Mierlo The temple of Poseidon at Ak Sounion Greece. ... Cape Sounion, looking out to the Aegean islands The cape of Sounion or Sounio, previously known as Sunium (in ancient Greek Σούνιον) is located 65 kilometres south-east of Athens, in Attica. ...

Bronze Age Greece

The name seems to rather transparently stem from Greek pósis "lord, husband" with a less-transparent -don element, perhaps from dea, "goddess'. If surviving Linear B clay tablets can be trusted, the name PO-SE-DA-WO-NE ("Poseidon") occurs with greater frequency than does DI-U-JA (Zeus). A feminine variant, PO-SE-DE-IA, is also found, indicating a lost consort goddess, in effect a precursor of Amphitrite. Tablets from Pylos record sacrificial goods destined for "the Two Queens and Poseidon" and to "the Two Queens and the King". The most obvious identification for the "Two Queens" is with Demeter and Persephone, or their precursors, goddesses who were not associated with Poseidon in later periods. Poseidon is already identified as "Earth-Shaker"— E-NE-SI-DA-O-NE— in Mycenaean Knossos,[2] a powerful attribute where earthquakes had accompanied the collapse of the Minoan palace-culture. In the heavily sea-dependent Mycenean culture, no connection between Poseidon and the sea has yet surfaced; among the Olympians it was determined by lot that he should rule over the sea (Hesiod, Theogony 456): the god preceded his realm. This article is about the ancient syllabary. ... Small tablets made out of clay were used from late 4th millennium BC onwards as a writing medium in Sumerian, Mesopotamian, Hittite, and Minoan/Mycenaean civilizations. ... Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Poseidon and Amphitrite In ancient Greek mythology, Amphitrite (not to be confused with Aphrodite) was a sea-goddess. ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... This article is about the Greek goddess. ... A portion of Arthur Evans reconstruction of the Minoan palace at Knossos. ... The Minoan civilization was a bronze age civilization which arose on the island of Crete. ...


Demeter and Poseidon's names are linked in one Pylos tablet, where they appear as PO-SE-DA-WO-NE and DA, referred to by the epithets Enosichthon, Seischthon and Ennosigaios, all meaning "earth-shaker" and referring to his role in causing earthquakes.


Poseidon in myth

Birth and triumph over Cronus

Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Neptune and Amphitrite

Poseidon was a son of Cronus and Rhea. In most accounts he is swallowed by Cronus at birth but later saved, with his other brother and sisters, by Zeus. However in some versions of the story, he, like his brother Zeus, did not share the fate of his other brother and sisters who were eaten by Cronus. He was saved by his mother Rhea, who concealed him among a flock of lambs pretended to have given birth to a colt, which she gave to Cronus to devour.[3] According to John Tzetzes[4] the kourotrophos, or nurse of Poseidon was Arne, who denied knowing where he was, when Cronus came searching; according to Diodorus Siculus[5] Poseidon was raised by the Telchines on Rhodes, just as Zeus was raised by the Korybantes on Crete. Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Neptune (god) and Amphitrite This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Neptune (god) and Amphitrite This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) is an ancient Roman town, located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano. ... Not to be confused with Chronos, the personification of time. ... Rhea (or Ria meaning she who flows) was the Titaness daughter of Uranus and of Gaia. ... Not to be confused with Chronos, the personification of time. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... John Tzetzes, was a Byzantine poet and grammarian, known to have lived at Constantinople during the 12th century. ... For the Greek goddess, see Artemis. ... Diodorus Siculus (c. ... In Greek mythology, the Telchines were the original inhabitants of the island of Rhodes, and were known in Crete and Cyprus. ... This article is about the Greek island of Rhodes. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... The Korybantes, called the Kurbantes in Phrygia, were the crested dancers who worshipped the Phrygian goddess Cybele with drumming and dancing. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ...


According to a single reference in the Iliad, when the world was divided by lot in three, Zeus received the sky, Hades the underworld and Poseidon the sea. title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Underworld (disambiguation). ...


The foundation of Athens

Athena became the patron goddess of the city of Athens after a competition with Poseidon. Yet Poseidon remained a numinous presence on the Acropolis in the form of his surrogate, Erechtheus. At the dissolution festival at the end of the year in the Athenian calendar, the Skira, the priests of Athena and the priest of Poseidon would process under canopies to Eleusis.[6] They agreed that each would give the Athenians one gift and the Athenians would choose whichever gift they preferred. Poseidon struck the ground with his trident and a spring sprang up; the water was salty and not very useful,[7] whereas Athena offered them an olive tree. The Athenians (or their king, Cecrops) accepted the olive tree and along with it Athena as their patron, for the olive tree brought wood, oil and food. After the fight, infuriated at his loss, Poseidon sent a monstrous flood to the Attic Plain, to punish the Athenians for not choosing him. The depression made by Poseidon's trident and filled with salt water was surrounded by the northern hall of the Erechtheum, remaining open to the air. "In cult, Poseidon was identified with Erechtheus," Walter Burkert noted.[8] "the myth turns this into a temporal-causal sequence: in his anger at losing, Poseidon led his son Eumolpus against Athens and killed Erectheus." This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Acropolis (Gr. ... Erechtheus in Greek Mythology was the name of a king of Athens, and a secondary name for two other characters In Homers Iliad the name is applied to the earth-born son of Hephaestus later mostly called Erichthonius by later writers. ... The Grand Master of the Knights Hospitaller at Rhodes under a canopy of estate, on a dais: there is a cushion under his feet Margaret Beaufort, Queen Mother, at prayer, by an anonymous artist, about 1500 Engraving of the Gnadenaltar in the Vierzehnheiligen Basilica, Bad Staffelstein, Bavaria. ... Eleusis (Game) The cardgame invented by Robert Abbott in 1962, and later popularized in 1977 by Martin Gardner in his Mathematical Games column in Scientific American magazine. ... The name Cecrops means face with a tail and it is said that this mythical Greek king, born from the earth itself, had his top half shaped like a man and the bottom half in serpent or fish-tail form. ... For other uses, see Wood (disambiguation). ... For the Popeye character, see Olive Oyl. ... Erechtheum, from SW The Porch of Maidens The Erechtheum, or Erechtheion, is an ancient Greek temple on the north side of the Acropolis of Athens in Greece, notable for a design that is both elegant and unusual. ... In traditional usage, the cult of a religion, quite apart from its sacred writings (scriptures), its theology or myths, or the personal faith of its believers, is the totality of external religious practice and observance, the neglect of which is the definition of impiety. ... Walter Burkert (born Neuendettelsau (Bavaria), February 2, 1931), the most eminent living scholar of Greek myth and cult, is an emeritus professor of classics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland who has also taught in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... In Greek mythology, Eumolpus was the son of Poseidon and Chione (or Hermes and Aglaulus). ...


The contest of Athena and Poseidon was the subject of the reliefs on the western pediment of the Parthenon, the first sight that greeted the arriving visitor. The Parthenon west façade For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ...


This myth is construed by Robert Graves and others as reflecting a clash between the inhabitants during Mycenaean times and newer immigrants. It is interesting to note that Athens at its height was a significant sea power, at one point defeating the Persian fleet at Salamis Island in a sea battle. Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... Motto: Esteqlāl, āzādÄ«, jomhÅ«rÄ«-ye eslāmÄ« 1 Independence, freedom, Islamic Republic Anthem: SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān Â² Capital (and largest city) Tehran Official languages Persian, Constitutional status for regional languages such as Azeri and Kurdish [1] Demonym Iranian Government Islamic Republic  -  Supreme Leader  -  President... Salamis (Greek, Modern: Σαλαμίνα Salamína, Ancient/Katharevousa: Σαλαμίς Salamís) is the largest Greek island in the Saronic Gulf, about 1 nautical mile (2 km) off-coast from Piraeus. ...


The walls of Troy

Poseidon and Apollo, having offended Zeus, were sent to serve King Laomedon of Troy. He had them build huge walls around the city and promised to reward them well, a promise he then refused to fulfill. In vengeance, before the Trojan War, Poseidon sent a sea monster to attack Troy (it was later killed by Perseus). For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Laomedon was a Trojan king and father of Ganymedes, Priam, Astyoche, Lampus, Hicetaon, Clytius, Cilla, Aethylla, and Hesione. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths...


