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Encyclopedia > Portland, Oregon
City of Portland

Flag

Seal
Nickname: "Rose City," "Stumptown," "Bridgetown," "PDX", and "Little Beirut"
Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon
Coordinates: 45°31′12″N 122°40′55″W / 45.52, -122.68194
Country United States
State Oregon
Counties Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas
Incorporated February 8, 1851
Government
 - Type Commission
 - Mayor Tom Potter[1]
 - Commissioners Sam Adams
Randy Leonard
Dan Saltzman
Erik Sten
 - Auditor Gary Blackmer
Area
 - City 145.4 sq mi (376.5 km²)
 - Land 134.3 sq mi (347.9 km²)
 - Water 11.1 sq mi (28.6 km²)
Elevation 50 ft (15.2 m)
Population (2007)
 - City 568,380
 - Density 4,199.17/sq mi (1,640.30/km²)
 - Metro 2,337,565
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 - Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP codes 97086-97299
Area code(s) 503/971
FIPS code 41-59000[2]
GNIS feature ID 1136645[3]
Website: http://www.portlandonline.com/

Portland is a city located near the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia rivers in the U.S. state of Oregon. With an estimated population of 568,380[4] it is Oregon's most populous city, and the third most populous city in the Pacific Northwest, after Vancouver, British Columbia, and Seattle, Washington. Approximately two million people live in Portland metropolitan area (MSA), the 23rd most populous in the United States as of July 2006.[5] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 294 pixelsFull resolution (3869 × 1422 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Portland,_Oregon. ... Flag of Portland, OR (2002-present) The city flag of Portland, Oregon consists of a green field on which is placed a white four-pointed directional star from which radiate blue stripes, each bordered by L-shaped yellow elements. ... Image File history File links Seal_of_Portland_OR.png‎ Converted to PNG from http://www. ... Seal of the City of Portland, Oregon The city seal of Portland, Oregon was originally adopted in 1878, standardized in 1964, and most recently revised August 3, 2005. ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... Image File history File links Multnomah_County_Oregon_Incorporated_and_Unincorporated_areas_Portland_Highlighted. ... Multnomah County (IPA: ) is one of 36 counties in the U.S. state of Oregon. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Map of the counties of Oregon List of Oregon counties: Baker County Benton County Clackamas County Clatsop County Columbia County Coos County Crook County Curry County Deschutes County Douglas County Gilliam County Grant County Harney County Hood River County Jackson County Jefferson County Josephine County Klamath County Lake County Lane... Multnomah County (IPA: ) is one of 36 counties in the U.S. state of Oregon. ... Washington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oregon. ... Clackamas County (IPA: ) is a county located in the state of Oregon. ... A Municipal Corporation is a legal defintion for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, and towns. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... City Commission government is a form of municipal government that was once common in the United States, but has fallen out of favor, most cities formerly governed by Commission having switched to the Council-Manager form. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Tom Potter is the Mayor of the city of Portland, Oregon in the United States. ... For other persons named Sam Adams, see Sam Adams (disambiguation). ... Dan Saltzman is an elected Commissioner serving in the City Council of Portland in Portland, Oregon, United States. ... Erik Sten (b. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... PST is UTC-8 The Pacific Standard Time Zone (PST) is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting eight hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) resulting in UTC-8. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... PDT is UTC-7 The Pacific Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting eight hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC-8). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... North American telephone area codes 503 and 971 service several locations in Oregon, including Portland, Salem, McMinnville, Tillamook, Astoria, and other locations in northwestern Oregon. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Look up confluence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Willamette River (pronounced wil-LAM-met) is a tributary of the Columbia River, approximately 240 mi (386 km) long, in northwestern Oregon in the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Pacific Northwest from space The Pacific Northwest, abbreviated PNW, or PacNW is a region in the northwest of North America. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... Seattle redirects here. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... The Portland metropolitan area is the urban area centered around Portland, Oregon and the Willamette River. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... There are two official definitions of metropolitan area used today in the United States, metropolitan statistical areas, and combined statistical areas, the former restrictive, the latter more extensive. ...


Portland was incorporated in 1851 and is the seat of Multnomah County. The city extends slightly into Washington County to the west and Clackamas County to the south. It is governed by a commission-based government headed by a mayor and four other commissioners. Portland's first mayor was Hugh O'Bryant who served for one year. A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Multnomah County (IPA: ) is one of 36 counties in the U.S. state of Oregon. ... Washington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oregon. ... Clackamas County (IPA: ) is a county located in the state of Oregon. ... City Commission government is a form of municipal government that was once common in the United States, but has fallen out of favor, most cities formerly governed by Commission having switched to the Council-Manager form. ... Hugh D. OBryant was the first mayor of Portland, Oregon, serving from 1851-1852. ...


The city and region are noted for strong land-use planning[6] and investment in public transit, supported by Metro, a distinctive regional-government scheme. Portland lies in the Marine West Coast climate region, which is marked by warm summers and rainy but temperate winters. This climate is ideal for growing roses, and for more than a century, Portland has been known as "The City of Roses" with many rose gardens – most prominently the International Rose Test Garden. Portland is also known for its large number of microbreweries and its coffee houses. It is the home of the Trail Blazers NBA basketball team. Mass transit redirects here. ... Metro, formerly known as Metropolitan Service District, is the regional governmental agency for the Oregon portion of the Portland metropolitan area. ... For other uses, see Rose (disambiguation). ... See: The White House Rose Garden. ... The International Rose Test Garden is a rose garden in Washington Park just to the west of downtown Portland, Oregon. ... Beer barrels outside the Castle Rock microbrewery in Nottingham, England. ... A Street Cafe, Jerusalem, Henry Fenn (1838- ): steel engraving in Picturesque Palestine, ca 1875 A coffeehouse, coffee shop, or caf shares some of the characteristics of a bar, and some of the characteristics of a restaurant. ... The Portland Trail Blazers are a professional basketball team based in Portland, Oregon. ... NBA redirects here. ...

Contents

History

Portland in 1890

Portland started as a spot known as "the clearing,"[7] which was on the banks of the Willamette about halfway between Oregon City and Fort Vancouver. In 1843, William Overton saw great commercial potential for this land but lacked the funds required to file a land claim. He struck a bargain with his partner Asa Lovejoy of Boston, Massachusetts: for 25¢, Overton would share his claim to the 640 acre (2.6 km²) site. Overton later sold his half of the claim to Francis W. Pettygrove of Portland, Maine. Pettygrove and Lovejoy each wished to name the new city after his respective home town; this was decided with a coin toss, which Pettygrove won in a series of two out of three tosses.[8]The coin used for this decision, now known as the Portland Penny, is on display in the headquarters of the Oregon Historical Society. Download high resolution version (1656x926, 285 KB)Panorama of Portland, Oregon, in 1890. ... Download high resolution version (1656x926, 285 KB)Panorama of Portland, Oregon, in 1890. ... Portland started as a spot known as The Clearing, which was on the banks of the Willamette River about halfway between Oregon City and Fort Vancouver. ... Oregon City is the first city in the United States incorporated west of the Rockies. ... Fort Vancouver Fort Vancouver was a 19th century fur trading outpost along the Columbia River that served as the headquarters of the Hudsons Bay Company in the companys Columbia District (known to Americans as the Oregon Country). ... Asa Lawrence Lovejoy (born 1808 in Massachusetts, died 1882) was an Oregon pioneer and one of the founders of the city of Portland, Oregon. ... Boston redirects here. ... The quarter is 1/4th of a United States dollar or 25 cents. ... Francis Pettygrove (center) and others Francis William Pettygrove (born 1812 in Maine, died 1887 in Port Townsend, Washington), commonly known as William Pettygrove, was a pioneer and one of the founders of the cities of Portland, Oregon and Port Townsend, Washington. ... Nickname: Motto: Resurgam (Latin for I will rise again) Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1632 Incorporated 1786 Government  - Mayor Nicholas M. Mavodones, Jr Area  - City  52. ... Coin flipping or coin tossing is the practice of throwing a coin in the air to resolve a dispute between two parties. ... The Oregon Historical Society (OHS) is an organization which encourages and promotes the study and understanding of the history of the Oregon Country, within the broader context of U.S. history. ...


At the time of its incorporation on February 8, 1851 Portland had over 800 inhabitants,[9] a steam sawmill, a log cabin hotel, and a newspaper, the Weekly Oregonian. By 1879, the population had grown to 17,500.[10] is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Log cabin (disambiguation). ... October 2, 2004 edition. ...


Portland's location, with access both to the Pacific Ocean via the Willamette and the Columbia rivers and to the agricultural Tualatin Valley via the "Great Plank Road" through a canyon in the West Hills (the route of current-day U.S. Route 26), gave it an advantage over nearby ports, and it grew quickly.[11] It remained the major port in the Pacific Northwest for much of the 19th century, until the 1890s, when Seattle's deepwater harbor was connected to the rest of the mainland by rail, affording an inland route without the treacherous navigation of the Columbia River. The Tualatin River The Tualatin Valley is a farming and suburban region southwest of Portland, Oregon in the United States. ... U.S. Route 26 is an east-west United States highway. ... Seattle redirects here. ...


The first known reference to Portland as "The City of Roses" was made by visitors to an 1888 Episcopal Church convention, the nickname growing in popularity after the 1905 Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition where Mayor Harry Lane suggested that the city needed a "festival of roses."[12] The first Portland Rose Festival was held two years later and remains the city's major annual festival a century later.-1... The Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition, commonly also known as the Lewis and Clark Exposition, and officially known as the Lewis and Clark Centennial American Pacific Exposition and Oriental Fair, was a worldwide exposition held in Portland, Oregon, United States in 1905 to celebrate the centennial of the Lewis and... The Portland Rose Festival is an annual civic festival held during the month of June in Portland, Oregon. ...


Law and government

See also: Government of Portland, Oregon
Portland City Mayor Tom Potter.

The city of Portland is governed by the Portland City Council, which includes the Mayor and four other Commissioners; and an auditor. Each is elected citywide to serve a four year term. The auditor provides checks and balances in the commission form of government and accountability for the use of public resources. In addition, the auditor provides access to information for all Council members and the public and issues reports on various matters of city government. The Government of Portland, Oregon, a city in the U.S. state of Oregon, is based on a city commission government system. ... Tom Potter is the Mayor of the city of Portland, Oregon in the United States. ... The Portland City Council is the governing body of Portland, Oregon. ...


The city's Office of Neighborhood Involvement serves as a conduit between city government and 95 neighborhood associations, which are grouped into seven coalitions. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Portland and its surrounding metropolitan area are also served by Metro, the United States' only directly elected regional government. Metro's charter includes land use and transportation planning, solid waste management, and map development. It also owns and operates the Oregon Convention Center, Oregon Zoo, Portland Center for the Performing Arts, and Portland Metropolitan Exposition Center. The Multnomah County government also provides many services to the Portland area, along with that of Washington and Clackamas Counties to the west and south. Metro, formerly known as Metropolitan Service District, is the regional governmental agency for the Oregon portion of the Portland metropolitan area. ... The Oregon Convention Center and its signature twin spires. ... The Oregon Zoo, formerly the Washington Park Zoo, is a zoo 2 miles WSW of downtown Portland, Oregon in Portlands Washington Park. ... The Portland Center for the Performing Arts is a collection of small- and medium-sized venues for live stage, concerts, cinema, small conferences, and similar events. ... The Portland Metropolitan Exposition Center, usually referred to as the Expo Center, is a convention center located in Portland, Oregon. ... Multnomah County (IPA: ) is one of 36 counties in the U.S. state of Oregon. ... Washington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oregon. ... Clackamas County (IPA: ) is a county located in the state of Oregon. ...


Since the 1950s, if not earlier, Portland has strongly favored the Democratic Party at all levels of government. Although local elections are nonpartisan, most of the city's elected officials are Democrats. Democrats also dominate the city's delegation to the Oregon Legislature. The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Oregon Legislative Assembly is the legislature for the U.S. state of Oregon. ...


Federally, Portland is split between three congressional districts. Most of the city is in the 3rd District, represented by Earl Blumenauer, who served on the city council from 1986 until his election to Congress in 1996. Most of the city west of the Willamette River is part of the 1st District, represented by David Wu. A small portion of the city is in the 5th District, represented by Darlene Hooley. All three are Democrats; a Republican has not represented a significant portion of Portland since 1975. Oregon's senior Senator, Ron Wyden, is from Portland. U.S. Congressional districts for representation in the House are determined after each census. ... As of the 2000 census, there are five Oregon United States congressional districts. ... Earl Blumenauer (born August 16, 1948) is a Democratic U.S. representative from Oregon, representing the 3rd congressional district. ... As of the 2000 census, there are five Oregon United States congressional districts. ... Congressman David Wu David Wu (Traditional Chinese: 吳振偉; pinyin: Wú Zhènwěi; born April 8, 1955) is a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives for Oregon, representing the states 1st Congressional District (map). ... As of the 2000 census, there are five Oregon United States congressional districts. ... Darlene Hooley (born April 4, 1939 in Williston, North Dakota) is a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Oregon and represents the 5th Congressional District. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Ronald Lee Wyden (born May 3, 1949) to German American parents, is Oregons senior United States Senator. ...


Planning and development

Aerial view of central Portland

The city consulted with urban planners as far back as 1903. Development of Washington Park and one of the country's finest greenways, the 40 Mile Loop, which interconnects many of the city's parks, began. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 814 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portland, Oregon Extensis Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/June Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/June 3 Talk:June 3 Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 814 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portland, Oregon Extensis Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/June Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries/June 3 Talk:June 3 Wikipedia:Selected anniversaries... Main entrance to Washington Park Washington Park is a public urban park in Portland, Oregon. ...


Portland is often cited as an example of a city with strong land use planning controls;[6] This is largely the result of statewide land conservation policies adopted in 1973 under Governor Tom McCall, in particular the requirement for an urban growth boundary (UGB) for every city and metropolitan area. The opposite extreme, a city with few or no controls, is typically illustrated by Houston, Texas. Land use planning is the term used for a branch of public policy which encompasses various disciplines which seek to order and regulate the use of land in an efficient way. ... Thomas Lawson McCall (March 22, 1913 – January 8, 1983) was an American politician, a Republican, and the thirtieth governor of Oregon from 1967 to 1975. ... UGB redirects here. ... Houston redirects here. ...


