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Encyclopedia > Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Seal
Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire
Coordinates: 43°4′32″N 70°45′41″W / 43.07556, -70.76139
Country United States
State New Hampshire
County Rockingham County
Incorporated 1653
Government
 - Mayor Steve Marchand
 - City manager John P. Bohenko
Area
 - City  16.8 sq mi (43.5 km²)
 - Land  15.6 sq mi (40.4 km²)
 - Water  1.2 sq mi (3.1 km²)
Elevation  20 ft (6 m)
Population (2000)
 - City 20,784
 - Density 1,331.3/sq mi (514.1/km²)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
Website: www.cityofportsmouth.com

Portsmouth, New Hampshire is a city in Rockingham County, New Hampshire in the United States of America. It is the fourth-largest community in the county[1], with a population of 20,784 as of the 2000 census. An historic seaport and popular summer tourist destination, Portsmouth is served by Pease International Airport, a former military base converted into a civilian airport and office park. Image File history File links Market_Square,_Portsmouth,_NH.jpg Summary Market Square, Portsmouth, NH; from a c. ... Image File history File links Portsmouth,_NH_Seal. ... Image File history File links Rockingham_Portsmouth_NH.png Map of the state of New Hampshire with Rockingham County Exploded, highlighting Portsmouth. ... Rockingham County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... List of New Hampshire counties: New Hampshire counties Belknap County: formed in 1840 from parts of Merrimack County and Strafford County. ... Rockingham County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... In local government, incorporation occurs when municipalities such as cities, towns, townships, villages, and boroughs become self-governing entities under the laws of the state or province in which they are located. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Steve Marchand is the current mayor of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. ... The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... ‹ The template below (Unit of length) is being considered for deletion. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Rockingham County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... Pease International Tradeport Airport (IATA: PSM, ICAO: KPSM) is an public airport in southeastern New Hampshire, about 50 miles north of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Pease Air Force Base was a Strategic Air Command base used during the Cold War. ... An industrial park is an area of land set aside for industrial development. ...

Contents

History

Market Square in 1853

The first known European to explore and write about the area was Martin Pring in 1603. It would be settled in 1623 as Piscataqua, then given the name Strawbery Banke because of abundant wild strawberries growing beside the Piscataqua River, a tidal estuary with a swift current. Strategically located for trade between various upstream industries (particularly logging) and mercantile interests abroad, the port prospered. Fishing, lumber and shipbuilding were principal businesses. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Abenaki couple Martin Pring (1580-1646) was an English explorer from Bristol, England. ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1623 (MDCXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Strawbery Banke is a historic district located in the South End neighborhood of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. ... Strawberries Promo Strawberries is an album by The Damned released October 1982 on Bronze Records (catalogue #BRON 542). ... The Piscataqua River seen from downtown Portsmouth, New Hampshire The Piscataqua River, in the northeastern United States, is a 12 mi (19 km) long tidal estuary formed by the confluence of the Salmon Falls and Cocheco rivers. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Rio de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... Logging is the process in which trees are cut down usually as part of a timber harvest which is good for the environment. ... Mercantilism is the economic theory that a nations prosperity depended upon its supply of gold and silver, that the total volume of trade is unchangeable. ... For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill Lumber or Timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use—from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use—as structural material for construction... Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ...


At the town's incorporation in 1653, the name Portsmouth was adopted in honor of the colony's founder, John Mason. He had been captain of the port of Portsmouth, England, in the county of Hampshire, for which New Hampshire is named. In 1679, Portsmouth became the colonial capital. It also became a refuge for exiles from Puritan Massachusetts. When Queen Anne's War ended, the town was selected by Governor Joseph Dudley to host the 1713 Treaty of Portsmouth, which ended hostilities between Eastern Abenaki Indians and English settlements of the Province of Massachusetts Bay and New Hampshire. Events February 2 - New Amsterdam (later renamed New York City) is incorporated. ... Captain John Mason (1586 – 1635) was born at Kings Lynn, Norfolk, England. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Events January 24 - King Charles II of England disbands Parliament August 7 - The brigantine Le Griffon, which was commissioned by René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, is towed to the southern end of the Niagara River, to become the first ship to sail the upper Great Lakes. ... For the record label, see Puritan Records. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Queen Annes War (1702–1713) was the second in a series of four French and Indian Wars fought between France and Great Britain in North America for control of the continent and was the counterpart of War of the Spanish Succession in Europe. ... Joseph Dudley (September 23, 1647 - April 2, 1720), colonial governor of Massachusetts from 1702 to 1715, the son of Thomas Dudley, was born and died in Roxbury, Massachusetts. ... Year 1713 (MDCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the 1713 treaty. ... The Abenaki (also Wabanuok or Wabanaki) are a tribe of Native Americans/First Nations belonging to the Algonquian peoples of northeastern North America. ... A map of the Province of Massachusetts Bay. ...