Consorts/children

Neptune's fountain in Prešov, Slovakia

His consort was Amphitrite, a nymph and ancient sea-goddess, daughter of Nereus and Doris. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2136x2848, 1348 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Poseidon PreÅ¡ov Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2136x2848, 1348 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Poseidon PreÅ¡ov Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... , Torysa riverbank in PreÅ¡ov PreÅ¡ov ( ; known also by alternative names) is a city in eastern Slovakia. ... Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Poseidon and Amphitrite In ancient Greek mythology, Amphitrite (not to be confused with Aphrodite) was a sea-goddess. ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... For other uses, see Nereus (disambiguation). ... // Doris may refer to: Doris (mythology) (bountiful) was, in Greek mythology, an Oceanid, daughter of Oceanus and Tethys. ...


Poseidon was the father of many heroes. He is thought to have fathered the famed Theseus. Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night (By some accounts, this was presented as a rape). ...


A mortal woman named Tyro was married to Cretheus (with whom she had one son, Aeson) but loved Enipeus, a river god. She pursued Enipeus, who refused her advances. One day, Poseidon, filled with lust for Tyro, disguised himself as Enipeus, and from their union were born the heroes Pelias and Neleus, twin boys. Poseidon also had an affair with Alope, his granddaughter through Cercyon, begetting the Attic hero Hippothoon. Cercyon had his daughter buried alive but Poseidon turned her into the spring, Alope, near Eleusis. In Greek mythology, Tyro was the daughter of Salmoneus and mother of Pelias and Neleus. ... In Greek mythology, Cretheus, or Krêtheus was the king and founder of Iolcus. ... In Greek mythology, Aeson (or Aison) was the son of Tyro and Cretheus, father of Jason and Promachus. ... In Greek mythology, Enipeus was an Oceanid, son of Oceanus and Tethys. ... For other uses, see River (disambiguation). ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... King Pelias was the father of Acastus, Pisidice, Alcestis in Greek mythology. ... Neleus was the son of Poseidon and Tyro, brother of Pelias. ... In Greek mythology, Alop was a mortal woman, daughter of Cercyon. ... Cercyon (boars tail) is a figure in Greek mythology. ... Hippothoon (or Hippothous) is a figure in Greek mythology, often described as the King of Eleusis after the death of Cercyon; however, Theseus was sometimes said to have taken the throne from Cercyon after his death. ... Eleusis (Game) The cardgame invented by Robert Abbott in 1962, and later popularized in 1977 by Martin Gardner in his Mathematical Games column in Scientific American magazine. ...


Poseidon rescued Amymone from a lecherous satyr and then fathered a child, Nauplius, by her. In Greek mythology, Amymone (the blameless one) was a daughter of Danaus. ... A bald, bearded, horse-tailed satyr balances a winecup on his erect penis, a trick worthy of note, on an Attic red-figured psykter, ca. ... In Greek mythology, Nauplius was the name of two characters, one descended from the other. ...


After having raped Caeneus, Poseidon fulfilled her request and changed her into a male warrior. Poseidon and Caenis, woodcut illustration of Ovid by Virgil Solis, 1563 In Greek mythology, Caeneus (Ancient Greek Καινεύς or Kaineus) was a Lapith hero and originally a Thessalonian woman, Caenis. ...


Not all of Poseidon's children were human. In an archaic myth, Poseidon once pursued Demeter. She spurned his advances, turning herself into a mare so that she could hide in a herd of horses; he saw through the deception and became a stallion and captured her. Their child was a horse, Arion, which was capable of human speech. Poseidon also raped Medusa on the floor of a temple to Athena. Medusa was then changed into a monster. When she was later beheaded by the hero Perseus, Chrysaor and Pegasus emerged from her neck. There is also Triton, the merman; Polyphemus, the cyclops; and Oto and Ephialtae, the giants. This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... For other uses, see mare (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... It has been suggested that Rapists be merged into this article or section. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... In Greek mythology, Arion or Areion (Ancient Greek Άρείων) is a divinely-bred, extremely swift immortal horse that, according to the Latin poet Sextus Propertius, was also endowed with speech. ... For other uses, see Medusa (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... This article is about the legendary creature. ... Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths... In Greek mythology, Chrysáor (Greek: Χρυσάωρ, English translation: He who has a golden armament), the brother of Pegasus, was often depicted as a young man, the son of Poseidon and Medusa. ... For other uses, see Pegasus (disambiguation). ... Triton is a mythological Greek god, the messenger of the deep. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... For the collection of short stories by Michael Shea, see Polyphemus (book). ... This page is about the mythical creature. ... In Greek mythology, the Aloadae were Otus and Ephialtes or Ephialtis, sons of Iphimidea and Aloeus. ... Jack the Giant-Killer by Arthur Rackham. ...