Portland's urban growth boundary, adopted in 1979, separates urban areas (where high-density development is encouraged and focused) from traditional farm land (where restrictions on non-agricultural development are very strict).[13] This was atypical in an era when automobile use led many areas to neglect their core cities in favor of development along interstate highways, in suburbs, and satellite cities. Interstate Highways in the lower 48 states. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... Satellite cities are smaller municipalities that are adjacent to a major city which is the core of a metropolitan area. ...


As a result, one can see pastoral farmlands and old red barns within 15 miles (24 km) of downtown Portland, literally across the street from large suburban developments (where that street is the urban growth boundary.) Opponents argue that this growth boundary has limited growth and increased the costs of housing; proponents argue that it has preserved valuable farmland, made possible the popular farmer's markets in Portland, and brought more efficient public transportation and less traffic than similarly sized cities.


As the population has grown, and undeveloped land inside the urban growth boundary has dwindled, there has been pressure to change or relax the rules. The rapid growth of two major employers in Washington County, namely Nike and Intel, contributed to this pressure. Nike, Inc. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ...


The original state rules included a provision for expanding urban growth boundaries, but critics felt this wasn't being accomplished. In 1995, the State passed a law requiring cities to expand UGBs to provide enough undeveloped land for a 20 year supply of future housing at projected growth levels.[14]

1966 photo shows sawdust-fired power plant on the edge of Downtown that was removed to make way for dense residential development. High rises to left in background were early projects of the Portland Development Commission.

The Portland Development Commission is a semi-public agency that plays a major role in downtown development; it was created by city voters in 1958 to serve as the city’s urban renewal agency. It provides housing and economic development programs within the city, and works behind the scenes with major local developers to create large projects. It has been criticized for clubbiness and lack of transparency. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x598, 560 KB) Summary 1966 slide by R. W. Rynerson shows Portland General Electric Companys Lincoln Station, generating electricity and steam for Downtown Portland by burning woodchips. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x598, 560 KB) Summary 1966 slide by R. W. Rynerson shows Portland General Electric Companys Lincoln Station, generating electricity and steam for Downtown Portland by burning woodchips. ... Urban Renewal redirects here. ...


In the early 1960s, the PDC led the razing of a large Italian-Jewish neighborhood downtown, bounded roughly by the I-405 freeway, the Willamette River, 4th Avenue and Market street. It was replaced by concrete office developments that proponents find clean and modern, and opponents find antiseptic and lifeless at night.


Mayor Neil Goldschmidt took office in the 1970s as a proponent of bringing housing and the associated vitality back to the downtown area, which was seen as emptying out after 5pm. The effort has had dramatic effects in the 30 years since, with many thousands of new housing units clustered in 3 areas; west of Portland State University (between the I-405 freeway, SW Broadway, and SW Taylor St.); the RiverPlace development along the waterfront under the Marquam (I-5) bridge; and most notably in the Pearl District (between I-405, Burnside St., NW Northrup St., and NW 9th Ave.). Neil Edward Goldschmidt (born June 16, 1940) is a former politician and businessman living in the State of Oregon and a member of the United States Democratic Party. ...


The Urban Greenspaces Institute, housed in Portland State University Geography Department's Center for Mapping Research, promotes better integration of the built and natural environments. The institute works on urban park, trail, and natural areas planning issues, both at the local and regional levels.


According to Grist Magazine, Portland is the second most eco-friendly or "green" city in the world trailing only Reykjavík, Iceland.[15] Grist Magazine, Environmental News & Commentary (est. ... Ecology is sometimes used as an incorrect synonym for the natural environment. ... Location in Iceland Coordinates: , Constituency Government  - Mayor (Borgarstjóri) Dagur B. Eggertsson Area  - City 274. ...


Free speech

Because of strong free speech protections of the Oregon Constitution[clarify],[16] Portland reportedly has more strip clubs per capita than either Las Vegas or San Francisco.[17] The Oregon Constitution is a U.S. state constitution, the governing document of the American state of Oregon. ...


Geography and climate

The Willamette River with the Lloyd District in the background.
A view of downtown with Mount Hood in the background.

Portland lies at the northern end of Oregon's most populated region, the Willamette Valley. However, as the metropolitan area is culturally and politically distinct from the rest of the valley, local usage often excludes Portland from the valley proper. Although almost all of Portland lies within Multnomah County, small portions of the city lie within Clackamas and Washington counties with mid-2005 populations estimated at 785 and 1,455, respectively. The Willamette River runs north through the city center, separating the east and west sections of the city before veering slightly northwest to join with the Columbia River (which separates the state of Washington from the state of Oregon) a short distance north of the city. Image File history File links Willametteriverboat. ... Image File history File links Willametteriverboat. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the tallest mountain in Oregon. ... The Willamette Valley The Willamette Valley The Willamette Valley is the region in northwest Oregon in the United States that surrounds the Willamette River as it proceeds northward from its emergence from mountains near Eugene to its confluence with the Columbia River. ... Clackamas County (IPA: ) is a county located in the state of Oregon. ... Washington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oregon. ... The Willamette River (pronounced wil-LAM-met) is a tributary of the Columbia River, approximately 240 mi (386 km) long, in northwestern Oregon in the United States. ... The Columbia River (French: fleuve Columbia) is a river in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 145.4 sq mi (376.5 km²). 134.3 sq mi (347.9 km²) of it is land and 11.1 sq mi (28.6 km²), or 7.6%, is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ...


Portland lies on top of an extinct Plio-Pleistocene volcanic field known as the Boring Lava Field.[18] The Boring Lava Field includes at least 32 cinder cones such as Mount Tabor,[19], and its center lies in Southeast Portland. The dormant but potentially active volcano Mount Hood to the east of Portland is easily visible from much of the city, and the active volcano Mount Saint Helens to the north in Washington is visible in the distance from high-elevation locations in the city and is close enough to have dusted the city with volcanic ash during its spectacular 1980 eruption. Bobs Mountain in Washington State The Boring Lava Field is an extinct Plio-Pleistocene volcanic zone with at least 32 cinder cones and small shield volcanoes lying within a radius of 13 miles (21 km) of Kelly Butte, which is approximately 4 miles (6 km) east of downtown Portland... Mt. ... This article is about the tallest mountain in Oregon. ... Mount St. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ...


Climate

Portland lies within the Marine west coast climate zone, with some distinct characteristics of the Mediterranean climate as well. Summers in Portland are warm and relatively dry, with July averaging a high of 27 °C (81 °F) and a low of 14 °C (58 °F). Winters can be mild to chilly, and very moist, with January averaging a high of 8 °C (46 °F) and a low of 3 °C (37 °F). The rainfall averages 36.3 inches (920 mm) per year. Portland averages 155 days with measurable precipitation a year. Snowfall occurs no more than a few times per year, although the city has been known to see major snow and ice storms thanks to cold air outflow from the Columbia River Gorge. The city's winter snowfall totals have ranged from just a trace on many occasions, to 154.7 cm (60.9 inches) in 1892-93. The lowest temperature ever recorded in Portland was −19 °C (−3 °F), set on February 2, 1950. The highest temperature ever recorded was 42 °C (107 °F), set on July 30, 1965 as well as August 8, 1981 and August 10, 1981. Temperatures of 38 °C (100 °F) have been recorded in each of the months from May through September. It has been suggested that The Cool Western Temperate Maritime Climate be merged into this article or section. ...  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is one that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin, which includes over half of the area with this climate type world-wide. ... The Columbia River Gorge is a spectacular canyon of the Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...

Avg / Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
High °C (°F) 7.8 (46) 10.0 (50) 13.9 (57) 16.7 (62) 20.0 (68) 23.3 (74) 26.7 (80) 27.2 (81) 23.3 (74) 17.2 (63) 10.6 (51) 7.8 (46) 17.2 (63)
Low °C (°F) 2.8 (37) 3.9 (39) 5.0 (41) 6.7 (44) 10.0 (50) 12.2 (54) 14.4 (58) 14.4 (58) 12.8 (55) 8.9 (48) 5.6 (42) 2.8 (37) 8.3 (47)
Precipitation mm
(inches)[20]
135.9
(5.35)
97.8
(3.85)
90.4
(3.56)
60.7
(2.39)
52.3
(2.06)
37.6
(1.48)
16.0
(0.63)
27.7
(1.09)
44.5
(1.75)
67.8
(2.67)
135.6
(5.34)
155.7
(6.13)
922.0
(36.30)

A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ...

Sections and neighborhoods

See also: Portland, Oregon neighborhoods
The sections of Portland.

Portland straddles the Willamette River near its confluence with the Columbia River. The denser and earlier-developed west side is mostly hemmed in by the nearby West Hills (Tualatin Mountains), though it extends over them to the border with Washington County. The flatter east side fans out for about 180 blocks, until it meets the suburb of Gresham. Rural Multnomah County lies farther east. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Portland. ... Image File history File links Portland. ... The Tualatin Mountains (also known as the West Hills or Southwest Hills of Portland, Oregon) are a range of hills on the western border of Multnomah County, Oregon, USA. A spur of the Coast Range, they separate the Tualatin Basin of Washington County, Oregon from the Portland Basin of western... Gresham (IPA: ) is a city located in Multnomah County, Oregon about 18km east of Portland. ...


In 1891 the cities of Portland, Albina, and East Portland were consolidated, and duplicate street names were given new names. The "great renumbering" on September 2, 1931 standardized street naming patterns, and changed house numbers from 20 per block to 100 per block. It divided Portland into five sections: Southwest, Southeast, Northwest, North, and Northeast. Burnside St. divides north and south, and the Willamette River divides east and west. The river curves west five blocks north of Burnside and in place of it, Williams Ave. is used as a divider. The North section lies between Williams Ave. and the Willamette River to the west. Albina is a historical city which was consolidated into Portland, Oregon in 1891. ... East Portland is a historical city which was consolidated into Portland, Oregon in 1891. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The streets of Portland are for the most part laid out on a grid, with named "streets" running perpendicular to the Willamette River and numbered "avenues" running parallel to (and with numbers increasing with distance from) the river. The grid breaks down in hilly regions, particularly in the West Hills, where roads follow the contours of elevation. The "logic" of the grid also breaks down slightly in the North section: it's the only section on the east side where address numbers go higher towards the river. In the rest of the east side, the numbers go lower towards the river.


On the west side, the RiverPlace, John's Landing and South Waterfront Districts lie in a "sixth quadrant" where addresses go higher from west to east toward the river. This "sixth quadrant" is roughly bounded by Naito Parkway and Barbur Boulevard to the west, Montgomery Street to the north and Nevada Street to the south.


Southwest

Downtown, in the southwest area of Portland, at night, from the east.
Panorama of Portland from the south.
Pioneer Courthouse Square, with Fox Tower in the background.

Downtown Portland lies in the Southwest section between the I-405 freeway loop and the Willamette River, centered around Pioneer Courthouse Square ("Portland's living room"). Downtown and many other parts of inner Portland have compact square blocks (200 ft [60 m] on a side) and narrow streets (64 ft [20 m] wide), a pedestrian-friendly combination. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 161 pixelsFull resolution (6300 × 1271 pixel, file size: 6. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 161 pixelsFull resolution (6300 × 1271 pixel, file size: 6. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 124 pixelsFull resolution‎ (7,073 × 1,100 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 124 pixelsFull resolution‎ (7,073 × 1,100 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 522 pixelsFull resolution (3068 × 2000 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 522 pixelsFull resolution (3068 × 2000 pixel, file size: 2. ... Pioneer Courthouse Square. ... Fox Tower, at right, seen from Pioneer Courthouse Square The Fox Tower is a 27-story office building in Portland, Oregon. ... Portland, Oregons skyline is centered mainly in the southwest district of the city. ... Pioneer Courthouse Square. ...


Many of Portland's recreational, cultural, educational, governmental, business, and retail resources are concentrated downtown, including:

Beyond downtown, the Southwest section also includes: Tom McCall Waterfront Park seen from the north Governor Tom McCall Waterfront Park is a park located on the west bank of the Willamette River in downtown Portland, Oregon. ... Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall and Heathman Hotel The Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall is a historic theater building and performing arts center in Portland, Oregon. ... The Portland Art Museum (PAM) in Portland, Oregon was founded in 1892, making it the oldest art museum in the Pacific Northwest. ... The Oregon Historical Society (OHS) is an organization which encourages and promotes the study and understanding of the history of the Oregon Country, within the broader context of U.S. history. ... Multnomah County Courthouse serves as the second courthouse for Multnomah County, Oregon. ... Portland Public Service Building The Portland Building is a 15-story office building located at 1120 SW 5th Avenue in downtown Portland, Oregon. ... Pioneer Courthouse The Pioneer Courthouse in Portland, Oregon is the oldest federal building in the Pacific Northwest. ... Hatfield Courthouse The Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse is a federal courthouse in Portland, Oregon. ... Portland State University Portland State University is a public state urban university located in downtown Portland, Oregon. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pioneer Place is a shopping mall in downtown Portland, Oregon. ... Wells Fargo Center The Wells Fargo Center (Originally known as First National Bank Tower, then First Interstate Bank Tower) is the tallest building in Portland, Oregon. ...

Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) is a public university in Oregon with a main campus, including three hospitals, in Portland and a smaller campus in Hillsboro. ... Lewis & Clark College is a private, independent, liberal arts college in Portland, Oregon, United States. ... Portland Community College (or PCC) is Oregons largest community college, located in Portland. ... Willamette River from Johns Landing South Portland is a long narrow neighborhood just south of Downtown Portland, Oregon, hemmed in between the Willamette River and the West Hills. ... South Burlingame is a neighborhood in the Southwest section of Portland, Oregon. ... Hillsdale is a neighborhood in southwest Portland, Oregon. ... The center of Multnomah Village. ... Alpenrose Dairy is a dairy company located in southwest Portland, Oregon since 1916. ... Hayhurst, Portland, OR Hayhurst is a Southwest Portland neighborhood close to Multnomah Village, a commercial district. ... Track cycling is a bicycle racing sport usually held on specially-built banked tracks or velodromes (but many events are held at older velodromes where the track banking is relatively shallow) using track bicycles. ... Little League Baseball - Logo Little League pitcher in Winesburg, Ohio Little League, Wayne, Michigan Little League Baseball is the name of a non-profit organization in the United States which organizes local childrens leagues of baseball and softball throughout the USA and the rest of the world. ... Main entrance to Washington Park Washington Park is a public urban park in Portland, Oregon. ... North American redirects here. ... A train lead by a Bombardier type-1 high floor vehicle enters the eastbound platform of Portland, Oregons Washington Park MAX station. ... The Oregon Zoo, formerly the Washington Park Zoo, is a zoo 2 miles WSW of downtown Portland, Oregon in Portlands Washington Park. ... The Hoyt Arboretum is located atop a ridge in the west hills of Portland Oregon. ... The International Rose Test Garden is a rose garden in Washington Park just to the west of downtown Portland, Oregon. ... The Portland Japanese Garden is a traditional Japanese garden, 5. ... The South Waterfront (or SoWa) is a new high-rise neighborhood under construction in Portland, Oregon on former brownfield industrial land south of downtown. ...

Northwest

NW 21st Ave.
The Made in Oregon sign above Old Town.

Northwest Portland includes the Pearl District, most of Old Town Chinatown, the Northwest District, and various residential and industrial neighborhoods. A range of streets in Northwest Portland is named alphabetically from Ankeny (actually one block South Of Burnside, which even though it is technically the divider between north and south, is the "B" street in the alphabetical sequence) north to Wilson (Though some claim Yeon is the northernmost "alphabet" street, there is no "X" street, and Yeon is not contiguous with the rest. Chronologically Yeon is a later addition as well.) Several characters in Portland native Matt Groening's TV show The Simpsons have names based on these: Ned Flanders, the bully Kearney, Reverend Lovejoy, Mayor Quimby, Milhouse Van Houten (actually in North Portland), and possibly C. Montgomery (also named for the large Montgomery Park (Formerly Montgomery Ward) sign) Burns[ide]. Contrary to popular belief, the character Sideshow Bob Terwilliger is not named after SW Terwilliger Boulevard in Southwest Portland.[21] Image File history File links Northwest01. ... Image File history File links Northwest01. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 782 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1310 × 1005 pixel, file size: 391 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portland, Oregon User... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 782 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1310 × 1005 pixel, file size: 391 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portland, Oregon User... The Pearl District is a former warehouse and light industrial area just north of downtown Portland, Oregon. ... Union Station. ... The Northwest District is a densely populated retail and residential neighborhood in the Northwest section of Portland, Oregon. ... Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Nedward Ned Flanders is a recurring character in the animated television series The Simpsons. ... Kearney (voiced by Nancy Cartwright) is one of Springfields many bullies in the long-running animated TV show The Simpsons. ... This article contains a list of recurring characters from The Simpsons with descriptions. ... Mayor Diamond Joe Quimby Joseph Joe Quimby, Jr. ... Milhouse Mussolini Van Houten is a fictional character featured in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Pamela Hayden. ... Mr. ... Robert Underdunk Terwilliger, better known by his stage name Sideshow Bob, is a recurring character in the animated television series The Simpsons. ...


The Pearl District is a recent name for a former warehouse and industrial area just north of downtown. Many of the warehouses have been converted into lofts, and new multistory condominiums have also been developed on previously vacant land. The increasing density has attracted a mix of restaurants, brewpubs, shops, and art galleries. The galleries sponsor simultaneous artists' receptions on the first Thursday of every month. Old warehouses in Amsterdam Inside Green Logistics Co. ... Look up Loft in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article refers to a form of housing. ... A brewpub is a microbrewery, often combined with a restaurant, that sells the majority of its beer on premises. ...


Between the Pearl District and the Willamette is the Old Town Chinatown neighborhood. It includes Portland's Chinatown, marked by a pair of lions at its entrance at NW 4th Ave. and W Burnside St. and home to the Portland Classical Chinese Garden. Before World War II, this area was known as Japan Town or Little Tokyo; Chinatown was previously located just south of W. Burnside St. along the riverfront. This article is about sections of an urban area associated with a large number of Chinese residents or commercial activities. ... Categories: Fictional dogs | Stub ... Portland Classical Chinese Garden is a Suzhou-style walled garden enclosing a full city block in the Chinatown neighborhood of Portland, Oregon. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Further west is the compact but thriving NW 21st and 23rd Avenue restaurant and retail area, the core of the Northwest District. Parts of this area are also called Uptown and Nob Hill. The residential areas adjacent to the shopping district include the Alphabet Historic District (with large Victorian and Craftsman homes built in the years before and shortly after 1900) and a large district centered around Wallace Park. The neighborhood has a mix of Victorian-era houses, apartment buildings from throughout the 20th century, and various businesses centered around Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. The Portland Streetcar connects Nob Hill to downtown, via the Pearl. The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... A streetcar at the PSU stop. ...


West of the developed areas is the northern portion of Portland's West Hills, including the majority of extensive Forest Park and the Willamette Heights, Hillside, Sylvan, Skyline and Forest Heights neighborhoods. Forest Park west of downtown Portland, Oregon is the largest natural forest reserve within a city in the U.S., with over 5000 acres (20 km²) of old growth forest, threaded by miles of recreational trails. ...


North

North Portland is a diverse mixture of residential, commercial, and industrial areas. It includes the Portland International Raceway, the University of Portland, and massive cargo facilities of the Port of Portland. Slang-names for it include "NoPo" (shortened from North Portland) and "the Fifth Quadrant" (for being the odd-man out from the four-cornered logic of SE, NE, SW, and NW). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2349x1851, 1435 KB) The St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2349x1851, 1435 KB) The St. ... The St. ... Portland International Raceway is located in Portlands Delta Park complex, just south of the Columbia River and less than a mile west of Interstate 5. ... The University of Portland (UP) is a private Catholic university located in Portland, Oregon. ... The Port of Portland is the agency responsible for overseeing Portland International Airport, general aviation, and marine activities in the Portland Metropolitan Area. ...


North Portland is connected to the industrial area of Northwest Portland by the St. Johns Bridge, a 2,067 ft (630.0 m) long suspension bridge completed in 1931 and extensively rehabilitated in 2003-05. The St. ...


During World War II, a planned development named Vanport was constructed to the north of this section between the city limits and the Columbia River. It grew to be the second largest city in Oregon, but was wiped out by a disastrous flood in 1948. Columbia Villa, another wartime housing project in the Portsmouth Neighborhood, is being rebuilt; the new $150 million community is known as New Columbia and offers public housing, rental housing, and single family home ownership units. Since 2004, a light rail line runs along Interstate Avenue, which parallels I-5, stopping short of crossing the Columbia River. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Vanport was a public housing project located in Multnomah County, Oregon between the contemporary Portland city boundary and the Columbia River, constructed in 1943 to house the workers at the wartime shipyards in Portland and Vancouver, Washington. ... The Columbia River (French: fleuve Columbia) is a river in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. ... MAX train traveling on the Yellow line to Portland. ... The Columbia River (French: fleuve Columbia) is a river in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. ...


Northeast

Structure in a more rural area of northeast Portland.
The Oregon Convention Center in inner NE Portland.

Northeast Portland contains a diverse collection of neighborhoods. For example, while Irvington and the Alameda Ridge feature some of the oldest and most expensive homes in Portland, nearby King is a more working-class neighborhood. Because it is so large, Northeast Portland can essentially be divided ethnically, culturally, and geographically into inner and outer sections. The inner Northeast neighborhoods that surround Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. were once predominantly African American, resembling typical urban inner-city environments found in most major U.S. cities. That is now changing due to the process of gentrification. Inner Northeast includes several shopping areas, such as the Lloyd District, Alberta Arts District and Hollywood, and part of the affluent Irvington, Alameda, Grant Park and Laurelhurst neighborhoods and nearby developments. The city plan targets Lloyd District as another mixed-use area, with high-density residential development. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 394 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Structure in a more rural area of northeast Portland. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 394 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Structure in a more rural area of northeast Portland. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2897x1708, 1284 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portland, Oregon Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2897x1708, 1284 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portland, Oregon Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... The Oregon Convention Center and its signature twin spires. ... Irvington is a neighborhood in the Northeast section of Portland, Oregon. ... King is a neighborhood in the Northeast section of Portland, Oregon. ... In San Francisco, during the mid-1960s, the bohemian center of the city shifted from the old Beat enclave of North Beach to Haight-Ashbury (pictured) as a response to gentrification. ... The Lloyd District is a primarily commercial neighborhood in the Northeast section of Portland, Oregon. ... Alberta Street is a thoroughfare in Portland, Oregon, stretching through the North and Northeast sections of the city. ... The Hollycock District (originally Hollyrod, after the Scottish Holyrood) is a neighborhood of NE Portland, Oregon named for its historic 1920s era Hollycock Theatre. ... Irvington is a neighborhood in the Northeast section of Portland, Oregon. ... Alameda Alameda (PDF map) is a neighborhood in Portland that sits on a hill with views of Downtown, the Willamette River and the Cascades. ... Grant Park is a neighborhood and park in the Northeast section of Portland, Oregon. ... Laurelhurst is a neighborhood of vintage homes and undulating streets surrounding a park of the same name, straddling the NE and SE sections of Portland. ...


Straddling the base of the borders of North and Northeast is the Rose Quarter. It is named after the Rose Garden, home of the Portland Trail Blazers, and also includes the Blazers' former home, the Memorial Coliseum. The Coliseum is the home to Portland's hockey team, the Portland Winter Hawks, of the Western Hockey League, though they often play at the Rose Garden. The newest Rose Quarter tenants are the LumberJax of the National Lacrosse League. The city still holds the lease to the land and owns the Coliseum, but the Rose Garden and other buildings were owned by private business interests until they went into receivership. The area is quite active during the teams' home games, and the city hopes to extend the activity by promoting a major increase in residential units in the quarter using zoning and tax incentives. The Portland Trail Blazers are a professional basketball team based in Portland, Oregon. ... Portland Memorial Coliseum The Memorial Coliseum is an indoor arena, the oldest part of what is now known as the Rose Quarter area within Portland, Oregon. ... City: Portland, Oregon League: Western Hockey League Conference: Western Division: U.S. Founded: 1976-77 Home Arena: Rose Garden Arena & Memorial Coliseum Colours: red, white and black Head Coach: Mike Williamson General Manager: Ken Hodge The Portland Winter Hawks are members of the Western Hockey League, the highest level of... The Western Hockey League is one of the three hockey Major Junior Tier I leagues which constitute the Canadian Hockey League. ... The Portland LumberJax (sometimes referred to as the Jax) are a professional lacrosse team in the National Lacrosse League (NLL) which started playing in the 2006 season. ... NLL redirects here. ...


Southeast

The Bagdad Theater in the Hawthorne district.
The Hawthorne Bridge taken from a dock on the Willamette River near the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry

Southeast Portland stretches from the warehouses along the Willamette, through the historic Ladd's Addition to the Hawthorne and Belmont districts out to Gresham. Southeast Portland initially tended toward the blue-collar but, with its lower real-estate prices, has since evolved to encompass a wide mix of backgrounds; inner southeast is something of a haven for hippies, hipsters, and environmentalists, while the outer edges remain populated by an increasingly diverse, largely working-class population constituted of significantly large immigrant communities from Eastern Europe and Southeast Asia. The Hawthorne district in particular is known for its hippie/radical crowd and small subculturally-oriented shops; not far away is Reed College with its counter-cultural flavor and strong intellectual, anti-establishment tradition. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2142x1354, 846 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portland, Oregon The Bagdad Theater and Pub Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2142x1354, 846 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Portland, Oregon The Bagdad Theater and Pub Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... The Bagdad Theater and Pub The Bagdad Theater is a movie theater in the Hawthorne District of Portland, Oregon, United States. ... The Hawthorne District in Portland, Oregon is an area of Southeast Portland that runs along Hawthorne Boulevard, particularly between 32nd and 42nd Avenues. ... The Hawthorne Bridge is a truss bridge with a vertical lift that spans the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon. ... The Willamette River (pronounced wil-LAM-met) is a tributary of the Columbia River, approximately 240 mi (386 km) long, in northwestern Oregon in the United States. ... The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry museum complex and its submarine, the U.S.S. Blueback The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI, pronounced AWM-zee) is a museum located on the East bank of the Willamette River in the Hosford-Abernethy neighborhood of inner southeast Portland, Oregon. ... Ladds Addition is one of the oldest residential districts in Portland, Oregon. ... The Hawthorne District in Portland, Oregon is an area of Southeast Portland that runs along Hawthorne Boulevard, particularly between 32nd and 42nd Avenues. ... The Belmont Area is a retail and residential district running along SE Belmont St. ... Gresham may refer to: Greshams Law Places Gresham Park, Georgia Gresham, Nebraska (York County) Gresham, Oregon Gresham, Wisconsin Educational Establishments Gresham College, London Businesses Gresham hotels People Sir Thomas Gresham, creator of Greshams Law J. Gresham Barrett, Republican politician Douglas Gresham, British Film Producer Joy Gresham, poet Peter... For the British TV show, see Hippies (TV series). ... In the 1990s and 2000s, the 1940s slang term hipster began being used in North America to describe young, well-educated urban middle class and upper class adults with leftist, liberal, or libertarian social and political views and interests in a non-mainstream fashion and cultural aesthetic. ... Bold textHello ... Eastern Europe is a concept that lacks one precise definition. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Reed College is a private, independent liberal arts college located in Portland, Oregon. ...


Between the 1920s and the 1960s, Southeast was home to Lambert Gardens. Southeast Portland also features Mt. Tabor, a cinder cone volcano that has become one of Portland’s more scenic and popular parks. Lambert Gardens was a private garden of over 30 acres (120,000 m²) in Portland, Oregon, north of Reed College at Southeast 28th Avenue and Steele Street. ... Mount Tabor is an extinct volcanic cinder cone within the city of Portland, Oregon. ... For peaks named Cinder Cone, see list of peaks named Cinder Cone. ...

Reservoir 6 At Mt. Tabor

People and culture

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1850 821
1860 2,874 250.1%
1870 8,293 188.6%
1880 17,577 111.9%
1890 46,385 163.9%
1900 90,426 94.9%
1910 207,214 129.199%
1920 258,288 24.6%
1930 301,815 16.9%
1940 305,394 1.2%
1950 373,628 22.3%
1960 372,676 −0.3%
1970 382,619 2.7%
1980 366,383 −4.2%
1990 437,319 19.4%
2000 529,121 21%
[22]

As of 2000, there are 529,121 people residing in the city, organized into 223,737 households and 118,356 families. The population density is 3,939.2 people per square mile (1,521/km²). There are 237,307 housing units at an average density of 1,766.7/sq mi (682.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city is 77.91% White, 6.64% African American, 6.33% Asian, 1.06% Native American, 0.38% Pacific Islander, 3.55% from other races, and 4.15% from two or more races. 6.81% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. 15.3% were of German, 8.9% Irish and 8.8% English ancestry according to Census 2000. 83.3% spoke English, 5.6% Spanish, 2.0% Vietnamese and 1.3% Russian as their first language. The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The term white American (often used interchangeably and incorrectly with Caucasian American[2] and within the United States simply white[3]) is an umbrella term that refers to people of European descent residing in the United States. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States and their history after European contact, chiefly in what is now the United States. ... // Demographics in 2000 US Census Pacific Islander Americans represent the smallest group counted on the 2000 US Census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... The United States 2000 Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Out of 223,737 households, 24.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.1% are married couples living together, 10.8% have a female householder with no husband present, and 47.1% are non-families. 34.6% of all households are made up of individuals and 9% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.3 and the average family size is 3. Matrimony redirects here. ...


The age distribution was 21.1% under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 34.7% from 25 to 44, 22.4% from 45 to 64, and 11.6% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 35 years. For every 100 females there are 97.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 95.9 males.


The median income for a household in the city is $40,146, and the median income for a family is $50,271. Males have a reported median income of $35,279 versus $29,344 reported for females. The per capita income for the city is $22,643. 13.1% of the population and 8.5% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 15.7% of those under the age of 18 and 10.4% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. Oregon has a 9% income tax which tends to suppress accurate reporting. Figures delineating the income levels based on race are not available at this time. Per capita income means how much each individual receives, in monetary terms, of the yearly income generated in their country. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


However, though the population of the city is increasing, the total population of children is diminishing, which has put pressure on the public school system to close schools. A 2005 study found that Portland is now educating fewer children than it did in 1925, despite the city's population having almost doubled since then, and the city will have to close the equivalent of three to four elementary schools each year for the next decade.[23]


Portland's public school system has remained racially imbalanced. As of the 2000 census, three of its high schools (Cleveland, Lincoln and Wilson) were over 70% white, while Jefferson High School was 86% non-white. The remaining six schools are more ethnically balanced.[24]


The imbalance can be explained through Portland's demographic history. Before the Second World War, Portland had very few residents of non-European ethnicity, primarily because Portland (and Oregon as a state) was a Sundown town for much of its history.[citation needed] In 1940, Portland's African-American population was approximately 2,000 and largely consisted of railroad employees and their families. During the war-time liberty ship construction boom, the need for workers drew many blacks to the city. Because of institutionalized racism in the real-estate community at the time, this new influx of blacks was guided to specific neighborhoods, such as the Albina district and Vanport. The post-war destruction of Vanport eliminated the only integrated neighborhood, and an influx of blacks into the NE quadrant of the city continued. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... A sundown town is a community in the United States where non-Caucasians— especially African Americans— are systematically excluded from living in or passing through after the sun went down. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... The Liberty ships were cargo ships built in the United States during World War II. They were cheap and quick to build, and came to symbolize U.S. wartime industrial output. ... Albina is a historical city which was consolidated into Portland, Oregon in 1891. ... Vanport was a public housing project located in Multnomah County, Oregon between the contemporary Portland city boundary and the Columbia River, constructed in 1943 to house the workers at the wartime shipyards in Portland and Vancouver, Washington. ... Vanport was a public housing project located in Multnomah County, Oregon between the contemporary Portland city boundary and the Columbia River, constructed in 1943 to house the workers at the wartime shipyards in Portland and Vancouver, Washington. ...


Media

See also: List of newspapers in Oregon and List of radio stations in Oregon
A Portland Tribune newspaper box.

The Oregonian is the only daily general-interest newspaper serving Portland. It also circulates throughout the state and in Clark County, Washington. The Ashland Daily Tidings [1] - Ashland The Daily Astorian [2] - Astoria The Bulletin Bend The Coos Bay World The Corvallis Gazette-Times Corvallis The Register-Guard - Eugene The Medford Nickel (web site) - Medford The Mail Tribune (web site) - Medford The East Oregoninan (web site) - Pendleton The Oregonian (web site) - Portland... Following is a list of radio stations in Oregon, by city. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (439x638, 24 KB) Summary A distribution box for the Portland Tribune; downtown Portland, June 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (439x638, 24 KB) Summary A distribution box for the Portland Tribune; downtown Portland, June 2006. ... A Portland Tribune news stand The Portland Tribune is a free newspaper published twice weekly (Tuesdays and Fridays) in Portland, Oregon. ... October 2, 2004 edition. ... Clark County is a county located in the southwestern part of the state of Washington, across the Columbia River from Portland, Oregon. ...


Smaller local newspapers, distributed free of charge in newspaper boxes and at venues around the city, include the Portland Tribune (general-interest paper published on Thursdays), Willamette Week (general-interest alternative weekly), the The Portland Mercury (another weekly, targeted at younger urban readers), The Asian Reporter (a weekly covering Asian news, both international and local), and The Portland Chinese Times (a Chinese-language weekly). A Portland Tribune news stand The Portland Tribune is a free newspaper published twice weekly (Tuesdays and Fridays) in Portland, Oregon. ... The Willamette Week is an alternative newsweekly published in Portland, Oregon. ... Recent cover of Portland, Oregons Willamette Week An alternative weekly is a type of weekly newspaper that eschews comprehensive coverage of general news in favor of opinionated reviews and columns, investigations into edgy topics and magazine-style feature stories highlighting local people and culture. ... The Portland Mercury is an alternative weekly newspaper published in Portland, Oregon. ... The Asian Reporter is a Pacific Northwest-based weekly newspaper, founded in 1991, featuring international and local northwest news and events with an Asian focus. ...


Portland Indymedia is one of the oldest and largest Independent Media Centers. The Portland Alliance, a largely anti-authoritarian socialist monthly, is the largest radical print paper in the city. Just Out, published in Portland twice monthly, is the region's foremost LGBT publication. A biweekly paper, Street Roots, is also sold within the city by members of the homeless community. The Independent Media Center, also called Indymedia or the IMC, is a loose network of amateur or alternative media organizations and journalists who organize into decentralized collectives, normally around geographic locations. ... The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ...


The Portland Business Journal, a weekly, covers business-related news, as does The Daily Journal of Commerce. Open Spaces is a quarterly magazine of society, culture, the environment and the arts. Portland Monthly is a monthly news and culture magazine. BarFly Magazine is a popular weekly periodical covering the city's nightlife and bar scene. Exotic Magazine is the major monthly magazine covering the city's adult entertainment and nightlife since 1993. The Mid-county Memo is a neighborhood newspaper serving the Gateway and Parkrose neighborhoods on Portland's east side. PORT is an art macroblog dedicated to the vibrant art scene that provides daily updates on the arty goings on around town. Oregon Business magazine covers business from a statewide perspective. Oregon Home magazine is the region's remodeling and decor publication. American City Business Journals is an American newspaper chain based in Charlotte, North Carolina. ... The Daily Journal of Commerce is a newspaper published in Portland, Oregon, United States. ...


Portland is well served by television and radio. The metro area is the 23rd largest Designated Market Area (DMA) in the U.S., consisting of 1,086,900 homes and 0.992% of the U.S. market. The major network television affiliates include: A designated market area is a group of counties in the United States that are covered by a specific television station. ...

KATU is a television station broadcasting on channel 2 in Portland, Oregon, USA. It has been owned by Fisher Communications of Seattle, Washington, owner of the Seattle ABC affiliate KOMO-TV, since its inception and is currently affiliated with the ABC Television Network. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... KOIN (KOIN 6) is the CBS television affiliate serving the Portland metropolitan area. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... KGW is an NBC affiliate serving the Portland, Oregon area. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... KOPB-TV is a public television station serving the Portland, Oregon television market. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... KPTV is the Fox television affiliate serving the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area. ... FOX redirects here. ... KPXG is the ION Television affiliate licensed to Salem, Oregon, and serves the Portland, Oregon-Vancouver, Washington television market. ... ION Television is a broadcast and cable television network first broadcast on August 31, 1998 under the name PAX TV (early on in its development, it was called PaxNet). ... KNMT (KNMT TV-24) is the Trinity Broadcasting Network religious television affiliate serving the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area. ... The Trinity Broadcasting Network, or TBN, is the largest Christian religious television network in the world and is headquartered near Los Angeles in Costa Mesa, California with studios near Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex in Irving, Texas and near Nashville in Hendersonville, Tennessee. ... KRCW-TV is The CW affiliate serving the Portland, Oregon television market. ... The CW Television Network, normally abbreviated to The CW, also known as The New CW in its first season of the network, is a television network in the United States launched during the 2006 television season. ... KUNP Univision Portland is a full-power affiliate of the Univision Spanish television network serving the markets of Portland and Bend. ... Univision is a Spanish-language television network in the United States and Puerto Rico. ... KPDX is the My Network TV affiliate serving the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area. ... MyNetworkTV (sometimes written My Network TV, and unofficially abbreviated MyNet, MyTV, MYN-TV, MNT, or MNTV) is a television network in the United States, owned by the Fox Broadcasting Company, a division of News Corporation. ...

Parks and attractions

The rose has played a significant role in Portland's history and inspires one of the city's nicknames.
See also: Tourist attractions in or around Portland, Oregon

Portland is proud of its parks and its legacy of preserving open spaces. Parks and Greenspace planning dates back to John Charles Olmsted's 1903 Report to the Portland Park Board, inspiring generations of urban greenspace advocates.[citation needed] In 1995, voters in the Portland metropolitan region passed a regional bond measure to acquire valuable natural areas for fish, wildlife, and people. Ten years later, more than 8,100 acres (33 km²) of ecologically valuable natural areas had been purchased and permanently protected from development.[25] A rose in the Portland Rose Garden in Portland, Oregon, USA. Photo courtesy of Geoff Boeing, July 2004 File links The following pages link to this file: Portland, Oregon ... A rose in the Portland Rose Garden in Portland, Oregon, USA. Photo courtesy of Geoff Boeing, July 2004 File links The following pages link to this file: Portland, Oregon ... Portland, Oregon, USA has a variety of tourist attractions. ... John Charles Olmsted (1852-1920) was a noted American landscape architect. ...


Portland along with Bend, Oregon are the only cities in the contiguous U.S. with extinct volcanoes within their boundaries. Mt. Tabor Park was inadvertently built on one of Portland's; it is known for its scenic views and historic reservoirs.[26] Bend is a city in Deschutes County, Oregon, United States. ... The continental United States is a term referring to the United States situated on the North American continent. ... Mt. ...


Forest Park is among the largest wilderness parks within city limits in the United States, covering over 5,000 acres (20 km²). Portland is also home to Mill Ends Park, the world's smallest park (a two-foot-diameter circle, the park's area is only about 0.3 square m). Washington Park is just west of downtown, and is home to the Oregon Zoo, the Portland Japanese Garden, and the International Rose Test Garden. Forest Park west of downtown Portland, Oregon is the largest natural forest reserve within a city in the U.S., with over 5000 acres (20 km²) of old growth forest, threaded by miles of recreational trails. ... Mill Ends Park, the smallest park in the world Mill Ends Park in Portland, Oregon, United States, is a small park that was created on St. ... Main entrance to Washington Park Washington Park is a public urban park in Portland, Oregon. ... The Oregon Zoo, formerly the Washington Park Zoo, is a zoo 2 miles WSW of downtown Portland, Oregon in Portlands Washington Park. ... The Portland Japanese Garden is a traditional Japanese garden, 5. ... The International Rose Test Garden is a rose garden in Washington Park just to the west of downtown Portland, Oregon. ...

Tom McCall Waterfront Park seen from the north.

Tom McCall Waterfront Park runs along the west bank of the Willamette for the length of downtown. The 37 acre (150,000 m²) park was built in 1974 after Harbor Drive was removed and now plays host to large events throughout the year. Portland's downtown also features two groups of contiguous city blocks dedicated for park space; they are referred to as the North and South Park Blocks. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x800, 678 KB) Tom McCall Waterfront Park seen from the north. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x800, 678 KB) Tom McCall Waterfront Park seen from the north. ... Tom McCall Waterfront Park seen from the north Governor Tom McCall Waterfront Park is a park located on the west bank of the Willamette River in downtown Portland, Oregon. ... Tom McCall Waterfront Park seen from the north Governor Tom McCall Waterfront Park is a park located on the west bank of the Willamette River in downtown Portland, Oregon. ... This article refers to the street named Harbor Drive in Portland, Oregon Harbor Drive is the name of a street in Portland, Oregon which was formerly a freeway, albeit crude, carrying U.S. Highway 99W along the western shore of the Willamette River in the downtown area. ...


The only state park in Portland is Tryon Creek State Natural Area; its creek still has a run of steelhead. Adjacent to the park is the Tryon Life Community Farm, an aspiring urban ecovillage and educational center. The Tryon Creek State Natural Area is the only Oregon state park within a major metropolitan area. ... It has been suggested that Steelhead be merged into this article or section. ... Ecovillages are intended to be socially, economically and ecologically sustainable intentional communities. ...


The Beverly Cleary Sculpture Garden, which immortalizes three of the award-winning author's best known characters with bronze sculptures, quote plaques, and a fountain, is located in Grant Park, just a few blocks from the real Klickitat Street of "Henry Huggins" fame. Beverly Cleary (born April 12, 1916) is an American author from the state of Oregon. ... Grant Park is a neighborhood and park in the Northeast section of Portland, Oregon. ... Klickitat Street is an actual street located in Northeast Portland, Oregon. ... Henry Huggins is a character appearing in a series of juvenile fiction novels by Beverly Cleary. ...


Leach Botanical Garden is a 15.6 acre botanical garden in the Southeast section of the city, emphasizing plants of the Pacific Northwest. Leach Botanical Garden (15 acres) is a botanical garden located at 6704 SE 122 Avenue, Portland, Oregon. ... Inside the United States Botanic Garden Washington, D.C. Botanical gardens grow a wide variety of plants primarily categorized and documented for scientific purposes. ...

A panoramic view of the International Rose Test Garden

Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden is a 9.49 acre garden in the Southeast section of the city, adjoining Reed College, featuring more than 2,500 rhododendron, azalea, and companion plants. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 485 pixelsFull resolution (4000 × 2426 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 485 pixelsFull resolution (4000 × 2426 pixel, file size: 3. ... The International Rose Test Garden is a rose garden in Washington Park just to the west of downtown Portland, Oregon. ... Crystal Spring Rhododendron Gardens (7 acres) are botanical gardens located on SE 28 Avenue between Eastmoreland Golf Course and Reed College, in Portland, Oregon, USA. The garden is open daily; an admission fee is charged during the peak season (March through Labor Day). ... Reed College is a private, independent liberal arts college located in Portland, Oregon. ... Subgenera Azaleastrum Candidastrum Hymenanthes Mumeazalea Pentanthera (Azaleas) Rhododendron Therorhodion Tsutsusi (Azaleas) Vireya Source: RBG, Edinburgh Rhododendron (from the Greek: rhodos, rose, and dendron, tree) is a genus of flowering plants in the family Ericaceae. ... Species see text Source: The Rhododendron page, and some research. ...


Hoyt Arboretum is a much-beloved Portland open space, covering 185 acres (0.7 km²) of ridge-top about two miles (3 km) west of downtown. It is home to a collection of trees representing more than 1,100 species gathered from around the world. The Hoyt Arboretum is located atop a ridge in the west hills of Portland Oregon. ...


Audubon Society of Portland, founded 1903, is one of the largest local Audubon chapters in the country with over 10,000 members. The Chapter's book store, wildlife care center, and administrative offices are located on a 143-acre (0.6 km²) sanctuary nestled against Forest Park only 5 minutes from downtown Portland. The sanctuary trails are open to the public. The National Audubon Society is an American non-profit environmental organization dedicated to nature conservancy. ...


Arts and culture

Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, home of the Oregon Symphony, among others.

Portland is home to a diverse array of artists and arts organizations, and was named in 2006 by American Style magazine as the 10th best Big City Arts Destination in the U.S. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (480x640, 81 KB) Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall and the Heathman Hotel in Portland, Oregon I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (480x640, 81 KB) Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall and the Heathman Hotel in Portland, Oregon I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall and Heathman Hotel The Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall is a historic theater building and performing arts center in Portland, Oregon. ...


Major performing arts institutions include the Oregon Ballet Theatre, Oregon Symphony, Portland Center Stage, and the Portland Opera. Over 75 other arts organizations produce theatre, music, dance, folk art, media arts in Portland, helping Portland achieve its reputation as an arts destination for cultural tourists. Oregon Ballet Theatre is the premiere ballet company for the state of Oregon. ... The Oregon Symphony is an American orchestra based in Portland, Oregon. ...


Some of the town's many theater companies include the following: Portland Center Stage, Artist Repertory Theater, Theatre Vertigo, Northwest Children's Theater, Stumptown Stages, Oregon Children's Theater, Miracle Theatre, Northwest Classical Theatre Company, Third Rail Repertory Theatre, defunkt theatre, Imago Theater, Blue Monkey Theater Company, Tears of Joy Theatre, and Profile Theatre.


The Portland Art Museum owns the city's largest art collection and presents a variety of touring exhibitions each year and with the recent addition of the Modern and Contemporary Art wing it became one of the United States' 25 largest museums. Art galleries abound downtown and in the Pearl District, as well as in the Alberta Arts District and other neighborhoods throughout the city. Other organizations displaying visual arts include the Portland Art Center, Disjecta, and Portland Institute for Contemporary Art (PICA). The Portland Art Museum (PAM) in Portland, Oregon was founded in 1892, making it the oldest art museum in the Pacific Northwest. ...


The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is located on the east bank of the Willamette River across from downtown Portland, and contains a variety of hands-on exhibits covering the physical sciences, life science, earth science, technology, astronomy, and early childhood education. OMSI also has an OMNIMAX Theater and is home to the USS Blueback (SS-581) submarine (which was featured in the film The Hunt for Red October). The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry museum complex and its submarine, the U.S.S. Blueback The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI, pronounced AWM-zee) is a museum located on the East bank of the Willamette River in the Hosford-Abernethy neighborhood of inner southeast Portland, Oregon. ... USS Blueback (SS-581) was a Barbel-class submarine in the United States Navy. ... This article contains a trivia section. ...

The copper statue Portlandia above the entry to the Portland Building on SW 5th Avenue.

Portland is also home to Portland Classical Chinese Garden, an authentic representation of a Suzhou-style walled garden. Local construction workers provided the site preparation and foundation, and dozens of workers from Suzhou, using material from China, constructed its walls and other structures, including a tea house. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 883 KB)taken with Canon S45 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 883 KB)taken with Canon S45 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Portlandia is a sculpture by Raymond Kaskey located above the entrance of Michael Graves Portland Building in downtown Portland, Oregon. ... The Portland Building is a fifteen-story office building in downtown Portland, Oregon designed by Michael Graves and opened in 1980. ... Portland Classical Chinese Garden is a Suzhou-style walled garden enclosing a full city block in the Chinatown neighborhood of Portland, Oregon. ... This article is about the city in Jiangsu. ... Yugao-tei, Kanazawa Ihōan at Kōdai-ji in Kyoto Tchai-Ovna, Glasgow Tea houses are houses or parlors centered on drinking tea. ...


Portlandia, a statue on the west side of the Portland Building, is the second-largest hammered-copper statue in the U.S. (after the Statue of Liberty). Portland's public art is managed by the Regional Arts & Culture Council. Portlandia is a sculpture by Raymond Kaskey located above the entrance of Michael Graves Portland Building in downtown Portland, Oregon. ... The Portland Building is a fifteen-story office building in downtown Portland, Oregon designed by Michael Graves and opened in 1980. ... The Regional Arts & Culture Council (also known by the acronym RACC) is the agency that oversees arts activity throughout the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. ...


Powell's City of Books says it is the largest independent bookstore in the United States and the largest bookstore west of the Mississippi River. Powells NW 10th & Burnside entrance Powells Books is a chain of bookstores in the Portland metropolitan area with origins (and a sister store) in Chicago, Illinois. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ...


As a city with a strong tradition of bizarre festivals such as the Keep Portland Weird Festival,[27] Portland hosts the world's only HP Lovecraft Film Festival[28] at the Hollywood Theatre. H. P. Lovecraft Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890–March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy and horror fiction, noted for giving horror stories a science fiction framework. ... The Hollywood Theatre is a central historical point of the Hollywood District in NE Portland, Oregon, located across from Fred Meyers first shopping center. ...


Beer

Oregon ranks 4th in the nation in craft breweries per capita.[29]
A bottle of Widmer Brothers' Hefeweizen.

Portland is well-known for its microbrewery beer. It is often said that Portland is the home of the microbrew revolution in the United States, sometimes being called Beervana. Some illustrate Portlanders' interest in the beverage by an offer made in 1888, when local brewer Henry Weinhard volunteered to pump beer from his brewery into the newly dedicated Skidmore Fountain. However, the renown for quality beer dates to the 1980s, when state law was changed to allow consumption of beer on brewery premises. In short order, microbreweries and brewpubs began to pop up all over the city. Their growth was supported by the abundance of local ingredients, including two-row barley, over a dozen varieties of hops, and pure water from the Bull Run Watershed. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (625x1904, 1049 KB) A bottle of Widmer Brotherss Hefeweizen carrying the old band, as of October 2006, new band has been spotted in stores. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (625x1904, 1049 KB) A bottle of Widmer Brotherss Hefeweizen carrying the old band, as of October 2006, new band has been spotted in stores. ... Widmer Brothers Brewing Company was founded in 1984 in Portland, Oregon by brothers Kurt and Rob Widmer. ... A pint of American Hefeweizen Hefeweizen, is a variety of wheat beer in which the yeast is not filtered out. ... Beer barrels outside the Castle Rock microbrewery in Nottingham, England. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Beer barrels outside the Castle Rock microbrewery in Nottingham, England. ... Booze redirects here. ... Henry Weinhards is a brand of beer first brewed in 1856 in Portland, Oregon. ... Kettles in a modern Trappist brewery A brewery can be a building or place that produces beer, or a business (brewing company) whose trade is the production and sale of beer. ... Beer barrels outside the Castle Rock microbrewery in Nottingham, England. ... A brewpub is a microbrewery, often combined with a restaurant, that sells the majority of its beer on premises. ... For other uses, see Barley (disambiguation). ... Species Humulus lupulus L. Humulus japonicus Siebold & Zucc. ... The watershed contains much old-growth forest, such as this Douglas Fir forest. ...


Today, with 28 breweries within the city, Portland is home to more breweries than any other city in the country.[30] The McMenamin brothers alone have over thirty brewpubs, distilleries, and wineries scattered throughout the metropolitan area, several in renovated theaters and other old buildings otherwise destined for demolition. Other notable Portland brewers include Widmer Brothers, BridgePort, and Hair of the Dog, as well as numerous smaller quality brewers. In 1999, author Michael "Beerhunter" Jackson called Portland a candidate for the beer capital of the world because the city boasted more breweries than Cologne, Germany. The Portland Oregon Visitors Association is promoting "Beervana" and "Brewtopia" as nicknames for the city.[31] In mid-January of 2006, Mayor Tom Potter officially gave the city a new nickname-- Beertown.[32] McMenamins Pubs and Breweries is a chain of over fifty brewpubs, microbreweries, music venues, historic hotels, theater pubs and more. ... A typical multiplex (AMC Promenade 16 in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, United States). ... Widmer Brothers Brewing Company was founded in 1984 in Portland, Oregon by brothers Kurt and Rob Widmer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hair of the Dog Brewing Company is an American microbrewery based in Portland, Oregon. ... For other persons named Michael Jackson, see Michael Jackson (disambiguation). ... Cologne (German: , IPA: ; local dialect: Kölle ) is Germanys fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Munich, and is the largest city both in the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and within the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Area, one of the major European metropolitan areas with more than...


Portland hosts a number of festivals throughout the year in celebration of beer, including the Oregon Brewers Festival. Held each July, it is the largest gathering of independent craft brewers in North America. Other major beer festivals throughout the calendar year are: the Spring Beer and Wine Festival in April, the Portland International Beerfest in July, and the Holiday Ale Festival in December.


An unusual feature of Portland entertainment is the large number of movie theaters that serve beer, often with second-run or revival films. Examples of these "brew and view" theaters include the Academy Theater, Bagdad Theater, Clinton Street Theater, Edgefield, Kennedy School, Laurelhurst Theater, Mission Theater, and St. John's Theater. The Bagdad Theater and Pub is a microbrewery located in the Hawthorne, Portland, Oregon district in Portland, Oregon. ...


Cuisine

Portland has a growing restaurant scene, and among three nominees, was recognized by the Food Network Awards as their "Delicious Destination of the Year: A rising city with a fast-growing food scene" for 2007.[33] The New York Times also spotlighted Portland for its burgeoning restaurant scene in the same year.[34] Travel + Leisure ranked Portland #9 among all national cities in 2007.[35] The city is also known for being the most vegetarian-friendly city in America.[36] The Food Network Awards 2007 The Food Network Awards are United States television production awards ceremony, focused on giving awards to chefs,cities, restaurants, and other notable food related institutions. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Travel + Leisure is an American magazine initially published in 1971 as a spin-off of Playboy, and is now a subsidiary of American Express. ... For animals adapted to eat primarily plants, sometimes referred to as vegetarian animals, see Herbivore. ...


Sports

The Rose Garden, home of the Portland Trail Blazers, the only top-level sports team in Oregon.

Portland has one major league sports team (the Trail Blazers) and a variety of minor league teams. Running is a major sport in the metropolitan area, which hosts the Portland Marathon and much of the Hood to Coast Relay (the world's largest such event). Skiing and snowboarding are also highly popular, with a number of nearby resorts on Mount Hood, including year-round Timberline. Although Portland, Oregon has but one major league sports team (the Trail Blazers of the NBA), it hosts a wide variety of sports and sporting events. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 449 pixelsFull resolution (3697 × 2073 pixel, file size: 5. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 449 pixelsFull resolution (3697 × 2073 pixel, file size: 5. ... This article is about movement. ... The Portland Marathon is one of the most established annual marathons in the USA. It was first held in 1971 and has been held every year since. ... The Nike Hood to Coast Relay is a unique long-distance relay race held in the U.S. state of Oregon, annually, traditionally on the Friday and Saturday of the last full weekend in August. ... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ... Snowboarder dropping a cornice. ... This article is about the tallest mountain in Oregon. ... Timberline Lodge in the summer. ...


It was formerly home to the Portland Rosebuds of the Pacific Coast Hockey Association, the first professional sports team in Oregon and the first professional hockey team in the U.S. The Portland Rosebuds were an ice hockey team based in Portland, Oregon which played in the Pacific Coast Hockey Association from 1914 to 1918. ... The Pacific Coast Hockey Association was a professional ice hockey league in western Canada, operating from 1911 to 1924 when it merged with the Western Canada Hockey League. ...


Portland has one of the most active bicycle racing scenes in the United States, with hundreds of events sanctioned each year by the Oregon Bicycle Racing Association. Weekly events at Alpenrose Velodrome and Portland International Raceway allow for racing nearly every night of the week during spring and summer, and fall cyclocross races such as the Cross Crusade can have over 1000 riders and boisterous spectators. For the Queen song, see Bicycle Race. ... // The mission of OBRA is to promote and develop the sport of bicycle racing in Oregon by providing the tools and resources necessary for competition. ... Alpenrose Dairy is a dairy company located in southwest Portland, Oregon since 1916. ... Portland International Raceway is located in Portlands Delta Park complex, just south of the Columbia River and less than a mile west of Interstate 5. ... Cyclo-cross is a form of bicycle racing. ... A cyclo-cross race series based in Portland, Oregon held over an eight week period during the months of October and November. ...

Club Sport League Championships Home Venue Founded
Portland Trail Blazers Basketball National Basketball Association 1 (1976-77) Rose Garden 1970
Portland Timbers Soccer United Soccer Leagues First Division 0 PGE Park 2001
Portland Winter Hawks Ice Hockey Western Hockey League 2 (1982-83, 1997-98) Rose Garden, Memorial Coliseum 1976
Portland Naughty Dogs Paintball National Professional Paintball League Multiple tournaments None 1996
Portland Beavers Baseball Pacific Coast League 0 PGE Park 2001
Rose City Rollers Roller Derby Women's Flat Track Derby Association 0 Portland Metropolitan Exposition Center 2004
Portland Chinooks Basketball International Basketball League 0 Multiple arenas 2005
Portland LumberJax Indoor lacrosse National Lacrosse League 0 Rose Garden 2006
Portland Wolfpack Mixed Martial Arts International Fight League 0 Rose Garden 2006
Multnomah County Buccaneers Football Northwest Football League 0 Jefferson High School (Portland, Oregon) 2000

The Portland Trail Blazers are a professional basketball team based in Portland, Oregon. ... This article is about the sport. ... NBA redirects here. ... The 1976-77 NBA Season was the 31st season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1970-71 NBA Season was the 25th season of the National Basketball Association. ... Portland Timbers FC. The Portland Timbers are Portland, Oregons entry in the USL First Division, the second tier of professional soccer in the United States. ... Soccer redirects here. ... The United Soccer Leagues First Division (often referred to as simply, USL-1) is a professional mens soccer league in North America. ... PGE Park (formerly Civic Stadium, a name still used by locals; originally Multnomah Stadium) is a stadium located in Portland, Oregon. ... City: Portland, Oregon League: Western Hockey League Conference: Western Division: U.S. Founded: 1976-77 Home Arena: Rose Garden Arena & Memorial Coliseum Colours: red, white and black Head Coach: Mike Williamson General Manager: Ken Hodge The Portland Winter Hawks are members of the Western Hockey League, the highest level of... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Western Hockey League is one of the three hockey Major Junior Tier I leagues which constitute the Canadian Hockey League. ... The 1982-83 WHL season was the 17th season for the Western Hockey League. ... The 1997-98 WHL season was the 32nd season for the Western Hockey League. ... For other uses, see Memorial Coliseum (disambiguation). ... A woodsball player firing at opponents from behind cover. ... The National Professional Paintball League (NPPL) is one of two American paintball national tournament series that travel throughout the United States each year. ... Class-Level Triple-A (1961-1972, 1978-1993, 2001-Present) Open (1952-1957) Class B (1918) Minor League affiliations Pacific Coast League Pacific Conference - North Division Pacific Coast International League (1918) Major League affiliations San Diego Padres Name Portland Beavers (1906-1917, 1919-1972, 1978-1993, 2001-Present) Portland Webfoots... This article is about the sport. ... The Pacific Coast League (PCL) is a minor league baseball league operating in the West and Midwest of the United States. ... PGE Park (formerly Civic Stadium, a name still used by locals; originally Multnomah Stadium) is a stadium located in Portland, Oregon. ... The Rose City Rollers are an all-female flat track roller derby league in Portland, Oregon, United States. ... For the skate brand of the same name, see Roller Derby (brand). ... WFTDA Logo Founded in April 2004 as the United Leagues Coalition (ULC) and renamed in early 2006, the Womens Flat Track Derby Association (WFTDA) is an association of womens flat track roller derby leagues in the United States. ... The Portland Metropolitan Exposition Center, usually referred to as the Expo Center, is a convention center located in Portland, Oregon. ... The Portland Chinooks are a franchise in the International Basketball League (2005-) based in Portland, Oregon and owned by local businessman Terry Emmert. ... This article is about the sport. ... The International Basketball League is a U.S.-based professional basketball league featuring teams from the West Coast, Rocky Mountains, Western Canada, and the Midwest. ... The Portland LumberJax (sometimes referred to as the Jax) are a professional lacrosse team in the National Lacrosse League (NLL) which started playing in the 2006 season. ... Victoria Shamrocks vs Peterborough Lakers, Mann Cup 2005. ... NLL redirects here. ... Portland Wolfpack The Portland Wolfpack are an International Fight League team based in Portland, Oregon. ... For the fighting styles that combine different arts, see hybrid martial arts. ... The International Fight League is an American mixed martial arts (MMA) promotion billed as the worlds first MMA league. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Commercial Street entrance to Jefferson High School, Portland, Oregon Jefferson High School is a public high school in central Portland, Oregon, USA, administered by Portland Public Schools. ...

Popular culture

See also: List of fiction set in Oregon

Portland is well known as a hub of American youth culture. The following are authors, filmmakers, musicians, and other performers, and their products, associated with Oregon. ...


From the late 1980s through today, Portland has been a major center for movements such as zine-making, including hosting such events as the Portland Zine Symposium[37] and home to major zine distributors such as Microcosm. The DIY craft community has also seen a population explosion in Portland since the 1990s and now hosts such events as Crafty Wonderland[38] and regular Church of Craft[39] meetings, and is home to such stores as Knittn' Kitten,[40] SCRAP,[41] and many independently-owned stores such as Bolt, Yarn Garden,[42] and the downtown Fiber District. Portland is also home to radical feminist and lesbian activist movements, and the city is also considered a haven for punk, hardcore, crust punk and anarchist movements and subgenres, including the self-reliant DIY culture movement that has been part of the aforementioned subcultures. A zine—an abbreviation of the word fanzine, and originating from the word magazine[1][2]—is most commonly a small circulation, non-commercial publication of original or appropriated texts and images. ... A zine—an abbreviation of the word fanzine, and originating from the word magazine[1][2]—is most commonly a small circulation, non-commercial publication of original or appropriated texts and images. ... For the definition of the word microcosm, see here. ... See also: DIY Network, a cable TV network. ... Look up bolt in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... The punk subculture is a subculture that is based around punk rock. ... Hardcore Punk is a subgenre of Punk Rock that originated in North America in the late 1970s. ... Crusty redirects here. ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ... Main articles: DIY ethic and Do it yourself DIY (or Do It Yourself) culture is a broad term used to refer to a wide range of grassroots political activism. ... In sociology, anthropology and cultural studies, a subculture is a set of people with a set of behaviors and beliefs, culture, which could be distinct or hidden, that differentiate them from the larger culture to which they belong. ...


It has been home to many artists of significant impact within their respective fields, including musicians and musical groups The Kingsmen, The Wipers, Poison Idea, Gary Jarman from The Cribs, Jacob Golden, The Dandy Warhols, Everclear, Elliott Smith, Pink Martini, Floater, Quarterflash, Quasi, Sleater-Kinney, Stephen Malkmus, Lifesavas, The Decemberists, The Shins, The Thermals, Menomena, Viva Voce, and M. Ward; animators Matt Groening, Will Vinton, and Bill Plympton; filmmakers Gus Van Sant and Todd Haynes; actors Sam Elliott and Lindsay Wagner and authors Beverly Cleary, Katherine Dunn, Ursula K. Le Guin, and Chuck Palahniuk. The Kingsmen were a rock band from Portland, Oregon who rose suddenly to fame with their recording of Richard Berrys Louie, Louie. ... The Wipers are a punk rock group formed in Portland, Oregon in 1977 by guitarist Greg Sage, drummer Sam Henry and bassist Doug Koupal. ... Poison Idea (sometimes referred to simply as “PI”) were a hardcore punk band from Portland, Oregon. ... Gary Jarman (born 20th October 1980) is bassist and singer in the Wakefields music group The Cribs. ... The Cribs are an English 3-piece indie band from Wakefield, West Yorkshire, consisting of twins Gary and Ryan Jarman and their younger brother Ross Jarman. ... Jacob Golden (*Mid 70s, Sacramento, CA) is an American songwriter/singer/guitarist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Everclear is a rock band formed in Portland, Oregon, USA, in 1992. ... For the self-titled album, see Elliott Smith (album). ... Pink Martini is a band from Portland, Oregon, consisting of 12 band members. ... Floater is a hard rock/heavy metal band currently based in Portland, Oregon. ... For the prefix, see wikt:quasi-. Quasi is an indie rock band formed in Portland, Oregon in 1993, consisting of the ex-husband and wife team of Sam Coomes (vocals, guitar, roxichord, various keyboards) and Janet Weiss vocals and drums. ... Sleater-Kinney are an indie rock trio from Olympia, Washington influenced by the riot grrrl movement of the 1990s. ... Stephen Malkmus (born May 30, 1966 , Santa Monica, California) is an indie rock musician and a former member of the band Pavement. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... The Decemberists are a five-piece indie pop band from Portland, Oregon, fronted by singer/songwriter Colin Meloy . ... The Shins is a United States indie rock group comprising singer, songwriter and guitarist James Russell Mercer, keyboardist/guitarist/bassist Martin Crandall, bassist/guitarist Dave Hernandez, drummer Jesse Sandoval, and Eric Johnson of the Fruit Bats. ... The Thermals, formed in 2002 (see also 2002 in music), are a punk rock band from Portland, Oregon on the label Sub Pop Records. ... Menomena IPA: are an experimental rock band from Portland, Oregon, made up of Brent Knopf on guitar, keyboards, glockenspiel; Justin Harris on bass, guitar, baritone sax and alto sax; and Danny Seim on percussion. ... Look up viva voce in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Matt Ward, known by his stage name M. Ward, is a singer-songwriter and guitarist who, until Summer 2006 was part of the music scene of Portland, Oregon. ... Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bill Plympton Bill Plympton (born April 30, 1946) is an American animator best known for his 1987 Academy Award-nominated animated short Your Face. ... Gus Green Van Sant, Jr. ... Maverick, onetime New Queer Cinema director Todd Haynes was born on January 2, 1961, in Encino, California, and has had a controversial career. ... Samuel Pack Elliott (born August 9, 1944) is an American film and television actor. ... This article is about the actress. ... Beverly Cleary (born April 12, 1916) is an American author from the state of Oregon. ... Katherine Dunn is a novelist, journalist, book reviewer, and poet from Portland, Oregon. ... Ursula Kroeber Le Guin [ˌɜɹsələ ˌkɹobɜɹ ləˈgWɪn] (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... Charles Michael Chuck Palahniuk (pronounced )[1] (born February 21, 1962) is an American transgressional fiction novelist and freelance journalist of Ukrainian ancestry born in Pasco, Washington. ...


Notable residents

Main article: List of Portlanders

The following is a partial list of Portlanders, people from or with connections to Portland, Oregon; a separate list of people from Oregon is available: Addy, Obo, worldbeat musician originally from Ghana Adkins, Brad, contemporary artist Alexakis, Art, member of Everclear Armstrong, Garner Ted, televangelist Auel, Jean M. Author of...

Education

Public elementary and secondary education

Portland is served by six school districts, Parkrose, David Douglas, Centennial, Reynolds, Riverdale, and Portland Public. The largest, Portland Public School District consists of about 100 schools covering, in various combinations, grades kindergarten through 12, as well as 50 special education programs. The number of students in the school district is approximately 53,000 — an enrollment of over 90% of the available school-age children, a higher percentage than other large urban school districts.[43][44] Nonetheless, total school enrollment is declining, accompanying a change in Portland's demographics, and the Portland Public Schools are facing increasing budget pressure.[citation needed] The Parkrose resides in Portland, and is not part of the Portland school district for it was at one time a city. ... The David Douglas School District is a school district located in eastern Portland, Oregon. ... Centennial School District is a school district in the U.S. state of Oregon. ... The Reynolds School District is a school district in the U.S. state of Oregon and serves the cities of Portland, Gresham, Fairview, Wood Village and Troutdale. ... Riverdale High School is the high school for the small but well-funded Riverdale School District in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Special education programs in the United States were made mandatory in 1973 when Congress passed the Education of the Handicapped Act (EHA) in response to discriminatory treatment by public educational agencies against students with disabilities. ...


Portland Public Schools high schools include Benson Polytechnic High School, Cleveland High School, Franklin High School, Grant High School, Jefferson High School, Lincoln High School, Madison High School, Marshall High School, Metropolitan Learning Center, and Woodrow Wilson High School. Lincoln, one of the oldest public high schools west of the Mississippi River, was established in 1869 and boasts several famous alumni, including cartoon voice actor Mel Blanc, singer-songwriter Elliott Smith, Matt Groening (creator of The Simpsons), Golfer Peter Jacobsen, and astronaut S. David Griggs. Both Lincoln and Cleveland draw many students because of the International Baccalaureate program. Phil Knight, the founder of Nike, graduated from Cleveland. Sally Struthers, Beverly Cleary, and Thomas M. Lauderdale of Pink Martini graduated from Grant. Benson is a citywide magnet high school named for lumber baron and social entrepreneur Simon Benson, who in 1917 endowed the school with a grant worth $1.5 million in 2006 dollars. For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Benson Polytechnic High School is a coeducational, public technical school in the Portland Public Schools District. ... Cleveland High School is a high school in Portland, Oregon. ... Benjamin Franklin High School is a public high school located in Portland, Oregon, United States. ... Grant High School with respect to its surrounding area. ... The Commercial Street entrance to Jefferson High School, Portland, Oregon Jefferson High School is a public high school in central Portland, Oregon, USA, administered by Portland Public Schools. ... Lincoln High School (generally known simply as Lincoln) is a secondary school located in Portland, Oregon. ... James Madison High School is a high school located on NE 82nd ave in Portland, Oregon, United States. ... Wilson High School Wilson High School is a secondary school located in SW Portland, Oregon. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Melvin Jerome Blanc (May 30, 1908 – July 10, 1989) was a prolific American voice actor. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... For the self-titled album, see Elliott Smith (album). ... Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... This list of golf players, known as golfers includes the most notable players of the sport, who are almost exclusively professionals in the sport. ... Peter Jacobsen (born March 4, 1954 in Portland, Oregon) is a professional golfer. ... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... NAME:S. David Griggs (Mr. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into International Baccalaureate Organization. ... This article is about the co-founder of Nike, Inc. ... Nike, Inc. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Beverly Cleary (born April 12, 1916) is an American author from the state of Oregon. ... Thomas M. Lauderdale was born in 1970 and adopted into a family that included two black siblings and an Iranian brother. ... Pink Martini is a band from Portland, Oregon, consisting of 12 band members. ... In the U.S. system of education, a magnet school is a public school which offers innovative courses, specialized training, etc. ... Simon Benson was a noted businessman and philanthropist from Portland, Oregon. ...


The Parkrose District, which is fully contained within the city, has a single high school, a middle school and four elementary schools.


Private primary and secondary education

The region also has a number of private schools, including: The Catlin Gabel School, Central Catholic High School, De La Salle North Portland Catholic High School, Franciscan Montessori Earth School & Saint Francis Academy, The French American International School, The International School, The Northwest Academy, Oregon Episcopal School, St. Mary's Academy, St. Mary of the Valley, Jesuit High School, Portland Waldorf School, Portland Jewish Academy, and Portland Adventist Academy. Portland is also home to Montessori Institute Northwest, an internationally recognized teacher training facility.[citation needed] The Catlin Gabel School is an independent pre-K to 12 private school located just outside Portland, OR in unincorporated Washington County, Oregon near Sunset Transit Center, adjacent to St. ... Central Catholic High School is co-educational, college-preparatory school for grades 9-12 located in inner southeast Portland, Oregon. ... The Franciscan Montessori Earth School & Saint Francis Academy (FMES/SFA) is located in Portland, Oregon, United States. ... The International School is an independent elementary school in Portland, Oregon, that provides language-immersion education in three tracks: Japanese, Spanish and Mandarin Chinese. ... Northwest Academy headquarters in Portland, Oregon The Northwest Academy is an arts and performing arts high school located in Northwest Portland, Oregon. ... Homepage The Oregon Episcopal School (also known as OES) is a private, coeducational college preparatory school in the suburbs of Portland, Oregon. ... St. ... Jesuit High School in Beaverton, Oregon, USA, is a Catholic high school founded by the Society of Jesus in 1956. ... Portland Adventist Academy (PAA) is a private high school located in Portland, Oregon, United States operated by Seventh-day Adventist Church. ...


Colleges and universities

Public colleges and universities

Waldschmidt Hall at the University of Portland.

Portland State University, with graduate and undergraduate enrollment of over 26,000, is Oregon's largest university. Its primary campus is at the southern edge of downtown. Image File history File links WaldschmidtHall. ... Image File history File links WaldschmidtHall. ... Portland State University Portland State University is a public state urban university located in downtown Portland, Oregon. ...


Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) began as the University of Oregon Medical School in 1913. In addition to its medical, nursing, and dental divisions (see below), it merged with the Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology in 2001, taking on its current name and composition. Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) is the present-day (2005) name for a university that can trace its roots back to the 1860s. ...


Portland Community College has two major campuses in the city—Cascade and Sylvania—as well as the smaller Southeast Center and Metropolitan Workforce Training Center. The third large campus—Rock Creek—is located outside of the city in unincorporated Washington County. Portland Community College (or PCC) is Oregons largest community college, located in Portland. ...


Private colleges and universities

Cascade College, Concordia University, Lewis & Clark College (including Lewis & Clark Law School), Linfield College (School of Nursing), Multnomah Bible College and Biblical Seminary, University of Portland, Reed College, Warner Pacific College, Portland Bible College, Walla Walla University (School of Nursing) and Western Seminary are all located in the city. Cascade College Cascade College is a private, four-year, liberal arts college located in Portland, Oregon affiliated with the Church of Christ. ... Concordia University is a Christian university affiliated with the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod and the Concordia University System located in northeast Portland, Oregon. ... Lewis & Clark College is a private, independent, liberal arts college in Portland, Oregon, United States. ... Lewis and Clark Law School (L&C), or Northwestern School of Law of Lewis & Clark College by its full name, is a private American law school located in Portland, Oregon. ... Linfield College is a private, four-year liberal arts college located in McMinnville, Oregon, United States, with a campus in Portland, Oregon, and an adult degree program located in eight communities throughout the state. ... Not to be confused with Multnomah College. ... The University of Portland (UP) is a private Catholic university located in Portland, Oregon. ... Reed College is a private, independent liberal arts college located in Portland, Oregon. ... Warner Pacific College is an urban residential and commuter Christian liberal arts college located in Southeast Portland, Oregon. ... Walla Walla University, known as Walla Walla College prior to September 2007, is a college offering liberal arts, professional, and technical programs. ...


Medical schools

The majority of the OHSU campus is located on Marquam Hill southwest of Downtown Portland.

OHSU has a major medical, dental, and nursing school at its primary campus just south of downtown, in the West Hills. The campus anchors a medical district (affectionately called "Pill Hill") surrounded by other hospitals including a Veterans Affairs Hospital, Portland Shriners Hospital, and Doernbecher Children's Hospital. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 318 pixelsFull resolution (5200 × 2067 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 318 pixelsFull resolution (5200 × 2067 pixel, file size: 3. ... Oregon Health and Science University is the present-day (2003) name for a university that can trace its roots back to the 1860s. ... Veterans Health Administration is the component of the Department of Veterans Affairs that implements the medical assistance program of the VA through the administration and operation of numerous VA Outpatient clinics, hospitals, medical Centers and longterm healthcare facilities (i. ... // Shriners Hospitals for Children is a network of 22 pediatric non-profit hospitals across North America that provide all care at no charge. ... Doernbecher Childrens Hospital is a childrens hospital located in Portland, Oregon, and associated with Oregon Health & Science University. ...


Schools of alternative medicine include Oregon College of Oriental Medicine, the National College of Naturopathic Medicine, and Western States Chiropractic College. The Oregon College of Oriental Medicine (OCOM), located in Portland, Oregon, United States, offers masters and postgraduate clinical doctoral degrees in acupuncture and Oriental medicine. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub ... Western States Chiropractic College in Northeast Portland Oregon, was the first chiropractic college to receive a federally funded research grant through HRSA. 2004 marks the centennial of Western States Chiropractic College. ...


Art schools

These include the Art Institute of Portland, Pacific Northwest College of Art, Oregon College of Art and Craft, and Northwest Film Center. The Art Institute of Portland is a college in Portland, Oregon, United States that grants bachelor and associate degrees in a number of disciplines including: Advertising, Apparel Design. ... The Pacific Northwest College of Art is a college in Portland, Oregon, United States that grants Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in painting, communication design, illustration, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and intermedia, a mentor-based MFA in Visual Studies, and also provides continuing education in the arts to the local community. ... Oregon College of Art and Craft is a college in Portland, Oregon, United States that grants Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees and certificates in book arts, ceramics, drawing and painting, fibers, metals, photography and wood. ... The Northwest Film Center (NWFC) is a component of the Portland Art Museum. ...


Other private schools

Concorde Career Institute and Western Culinary Institute. The Western Culinary Institute is a cooking institute and member of Le Cordon Bleu Culinary Arts School located in downtown Portland, Oregon. ...


Economy

The Portland Metro Area has experienced growth outpacing the national average over the last 10 years, with current estimates showing an 80% chance of population growth in excess of 60% over the next 50 years.[45] This explosion of workers and the efforts of the Portland Development Commission to improve access to business and housing have prompted the economy of Portland to generally be of good health over the last decade, with a hopeful outlook for the foreseeable future.


Portland's economy is situated as an important location for several industries, owing to its relatively low cost of energy, easy access to many resources, and the access to large North-South and East-West Interstates, international air terminals, large marine shipping facilities and both west coast intercontinental railroads.[46]


Real Estate, Housing and Construction

The Portland House-Price Index has remained stronger than the national average.

‎Due to a state law enacted during 1973, each metropolitan area in Oregon is required to maintain an "urban growth boundary" (UGB), beyond which large scale development and access to utilities such as sewage, water and telecommunications, as well as coverage by fire, police and schools are limitted.[47] Originally this law mandated that the city must maintain enough land within the boundary to provide an estimated 20 years of growth, however in 2007 the legislature altered the law to require the maintenance of an estimated 50 years of growth within the boundary, as well as the protection of accompanying farm/rural lands.[45] UGB redirects here. ...


This UGB, along with efforts the PDC to create economic development zones, has led to the development of a large portion of downtown, a large number of mid- and high-rise developments, an overall increase in housing and business density, and an increase in average house prices.[48][49]


High-Tech Manufacturing

Computer components manufacturer Intel is the Portland area's largest employer, providing jobs for more than 14,000 residents, with several campuses on the west end of the city in the more sparse community of Hillsboro.[46] The metro area is home to more than 1,200 technology companies.[46] This high density of technology companies has led to the nickname Silicon Forest being used to describe Portland, a reference to the abundance of trees in the region. Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... The Silicon Forest is a nickname for the Portland metropolitan area in Oregon and Southwest Washington. ...


Textiles and Apparel

Portland is home to the regional headquarters for German apparel corporation Adidas, and also serves as the headquarters for the Columbia Sportswear corporation, and Nike, Inc., the only Fortune 500 company which is located primarily in the Portland Metro Area. Philip Knight, co-founder and chairman of Nike, is an Oregon native and University of Oregon alumni. This article is about the company. ... Columbia Sportswear Company NASDAQ: COLM is a United States company that manufactures and distributes outerwear and sportswear. ... Nike, Inc. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Philip Knight (born February 24, 1938) is the founder and former CEO of Nike, Inc. ... The University of Oregon is a public university located in Eugene, Oregon. ...


Steel and Aluminum

The steel industry has a long history in Portland, dating back prior to World War II. By the 1950s, the steel industry had become the city's number one industry by employment.[50] Today the steel industry continues to thrive in the region, with one of the more prominent steel companies, Schnitzer Steel Industries, shipping a record 1.15 billion tons of scrap metal to Asia during 2003.[50] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Schnitzer Steel Industries, Inc. ...


The aluminum industry began to expand in the Portland area during the later half of the 20th century. This was primarily due to the relatively low cost of electricity in the region, courtesy of the many dams on local rivers. The industry has been one of the more intrusive industries pollitically however, due to the effect on residential and business energy costs to the rest of the city, and the pollution associated with aluminum production.[51]


Shipping

Portland is the largest shipper of wheat in the United States, and is the third largest port for wheat in the world.[52] The marine terminals alone handle over 13 million tons of cargo per year, and is home to one of the largest commercially run dry docks in the country.[53][54] The Port of Portland is the third largest port on the west coast, despite the fact that it remains about 80 miles upriver.[54][46]


Transportation

MAX Light Rail is the centerpiece of the city's public transportation system.

The Portland metropolitan area has the typical transportation services common to major U.S. cities, though Oregon's emphasis on proactive land-use planning and transit-oriented development within the urban growth boundary means that commuters have multiple well-developed options. Image File history File links TriMet MAX train on the MAX Yellow Line to downtown Portland. ... Image File history File links TriMet MAX train on the MAX Yellow Line to downtown Portland. ... Metropolitan Area Express (MAX) is a light rail system in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 528 pixelsFull resolution (2642 × 1743 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 528 pixelsFull resolution (2642 × 1743 pixel, file size: 2. ... A streetcar at the PSU stop. ... Portland State University Portland State University is a public state urban university located in downtown Portland, Oregon. ... Like transportation in the rest of the United States, the primary mode of local transportation in Portland (Oregon) is the automobile. ... Land use forecasting undertakes to project the distribution and intensity of trip generating activities in the urban area. ... Aerial view of growth patterns in Arlington County, Virginia. ... UGB redirects here. ... Commuters on the New York City Subway during rush hour Rush hour at Shinjuku Station, Yamanote Line Traffic jam Commuting is the process of travelling between a place of residence and a place of work. ...


TriMet operates most of the region's buses and the MAX (short for Metropolitan Area Express) light rail system, which connects the city and suburbs. 5th and 6th avenues used to be the Portland Transit Mall, devoted primarily to bus traffic with limited automobile access, running north/south through downtown. During construction of the new Portland Transit Mall, which will include light rail, buses have been moved to 3rd and 4th avenues, and 5th and 6th avenues have been closed for construction between Northwest Hoyt Street and about Southwest Clay. Current TriMet logo TriMet, more formally known as the Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon, is a public agency that operates mass transit in a region that spans most of the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area. ... Metropolitan Area Express (MAX) is a light rail system in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... Future view of the transit mall depicting planned improvements and changes. ...


I-5 connects Portland with the Willamette Valley, Southern Oregon, and California to the south and with Washington to the north. I-405 forms a loop with I-5 around the central downtown area of the city and I-205 is a loop freeway route on the east side which connects to the Portland International Airport. US 26 supports commuting within the metro area and continues to the Pacific Ocean westward and Mount Hood and Central Oregon eastward. US 30 has a main, bypass and business route through the city extending to Astoria, Oregon to the west; through Gresham, Oregon, and the eastern exurbs, and connects to I-84, traveling towards Boise, Idaho. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 5 Interstate 5 (abbreviated I-5) is the westernmost interstate highway in the contiguous United States. ... The Willamette Valley The Willamette Valley The Willamette Valley is the region in northwest Oregon in the United States that surrounds the Willamette River as it proceeds northward from its emergence from mountains near Eugene to its confluence with the Columbia River. ... The region of Oregon south of Lane County and west of or in the Cascade Range, excluding the southern Oregon Coast. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Interstate 405 (abbreviated I-405) in Oregon is a short loop route, also known as the Stadium Freeway, which is Highway 61. ... This Interstate Highway article needs to be cleaned up to conform to both a higher standard of article quality and accepted design standards outlined in the WikiProject U.S. Interstate Highways. ... KPDX Airport Diagram Aerial view of KPDX from the southwest For the airport of Portland, Maine, see Portland International Jetport For the drug PDX, see 10-propargyl-10-deazaaminopterin PDX is also a nickname for the city of Portland, Oregon Portland International Airport (IATA: PDX, ICAO: KPDX) is the largest... U.S. Route 26 is an east-west United States highway. ... This article is about the tallest mountain in Oregon. ... Central Oregon is a geographical term that is generally taken to apply to the portion of the state of Oregon that is east of the Cascade Range, near the geographic center of Oregon. ... U.S. Route 30 is an east-west main route of the system of United States Numbered Highways, with the highway traveling across the northern tier of the country. ... , Location in Oregon Coordinates: , Country State County Clatsop Incorporated 1876 Government  - Mayor Willis L. Van Dusen Area  - Total 10. ... Gresham (IPA: ) is a city located in Multnomah County, Oregon about 18km east of Portland. ... Commuters waiting for the morning train in Maplewood, New Jersey to travel to New York City A commuter town is an urban community that is primarily residential, from which most of the workforce commute out of the community to earn their livelihood. ... Interstate 84 travels east-west across the north part of the U.S. state of Oregon, following the Columbia River and the rough path of the old Oregon Trail from Portland east to Idaho. ... Boise redirects here. ...

Portland Aerial Tram car descends towards the growing South Waterfront district.

Portland's main airport is Portland International Airport (IATA: PDX, ICAO: KPDX), located about 20 minutes by car (40 minutes by MAX) northeast of downtown. Scheduled international flights depart to Japan (Tokyo), Germany (Frankfurt), Mexico (Guadalajara, Mexico City, Cabo San Lucas, and Puerto Vallarta), and Canada (Vancouver, British Columbia), and The Netherlands (Amsterdam). In addition Portland is home to Oregon's only public use heliport, the Portland Downtown Heliport (ICAO: 61J). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 594 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1486 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 594 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1486 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Portland Aerial Tram is an aerial tramway under construction in Portland, Oregon. ... The South Waterfront (or SoWa) is a new high-rise neighborhood under construction in Portland, Oregon on former brownfield industrial land south of downtown. ... KPDX Airport Diagram Aerial view of KPDX from the southwest For the airport of Portland, Maine, see Portland International Jetport For the drug PDX, see 10-propargyl-10-deazaaminopterin PDX is also a nickname for the city of Portland, Oregon Portland International Airport (IATA: PDX, ICAO: KPDX) is the largest... An IATA airport code, also known an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier [1], is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). ... The ICAO (IPA pronunciation: ) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ... Coordinates: , Country State Foundation 1542 Government  - Mayor Alfonso Petersen Farah ( PAN) Area  - City 187. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... Cabo is well known for its pristine beaches. ... Puerto Vallarta is a Mexican resort city situated on the Pacific Oceans Bahía de Banderas. ... This article refers to the city in British Columbia, Canada. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... For other uses, see Amsterdam (disambiguation). ... List of airports in Oregon (U.S. state), grouped by type and sorted by location. ... Portland Downtown Heliport (FAA LID: 61J), is a public heliport located in the Old Town Chinatown neighborhood in the Northwest section of the city of Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon, USA. It occupies the roof of a 1989 parking garage located at the intersection of NW Naito Parkway and NW Davis... The ICAO (IPA pronunciation: ) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. ...

Union Station with its iconic "Go By Train" sign.
Riding bikes in Portland.

Amtrak, the national passenger rail system, provides service to Portland at Union Station on three routes. Long-haul train routes include the Coast Starlight (with service from Los Angeles to Seattle) and the Empire Builder (with service from Portland to Chicago.) The Amtrak Cascades commuter trains operate between Vancouver, British Columbia and Eugene, Oregon, and serve Portland several times daily in both directions. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1099x595, 92 KB)Union Station in Portland, Oregon. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1099x595, 92 KB)Union Station in Portland, Oregon. ... Other information Code PDX Owned by Portland Development Commission Traffic Passengers (2006) 482,695 0. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Vermonter at the Brattleboro, Vermont, station, 18 March 2004. ... Other information Code PDX Owned by Portland Development Commission Traffic Passengers (2006) 482,695 0. ... The Coast Starlight at San Luis Obispo, California. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... Empire Builder is a train route operated by Amtrak in the Midwestern and Northwestern United States. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Amtrak Cascades consist in Portland, Oregon. ... This article refers to the city in British Columbia, Canada. ... Nickname: Motto: The Worlds Greatest City of the Arts & Outdoors Coordinates: , Country State County Lane Founded 1846 Incorporated 1862 Government  - Mayor Kitty Piercy Area  - City 40. ...


Portlanders have other transportation alternatives. The Portland Streetcar operates from the southern waterfront, through Portland State University north to nearby homes and shopping districts. The city is particularly supportive of urban bicycling and has been recognized by the League of American Bicyclists among others for its network of paths and other bicycle-friendly services. Car sharing through Flexcar is also available to residents of the city and some inner suburbs. The new Portland Aerial Tram connects the South Waterfront district on the Willamette River and the Oregon Health & Science University campus on Marquam Hill above. Construction of the tram was completed in December 2006. A streetcar at the PSU stop. ... Urban bicycling is the branch of cycling that generally takes place in urban areas. ... The League of American Bicyclists (LAB) is a non-profit membership organization which promotes cycling for fun, fitness and transportation through advocacy and education. ... Car sharing is a system where a fleet of cars (or other vehicles) is owned by a company or cooperative, which are available for use by members of the car share. ... Flexcar is a for-profit car sharing company, the oldest and second-largest (behind Boston-based Zipcar) in the United States. ... The Portland Aerial Tram is an aerial tramway under construction in Portland, Oregon. ... The South Waterfront (or SoWa) is a new high-rise neighborhood under construction in Portland, Oregon on former brownfield industrial land south of downtown. ... The Willamette River (pronounced wil-LAM-met) is a tributary of the Columbia River, approximately 240 mi (386 km) long, in northwestern Oregon in the United States. ... Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) is a public university in Oregon with a main campus, including three hospitals, in Portland and a smaller campus in Hillsboro. ...


Bicycling is a popular transportation and commuting option in Portland. The Bicycle Transportation Alliance sponsors an annual Bicycle Commute Challenge, in which thousands of commuters compete for prizes and recognition based on the length and frequency of their commutes.[55]


The Yellow Bike Project was a 1994 civic engagement project and the brainchild of Portland, Oregon activist Tom O'Keefe. After watching the documentary "Sex Drugs & Democracy", O'Keefe proposed painting donated bikes - repaired by at-risk youth served by the Portland-based Community Cycling Center - bright yellow, and deploying them for free use around Portland. O'Keefe enrolled fellow environmental activists Joe Keating and Steve Gunther along with two Community Cycling Center employees into promoting and supporting the project. "Gratis Pedalis Feralvus" was a tongue-in-cheek slogan for the quirky eco-transportation project. Project launch: On an overcast weekday morning in East Portland, in front of a local radio station, a press conference was arranged by United Community Action Network (UCAN) Directors O'Keefe & Keating. They presented about a dozen bright yellow bicycles for free distribution. Local media showed up and that night's evening news featured what looked like scores of bright yellow bikes ridden by a variety of Portland characters. A local Earl Scheib franchise painted the bikes at no charge. The bikes' tires, spokes, pedals, chains, and even the handlebars were all painted mustard yellow. The project was one of the first community bicycle programs in the United States. The Yellow Bike Project sparked tremendous interest around the country with a report in the New York Times, editorial condemnation from the Wall Street Journal (as a failed affront to private property rights) and culminating in a nationally broadcast Yellow Bike story on the CBS News Magazine 48 Hours. The Yellow Bike Project provided nearly 400 free bicycles for unrestricted use in downtown Portland in its first six months. Though The Yellow Bike Project inevitably suffered from theft and vandalism of the bikes, in a broader sense the Yellow Bike Project was an amazingly successful publicity generator for Portland, Community Bicycling Programs and The Community Cycling Center. The Community Cycling Center, which helped to operate the Yellow Bike Project, has since developed its Create-a-Commuter program, which provides 375 free bicycles per year to individuals.[10][11] Some of Portland's bicycling advocates have participated in Critical Mass and Zoobomb activities.


Nicknames

The most common nickname for Portland is "The Rose City".[12] Other nicknames for Portland include "Stumptown" (because of early logging to clear land for development[56]), and "Bridgetown" (because of its numerous bridges[57]). City officials are promoting Portland's thriving microbrewery industry with the nicknames "Beervana" and "Brewtopia".[31][58] Many Portlanders and Oregonians also refer to Portland synecdochically by the Airport code of Portland International Airport, "PDX". Stumptown is a nickname for Portland, Oregon, coined in a period of phenomenal growth in the city after 1847. ... Synecdoche is a figure of speech in which: a term denoting a part of something is used to refer to the whole thing, or a term denoting a thing (a whole) is used to refer to part of it, or a term denoting a specific class of thing (a species... An IATA airport code, also known an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier [1], is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). ... KPDX Airport Diagram Aerial view of KPDX from the southwest For the airport of Portland, Maine, see Portland International Jetport For the drug PDX, see 10-propargyl-10-deazaaminopterin PDX is also a nickname for the city of Portland, Oregon Portland International Airport (IATA: PDX, ICAO: KPDX) is the largest...


"Rip City" is a nickname coined by Blazer's broadcaster Bill Schonely when referring to the basketball team and its surrounding culture. Regarding Portland culture, "Mayberry on Mushrooms", was offered by Environmentalist, Steve Gunther in 2005, while ""Des Moines Register" journalist Donald Kaul, as quoted by Jonathan Nicholas in "The Oregonian," November 15, 1999, reported that “Portland is San Francisco run by Canadians.” Bill Schonely was the National Basketball Associations Portland Trail Blazers first play-by-play announcer, starting with the team in 1970. ...


Staffers of former US President George H. W. Bush used to refer to Portland as "Little Beirut" because of the protesters he encountered during his visits.[59] George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ...


See also

The 1972 Portland-Vancouver Tornado was a destructive tornado that struck on April 5, 1972. ... The Architecture of Portland includes a wide range of styles and a few notable pioneering buildings. ... Portland, Oregons skyline is centered mainly in the southwest district of the city. ... The following is a partial list of institutions and individuals active in the art scene of Portland, Oregon. ... The following is a partial list of hospitals in Portland, Oregon: // Legacy Health System Legacy Emanuel Hospital Legacy Good Samaritan Hospital Providence Health System Providence Medical Center Providence St Vincent Medical Childrens Hospitals Shriners Hospital for Children Doernbecher Childrens Hospital Public/Government/Educational Oregon State Hospital Portland Oregon Health... The Portland metropolitan area is the urban area centered around Portland, Oregon and the Willamette River. ...

Sister cities

Portland has eleven sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Sister Cities International is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting and fostering town twinning, especially between cities in the United States and cities in other countries. ...


Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Hebrew אַשְׁקְלוֹן (Standard) AÅ¡qÉ™lon Arabic عسقلان Founded in 1951 Government City Also Spelled Ashqelon (officially) District South Population 105,100 (2004) Jurisdiction 55,000 dunams (55 km²) Mayor Roni Mahatzri Ashkelon (Hebrew: ‎; Tiberian Hebrew ʾAÅ¡qÉ™lôn; Arabic: ‎  ; Latin: Ascalon) is a city in the western Negev, in the... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... For the food product, see Bologna sausage. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nicaragua. ... Corinto [kOrEn´tO] is a town of 17,000 (1995 population) on the northwest Pacific coast of Nicaragua and is one of the most important cities and port in the department of Chinandega. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... Coordinates: , Country State Foundation 1542 Government  - Mayor Alfonso Petersen Farah ( PAN) Area  - City 187. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Region City seat Lingya District (苓雅區) Government  - Mayor Chen Chu (陳菊) Area  - Total 154 km² (59. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Government Country District Krai Russia Far Eastern Federal District Khabarovsk Krai Established 1858 Mayor Alexandr Sokolov Geographical characteristics Area  - City 372 km² Population  - City (2005) 579,000 Coordinates Other Information Postal Code 680xxx Dialing Code +7 4212 Website: www. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Zimbabwe. ... Nickname: Motto: Justice and Freedom Coordinates: , Country Province Founded 1897 Government  - Mayor Misheck Kagurabadza Population (2002)  - City 189,000   estimated Time zone CET (UTC+1)  - Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+1) Mutare (known as Umtali until 1982) is the fourth largest city in Zimbabwe, with a population of approximately 189,000. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Honduras. ... Nickname: Country Department Foundation June 1536 Government  - Alcalde (Mayor) Rodolfo Padilla Sunseri Area  - Urban 136 km² (52. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Sapporo redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... This article is about the city in Jiangsu. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Ulsan, a metropolitan city in the south-east of South Korea, facing the Sea of Japan (East Sea). ...


Portland also has a friendship city relationship with Tallinn, Estonia.[60] County Area 159. ...


References

  1. ^ Elected Officials. City of Portland, Oregon (2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-26.
  2. ^ American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ US Board on Geographic Names. United States Geological Survey (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ http://www.pdx.edu/media/p/r/prcCertifiedRelease_07_web_cities.pdf
  5. ^ JULY 1, 2006 Population estimates for Metropolitan Combined Statistical Areas (csv). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-10-19.
  6. ^ a b The "Smart Growth" Debate Continues. Urban Mobility Corporation (May/June 2003). Retrieved on 2006-11-07.
  7. ^ Orloff, Chet (2004). Maintaining Eden: John Charles Olmsted and the Portland Park System. Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers 66: 114–119. doi:10.1353/pcg.2004.0006. 
  8. ^ Portland: The Town that was Almost Boston. Portland Oregon Visitors Association. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  9. ^ Gibson, Campbell (June 1998). Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990. U.S. Bureau of the Census - Population Division.
  10. ^ Loy, William G.; Stuart Allan, Aileen R. Buckley, James E. Meecham (2001). Atlas of Oregon. University of Oregon Press, 32-33. ISBN 0-87114-102-7. 
  11. ^ "City keeps lively pulse." (Spencer Heinz, The Oregonian, January 23, 2001)
  12. ^ a b City Flower. City of Portland Auditor's Office - City Recorder Division.
  13. ^ Statewide Planning Goals. Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development. Retrieved December 23, 2007.
  14. ^ Comprehensive Land Use Planning Coordination. Legislative Counsel Committee of the Oregon Legislative Assembly. Retrieved on 2006-11-07.
  15. ^ Grist 15 Green Cities. Grist Magazine Online. Retrieved on 2007-01-02.
  16. ^ Busse, Phil (November 7, 2002). Cover Yourself!. The Portland Mercury. Retrieved on 2007-02-01.
  17. ^ Moore, Adam S.; Beck, Byron (November 8, 2004). Bump and Grind. Willamette Week. Retrieved on 2007-02-01.
  18. ^ The Boring Lava Field, Portland, Oregon. USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory. