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Encyclopedia > Portsmouth
City of Portsmouth
Geography
Status: Unitary, City (1926)
Region: South East England
Ceremonial County: Hampshire
Area:
- Total
Ranked 319th
40.25 km²
Admin. HQ: Portsmouth
ONS code: 00MR
Demographics
Population:
- Total (2006 est.)
- Density
Ranked 71st
196,400
4880 / km²
Ethnicity[1]: 91.9% White
3.4% S.Asian
1.1% Black
1.2% Mixed Race
2.4% Chinese or Other
Politics

Portsmouth City Council
http://www.portsmouth.gov.uk/
Leadership: Leader & Cabinet
Executive: Liberal Democrat / Labour
MPs: Mike Hancock (LD)
Sarah McCarthy-Fry (Lab/Co-op)

Portsmouth (/ˈpɔrtsməθ/ ) is a city of about 189,000 people[citation needed] located in the county of Hampshire on the southern coast of England. It is commonly nicknamed Pompey. The administrative unit itself forms part of the wider Portsmouth conurbation, with an estimated 442,252 residents within its boundaries[citation needed], making it the 11th largest urban area in England. At the 2001 census it was the only city in England with a greater population density (4,638.5/km²) than London as a whole (4,562.2/km²), although many of London's individual boroughs had a much greater density. Image File history File links EnglandPortsmouth. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Area is the measure of how much exposed area any two dimensional object has. ... This is a list of districts of England ordered by area. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... For other uses, see Density (disambiguation). ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... Arms of Portsmouth City Council. ... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... For the mayor of Brantford, Ontario, see Mike Hancock (Canadian politician). ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... Sarah McCarthy-Fry is the Labour Party Member of Parliament for Portsmouth North in the United Kingdom since the 2005 general election, when she replaced Syd Rapson. ... Labour Co-operative describes those candidates in British elections standing on behalf of both the Labour Party and the Co-operative Party, based on a national agreement between the two parties. ... Portsmouth may refer to: Portsmouth in England, the original Portsmouth Portsmouth F.C., the football club Canada Portsmouth, Ontario (former village; now part of Kingston, Ontario) Dominica Portsmouth, Dominica, that countrys second-largest town United States Portsmouth, New Hampshire Portsmouth Naval Shipyard (U.S. Navy Base, place of signing... Cathedral city redirects here. ... The traditional counties as usually portrayed. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A conurbation is an urban area comprising a number of cities, towns and villages which, through population growth and expansion, have physically merged to form one continuous built up area. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The administrative area of Greater London contains thirty-two London boroughs. ...


A significant naval port for centuries, Portsmouth is home to the world's oldest dry dock still in use and home to many famous ships, which includes Nelson's famous flagship HMS Victory. Portsmouth has declined as a military port in recent years but remains a major dockyard and base for the Royal Navy. There is also a commercial port serving destinations on the continent for freight and passenger traffic. For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ... U.S. Navy submarine USS Greeneville in dry dock following collision with a fishing boat. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Victory (disambiguation). ... Portsmouth Naval Dockyard. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ...


The Spinnaker Tower is a recent addition to the city's skyline. It can be found in the recently redeveloped area known as Gunwharf Quays. The Spinnaker Tower in June 2005. ... Shops, bars, and restaurants in Gunwharf Quays. ...


The Portsmouth Urban Area covers an area with a population well over twice that of the city of Portsmouth itself, and includes Fareham, Portchester, Gosport, Havant (which includes the large suburb Leigh Park), Lee-on-the-Solent, Stubbington and Waterlooville. The Portsmouth Urban Area has a population of 422,252 (2001 census) and includes the following components (as defined by the ONS): Fareham/Portchester Gosport Havant Lee-on-the-Solent Portsmouth Stubbington Waterlooville Portsmouth itself makes up less than half this population, with 187,056 people. ... Arms of Fareham Borough Council Fareham Creek today, looking towards Gosport The market town of Fareham lies in the south east of Hampshire, England, between the cities of Southampton and Portsmouth, roughly in the centre of the South Hampshire conurbation. ... View of Portchester from Portsdown Hill; castle keep on left, Portsmouth harbour and city in background Portchester is a small suburb to the northwest of Portsmouth, England. ... Gosport is a town and district in Hampshire with around 77,000 inhabitants (including Lee-on-the-Solent), situated on the south coast of England. ... Havant is a town and district in Hampshire on the South coast of England, between Portsmouth and Chichester. ... leigh park is great u mother fuckers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Leigh Park is a large suburb (population 27,500) of Havant, in Hampshire, England. ... The seafront and beach at Lee-on-the-Solent. ... Stubbington is a large Hampshire village which is located between Southampton and Portsmouth on the south coast of England. ... , Waterlooville is a town in Hampshire, England approx 8 miles north of Portsmouth. ...


The suburbs of Portsmouth and Southampton to the west arguably form a conurbation stretching from Southampton to Havant on the M27/A27 road along the coast, and north to Clanfield on the A3 road. For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... A conurbation is an urban area comprising a number of cities, towns and villages which, through population growth and expansion, have physically merged to form one continuous built up area. ... M27 is: A major road in England: M27 motorway Messier object 27, or the Dumbbell Nebula This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The A27 is a major road in England. ... Clanfield could be Clanfield, Hampshire Clanfield, Oxfordshire This article consisting of geographical locations is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... A3 can refer to: A3, a paper size defined by ISO 216. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Portsmouth
Portchester Castle at night, showing the Tower's uplighting.

There have been settlements in the area since before Roman times, mostly being offshoots of Portchester, which was a Roman base (Portus Adurni) and possible home of the Classis Britannica. Portsmouth is commonly regarded as having been founded in 1180 by John of Gisors (Jean de Gisors).[citation needed] Most early records of Portsmouth are thought to have been destroyed by Norman invaders following the Norman Conquest. The earliest detailed references to Portsmouth can be found in the Southwick Cartularies. However, there are records of "Portesmūða" from the late 9th century, meaning "mouth of the Portus harbour".[2] Portsmouth harbour, with HMS Warrior on the left, Portsmouth Harbour railway station in the centre, and construction of the Spinnaker Tower on the right. ... Portchester Castle (Latin name: Portus Adurni) is a Roman Channel Fort, considered by many as one of the finest Roman fortifications remaining in Europe. ... View of Portchester from Portsdown Hill; castle keep on left, Portsmouth harbour and city in background Portchester is a small suburb to the northwest of Portsmouth, England. ... Portus Adurni was a Saxon Shore Fort in the Roman province of Britannia. ... The Classis Britannica (literally, British fleet, in the sense of the fleet in British waters or the fleet of the province of Britannia, rather than the fleet of the state of Britain) was a provincial naval fleet of the navy of ancient Rome. ... Jean de Gisors (1133 - 1220) was a Norman lord of the fortress of Gisors in Normandy, where meetings were traditionally convened between English and French kings and where, in 1188, a curious squabble occurred that involved the cutting of an elm. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... Created by lord Pimpernel Jones sometime between 1200-1210. ...


The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle entry for 501 claims that "Portesmuða" was founded by a Saxon warrior called Port, though historians do not accept that origin of the name. The Chronicle states that: The initial page of the Peterborough Chronicle. ...


"Her cwom Port on Bretene 7 his .ii. suna Bieda 7 Mægla mid .ii. scipum on þære stowe þe is gecueden Portesmuþa 7 ofslogon anne giongne brettiscmonnan, swiþe æþelne monnan."


The battle is attested in early Welsh sources as the Battle of Llongborth. The poem names the Chronicle’s "young British man of nobility" as Geraint map Erbin. The Battle of Llongborth was an ancient battle in Great Britain mentioned in a poem of the same name, traditionally attributed to Llywarch Hen. ...

Anglican Cathedral

In the Domesday Book there is no mention of Portsmouth. However, settlements that later went on to form part of Portsmouth are listed. At this time it is estimated the Portsmouth area had a population not greater than two or three hundred. While in Portsea there was a small church prior to 1166, Portsmouth's first real church came into being in 1181 when a chapel dedicated to Thomas Becket was built by Augustinian monks and run by the monks of Southwick Priory until the Reformation. The modern Portsmouth Anglican Cathedral is built on the original location of the chapel. A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... St. ... Southwick Priory is an English Heritage site in Southwick, near Portsmouth, Hampshire, England. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... Portsmouth Anglican Cathedral Interior of the cathedral, at the original nave. ...

In 1194 King Richard The Lionheart returned from being held captivity in Austria, and set about summoning a fleet and an army to Portsmouth, which Richard had taken over from John of Gisors. On May 2, 1194 the King gave Portsmouth its first Royal Charter granting permission it city status[3] to hold a fifteen day annual "Free Market Fair", weekly markets, to set up a local court to deal with minor matters, and exemption from paying the annual tax, with the money instead used for local matters. King Richard later went on to build a number of houses and a hall in Portsmouth. The hall is thought to have been at the current location of the Clarence Barracks (the area was previously known as Kingshall Green). It is believed that the crescent and eight-point star found on the thirteenth century common seal of the borough was derived from the arms of William de Longchamp, Lord Chancellor to Richard I at the time of the granting of the charter.[4] The crescent and star, in gold on a blue shield, were subsequently recorded by the College of Arms as the coat of arms of the borough.[5] Southsea Castle is one of Henry VIIIs Device Forts, built on the Southsea waterfront to guard the eastern entrance to the Solent. ... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England and ruler of the Angevin Empire from 6 July 1189 until his death. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events November 20 - Palermo falls to Henry VI, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire December 25 - Henry VI is crowned king of Sicily. ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... The entrance of the College of Arms. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...