During the Revolution, in 1774 Paul Revere rode to Portsmouth warning that the British were coming. Although the harbor was protected by Fort William and Mary, the rebel government moved the capital inland to Exeter, particularly after Falmouth (now Portland, Maine) was bombarded by the Royal Navy on October 18, 1775. During President Thomas Jefferson's 1807 embargo, which withered trade, a number of local fortunes were lost. Others were gained by privateering during the War of 1812. In 1849, Portsmouth incorporated as a city. John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... For the song by the Beastie Boys, see Paul Revere (song). ... Fort Willam and Mary in 1705 Fort William and Mary was a colonial defensive post at New Castle, New Hampshire. ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Rockingham County Incorporated 1638  - Board of Selectmen Paul Binette, Chairman Robert Eastman Joe Pace William Campbell Lionel Ingram Area    - Town 51. ... Nickname: Motto: Resurgam (Latin for I will rise again) Country United States State Maine County Cumberland Settled 1632 Incorporated 1786 Government  - Mayor Nicholas M. Mavodones, Jr Area  - City  52. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Embargo Act of 1807 was an American law prohibiting all export of cargo from American ports. ... A privateer was a private ship (or its captain) authorized by a countrys government by letters of marque to attack foreign shipping. ... This article is about the U.S. – U.K. war. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...

Market Square in c. 1908

Once one of the nation's busiest ports and shipbuilding cities, Portsmouth's wealth was expressed in fine architecture. It contains significant examples of Colonial, Georgian, and Federal style houses, a selection of which are now museums. Portsmouth's heart contains stately brick Federalist stores and townhouses, built all-of-a-piece after devastating early 19th century fires, the worst being in 1813 when 244 buildings burned. Subsequently, a fire district was created which required that all new buildings within the district be constructed of brick with slate roofs. The city is also noted for producing boldly veneered Federalist furniture, particularly that by master cabinet maker Langley Boardman. Image File history File links Market_Square_from_Daniel_St. ... Image File history File links Market_Square_from_Daniel_St. ... This article is about building architecture. ... Colonial house and street A colonial house, also called Georgian, is a style of house that was popular in America from 1690 to 1830. ... Federal style architecture occurred in the United States between 1780 and 1830, particularly from 1785 to 1815. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Slate Slate Macro Slate roof Slate is a fine-grained, homogeneous, metamorphic rock derived from an original shale-type sedimentary rock composed of clay or volcanic ash through low grade regional metamorphism. ... Veneer, in woodworking, refers to thin slices of wood, usually thinner than 3 millimetres (1/8 inch). ... Cabinet making is the practice of utilizing many woodworking skills to create cabinets, shelving and furniture. ...