Gill, N.S. (2007). Mates and Children of Poseidon (English). Retrieved on 2007-02-05. Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

  1. With Aethra
    1. Theseus
  2. With Alope
    1. Hippothoon
  3. With Amphitrite
    1. Rhode
    2. Triton
    3. Benthesikyme
  4. With Amymone
    1. Nauplius
  5. With Astypalaea
    1. Ancaeus
    2. Eurypylos
  6. With Canace
    1. Aloeus
    2. Epopeus
    3. Hopelus
    4. Nireus
    5. Triopas
  7. With Celaeno
    1. Lycus
  8. With Chione
    1. Eumolpus
  9. With Chloris
    1. Poriclymenus
  10. With Clieto
    1. Atlas
    2. Eymelus
    3. Ampheres
    4. Evaemon
    5. Mneseus
    6. Autochthon
    7. Elasippus
    8. Mestor
    9. Azaes
    10. Diaprepes
  11. With Demeter
    1. Arion
    2. Despoina
  12. With Europa
    1. Euphemus
  13. With Euryale
    1. Orion
  14. With Gaia
    1. Antaeus
    2. Charybdis
  15. With Halia
    1. Rhode
  16. With Hiona
    1. Hios
  17. With Hippothoe
    1. Taphius
  18. With Iphimedia
    1. Aloadae, giants Otus and Ephialtes
  19. With Libya
    1. Belus
    2. Agenor
    3. Lelex
  20. With Lybie
    1. Lamia
  21. With Melia
    1. Amycus
  22. With Medusa
    1. Pegasus
    2. Chrysaor
  23. With Periboea
    1. Nausithous
  24. With Satyrion
    1. Taras
  25. With Thoosa
    1. Polyphemus
  26. With Tyro
    1. Neleus
    2. Pelias
  27. Unknown mother
    1. Aon
    2. Byzas
    3. Cercyon
    4. Cycnus
    5. Evadne
    6. Lotis
    7. Rhodus
    8. Sinis

// Aethra was a daughter of King Pittheus of Troezen and, with the king Aegeus of Athens — or in some versions, Poseidon — mother of Theseus. ... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night (By some accounts, this was presented as a rape). ... In Greek mythology, Alop was a mortal woman, daughter of Cercyon. ... Hippothoon (or Hippothous) is a figure in Greek mythology, often described as the King of Eleusis after the death of Cercyon; however, Theseus was sometimes said to have taken the throne from Cercyon after his death. ... Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Poseidon and Amphitrite In ancient Greek mythology, Amphitrite (not to be confused with Aphrodite) was a sea-goddess. ... In Greek mythology, Rhode was the oldest Oceanid, a daughter of Tethys and Oceanus. ... Triton is a mythological Greek god, the messenger of the deep. ... Benthesikyme in Greek mythology according to Apollodorus (3. ... In Greek mythology, Amymone (the blameless one) was a daughter of Danaus. ... In Greek mythology, Nauplius was the name of two characters, one descended from the other. ... In Greek mythology, Astypalaea was the daughter of Phoenix and Perimede and the sister of Europa. ... Ancaeus was a son of Poseidon, Greek mythical god of the sea, horses, and earthquakes, who, having left a flagon of wine to pursue a boar, was killed by it. ... In Greek mythology, Eurypylus referred to three different people. ... In Greek mythology, Canace was a daughter of Aeolus and Enarete, and the beloved of Poseidon. ... In Greek mythology, Aloeus was the son of Poseidon and Canace, husband first of Iphimedia and later of Eeriboea, and father of Salmoneus (who founded Elis), Otus and Ephialtes, collectively known as the Aloadae. ... In Greek mythology, Triopas was one of the Heliadae, sons of Helios and Rhodus. ... In Greek mythology, Celaeno referred to several different beings. ... Son of Poseidon and Celaeno, brother of Eurypylus. ... In Greek mythology, Chione was the daughter of Boreas and Oreithyia. ... In Greek mythology, Eumolpus was the son of Poseidon and Chione (or Hermes and Aglaulus). ... As she talks, her lips breathe spring roses: I was Chloris, who am now called Flora. ... In Greek mythology, Poriclymenus (or Periclymenus) referred to two different people. ... Lee Lawries colossal bronze Atlas, Rockefeller Center, New York For the Transformers character see King Atlas (Transformers). ... In Greek mythology, Mneseus is the twin brother of Autochthon. ... Look up autochthonous in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... In Greek mythology, Arion or Areion (Ancient Greek Άρείων) is a divinely-bred, extremely swift immortal horse that, according to the Latin poet Sextus Propertius, was also endowed with speech. ... In Greek mythology, Despina (Δέσποινα, mistress or queen) was the daughter of Demeter and Poseidon. ... Europa and the Bull by Gustave Moreau, circa 1869. ... In Greek mythology, Euphemus was the son of Europa and Poseidon. ... Euryale as depicted in God of War II. Euryale (far-roaming), in Greek mythology, was one of the immortal Gorgons, three vicious sisters with brass hands, sharp fangs, and hair of living, venomous snakes. ... Not to be confused with Arion. ... For other uses, see Gaia. ... Heracles and Antaeus, red-figured krater by Euphronios, 515–510 BC, Louvre (G 103) Heracles and Antaeus. ... In Greek mythology, Charybdis, or Kharybdis (sucker down, Greek Χάρυβδις), is a sea monster, daughter of Poseidon and Gaia, who swallows huge amounts of water three times a day and then belches it back out again. ... In Greek mythology, Halia was a nymph from Rhodes. ... In Greek mythology, Rhode was the oldest Oceanid, a daughter of Tethys and Oceanus. ... Hiona was a consort of the Poseidon, Greek mythical God of the sea, horses, and earthquakes. ... In Greek mythology, Hios is a love-child of Poseidon and Hiona, and is associated with the Greek island of Khios. ... In Greek mythology, Hippothoe was the mother of Taphius by Poseidon. ... In Greek mythology, Taphius founded the city Taphos on the island of the same name, and was its king. ... In Greek mythology, Aloeus was the son of Poseidon and Canace, husband first of Iphimedia and later of Eeriboea, and father of Salmoneus (who founded Elis),Otus and Ephialtes, collectively known as the Aloadae. ... In Greek mythology, the Aloadae were Otus and Ephialtes or Ephialtis, sons of Iphimidea and Aloeus. ... Belus (Greek Belos) the Egyptian is in Greek Mythology a son of Poseidon by Libya. ... This article needs cleanup. ... In Greek mythology, Lelex was a King of Laconia (then named Lelegia). ... In Greek mythology, Lybie was the mother of Lamia by Poseidon. ... The Lamia who moodily watches the serpent on her forearm (painting by Herbert James Draper, 1909), appears to represent the hetaira. ... In Greek mythology, Melia was a nymph, one of the Meliae, who were daughters of Oceanus. ... Amycus punished, red-figured Lucanian hydria, end of 4th century BC, Cabinet des Médailles In Greek mythology, Amycus was the son of Poseidon and Melia. ... For other uses, see Medusa (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pegasus (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Chrysáor (Greek: Χρυσάωρ, English translation: He who has a golden armament), the brother of Pegasus, was often depicted as a young man, the son of Poseidon and Medusa. ... In Greek mythology, five people shared the name Periboea. ... In Greek mythology, Nausithous, or Nausíthoös was a son of Poseidon with Periboea. ... In Greek mythology, Satyrion is the name of a nymph, perhaps from the region of Taranto, Italy. ... A coin of the ancient Magna Graecia city of Taras, with Taras riding a dolphin. ... In Greek mythology, Thoosa was a Nereid, and one of Poseidons paramours. ... For the collection of short stories by Michael Shea, see Polyphemus (book). ... In Greek mythology, Tyro was the daughter of Salmoneus and mother of Pelias and Neleus. ... Neleus was the son of Poseidon and Tyro, brother of Pelias. ... King Pelias was the father of Acastus, Pisidice, Alcestis in Greek mythology. ... A statue of Poseidon, Aons father. ... According to a Greek legend, Byzas was a Greek colonist (reported by some to be a leader or even a king) from the Doric colony of Megara in Ancient Greece, who consulted the oracle of Apollo at Delphi. ... Cercyon (boars tail) is a figure in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, four people were known as Cycnus or Cygnus. ... In Greek mythology, there were two people named Evadne. ... In Greek mythology, Lotis was a nymph, daughter of Poseidon or Nereus. ... In Greek mythology, Rhode was the oldest Oceanid, a daughter of Tethys and Oceanus. ... In Greek mythology, Siris or Sinis was killed by Theseus. ...

Epithets

Poseidon was known in various guises, denoted by epithets. In the town of Aegae in Euboea, he was known as Poseidon Aegaeus and had a magnificent temple upon a hill.[9][10][11] Poseidon also had a close association with horses, known under the epithet Poseidon Hippios. The entrance to the Great Tumulus Museum at Vergina Vergina (in Greek Βεργίνα; also spelled Verghína and Veryína) is a small town in northern Greece, located at coordinates , in the prefecture of Imathia in the region of Central Macedonia. ... For the Greek mythological figures see Euboea Euboea, or Negropont or Negroponte (Modern Greek: Εύβοια Évia, Ancient Greek Eúboia), is the second largest of the Greek Aegean Islands and the second largest Greek island overall in area and population (after Crete). ...


Poseidon in literature and art

The Neptun brunnen fountain in Berlin

In Greek art, Poseidon rides a chariot that was pulled by a hippocampus or by horses that could ride on the sea. He was associated with dolphins and three-pronged fish spears (tridents). He lived in a palace on the ocean floor, made of coral and gems. This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Greece has a rich and varied artistic history, spanning some 5000 years and beginning in the Cycladic and Minoan prehistorical civilization, giving birth to Western classical art in the ancient period (further developing this during the Hellenistic Period), to taking in the influences of Eastern civilizations and the new religion... For other uses, see Chariot (disambiguation). ... The location of the hippocampus in the human brain. ... For other uses, see Dolphin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... Spears were one of the most common personal weapons from the late Bronze Age until the advent of firearms. ... For other uses, see Trident (disambiguation). ... Animated map exhibiting the worlds oceanic waters. ... Extant Subclasses and Orders Alcyonaria    Alcyonacea    Helioporacea Zoantharia    Antipatharia    Corallimorpharia    Scleractinia    Zoanthidea [1][2]  See Anthozoa for details For other uses, see Coral (disambiguation). ... Look up gem in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In the Iliad Poseidon favors the Greeks, and on several occasion takes an active part in the battle against the Trojan forces. However, in Book XX he rescues Aeneas after the Trojan prince is laid low by Achilles. title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ...


In the Odyssey, Poseidon is notable for his hatred of Odysseus due to the latter's having blinded the god's son, the cyclops Polyphemus. The enmity of Poseidon prevents Odysseus's return home to Ithaca for many years. Odysseus is even told, notwithstanding his ultimate safe return, that to placate the wrath of Poseidon will require one more voyage on his part. This article is about Homers epic poem. ... For other uses, see Odysseus (disambiguation). ... This page is about the mythical creature. ... For the collection of short stories by Michael Shea, see Polyphemus (book). ... For other places or objects named Ithaca, see Ithaca (disambiguation). ...


In the Aeneid, Neptune is still resentful of the wandering Trojans, but is not as vindictive as Juno, and in Book I he rescues the Trojan fleet from the goddess's attempts to wreck it, although his primary motivation for doing this is his annoyance at Juno's having intruded into his domain. Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story... Vatican statue of Juno Sospita This article is about a figure in mythology. ...


A hymn to Poseidon included among the Homeric Hymns is a brief invocation, a seven-line introduction that addresses the god as both "mover of the earth and barren sea, god of the deep who is also lord of Helicon and wide Aegae[12], and specificies his twofold nature as an Olympian: "a tamer of horses and a saviour of ships." The anonymous Homeric Hymns are a collection of ancient Greek hymns. ... This article is about the mountain. ... The entrance to the Great Tumulus Museum at Vergina Vergina (in Greek Βεργίνα; also spelled Verghína and Veryína) is a small town in northern Greece, located at coordinates , in the prefecture of Imathia in the region of Central Macedonia. ...


In contemporary culture

"King" Neptune appears as the ruler of the sea, from cans of tuna to The Spongebob Squarepants Movie. Disney animators have portrayed Neptune as a fish-man, mistaking him for Typhon, in the 1997 animated Hercules. In Percy Jackson & The Olympians, by Rick Riordan, the main character Perseus Jackson is a son of Poseidon (making him a demigod). The comic book superheroes Namor and Aquaman also bear a strong resemblance to Poseidon. In the anime/manga, Eyeshield 21, one of the teams is called Kyoshin Poseidon, with Poseidon as the mascot. In the animé One Piece Poseidon is viewed as a weapon capable of destruction on a massive level which can be found by reading the inscriptions on a poneglyph. The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie is a feature film based on Nickelodeons hit TV show SpongeBob SquarePants. ... Zeus darting his lightning at Typhon, Chalcidian black-figured hydria, ca. ... Hercules is a 1997 animated feature film, produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures on June 27, 1997. ... This article is about the series of books by Rick Riordan. ... Rick Riordan is an American author from Texas famous for his Percy Jackson and the Olympians series (The Lightning Thief, The Sea of Monsters, and The Titans Curse). ... The term demigod, meaning half-god, is a modern distinction, often misapplied in Greek mythology. ... Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional comic-book character in the Marvel Comics Universe, and one of the first superheroes, debuting in Spring 1939. ... Aquaman is a fictional comic book superhero who appears in DC Comics. ... Serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump Original run 2002 – ongoing Volumes 28 volumes with 277 chapters Animated movie: Eyeshield 21 (Jump Festa) Director Tamaki Nakatsu Studio Production I.G Released 2004 Runtime 30 min TV anime Director Masayoshi Nishida Studio NAS, Studio Gallop Network Animax, TV Tokyo Original run April 6... One piece redirects here. ...


Sound and images

Poseidon myths as told by story tellers
1. Poseidon and Pelops, part I, (integral to Tantalus myth), read by Timothy Carter
Bibliography of reconstruction: Homer, Odyssey, 11.567 (7th c. BC); Pindar, Olympian Odes, 1 (476 BC); Euripides, Orestes, 12-16 (408 BC); Apollodorus, Epitomes 2: 1-9 (140 BC); Ovid, Metamorphoses, VI: 213, 458 (AD 8); Hyginus, Fables, 82: Tantalus; 83: Pelops (1st c. AD); Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.22.3 (AD 160 - 176)
2. Poseidon and Pelops, part II (Integral to the myth of Pelops and Hippodameia), read by Timothy Carter
Bibliography of reconstruction: Pindar, Olympian Ode, I (476 BC); Sophocles, (1) Electra, 504 (430 - 415 BC) & (2) Oenomaus, Fr. 433 (408 BC); Euripides, Orestes, 1024-1062 (408 BC); Apollodorus, Epitomes 2, 1-9 (140 BC); Diodorus Siculus, Histories, 4.73 (1st c. BC); Hyginus, Fables, 84: Oinomaus; Poetic Astronomy, ii (1st c. AD); Pausanias, Description of Greece, 5.1.3 - 7; 5.13.1; 6.21.9; 8.14.10 - 11 (c. AD 160 - 176); Philostratus the Elder Imagines, I.30: Pelops (AD 170 - 245); Philostratus the Younger, Imagines, 9: Pelops (c. AD 200 - 245); First Vatican Mythographer, 22: Myrtilus; Atreus et Thyestes; Second Vatican Mythographer, 146: Oenomaus

Notes

  1. ^ (Hippocrates), On the Sacred Disease, Francis Adams, tr.
  2. ^ Adams, Professor John Paul. Mycenaean Divinities. List of Handouts for Classics 315. Retrieved on September 2, 2006.
  3. ^ In the second century CE, a well with the name of Arne, the "lamb's well", in the neighbourhood of Mantineia in Arcadia, where old traditions lingered, was shown to Pausanias. (Pausanias viii.8.2.)
  4. ^ Tzetzes, ad Lycophron 644.
  5. ^ Diodorus, v. 55.
  6. ^ Discussed by Walter Burkert, Homo Necans, (1972, tr. 1983143-49.
  7. ^ Another version of the myth says that Poseidon gave horses to Athens.
  8. ^ Burkert, Homo Necans (1972, tr. 1983:157). "That Poseidon and Erechtheus were merely two names for a single god, a fact that is stated by Euripides, is also clearly visible in the cult." (p. 149).
  9. ^ Strabo, ix. p. 405
  10. ^ Virgil, Aeneid iii. 74, where Servius erroneously derives the name from the Aegean Sea
  11. ^ Schmitz, Leonhard (1867), “Aegaeus”, in Smith, William, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, vol. 1, Boston, pp. 24 
  12. ^ The ancient palace-city that was replaced by Vergina

Mantinea – Greek: Mαντινεία Mantineia, modern romanizations: Mantinia, Mandineia or Mandinia; and for a time Antigonia (Greek: Αντιγόνεια) also transliterated as Antigonea and Antigoneia – is a city in Arcadia in the central Peloponnese that was the site of two significant battles in Classical Greek history. ... This article is about a region of Greece. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story... Maurus (or Marius) Servius Honoratius, Roman grammarian and commentator on Virgil, flourished at the end of the 4th century AD. He is one of the interlocutors in the Saturnalia of Ambrosius Theodosius Macrobius, and allusions in that work and a letter from Quintus Aurelius Symmachus to Servius show that he... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology (1849, originally published 1844 under a slightly different title) is an encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. ... Location of Aigéai/Vergina in Greece. ...

References

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Poseidon
Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... The Twelve Olympians by Monsiau, circa late 18th century. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, virginal Hestia,(Roman name, Vesta) daughter of Cronus and Rhea, (ancient Greek ) is the goddess of the hearth, of the right ordering of domesticity and the family, who received the first offering at every sacrifice in the household. ... This article is about the grain goddess Demeter. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ancient Greek god. ... Hephaestus (pronounced or ; Greek HÄ“phaistos) was a Greek god whose Roman equivalent was Vulcan; he was the god of technology, blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals and metallurgy, and fire. ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... Oceanus, with his wife, Tethys, ruled the seas before Poseidon. ... In Greek mythology, Ceto, or Keto (Greek: Κητος, Ketos, sea monster) was a hideous aquatic monster, a daughter of Gaia and Pontus. ... For other uses, see Nereus (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Glaucus (shiny, bright or bluish-green) was the name of several different figures, including one God. ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ... Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Poseidon and Amphitrite In ancient Greek mythology, Amphitrite (not to be confused with Aphrodite) was a sea-goddess. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... Triton is a mythological Greek god, the messenger of the deep. ... This article is about Proteus in Greek mythology. ... Phorcys and Ceto, Mosaic, Late Roman, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia In Greek mythology, Phorcys, or Phorkys was one of the names of the Old One of the Sea, the primeval sea god, who, according to Hesiod, was the son of Pontus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology, Pontus (or Pontos, sea) was an ancient, pre-Olympian sea-god, son of Gaia and Aether, the Earth and the Air. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are blue-haired sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ... Naiad by John William Waterhouse, 1893 In Greek mythology, the Naiads (from the Greek νάειν, to flow, and νἃμα, running water) were a type of nymph who presided over fountains, wells, springs, streams, and brooks, as river gods embodied rivers, and some very ancient spirits inhabited the still waters of...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Poseidon (577 words)
The son of Cronus and Rhea, Poseidon is one of six siblings who eventually "divided the power of the world." His brothers and sisters include: Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Hades, and Zeus.
Poseidon was relied upon by sailors for a safe voyage on the sea.
Poseidon is Greek for "Husband" (possibly of wheat), and therefore it is thought that he and Demeter (goddess of wheat) are a good match because they reign as the god and goddess of fertility.
Poseidon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1678 words)
Given Poseidon's connection with horses as well as the sea, and the landlocked situation of the likely Indo-European homeland, some scholars have proposed that Poseidon was originally an aristocratic horse-god who was then assimilated to Near Eastern aquatic deities when the basis of the Greek livelihood shifted from the land to the sea.
Poseidon was a major civic god of several cities: in Athens, he was second only to Athena in importance; while in Corinth and many cities of Magna Graecia he was the chief god of the polis.
Poseidon was a son of Cronus and Rhea.
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