In 1200 King John reaffirmed the rights and privileges awarded by King Richard. King John's desire to invade Normandy resulted in the establishment of Portsmouth as a permanent naval base, and soon after construction began on the first docks, and the Hospital of St Nicholas, which performed its duties as an almshouse and hospice. During the thirteenth century Portsmouth was commonly used by King Henry III and Edward I as a base for attacks against France. John of England depicted in Cassells History of England (1902) John (French: Jean) (December 24, 1166/67–October 18/19, 1216) reigned as King of England from 1199 to 1216. ... For other uses, see Normandy (disambiguation). ... Saint Nicholas, also known as Nikolaus in Germany and Sinterklaas (a contracted form of Sint Nicolaas) in the Netherlands and Flanders, is the common name for the historical Saint Nicholas of Myra, who lived in 4th century Byzantine Anatolia, (now in modern Turkey) and had a reputation for secret gift... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John Lackland as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ...


By the fourteenth century commercial interests had grown considerably, despite rivalry with the dockyard of nearby Southampton. Common imports included wool, grain, wheat, woad, wax and iron, however the ports largest trade was in wine from Bayonne and Bordeaux. For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... Grain redirects here. ... Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat Wheat For the indie rock group, see Wheat (band). ... Binomial name L. Synonyms Isatis indigotica Fortune Woad (or glastum) is the common name of the flowering plant Isatis tinctoria in the family Brassicaceae. ... candle wax This page is about the substance. ... General Name, symbol, number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... Bayonne (French: Bayonne, pronounced ; Gascon Occitan and Basque: Baiona) is a city and commune of southwest France at the confluence of the Nive and Adour rivers, in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques département, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... For other uses, see Bordeaux (disambiguation). ...

Round Tower

In 1338 a French fleet led by Nicholas Béhuchet raided Portsmouth, destroying much of the town, with only the local church and hospital surviving. Edward III gave the town exemption from national taxes to aid reconstruction. Only ten years after this devastation the town for the first time was struck by the Black Death. In order to prevent the regrowth of Portsmouth as a threat, the French again sacked the city in 1369, 1377 and 1380. Henry V was the first to build permanent fortification in Portsmouth. In 1418 he ordered a wooden Round Tower be built at the mouth of the harbour, which was completed in 1426. King Henry VIII rebuilt the fortifications with stone, raised a square tower, and assisted Robert Brygandine and Sir Reginald Bray in the construction of the country's first dry dock. In 1527, with some of the money from the dissolution of the monasteries, Henry VIII built Southsea Castle. In 1545, he saw his vice-flagship Mary Rose founder off Southsea Castle, with a loss of about 500 lives, while going into action against the French fleet. Over the years Portsmouth's fortification was increased by numerous monarchs, although most of these have now been converted into tourist attractions. Combatants England Flanders France Genoese mercenaries Castilian mercenaries Commanders Robert Morley, Various others Hugues Quiéret, Nicolas Béhuchet Strength Varied 40-70 ships The English Channel naval campaign of the years 1338 and 1339 saw a protracted series of raids conducted by the nascent French navy and numerous privately... This article is about the King of England. ... This article concerns the mid fourteenth century pandemic. ... // Events January 17 – Pope Gregory XI enters Rome. ... Henry V of England (16 September 1387 – 31 August 1422) was one of the great English warrior kings of the Middle Ages. ... Sir Reginald Bray KG ( 1440–1503) was a British courtier, advisor to Henry VII and architect of the Henry VII Lady Chapel in Westminster Abbey. ... U.S. Navy submarine USS Greeneville in dry dock following collision with a fishing boat. ... Southsea Castle is one of Henry VIIIs Device Forts, built on the Southsea waterfront to guard the eastern entrance to the Solent. ... This article is about the lead ship, store, or product of a group. ... Mary Rose depicted on the Anthony Roll, a survey of Henry VIIIs navy, completed in 1546 The Mary Rose was an English Tudor warship of the carrack type and one of the first to be able to fire a full broadside of cannons. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Portsmouth. ...

HMS Warrior

Portsmouth has a long history of supporting the Royal Navy logistically, leading to it being important in the development of the Industrial Revolution. Marc Isambard Brunel, the father of famed Portsmouth engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel, established in 1802 the world's first mass production line at the Portsmouth Block Mills, to mass produce pulley blocks for rigging on the Royal Navy's ships. At its height the Dockyard was the largest industrial site in the world.[6] HMS Warrior - Portsmouth, England Photo taken October 3, 2002 copyright Richard Gallagher. ... HMS Warrior - Portsmouth, England Photo taken October 3, 2002 copyright Richard Gallagher. ... HMS Warrior was the first iron-hulled, armour-plated warship, built for the Royal Navy in response to the first ironclad warship, the French La Gloire, launched only a year earlier. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... Marc Isambard Brunel, engraving by G. Metzeroth, circa 1880 Sir Marc Isambard Brunel, FRS (April 25, 1769 – December 12, 1849) was a French-born engineer who settled in the United Kingdom. ... Isambard Kingdom Brunel, FRS (9 April 1806 – 15 September 1859) (IPA: ), was a British engineer. ... A method of production which embodies groups of workers repeating the same procedures of production along a line over which the product is moved and gradually completed. ... The Portsmouth Block Mills form part of the Portsmouth Dockyard at Portsmouth, Hampshire, England, and were built during the Napoleonic Wars to supply the British Royal Navy with pulley blocks. ... For the band, see Pulley (band). ... In sailing, a block is a pulley or a number of pulleys enclosed in sheaves so as to be fixed to the end of a line or to a spar or surface. ...


Admiral Nelson left Portsmouth for the final time in 1805 to command the fleet that would defeat the larger Franco-Spanish fleet at Trafalgar.[7] The Royal Navy's reliance on Portsmouth led to the city becoming the most fortified in Europe,[8] with a network of forts circling the city.[9] From 1808 the Royal Navy's West Africa Squadron, who were tasked to stop the slave trade, operated out of Portsmouth. On December 21, 1872 a major scientific expedition, the Challenger Expedition, was launched from Portsmouth. Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 – October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. ... Combatants United Kingdom First French Empire Kingdom of Spain Commanders Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson † Pierre Charles Silvestre de Villeneuve Strength 27 ships of the line and 6 others. ... The West Africa Squadron was a unit of the Royal Navy that was involved in the suppression of the slave trade in West Africa. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Challenger Expedition was a scientific expedition that made many discoveries to lay the foundation of oceanography. ...

Gosport - Taken in 1960

In 1916 the town experienced its first aerial bombardment when a Zeppelin airship bombed it during World War I.[10] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3012x2054, 2513 KB) Summary Gosport 1960s W N Mansfield Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3012x2054, 2513 KB) Summary Gosport 1960s W N Mansfield Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Gosport is a town and district in Hampshire with around 77,000 inhabitants (including Lee-on-the-Solent), situated on the south coast of England. ... Zeppelins are types of rigid airships pioneered by German Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin in the early 20th century, based in part on an earlier design by aviation pioneer David Schwarz. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


In 1929 the city council added the motto "Heaven's Light Our Guide" to the medieval coat of arms. Apart from referring to the celestial objects in the arms, the motto was that of the Star of India. This recalled that troop ships bound for the colony left from the port.[5] Further changes were made to the arms in 1970, when the Portsmouth Museums Trust sponsored the grant of crest, supporters and heraldic badge. The crest and supporters are based on those of the royal arms, but altered to show the city's maritime connections: the lions and unicorn have been given fish tails, and a naval crown placed around the latter animal. Around the unicorn is wrapped representation of "The Mighty Chain of Iron", a Tudor defensive boom across Portsmouth Harbour.[11] For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The Star of India may refer to one of the followings: Star of India (gem): the largest star sapphire in the world. ... The Coat of Arms of Prince Edward Island uses two foxes as supporters. ... Heraldic badges were common in the Middle Ages particularly in England. ... The Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom The Royal Arms of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II are her arms of dominion in right of the United Kingdom. ... The Naval Crown (in Latin corona navalis), was a gold crown awarded to the first man who boarded an enemy ship during a naval engagement. ...


The city was bombed extensively during World War II, destroying many houses and the Guildhall. While most of the city has since been rebuilt, developers still occasionally find unexploded bombs. Southsea beach and Portsmouth Harbour were military embarkation points for the D-Day landings on June 6 1944. Southwick House, just to the north of Portsmouth, had been chosen as the headquarters for the Supreme Allied Commander, US General Dwight D. Eisenhower, during D-Day. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... UXO redirects here. ... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Southwick House was the manor house of the Southwick Estate located just to the north of Portsmouth in Hampshire, England. ...


After the war, much of the city's housing stock was damaged and more was cleared in an attempt to improve the quality of housing. Those people affected by this were moved out from the centre of the city to new developments such as Paulsgrove and Leigh Park. Post-war redevelopment throughout the country was characterised by utilitarian and brutalist architecture, with Portsmouth's Tricorn Centre one of the most famous examples. More recently, a new wave of redevelopment has seen Tricorn's demolition, the renewal of derelict industrial sites, and construction of the Spinnaker Tower. leigh park is great u mother fuckers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Leigh Park is a large suburb (population 27,500) of Havant, in Hampshire, England. ... Brutalism is an architectural style that spawned from the Modernist architectural movement and which flourished from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... The Tricorn Centre was a famed Brutalist shopping centre, apartment complex, nightclub and car park complex in Portsmouth, Hampshire, United Kingdom; designed by Owen Luder it was home to the one of the first Virgin Megastores. ... The Spinnaker Tower in June 2005. ...

Portsmouth Harbour, taken from Gosport showing Portsdown Hill in the centre and the city of Portsmouth on the right including the home of the Royal Navy, HMNB Portsmouth.
Portsmouth harbour, with HMS Warrior on the left, Portsmouth Harbour railway station in the centre, and construction of the Spinnaker Tower on the right.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 147 pixelsFull resolution (3260 × 600 pixel, file size: 165 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Panoramic view of Portsmouth Harbour I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 147 pixelsFull resolution (3260 × 600 pixel, file size: 165 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Panoramic view of Portsmouth Harbour I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Gosport is a town and district in Hampshire with around 77,000 inhabitants (including Lee-on-the-Solent), situated on the south coast of England. ... Portsdown Hill is a long chalk hill overlooking Portsmouth, in Hampshire, England, offering good views over Portsmouth, The Solent, Hayling Island and Gosport, with the Isle of Wight beyond. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Portsmouth Naval Dockyard. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... HMS Warrior was the first iron-hulled, armour-plated warship, built for the Royal Navy in response to the first ironclad warship, the French La Gloire, launched only a year earlier. ... Portsmouth Harbour railway station is a railway station in Portsmouth, England. ... The Spinnaker Tower in June 2005. ...

Economy

This is a chart of trend of regional gross value added of Portsmouth at current basic prices published (pp.240-253) by Office for National Statistics with figures in millions of British Pounds Sterling. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Year Regional Gross Value Added[4] Agriculture[1] Industry[2] Services[3]
1995 2,023 - 496 1,528
2000 2,750 - 658 2,092
2003 3,362 - 705 2,657
Note 1. includes hunting and forestry
Note 2. includes energy and construction
Note 3. includes financial intermediation services indirectly measured
Note 4. Components may not sum to totals due to rounding

A tenth of the city's workforce works at Portsmouth Naval Dockyard, which is directly linked to the city's biggest industry, defence with major sites for BAE and VT Group located in the city. VT have been awarded some of the construction on the two new Royal Navy aircraft carriers, although this will involve merger with BAe ship group.[12][13][14] This potentially could lead to job creation or cuts depending on overlap between the two companies. At the same time as announcing the placement of the carrier contracts the MoD confirmed that, following review, HMNB Portsmouth would continue to operate but with a reduced workforce.[15] There is also a major ferry port which deals with both passengers and cargo. The city is also host to the European headquarters of IBM and Nintendo, and the UK headquarters of Zurich. VT Group plc is the company formerly known as Vosper Thornycroft. ... For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ... For the video game system, see Nintendo Entertainment System. ... Zurich Financial Services Group is a major financial services group based in Zurich, Switzerland. ...


In the last decade the number of shops in Portsmouth has grown dramatically due to both the buoyancy of the local economy and improved transport links. In the city centre, shopping is centred around Commercial Road and the 1980s Cascades Shopping Centre, with over 100 high street shops between them. Recent redevelopment have created new shopping areas, including the upmarket Gunwharf Quays, containing fashion stores, restaurants, and a cinema; and the Historic Dockyard, which aims at the tourist sector and holds regular French markets, and an annual Christmas market. Large shopping areas include Ocean Retail Park, on the north-eastern side of Portsea Island, composed of shops requiring large floor space for selling consumer goods; and the Bridge Centre an 11,043 square metre shopping centre built in 1988, now dominated by the Asda Walmart store. There are also many smaller shopping areas throughout the city. Cascades Shopping Centre is an indoor shopping centre in Portsmouth, England. ... Shops, bars, and restaurants in Gunwharf Quays. ... This article is about the supermarket chain, for other meanings, see ASDA (disambiguation) ASDA is a chain of supermarkets in the United Kingdom offering food, clothing and general merchandise products. ...


There is a small fishing fleet based in the city.


Tourism is also a growing sector of the economy.


The housing boom has also spurned economic growth with prices rising at a speed second only to London.


Government and politics

The city is administered by Portsmouth City Council, which is currently a unitary authority. Portsmouth was granted its first charter in 1194. In 1904 the boundaries were extended to finally include the whole of Portsea Island. The boundaries were further extended in 1920 and 1932, taking in areas of the mainland. Until April 1, 1997 it was a non-metropolitan district of Hampshire. Portsmouth remains part of the Ceremonial county of Hampshire. The city is divided into two parliamentary constituencies, represented in the House of Commons by a Liberal Democrat Member of Parliament, Mike Hancock, and a Labour MP, Sarah McCarthy-Fry. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1862, 705 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portsmouth Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1862, 705 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portsmouth Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Portsmouth Guildhall is the biggest events venue in the Hampshire city of Portsmouth. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... For the mayor of Brantford, Ontario, see Mike Hancock (Canadian politician). ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Sarah McCarthy-Fry is the Labour Party Member of Parliament for Portsmouth North in the United Kingdom since the 2005 general election, when she replaced Syd Rapson. ...


The city council is made up of 42 councillors. There is no overall majority control of the city council, with 20 Liberal Democrat, 15 Conservative, 3 Labour, 3 members of the Independent group, one independent councillor. The Council is currently led by the Liberal Democrat Gerald Vernon-Jackson. Councillors are returned from 14 wards, each ward having three councillors. Councillors have a 4 year term, only one council seat is up for election in each Ward at any one election. The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... The Conservative and Unionist Party, more commonly known as the Conservative Party, is currently the largest majortiy opposition party in the United Knigdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...


Demographics

Population change[16]
Year Dwellings Population
1560 1000 (est)
1801 5310 32,160
1851 12,825 72,096
1901 36,368 188,133
1951 233,545
1961 68,618 215,077
1971 197,431
1981 175,382
1991 177,142
2001 186,700

Portsmouth is a mainly white city in terms of ethnicity with 94.7%. Portsmouth's long association with the Royal Navy has meant that it represents one of the most diverse cities in terms of the peoples of the British Isles, with many De-mobilised sailors staying in the city, in particular, Scots and English from the Industrial North East and Northern Ireland, Former Prime Minister James Callaghan's father was a Protestant from Northern Ireland. Similarly some of the largest and most established non white communities have their roots with the Royal Navy, most notably the large community from Hong Kong. Portsmouth's long industrial history in support of the Royal Navy has seen many people from across the British Isles move to Portsmouth to work in the factories and docks, the largest of these groups being the Irish Catholics (Portsmouth is one of a handful of cities with a catholic cathedral); surnames like Doyle and Murphy are extremely common in Portsmouth.[17][18] Portsmouth is the City with the highest number of emmigrants, in the UK, particularly the most skilled [19]. This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ...


Culture

The city has three established music venues: The Wedgewood Rooms, The Pyramids and The Guildhall. The most successful bands to have emerged from Portsmouth in the past quarter of a century are The Cranes and Ricky, both of whom enjoyed critical acclaim and minor chart success. However there remains a very limited number of venues for less experienced bands to play at. The Wedgewood Rooms is a venue, in Southsea, Hampshire, UK, that hosts music and comedy events. ... Portsmouth Guildhall is the biggest events venue in the Hampshire city of Portsmouth. ... Cranes are a British band, often described as gothic rock, Dream Pop or shoegazers. ... Ricky also known as chubbs was killed in freak accident th other day. ...


The city is home to FA Premier League football team, Portsmouth F.C., who play their home games at Fratton Park. 'Pompey', as the club is colloquially known, are the most successful football club south of Birmingham (with the exception of the clubs in London), having twice been crowned Champions of England. The City's second team, United Services Portsmouth F.C. play in the Wessex League Division One. Portsmouth Rugby Football Club play their home games in the London Division 1 at Rugby Camp, Hilsea. Like many towns on the English south coast, watersports are popular here, particularly sailing and yachting. Locks Sailing Club at Longshore way is the city's premier dinghy sailing club[citation needed]. The city's rowing club is located in Southsea at the Seafront near the Hovercraft Terminal. For the Scottish equivalent see Scottish Premier League The FA Premier League (often referred to as the Barclays Premiership in England and the Barclays English Premier League or just simply The EPL internationally) is a league competition for football clubs located at the top of the English football league system... Soccer redirects here. ... Portsmouth Football Club are an English football club based in the south coast city of Portsmouth. ... Fratton Park is the home stadium of Portsmouth F.C., and is situated in the English city-port of Portsmouth. ... United Services Portsmouth F.C. is a football club based in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England. ... The Wessex League Division One is at Step 5 in the National League System (Level 9 in the entire English Pyramid). ...


In literature, Portsmouth is the chief location for Jonathan Meades' novel Pompey (1993) ISBN 0-09-930821-5, in which it is inhabited largely by vile, corrupt, flawed freaks. He has subsequently admitted that he had never actually visited the city at that time. Since then he has presented a TV programme about the Victorian architecture in Portsmouth Dockyard. Jonathan Meades in Abroad Again in Britain Jonathan (Turner) Meades (born 21 January 1947, Salisbury, England) is a British writer on food, architecture, and culture, as well as an author and broadcaster. ...


In Jane Austen's novel Mansfield Park, Portsmouth is the hometown of the main character Fanny Price, and is the setting of most of the closing chapters of the book. Mansfield Park book cover Mansfield Park is a novel by Jane Austen. ...


Portsmouth Point is an overture for orchestra by the English composer William Walton. The work was inspired by Rowlandson's print depicting Portsmouth Point. It was used as an opening for a Proms Concert in the 2007 season.