The Industrial Revolution, however, would leave Portsmouth in the shadow of New Hampshire mill towns like Dover, Keene, Laconia, Manchester, Nashua and Rochester. The effect of this economic shift was to preserve old Portsmouth throughout its Victorian doldrums, a time described in the works of native son Thomas Bailey Aldrich. Now, with the protection of an Historic District Commission, much of the city's architectural legacy survives -- to the delight of tourists and artists, who each summer throng the cafes around Market Square. A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... Amoskeag Canal, 1948, by Charles Sheeler A mill town is a community that grew up around one or more mills or factories, usually on a river that was used as a source of power in the days before electricity. ... Nickname: Location within New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country United States State New Hampshire County Strafford Settled 1623 Incorporated 1623 (town) Incorporated 1855 (city) Government  - City Manager Mike Joyal  - Mayor Scott Myers  - City Council Robert Keays David Scott Catherine Cheney Dennis Ciotti Douglas DeDe Dean Trefethen Harvey Turner Area  - City  29. ... Nickname: Elm City Location in Cheshire County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Cheshire Settled 1736 Incorporated 1753 (town) Incorporated 1874 (city) Government  - Mayor Michael E.J. Blastos  - City Council Charles H. Redfern Angelo D. DiBernardo, Jr. ... Motto: City on the Lakes Location in Belknap County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Belknap County Incorporated 1855 City Council Matthew J. Lahey, Mayor Area    - City 68. ... Nickname: Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough County Incorporated 1751 Government  - Mayor Frank Guinta (R) Area  - City  34. ... Nickname: Gate City Location in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Hillsborough Incorporated 1746 Government  - Mayor Bernard A. Streeter Area  - City  31. ... Nickname: The Lilac City Location within Strafford County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Strafford Settled 1749 Incorporated 1778 Area    - City 118. ... Victorian can refer to: people from or attributes of places called Victoria (disambiguation page), including Victoria, Australia, people who lived during the British Victorian era of the 19th century, and aspects of the Victorian era, for example: Victorian architecture Victorian fashion Victorian morality Victorian literature This is a disambiguation page... Thomas Bailey Aldrich Thomas Bailey Aldrich (born 11th November 1836, died 19th March 1907) was a poet and novelist born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, USA. When he was but a child his father moved to New Orleans, but after ten years the boy was sent back to Portsmouth--the Rivermouth... A tourist boat travels the River Seine in Paris, France Tourism can be defined as the act of travel for the purpose of recreation, and the provision of services for this act. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


Portsmouth shipbuilding history has a long symbiotic relationship with Kittery, Maine, across the Piscataqua River. Although John Paul Jones boarded at the Portsmouth house which now bears his name, his ship Ranger was built on Badger's Island in Kittery. The Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, established in 1800 as the first federal navy yard, is located on Seavey's Island in Kittery. At the base, President Theodore Roosevelt arranged negotiations leading to the 1905 Treaty of Portsmouth, ending the Russo-Japanese War. Common Clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris) in their Magnificent Sea Anemone (Heteractis magnifica) home. ... Location of town of Kittery in state of Maine Kittery is a town located in York County, Maine. ... Template:Infobox Military Person. ... The first USS Ranger was a sloop-of-war in the Continental Navy and received the first official salute at sea by a foreign power. ... Portsmouth Naval Shipyard The Portsmouth Naval Shipyard (PNS), often called the Portsmouth Navy Yard, is a United States Navy shipyard for building, remodeling, and repairing the Navys ships. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Seaveys Island in 1893 Seaveys Island, on which the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard resides, is located in the Piscataqua River in Kittery, Maine, opposite Portsmouth, New Hampshire. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Russian and Japanese delegates around the negotiating table at the Portsmouth Navy Yard St The Treaty of Portsmouth formally ended the 1904-1905 Russo-Japanese War. ... Combatants Russian Empire Montenegro[1] Empire of Japan Commanders Emperor Nicholas II Aleksey Kuropatkin Stepan Makarov â€  Emperor Meiji Oyama Iwao Heihachiro Togo The Russo–Japanese War (Japanese: Nichi-Ro Sensō, Russian: , Chinese: , February 10, 1904 – September 5, 1905) was a conflict that grew out of the rival imperialist ambitions of...

Notable inhabitants

Main article: List of notable inhabitants of Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Wentworth-Gardner House in c. 1920, once owned by the Metropolitan Museum of Art

// Jim McDermott, painter, illustrator and cartoonist Thomas Bailey Aldrich, poet & novelist Joseph Stevens Buckminster, Unitarian minister & writer Samuel Cushman, United States Representative from New Hampshire James T. Fields, publisher and author Benjamin Penhallow Shillaber, humorist Celia Thaxter, poet and writer The Bruisers, punk rock band Ronnie James Dio, musician Tom... Image File history File links Doorway,_Wentworth-Gardner_House. ... Image File history File links Doorway,_Wentworth-Gardner_House. ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as The Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... Brooke Astor (March 30, 1902 - August 13, 2007) was an American socialite and philanthropist who was the chairwoman of the Vincent Astor Foundation, which had been established by her third husband. ... Ichabod Bartlett (July 24, 1786 - October 19, 1853) was a United States Representative from New Hampshire. ... Samuel Cushman Samuel Cushman (June 8, 1783 - May 20, 1851) was a United States Representative from New Hampshire. ... Ronnie James Dio (born Ronald James Padavona on July 10, 1942 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, USA), is an American heavy metal vocalist who has performed with Black Sabbath, Rainbow, Elf, and his own band Dio. ... James Thomas Fields (December 31, 1817 – April 24, 1881), American publisher and author, was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. ... Betty and Barney Hill claimed to have been abducted by extraterrestrials on September 16, 1961. ... Frank Jones Brewery Frank Jones (September 15, 1832 - October 2, 1902) was a United States Representative from New Hampshire. ... Template:Infobox Military Person. ... John Langdon John Langdon (June 26, 1741—September 18, 1819) was a politician from New Hampshire and one of the first two United States Senators from that state. ... Tobias Lear V (1762 - 1816) was an American who served as President George Washingtons personal secretary. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Daniel Marcy (November 7, 1809 - November 3, 1893) was a United States Representative from New Hampshire. ... Jim McDermott is a New Hampshire-based artist who works in a variety of styles and media. ... Fitz John Porter Fitz John Porter (August 31, 1822 – May 21, 1901) (sometimes written FitzJohn Porter) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Union general in the American Civil War. ... Tom Rush (February 8, 1941-) was a popular folk and blues musician in the early 1960s. ... Richard A. Searfoss (born June 5, 1956), is a former United States Airforce Colonel and NASA Astronaut. ... Benjamin Penhallow Shillaber Benjamin Penhallow Shillaber (1814 - 1890) was an American humorist. ... Benjamin Thompson. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Benning Wentworth (1696–1770) was the colonial governor of New Hampshire from (1741-1766). ... John Wentworth (1737-1820) was the British colonial governor of New Hampshire at the time of the American Revolution. ... William Whipple, Jr. ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ...

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 43.5 km² (16.8 mi²). 40.4 km² (15.6 mi²) of it is land and 3.1 km² (1.2 mi²) of it is water, comprising 7.03% of the town. Portsmouth is drained by Sagamore Creek and the Piscataqua River. The highest point in the city is 100 feet (30 meters) above sea level, within Pease International Airport. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... The Piscataqua River seen from downtown Portsmouth, New Hampshire The Piscataqua River, in the northeastern United States, is a 12 mi (19 km) long tidal estuary formed by the confluence of the Salmon Falls and Cocheco rivers. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... metre or meter, see meter (disambiguation) The metre is the basic unit of length in the International System of Units. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ...


Demographics

Moffatt-Ladd House in 1905

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 20,784 people, 9,875 households, and 4,858 families residing in the city. The population density was 514.1/km² (1,331.3/mi²). There were 10,186 housing units at an average density of 251.9/km² (652.5/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.55% White, 2.13% African American, 0.21% Native American, 2.44% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.28% from other races, and 1.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.35% of the population. Image File history File links The_Moffatt-Ladd_House,_Portsmouth,_NH.jpg‎ The Moffatt-Ladd House, Portsmouth, NH; from a 1905 postcard. ... Image File history File links The_Moffatt-Ladd_House,_Portsmouth,_NH.jpg‎ The Moffatt-Ladd House, Portsmouth, NH; from a 1905 postcard. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 9,875 households out of which 20.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.8% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 50.8% were non-families. 38.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.04 and the average family size was 2.75. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...

Rockingham Hotel in 1911

In the city the population was spread out with 17.2% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 36.2% from 25 to 44, 23.2% from 45 to 64, and 16.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 94.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.0 males. Image File history File links The_Rockingham_Hotel,_Portsmouth,_NH.jpg Summary Rockingham Hotel, Portsmouth, NH; from a 1911 postcard. ... Image File history File links The_Rockingham_Hotel,_Portsmouth,_NH.jpg Summary Rockingham Hotel, Portsmouth, NH; from a 1911 postcard. ...


The median income for a household in the city was $45,195, and the median income for a family was $59,630. Males had a median income of $41,966 versus $29,024 for females. The per capita income for the city was $27,540. About 6.4% of families and 9.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.3% of those under age 18 and 8.4% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Sites of interest

  • Strawbery Banke - a neighborhood featuring several dozen restored historic homes in Colonial, Georgian and Federal styles of architecture. The site of one of Portsmouth's earliest settlements.
  • The Music Hall (Portsmouth) - an 800-seat theater originally opened in 1878. After several closings, the theater is now run by a non-profit organization and currently under restoration. The venue hosts musical acts, theater and cinema.
  • USS Albacore Museum & Park - a museum featuring the USS Albacore, a U.S. Navy submarine used for testing that was decommissioned in 1972 and moved to the park in 1985. The submarine is open for tours.

Strawbery Banke is a historic district located in the South End neighborhood of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. ... The Music Hall is an 800-seat theater located in Portsmouth, NH. Built in 1878, The Music Hall claims to be the oldest operating theater in New Hampshire and the 14th oldest in the United States. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... USS Albacore (AGSS-569), a unique research submarine, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for the albacore, a small tuna found in temperate seas throughout the world. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...

Historic house museums

Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion in 1902, the home of Colonial Governor Benning Wentworth

Image File history File links Wentworth-Coolidge_Mansion,_Portsmouth,_NH.jpg‎ The Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion, Portsmouth, NH; from a 1902 postcard. ... Image File history File links Wentworth-Coolidge_Mansion,_Portsmouth,_NH.jpg‎ The Wentworth-Coolidge Mansion, Portsmouth, NH; from a 1902 postcard. ... Events March 12 - New Jersey becomes a colony of England. ... Year 1758 (MDCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... // Events August 5 - In the Battle of Peterwardein 40. ... // Events April 10 - Austrian army attack troops of Frederick the Great at Mollwitz August 10 - Raja of Travancore defeats Dutch East India Company naval expedition at Battle of Colachel December 19 - Vitus Bering dies in his expedition east of Siberia December 25 - Anders Celsius develops his own thermometer scale Celsius... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

Sister cities

Gov. Langdon House in c. 1915

Portsmouth has five sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI): Image File history File links Gov. ... Image File history File links Gov. ... Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Friendship city: Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Carrickfergus Borough UK Parliament: East Antrim European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Carrickfergus Postal District(s): BT38 Population (2005) 32,668 Carrickfergus (from the Irish: Carraig Fhearghais meaning Rock of Fergus) is a large town in... Northern Ireland (Irish: ) is a part of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Nichinan (日南市; -shi) is a city located in Miyazaki, Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Estonia. ... County Pärnu County Mayor Mart Viisitamm Area 32. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Sewerodwinsk (Russian: ) is a city in Archangelsk Oblast, Russia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Aerial photography: Szolnok - Hungary The Catholic Church The Calvinist Church Szolnok (Romanian: ) is the capital of the county of Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok, central Hungary. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

Education

Category: ‪Possible copyright violations‬ ... Southern New Hampshire University, also known as SNHU, is a private university in Manchester, New Hampshire. ...

Media

The New Hampshire Gazette is a non-profit, alternative, bi-weekly newspaper published in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. ... The Portsmouth Herald (and Herald Sunday) is a seven-day daily newspaper serving Greater Portsmouth, New Hampshire. ...

Notes

  1. ^ The Rockingham County towns (not cities) of Derry (34,021), Salem (28,112), and Londonderry (23,236) had greater populations as of the 2000 census.

Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Rockingham County Incorporated 1827 Government  - Town Council Brent Carney Kevin Coyle Craig W. Bulkley Janet Fairbanks Rick Metts Beverly Ferrante Brian Chirichiello Area  - Town  36. ... Salem is a town located in Rockingham County, New Hampshire. ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Rockingham County Incorporated 1722 Government  - Town council Joe Paradis, Chairman Brian Farmer Marty Bove Mark Oswald Kathy Wagner Area  - Town  41. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
New Hampshire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3398 words)
New Hampshire was home to the famous rock formation called the Old Man of the Mountain, a face-like profile in Franconia Notch, until May 2003, when the formation, an icon of the state, fell apart.
New Hampshire was a Jacksonian stronghold; the state sent Franklin Pierce to the White House in the election of 1852.
New Hampshire has a bifurcated executive branch, consisting of the governor and a five-member Executive Council which votes on state contracts over $5,000 and "advises and consents" to the governor's nominations to major state positions such as department heads and all judgeships and pardon requests.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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