H.M.S. Pinafore, is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert, which is set in Portsmouth Harbour. Wikisource has original text related to this article: H.M.S. Pinafore H.M.S. Pinafore, or The Lass that Loved a Sailor, is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert. ...


Portsmouth also runs its own series of concerts encompassing a range of music at the Bandstand in Southsea Common.


The city is also known for its vibrant south Asian community and is where bollywood starlet Geeta Basra hails from. She was born and raised in the city where her family still live. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The City hosts yearly remembrances of the D-Day landings to which veterans from the Allied nations travel to attend.[20] Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ...


Portsmouth residents are fond of holding street parties, this is a tradition that started in 1994 with the city 800 celebrations [21]. The following year parties were held for the 50th anniversary VE Day. In recent years parties were held for the Queens Jubilee and the 60th anniversary of VE Day [22].


Media

ITV1 Meridian is the local ITV television franchise. Portsmouth was one of the second-tier of cities in the UK to get a local TV station, MyTV, in 2001. The station later rebranded to PortsmouthTV, but its limited availability in some parts of Portsmouth had limited its growth, and the station later went off-air as a result of the parent company becoming insolvent. ITV Meridian Ltd (formerly and more commonly known as Meridian Broadcasting) is the holder of the ITV franchise for South and South East England[1]. It has been broadcasting since 1 January 1993, when it replaced TVS. The main headquarters were situated at studios in Northam, Southampton (previously used by... For other uses, see ITV (disambiguation). ... This article is in need of attention. ...


The local commercial radio station is 107.4 The Quay, whilst the city also has a non-profit community radio station Express FM on 93.7. Other radio stations based outside of Portsmouth, but received there are Ocean FM, on 97.5FM, Power FM on 103.2FM, Wave 105 on 105.2FM and BBC Radio Solent on 96.1FM. Original 106 launched on 1 October, 2006; based in Southampton, they have a newsroom in the Portsmouth area. 107. ... // Overview Ocean FM is a British commercial radio station serving South Hampshire, West Sussex and the Isle of Wight primarily for Portsmouth and Southampton. ... Power FM (or 103. ... Wave 105 is a UK regional commercial radio station broadcasting across Dorset, Hampshire, the Isle of Wight and part of West Sussex. ... BBC Radio Solent is the BBC Local Radio service for the Isle of Wight and the English counties of Hampshire and Dorset. ... Original 106fm is a radio station broadcasting to the Solent region of southern England, centred on the towns and cities of Portsmouth, Southampton and Bournemouth. ... A newsroom is the place where journalists, either reporters, editors, producers and other staffers work to gather news to be published in a newspaper or magazine or broadcast on television, cable or radio. ...


When the first local commercial radio stations were licenced in the 1970s by the IBA, Radio Victory was the radio service for Portsmouth, however in 1986 it was replaced by Ocean Sound, later renamed as Ocean FM. With the launch of cable television, Victory was relaunched as a cable station. The station went on to win a Radio Authority small scale licence, launching on the 107.4FM frequency. However, due to bad RAJAR figures the station relaunched in 2001 as The Quay, with Portsmouth Football Club purchasing a stake in the station during 2007. IBA or Iba may mean: Important Bird Area or IBA Independent Broadcasting Authority Indole-3-butyric acid - auxin, a plant Rooting hormone InfiniBand Architecture Institute of Business Administration Interceptor Body Armor International Bank of Asia International Bodyboarding Association International Boxing Association International Bryozoology Association International Business Alliance Ion beam analysis... // Overview Ocean FM is a British commercial radio station serving South Hampshire, West Sussex and the Isle of Wight primarily for Portsmouth and Southampton. ... Cable TV redirects here. ... The Office of Communications, usually known as Ofcom, is the UKs communications regulator. ... RAJAR (Radio Joint Audience Research Limited) was established in 1992 to operate a single audience measurement system for the radio industry in the United Kingdom. ...


The city currently has one daily local newspaper known as The News, together with a free weekly newspaper, from the same publisher, called The Journal. Portsmouth also has a weekly magazine called the Portsmouth and District Post which is sold in Portsmouth, Havant, Fareham, Gosport and Waterlooville. Portsmouth News is the only paid-for newspaper in Portsmouth, England. ...


Crime

In the British crime survey of 2001, Portsmouth did not have a distinctly different profile to the other cities in its basic command unit profile.[23] However, for that period it did have a large number of sexual assaults and rapes. A BBC News report in May 2006 reported that it was Britain's worst city for sexual assaults and rapes, based on the 2001 British crime survey by the think tank Reform.[24][25] Police officers responded by saying "Police in Portsmouth have worked closely with partner agencies and the city council to develop a climate where victims feel confident to report rape, which is generally an under-reported crime" and that this could be the reason for the increased number of reported sexual assaults.[26] However, in a subsequent government survey, the number of reported sexual assaults and rapes had decreased by 22.8% bringing the rate below most large UK cities.[27] Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Sexual assault is any physical contact of a sexual nature without voluntary consent. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... For other uses, see May (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the institution. ... Reform is a London, United Kingdom-based think tank whose mission is to set out a better way to deliver public services and economic prosperity. ...


Geography

East facing aerial view of Portsmouth (with Gosport in the foreground)
View over Portsmouth from Portsdown Hill.

Most of the city of Portsmouth lies on Portsea Island, located where the Solent joins the English Channel. This makes Portsmouth the United Kingdom's only island city and the thirteenth most densely populated place in Europe. It is the second most densely populated place in the UK, after Inner London.[28] The island is separated from the mainland to the north by a narrow creek, bridged in places to make it - in appearance - a peninsula. The sheltered Portsmouth Harbour lies to the west of the island and the large tidal bay of Langstone Harbour is to the east. Portsdown Hill dominates the skyline to the north, providing a magnificent panoramic view over the city, and to the south are the waters of the Solent with the Isle of Wight beyond. Being a seaside city, it is low-lying -- the majority of its surface area is only about 10 feet above sea level, the highest natural point on Portsea Island being Kingston Cross (21 feet) although the road surface over Fratton raliway bridge reaches 25. There are, therefore, dangers that rising sea levels as a result of global warming could cause serious damage to the city. The west of the city is mainly council estates such as Buckland, Landport and Portsea. These were built after most of the original Victorian terraces were destroyed by bombings in World War II. After the war the massive estate of Leigh Park (one of the largest housing development of its kind in Europe) was built to solve the chronic housing shortage during the post-war reconstruction. As of the early part of this decade this estate is now entirely under the jurisdiction of Havant Borough Council. Old Portsmouth which is the oldest part of the city, was also known as Spice Island and was famous for its pubs, that serviced the many sailors calling into the port. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2832x2128, 1875 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portsmouth Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2832x2128, 1875 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portsmouth Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Download high resolution version (2048x900, 277 KB)View of Portsmouth and Portsea Island from Portsdown Hill, UK. Photo taken by me 2005-06-09. ... Download high resolution version (2048x900, 277 KB)View of Portsmouth and Portsea Island from Portsdown Hill, UK. Photo taken by me 2005-06-09. ... Portsdown Hill is a long chalk hill overlooking Portsmouth, in Hampshire, England, offering good views over Portsmouth, The Solent, Hayling Island and Gosport, with the Isle of Wight beyond. ... Satellite image showing the Solent, separating the Isle of Wight from mainland Britain The Solent is a stretch of sea separating the Isle of Wight from the mainland of Great Britain. ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ... A peninsula in Croatia A peninsula is a piece of land that is bordered on three or more sides by water. ... Portsmouth Harbour is a large natural harbour in Hampshire, England. ... Langstone Harbour is an inlet of the English Channel east of the city of Portsmouth and west of Hayling Island. ... Portsdown Hill is a long chalk hill overlooking Portsmouth, in Hampshire, England, offering good views over Portsmouth, The Solent, Hayling Island and Gosport, with the Isle of Wight beyond. ... For other uses, see Isle of Wight (disambiguation). ... Global warming refers to the increase in the average temperature of the Earths near-surface air and oceans in recent decades and its projected continuation. ... Cheap, safe, housing owned by the British Government. ... Buckland is the name of a person: Buckland, William (1784-1856), English geologist and palaeontologist Buckland, Francis Trevelyan (1826-1880), English zoologist and natural historian Buckland, Kira, voice actress Buckland is the name of more than one place in the United Kingdom: Buckland, Buckinghamshire Buckland, Devon Buckland, Gloucestershire Buckland, Hertfordshire... Landport is a district located near the centre of Portsea Island and is part of the city of Portsmouth. ... Portsea is a small island on the south coast of England. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... leigh park is great u mother fuckers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Leigh Park is a large suburb (population 27,500) of Havant, in Hampshire, England. ... Havant is a local government district and borough in Hampshire, England. ... Portsmouth Point is located at the far end of Spice Island, part of a district of Portsmouth now called Old Portsmouth. Historically, Portsmouth Point comprised a series of public houses, houses of ill repute, boat yards and, on the south side, strong military defences, containing a prison, at the entrance...


Education

The city has one university, the University of Portsmouth, a post-1992 university previously known as Portsmouth Polytechnic, whose strengths include mathematics and biological sciences. Several local colleges also have the power to award HNDs, including Highbury College, the largest, which specializes in vocational education; and Portsmouth College, which offers a mixture of academic and vocational courses in the city. Additionally there are several colleges in the surrounding area, all of which offer a varying range of academic and vocational courses available. Post 16 education in Portsmouth, unlike many areas, is carried at these colleges rather than at secondary schools. The University of Portsmouth is the only university in the city of Portsmouth, Hampshire. ... In the UK, the Post-1992 universities or Modern Universities are the former polytechnics or colleges of higher education that were given the status of universities by John Majors government in 1992 or colleges that have been granted university status since then: Post-1992 or Modern Universities Abertay University... The term polytechnic, from the Greek πολύ polú meaning many and τεχνικός tekhnikós meaning arts, is commonly used in many countries to describe an institution that delivers vocational or technical education and training, other countries do not use the term and use alternative terminology. ... A Higher National Diploma (HND) is a higher education qualification in the United Kingdom. ...


As of 2007 for the first time in over a decade, no school in Portsmouth is below the governments minimum standards and thus none of them are in special measures but many are still among the worst performing schools in the country. St Luke's C of E VA Secondary School is, in terms of performance, one of the worst schools in the country though it has improved in recent years. St Luke's is one of the few religious schools in the country that operates its intake policy as a standard comprehensive taking from its catchment area rather than being selective on religious background. This is the opposite of its nearby rival St Edmund RC school. The rivalry between St Edmund's Catholic School and St Luke's Church of England school (Protestant) has often become violent. This has its roots in the Catholic-Protestant conflict of Northern Ireland as the city has both large communities of Irish Catholics and Irish Protestant, who settled in the city because of the Royal Navy.[29] Both Admiral Lord Nelson School and Miltoncross School were built recently to meet the demand of a growing school age population.[citation needed]


Portsmouth's secondary schools are to undergo a major redevelopment in the next few years with three being totally demolished and rebuilt, (St Edmund's, City boys and King Richard's) and the rest receiving major renovation work.


Tourist attractions

HMS Victory in dry dock.
Spinnaker Tower & Harbour.

Most of Portsmouth's tourist attractions are related to its naval history. In the last decade Portsmouth's Historic Dockyard has been given a much needed face-lift. Among the attractions are the D-Day museum (which holds the Overlord embroidery) and, in the dockyard, HMS Victory, the remains of Henry VIII's flagship, the Mary Rose (raised from the sea-bed in recent years), HMS Warrior (Britain's first iron-clad steamship) and the Royal Naval Museum. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 2448 KB) Background notes: HMS Victory (1765) Edit Info:HMS Victory (1765) Photographer: User:Ballista Talk File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portsmouth HMS Victory User... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 2448 KB) Background notes: HMS Victory (1765) Edit Info:HMS Victory (1765) Photographer: User:Ballista Talk File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portsmouth HMS Victory User... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Victory (disambiguation). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 2361 KB) Photographer: User:Ballista I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 2361 KB) Photographer: User:Ballista I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... The D-Day Museum is located in Southsea, Hampshire. ... // Mary Rose HMS Victory HMS Warrior Royal Naval Museum External links http://www. ... For other ships of the same name, see HMS Victory (disambiguation). ... Mary Rose depicted on the Anthony Roll, a survey of Henry VIIIs navy, completed in 1546 The Mary Rose was an English Tudor warship of the carrack type and one of the first to be able to fire a full broadside of cannons. ... HMS Warrior was the first iron-hulled, armour-plated warship, built for the Royal Navy in response to the first ironclad warship, the French La Gloire, launched only a year earlier. ... Museum of the Royal Navy in the Portsmouth Historic Dockyard section of HMNB Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Hampshire. ...


Many of the city's former defences now host museums or events. Several of the Victorian era forts on Portsdown hill are now tourist attraction. Fort Nelson is now home to the Royal Armouries museum,[30] Forts Purbrook and Widley are activities centres.[31] the Tudor era Southsea Castle has a small museum, and much of the seafront defences up to the Round Tower are open to the public. The southern part of the once large Royal Marines Eastney Barracks is now the Royal Marine Museum.[32] There are also many buildings in the city that host occasionally open days particularly those on the D-day walk which are serious of signs around the city which notes sites of particularly importance in the city to operation Overlord.


The city also hosts the D-Day museum a short distance from southsea castle, this museum is home to the famous Overlord Tapestry.[33]


Portsmouth's long association with the armed forces means it has a large number of war memorials around the city, including several at the Royal Marines Museum, at the dockyards and in Victoria Park. In the city centre, the Guildhall Square Cenotaph displays the names of the fallen, and is guarded by stone sculptures of machine gunners carved by the sculptor Charles Sargeant Jagger.[34] The memorial is inscribed: The Royal Marines Museum is located in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England and is open to the public 7 days a week all year apart from Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Boxing Day. ... Detail from the Royal Artillery Memorial Charles Sargeant Jagger MC (1885-1934) was a British sculptor who, following active service in the First World War, sculpted many works on the theme of war. ...

THIS MEMORIAL WAS ERECTED BY THE PEOPLE OF PORTSMOUTH IN PROUD AND LOVING MEMORY OF THOSE WHO IN THE GLORIOUS MORNING OF THEIR DAYS FOR ENGLAND'S SAKE LOST ALL BUT ENGLAND'S PRAISE. MAY LIGHT PERPETUAL SHINE UPON THEM.

—West face

The millennium project to build the Spinnaker Tower at Gunwharf Quays was completed in 2005. The tower is 552 ft tall and features viewing decks at sea level, 325 ft, 341 ft and 357 ft. The Spinnaker Tower in June 2005. ... Shops, bars, and restaurants in Gunwharf Quays. ...


Other tourist attractions include the birthplace of Charles Dickens, the Blue Reef Aquarium (formerly the Sea Life Centre), Cumberland House (a natural history museum), The Royal Marines Museum and Southsea Castle, also in the Southsea area of Portsmouth is home to the famous[dubious ] Clarence Pier amusement park. Dickens redirects here. ... Sea Life Centres are a chain of sealife themed attractions. ... The Royal Marines Museum is located in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England and is open to the public 7 days a week all year apart from Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Boxing Day. ... Southsea Castle is one of Henry VIIIs Device Forts, built on the Southsea waterfront to guard the eastern entrance to the Solent. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


English Heritage and the Ministry of Defence are in the process of turning the Portsmouth Block Mills into a museum.


Places of worship

St John's Cathedral

Portsmouth is unusual among British cities in having two cathedrals; the Anglican cathedral of St Thomas, in Old Portsmouth, and the Roman Catholic cathedral of St John the Evangelist, in Edinburgh Road, Portsea. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1653x2176, 699 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portsmouth Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1653x2176, 699 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portsmouth Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... A Cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, which serves as the central church of a bishopric. ... Portsmouth Anglican Cathedral Interior of the cathedral, at the original nave. ... Old Portsmouth is a district of the city of Portsmouth. ...


The Roman Catholic Diocese of Portsmouth was founded in 1882 by Pope Leo XIII. Vatican policy in England at the time was to found sees in locations other than those used for Anglican cathedrals, and the Ecclesiastical Titles Act forbade a Catholic bishop from bearing the same title as one in the established church. Accordingly, Portsmouth was chosen in preference to Winchester.[35] // St Johns Catholic Cathedral Portsmouth The Portsmouth Diocese, situated centrally within the Metropolitan Province of Southwark, extending as far as Abingdon in the North; and down to and including the Channel Isles in the South, and roughly from Liphook in the East to Andover in the West. ... Pope Leo XIII (March 2, 1810—July 20, 1903), born Count Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci, was the 256th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church, reigning from 1878 to 1903, succeeding Pope Pius IX. Reigning until the age of 93, he was the oldest pope, and had the third longest...


In 1927 the Church of England diocese of Winchester was divided, and St Thomas's Anglican Church became the cathedral for the newly created Diocese of Portsmouth.[36] When St Mary's Church, Portsea, was rebuilt in Victorian times, it had been envisaged that it might be the cathedral if Portsmouth became the seat of a bishop, but St Thomas's was given the honour because of its historic status. The Diocese of Winchester forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. ... Portsmouth Cathedral The Diocese of Portsmouth is an administrative division of the Church of England Province of Canterbury in England. ...


Another historic old Portsmouth church, the Garrison Church, was bombed during World War II with the nave left roofless as a memorial. Of more modern buildings, St Philip's Cosham is cited as a fine example of Ninian Comper's work. There are numerous other active churches and places of worship throughout the city. There are several Mosques and a Jewish cemetery in the city. Domus Dei (Hospital of Saint Nicholas) was an almshouse and hospice established in 1212 in Portsmouth, Hampshire, UK by Pierre des Roches, Bishop of Winchester. ... The IBM Pilot Head Office at Cosham, UK is a beautiful building. ... Sir John Ninian Comper, (June 10, 1864 – December 22, 1960), was a Scottish architect of church buildings and furnishings. ...


Transport and communications

The Spinnaker Tower, as seen from Gunwharf Quays.

Download high resolution version (600x1440, 92 KB)The Spinnaker Tower in Portsmouth, UK, as seen from the Gunwharf Quays waterfront. ... Download high resolution version (600x1440, 92 KB)The Spinnaker Tower in Portsmouth, UK, as seen from the Gunwharf Quays waterfront. ... The Spinnaker Tower in June 2005. ... Shops, bars, and restaurants in Gunwharf Quays. ...

Bus Services

Local bus services are provided by First in Hampshire & Dorset and Stagecoach serving the city of Portsmouth and the surroundings of Havant, Leigh Park, Waterlooville, Fareham, Petersfield and long distance service 700 to Chichester, Worthing and Brighton. National Express services from Portsmouth run mainly from The Hard Interchange to London, Cornwall, Bradford, Birkenhead and Eastbourne. Many bus services also stop at The Hard Interchange. Other bus services run from Commercial Road North and Commercial Road South. A new bus station has been proposed next to Portsmouth & Southsea Station replacing Commercial Road South bus stops and new bus stops and taxi ranks on Andrew Bell Street to replace the Commercial Road North bus stops when the Northern Quarter Development is built.-1... Stagecoach South East is an operating division of the Stagecoach Group. ... Havant is a town and district in Hampshire on the South coast of England, between Portsmouth and Chichester. ... leigh park is great u mother fuckers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Leigh Park is a large suburb (population 27,500) of Havant, in Hampshire, England. ... , Waterlooville is a town in Hampshire, England approx 8 miles north of Portsmouth. ... Arms of Fareham Borough Council Fareham Creek today, looking towards Gosport The market town of Fareham lies in the south east of Hampshire, England, between the cities of Southampton and Portsmouth, roughly in the centre of the South Hampshire conurbation. ... Petersfield can refer to any of the following places: Petersfield, Hampshire, a market town in England Petersfield, Manitoba, in Canada Petersfield, South Carolina in the United States of America Petersfield, an area of Cambridge, England This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise... For the larger local government district, see Chichester (district). ... For other uses, see Worthing (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Brighton (disambiguation). ... Portsmouth and Southsea railway station is the main railway station in central Portsmouth in Hampshire, England. ...


Light Rapid Transit & Monorail

There is an ongoing debate on the development of public transport structure, with monorails and light rail both being considered. A light rail link to Gosport has been authorised but is unlikely to go ahead following the refusal of funding by the Department for Transport in November 2005.[37] The monorail scheme is unlikely to proceed following the withdrawal of official support for the proposal by Portsmouth City Council, after the development's promoters failed to progress the scheme to agreed timetables.[38] The KL Monorail in Kuala Lumpur, a colorful straddle-beam monorail A monorail is a single rail serving as a track for a wheeled vehicle; also, a vehicle traveling on such a track. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... In the United Kingdom, the Department for Transport is the government department responsible for the transport network. ...


Roads

There are three road links to the mainland. These are the M275, A3 (London Road) and A2030 (Eastern Road). The M27 has a junction connecting to the M275 into Portsmouth. The A27 has a westbound exit onto the A3 (London Road) and a junction onto the A2030 (Eastern Road). The A3(M). The M275 is a two-mile long, dual three-lane motorway in the county of Hampshire, southern England. ... The A3 is a trunk road in Southern England, connecting London to Portsmouth. ... Looking down onto the M27 from Portsdown Hill. ... The A27 near Southwick The A27 is a major road in England. ...


Cycling

The city is connected to Route 2 of the National Cycle Network. The first section of the NCN to be built was the Bristol and Bath Railway Path, opened in 1984. ...


Railways

The city has several mainline railway stations, on two different direct South West Trains routes to London Waterloo, via Guildford and via Basingstoke. There is also a South West Trains stopping service to Southampton Central, and a service by First Great Western to Cardiff Central via Southampton, Bath and Bristol. South West Trains (SWT) is a train operating company operating in the United Kingdom, providing train services to the south-west of London, chiefly in Greater London and the counties of Surrey, Hampshire, Dorset, Devon, Somerset, Berkshire and Wiltshire (the area largely covered before 1923 by the London and South... Facade of Waterloo Station, London Waterloo is a major train station and transport interchange located in the Waterloo district of London, which was itself named after the Battle of Waterloo in which Napoleon was defeated near Brussels. ... , For other places with the same name, see Guildford (disambiguation). ... , Basingstoke is a town in northeast Hampshire, England. ... South West Trains (SWT) is a train operating company operating in the United Kingdom, providing train services to the south-west of London, chiefly in Greater London and the counties of Surrey, Hampshire, Dorset, Devon, Somerset, Berkshire and Wiltshire (the area largely covered before 1923 by the London and South... Southampton Central railway station is a main line railway station serving the city of Southampton in Hampshire, southern England. ... First Great Western is the operating name of First Greater Western Ltd,[1] a British train operating company owned by FirstGroup, which operates services in the west and south west of England and South Wales. ... The term Cardiff Central has several meanings: Cardiff Central station Cardiff Central (UK Parliament constituency) Cardiff Central (National Assembly for Wales constituency) Cardiff central bus station Cardiff city centre Category: ...


Portsmouth's stations are (in order, out of the city): Portsmouth Harbour, Portsmouth & Southsea, Fratton, Hilsea and Cosham. Portsmouth Harbour railway station is a railway station in Portsmouth, England. ... Portsmouth and Southsea railway station is the main railway station in central Portsmouth, close to the Commercial Road shopping centre. ... Fratton railway station is a railway station in Portsmouth, located near Fratton Park, the stadium of association football (soccer) club Portsmouth F.C.. It is located on the Portsmouth Direct Line which runs between London (London Waterloo) and Portsmouth (Portsmouth Harbour). ... Hilsea railway station is a railway station in Portsmouth, England with a limited service. ... Cosham railway station is a railway station in Portsmouth It was built by the LSWR in 1847. ...


Ferries

Portsmouth Harbour has passenger ferry links to Gosport and the Isle of Wight. A car ferry service to the Isle of Wight operated by Wightlink is nearby. Britain's longest-standing commercial hovercraft service, begun in the 1960s, still runs from near Clarence Pier to Ryde, Isle of Wight, operated by Hovertravel. Portsmouth Harbour is a large natural harbour in Hampshire, England. ... The Gosport Ferry is a ferry service operating between the Gosport pontoon and the Portsmouth pontoon in Hampshire, southern England. ... Gosport is a town and district in Hampshire with around 77,000 inhabitants (including Lee-on-the-Solent), situated on the south coast of England. ... For other uses, see Isle of Wight (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Isle of Wight (disambiguation). ... A Wightlink ferry and catamaran at the entrance to Portsmouth Harbour. ... For the band, see Hovercraft (band). ... Ryde, seen from Ryde Pier and showing the twin spires. ... For other uses, see Isle of Wight (disambiguation). ... Hovertravel is a ferry company operating from Southsea, Portsmouth to Ryde, Isle of Wight, UK. They are the last company operating in Britain with passenger hovercraft, after Hoverspeed stopped using their craft in favour of catamarans. ...


Portsmouth Continental Ferry Port has links to Caen, Cherbourg-Octeville, St Malo and Le Havre in France, Bilbao in Spain and the Channel Islands. Ferry services from the port are operated by Brittany Ferries, P&O Ferries, Condor Ferries and LD Lines. On 18 May 2006 Acciona Trasmediterranea started a service to Bilbao in competition with P&O’s existing service. This service got off to a bad start when the ferry 'Fortuny' was detained in Portsmouth by the MCA for numerous safety breaches. The faults were quickly corrected by Acciona and the service took its first passengers from Portsmouth on the 25 May 2006. The port is the second busiest ferry port in the UK after Dover handling around 3 million passengers a year and has direct access to the M275. , Caen (pronounced ) is a commune of northwestern France. ... For the Australian town and Aboriginal Mission, see Cherbourg, Queensland. ... Categories: France geography stubs | Communes of Ille-et-Vilaine ... Le Havre is a city in Normandy, northern France, on the English Channel, at the mouth of the Seine. ... La Muy Noble y Muy Leal e Invicta (The most noble and most loyal and undefeated) Location Location of Bilbao in Spain and Biscay Coordinates : , Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Bilbao (Basque) Spanish name Bilbao Nickname El Botxo (the hole) Founded 15... This article is about the British dependencies. ... Current Brittany Ferries logo Brittany Ferries is a French ferry company that runs ships between France, the UK, Ireland and Spain. ... P&O Ferry Pride of Rotterdam one of the Hull-Rotterdam sister flagships of P&O Ferries P&O Ferries (formerly P&O European Ferries) is a constituent company of DP World (which took over its parent company, the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company (P&O) in March 2006). ... Condor Ferries is the current operator of ferry services between the United Kingdom and the Channel Islands. ... LD Lines are a French-owned shipping company. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Acciona Trasmediterránea is a Spanish ferry company. ... La Muy Noble y Muy Leal e Invicta (The most noble and most loyal and undefeated) Location Location of Bilbao in Spain and Biscay Coordinates : , Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Bilbao (Basque) Spanish name Bilbao Nickname El Botxo (the hole) Founded 15... The Maritime and Coastguard Agencys Logo The Maritime and Coastguard Agency is a UK government agency working to prevent the loss of lives at searesponsible for implimenting maritime safety policy. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... , Dover is a major channel port in the English county of Kent. ... The M275 is a two-mile long, dual three-lane motorway in the county of Hampshire, southern England. ...


Airports

The nearest airport is Southampton which is approximately 20-30 minutes away by motorway, with a indirect South West Trains rail connection requiring a change at Southampton Central or Eastleigh. This airport is located in the United Kingdom, for the airport in Canada, see Southampton Airport (Ontario) Southampton Airport (IATA: SOU, ICAO: EGHI) is the 20th largest airport in the UK, located in Eastleigh near Southampton. ... South West Trains (SWT) is a train operating company operating in the United Kingdom, providing train services to the south-west of London, chiefly in Greater London and the counties of Surrey, Hampshire, Dorset, Devon, Somerset, Berkshire and Wiltshire (the area largely covered before 1923 by the London and South... Southampton Central railway station is a main line railway station serving the city of Southampton in Hampshire, southern England. ... This article is about the town in Hampshire. ...


Heathrow and Gatwick are both about 60-90 minutes away by motorway. Gatwick is directly linked by Southern Railway services to London Victoria, whilst Heathrow is linked by coach to Woking, which is on both rail lines to London Waterloo. Heathrow is directly linked to Portsmouth by National Express coaches. Heathrow redirects here. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA: LGW, ICAO: EGKK) is Londons second largest airport and the second busiest airport in the United Kingdom after Heathrow. ... The following railways or railroads are or were called the Southern Railway or Southern Railroad: // The world other than North America Southern Railway in southern England (1923-1948) Southern, a National Rail franchise operators in the United Kingdom Southern Railway of India Southern Railway of Austria North America Southern Railway... Victoria Station concourse Victoria station is a London Underground and railway station in London, in the City of Westminster. ... , See Woking (borough) for the administrative district. ... Facade of Waterloo Station, London Waterloo is a major train station and transport interchange located in the Waterloo district of London, which was itself named after the Battle of Waterloo in which Napoleon was defeated near Brussels. ... National Express coach on route 561 National Express is the brand under which the majority of long distance bus and coach services in the United Kingdom are marketed, and also the company that manages this network and operates some of the services. ...


Portsmouth had an airport with grass runway from 1932 to 1973; after its closure, housing, industrial sites, retail areas and a school were built on the site. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Communications

The telephone area code for Portsmouth is 023 followed by an eight digit number (usually beginning with 92), and was previously (01705), and before that (0705).


Future developments

East Side Plaza tower

Portsmouth will build and be the home port of the two new Royal Navy Supercarriers, this has secured the base future for the next 40 years and will revitalise shipbuilding in the city.[39] Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 1280 pixel, file size: 147 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 1280 pixel, file size: 147 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...


Development at Gunwharf Quays will continue until 2007 with the completion of the 29 storey East Side Plaza. Development of the former Whitbread Brewery site, now under way, will include a 22 storey tower known as the Admiralty Quarter Tower.[citation needed] This article is about the Whitbread company. ...


Portsmouth's regeneration is being continued in the city centre with the controversial demolition of the award winning Tricorn Centre, a long abandoned shopping mall and car park, described as a "concrete monstrosity".[citation needed] The Tricorn Centre was a famed Brutalist shopping centre, apartment complex, nightclub and car park complex in Portsmouth, Hampshire, United Kingdom; designed by Owen Luder it was home to the one of the first Virgin Megastores. ...


The site is due to be transformed by 2010 to include shops, cafés and restaurants, a four-star 150-bed hotel, 200 residential apartments, and a 2,300-space car park.


Portsmouth is in the midst of a continuing housing boom with many former commercial, industrial and military sites being converted into residential properties particularly large blocks of flats, leading to an increasing population, if demand upon services such as water and transport infrastructure continues to increase at the current rate demand will surpass maximum capacity in under 5 years.[40]


In April 2007 Portsmouth F.C. announced plans to move away from Fratton Park, their home for 109 years, to a new stadium situated on a piece of reclaimed land on The Hard beside the Historic Dockyard. The £600m mixed use development, designed by world renowned architects Herzog & de Meuron, would also include 1,500 harbourside apartments as well as shops and offices. The scheme has attracted considerable criticism due to its huge size and location.[41][42] It also involves moving HMS Warrior from her current permanent mooring, the HMS Warrior trust has said they will not move. This threatens to derail the project as the trust own the sea bed and pier which would be built on were the project to go ahead.[citation needed] In Autumn 2007 Portsmouth's local paper 'The News' published that the plans had been turned down as the supercarriers to be situated in Portsmouth dockyard sight lines would be blocked[citation needed]. In answer to this Portsmouth FC have planned a similar stadium in Horsea Island near Port Solent. This plan will involve building a 36,000 seated stadium, around 1,500 apartments as the original plan yet this time not around the stadium but as single standing structures. Yet the new plan also involves improving and saving land for the Royal Navy's diver training centre by the proposed site and buying a fair amount of land from the MoD[citation needed]. Also a new £7m railway station is to be built at Paulsgrove in Racecourse Lane near the site where there was originally a station[citation needed]. Along with these new roads towards the stadium, it has also been proposed to build a new bridge from Tipner alongside the motorway[citation needed]. This will be for people walking to the stadium and for a park and ride scheme that will also be introduced. there are also plans to capitalise on the proposed development for the local tip which will be neighbouring the new stadium. If accepted the stadium is predicted to be finished for the 2011/12 season. As part of the plans, the club's previous stadium site at Fratton Park would also be redeveloped once the new stadium is completed. Make Architects has been commissioned to draw up designs for 750 new apartments on the site. Planning applications for the proposed development will be submitted in the autumn.[citation needed] Portsmouth Football Club are an English football club based in the south coast city of Portsmouth. ... Allianz Arena in Munich. ... Four ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Warrior. ... MAKE Architects is an architects practice based in the United Kingdom. ...


Notable residents

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to everyday speech. ... George Anson, 1st Baron Anson (April 23, 1697 - 1762) was a British admiral and a wealthy aristocrat, noted for his circumnavigation of the globe. ... Sir Francis Austen (1774–1865) was a British officer who spent most of his long life on active duty in the Royal Navy, rising to the position of Admiral of the Fleet. ... A watercolour and pencil sketch of Jane Austen, believed to be drawn from life by her sister Cassandra (c. ... Emma Jane Barton (born February 29, 1976 in Portsmouth, England) is an English actress. ... Susan Honey Mitchell (née Edwards) is a fictional character in the BBC soap opera EastEnders. ... Albert Square in the 1980s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Admiral Sir Jonathon Band, KCB, ADC,BSc(Exon), (born 1950), since 2006, is the First Sea Lord of the United Kingdom, the most senior serving officer in the Royal Navy. ... Sir Jonathon Band, the current First Sea Lord The First Sea Lord is the professional head of the Royal Navy and the whole Naval Service. ... Sir Walter Besant (1836 - 1901) was a novelist and historian from London. ... Roger Anthony Black MBE (born 31 March 1966) is a former Olympic athlete and now works as a television presenter and motivational speaker. ... Isambard Kingdom Brunel, FRS (9 April 1806 – 15 September 1859) (IPA: ), was a British engineer. ... For the American vaudevillian and female impersonator, see Neil Burgess (comedian). ... Neil Burgess is an actor perhaps best known for his portrayal of the character Barry Scott in the UK version of the television adverts for cleaning product Cillit Bang. ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a British author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. ... Family Affairs veteran actress who also appeared in Eastenders as Debbie. ... Family Affairs was a British soap opera. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In England, a succession of Witchcraft Acts have governed witchcraft and provided penalties for its practice. ... Michael John East (born: January 20, 1978 in Reading, England) is a middle distance athlete. ... Current flag of the Commonwealth Games Federation Locations of the games, and participating countries Commonwealth Games Federation seal, adopted in 2001 The Commonwealth Games is a multinational, multi-sport event. ... Kate Edmondson (born November 19, 1983) is a British television presenter, who, in 2006, was selected after a nationwide search to present The Loaded Hour, sponsored by Loaded magazine, on Freeview channel TMF. Kate has since gone on to present TMF Live, as well as Totally Boyband Live on sister... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... TMF (The Music Factory) is a pop music channel that operates in the Netherlands (TMF NL), Belgium (TMF Vlaanderen) and the United Kingdom (TMF UK). ... We dont have an article called Matt Edmondson Start this article Search for Matt Edmondson in. ... Current CBBC Logo CBBC - short for Childrens BBC - is the brand-name for the BBCs childrens television programmes aimed at children aged between 6 and 12 years old. ... Richard Verrall was a National Front member. ... // Profile Rob Hayles (Robert) was born in Portsmouth on 21 January 1973. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a means of transport, a form of recreation and a sport. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Ian Hicks, better known as DJ Hixxy, is a DJ and musician from Portsmouth, England. ... Christopher Eric Hitchens (born April 13, 1949) is a British-American author, journalist and literary critic. ... Roger Hodgson (born Charles Roger Pomfret Hodgson, 21 March 1950, in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England) is a British vocalist and musician, and he was one of the founding members of the progressive rock group Supertramp. ... This article is about the band. ... For the murder victim of Mary Bell see Brian Howe. ... Bad Company were an English hard rock supergroup founded in 1973, consisting of band members from Free (Paul Rodgers, Simon Kirke), Mott the Hoople (Mick Ralphs) and King Crimson (Boz Burrell). ... Joe Jackson (born David Ian Jackson, 11 August 1954, Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire) is an English musician and singer-songwriter probably best-known for the 1979 hit song Is She Really Going Out With Him?, which still gets extensive FM radio airplay; for his 1982 hit, Steppin Out; and for... Paul Jones (born Paul Pond, 24 February 1942, in Portsmouth, England) is an English singer, actor, harmonica player, and radio and television presenter. ... Cock-A-Hoop Manfred Mann was a British R&B and pop band of the 1960s, named after its keyboard player, who later led the successful 1970s follow-on group Manfred Manns Earth Band. ... Dillie Keane is perhaps best known as one third of the comedy cabaret trio Fascinating Aida, ever since its inception in 1983, but she has had an equally prominent solo career. ... Fascinating Aïda are a cult British satirical musical comedy cabaret trio founded in 1983 by Dillie Keane. ... This article is about the British author. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Goodnight Mister Tom is a 1981 novel by Michelle Magorian. ... Roland Orzabal (full name Roland Jaime Orzabal de la Quintana) is an internationally acclaimed musician, songwriter and record producer. ... Tears for Fears (sometimes abbreviated to TFF) are a popular English pop band formed in the early 1980s by Roland Orzabal and Curt Smith, which emerged after the dissolution of their first band, the mod-influenced Graduate. ... Alan Pascoe was a British athlete who gained success in hurdles. ... Ben used to be happy-go-lucky, but in the aftermath of the accident that killed Theo and Jamie he sank into depression. ... Hollyoaks is a British television soap opera, first broadcast on 23 October 1995, on Channel 4. ... John Pounds (June 17, 1766 - 1839) was a teacher and altruist born in Portsmouth in 1766. ... Ragged schools is a name given to the 19th century charity schools in the United Kingdom which provided education and, in most cases, food, clothing, and lodging for destitute children. ... This article is about the British actor. ... Katy Sexton (MBE) was a professional competitive swimmer, competing at international events, as well as those in her native Britain. ... Cranes are a British band, often described as gothic rock, Dream Pop or shoegazers. ... Nevil Shute (London, January 17, 1899 – Melbourne, January 12, 1960) (full name Nevil Shute Norway) was one of the most popular novelists of the mid-20th century. ... For other uses, see David Wells (disambiguation). ... Most Haunted is a British paranormal television programme based on investigating purported paranormal activity. ... H. G. Wells at the door of his house at Sandgate Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 - August 13, 1946) was an English writer best known for his science fiction novels such as The War of the Worlds and The Time Machine. ... Kim Woodburn (born Kimberley MacKenzie March 25, 1942) is an expert cleaner who appears on the British television programme How Clean Is Your House?. She was born in Eastney, near Portsmouth. ... Aggie MacKenzie and Kim Woodburn, stars of How Clean Is Your House? How Clean Is Your House? is a British entertainment/lifestyle television programme in which expert cleaners Kim Woodburn and Aggie MacKenzie visit filthy homes and then clean them. ... Colonel Sir Arthur Edwin Young, KBE, CMG, CVO, KPM (born 1907) was the Commissioner of the City of London Police from 1950 to 1971. ...

Town twinning

Portsmouth is twinned with two European cities, and has sister and friendship links with a numbers of other places around the world.[43] Many of the schools in the local area conduct visits to the cities in order to educate its residents on foreign languages and culture[citation needed].

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Duisburg is a German city and port in the western part of the Ruhr Area (Ruhrgebiet) in North Rhine-Westphalia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... , Caen (pronounced ) is a commune of northwestern France. ...

Sister links

Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Hebrew Arabic حَيْفَا Founded in 3rd century CE Government City District Haifa Population 267,000 1,039,000 (metropolitan area) Jurisdiction 63,666 dunams (63. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Maizuru (舞鶴市; -shi) is a city located in Kyoto, Japan, on an inlet of the Sea of Japan. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Map Political Statistics Founded 1752 County Independent city Mayor Dr. James W. Holley III Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 120. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... NSW redirects here. ...

Friendship links

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The City of Lakewood is a home rule municipality located in Jefferson County, Colorado, United States. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Rockingham County Incorporated 1653 Government  - Mayor Steve Marchand  - City manager John P. Bohenko Area  - City  16. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... A banner (Mongolian: khoshuu, Chinese: 旗, pinyin: qí) is an administrative division of Inner Mongolia. ... Hinggan league (Mongolian: Khyangan aimag; Chinese: 兴安盟; Pinyin: XÄ«ngān Méng) is an administrative division of Inner Mongolia. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Portsmouth
Hampshire Portal

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... map of admin county File links The following pages link to this file: Hampshire Southampton Itchen (UK Parliament constituency) Southampton Test (UK Parliament constituency) Romsey (constituency) Hampshire North West (UK Parliament constituency) Aldershot (constituency) Havant (constituency) Portsmouth South (UK Parliament constituency) Portsmouth North (UK Parliament constituency) Gosport (constituency) Basingstoke (constituency... Portsmouth Naval Dockyard. ... Southsea is a seaside resort located in Portsmouth at the southern tip of Portsea Island in the county of Hampshire in England. ... Ferrol can refer to: EUROPE Ferrol, Spain City and Naval Station in North Western Spain, European Union Note: Place of birth of both Francisco Franco (1892) the Spanish dictator and Pablo Iglesias (1850) founder of PSOE and UGT. ASIA Ferrol, Romblon Small Town in the Philippines Note: The Philippines got... The Portsmouth Sinfonia was a musical group founded by English composer Gavin Bryars, while teaching at Portsmouth School of Art in the early 1970s. ... Old Portsmouth is a district of the city of Portsmouth. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk/dissemination/LeadTableView.do?a=3&b=276855&c=portsmouth&d=13&e=13&g=411650&i=1001x1003x1004&m=0&r=1&s=1207429514303&enc=1&dsFamilyId=1812
  2. ^ Oxford Dictionary of Place names
  3. ^ http://football.guardian.co.uk/News_Story/0,,1396787,00.html
  4. ^ The liberty of Portsmouth and Portsea Island: Introduction (1908). Retrieved on February 25, 2008.
  5. ^ a b Portsmouth City Council, (www.civicheraldry.co.uk), accessed February 25, 2008
  6. ^ ABROAD AGAIN IN BRITAIN, BBC
  7. ^ Vice Admiral Horatio Nelson 1758 - 1805. Portsmouth City Council's Economy, Culture and Community Safety. Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  8. ^ ABROAD AGAIN IN BRITAIN, BBC
  9. ^ http://www.portsmouth.co.uk/latest/GALLERY-Defences-that-were-never.3078128.jp
  10. ^ The Dockyard at War. Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  11. ^ Portsmouth's Coat of Arms, Portsmouth City Council, accessed February 25, 2008
  12. ^ Details on the construction of the new carriers. MoD. Retrieved on 2007-07-28.
  13. ^ Details on the construction of the new carriers. BBC. Retrieved on 2007-07-28.
  14. ^ Details on the merger of VT GRoup and BAe's ship building divisions. VT Group. Retrieved on 2007-07-28.
  15. ^ Details on the MoD review of naval bases. MoD. Retrieved on 2007-07-28.
  16. ^ See History of Portsmouth for a list of references for this table.
  17. ^ Office of National Statistics
  18. ^ Portsmouth City Council
  19. ^ BBC South Today 11/4/08
  20. ^ The pride and tears of D-Day. The News (2006-10-12). Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  21. ^ http://www.portsmouthvideos.co.uk/events/1994_800pageant.htm
  22. ^ http://www.portsmouth.co.uk/portsmouth/Taking-to-the-streets-to.1060295.jp
  23. ^ British Crime Survey
  24. ^ 'Minimum rape risk' posed in city, BBC News Online, 23 May 2006, accessed 22 June 2007
  25. ^ British Crime Survey
  26. ^ 'Minimum rape risk' posed in city, BBC News Online, 23 May 2006, accessed 22 June 2007
  27. ^ Government Report on Crime in England and Wales
  28. ^ England planning overhaul urged, BBC News Online, 5 December 2006, retrieved 5 December 2006
  29. ^ Portsmouth City Council Report, School Violence 1999
  30. ^ Royal Armouries: Fort Nelson
  31. ^ Peter Ashley Activity Centres- Learning is Fun !
  32. ^ http://www.royalmarinesmuseum.co.uk/
  33. ^ D-Day Museum
  34. ^ Tim Backhouse. The Guildhall Square Cenotaph. Memorials & Monuments In Portsmouth. Retrieved on 2007-11-04.
  35. ^ Diocese of Portsmouth, Catholic Encyclopedia, accessed February 17, 2008
  36. ^ Order in Council founding the Bishopric of Portsmouth (S.I. 1927/358), in effect May 1, 1927
  37. ^ Hampshire County Council (2005-11-29). PROMOTER SLAMS GOVERNMENT FOR TRAM SCHEME `NO'. Hantsweb Press Release 2489. Retrieved on 2007-04-08.
  38. ^ End of the line for monorail plan. The News (2006-10-12). Retrieved on 2007-04-08.
  39. ^ Portsmouth News, 6/7/07 .
  40. ^ SEEDA Report on Population Growth
  41. ^ Emily Pykett and Victoria Taylor, Pie-in-the-sky or a real winner for our city?, Portsmouth News, 26 April 2007, retrieved 2 July 2007
  42. ^ Majority say it's a threat to harbour, Portsmouth News, 4 May 2007, retrieved 2 July 2007
  43. ^ Portsmouth City Council. Twinning. Retrieved 22 August 2007.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Portsmouth harbour, with HMS Warrior on the left, Portsmouth Harbour railway station in the centre, and construction of the Spinnaker Tower on the right. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... BBC News website in June 2007. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links

  • Clarence Pier
  • Portsmouth Pubs
  • Portsmouth City Council
  • University of Portsmouth
  • Portsmouth Records Office
  • Queen's Harbour Master, Portsmouth
  • Gunwharf Quays Shopping Centre
  • Portsmouth Port
  • Portsmouth travel guide from Wikitravel

Coordinates: 50°49′N, 1°05′W This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... This article is about the country. ... , Bangor, in north Wales, is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the city of Newport in Wales. ... St Davids (Welsh: Tyddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... For other places with similar names, see Derry (disambiguation) and Londonderry (disambiguation). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... , Newry (from the Irish: Iúr Cinn Trá meaning The Yew Tree at the Head of the Strand, short form An tIúr, The Yew) is the fourth largest city in Northern Ireland and eighth on the island of Ireland. ... For the council, see Lisburn City Council. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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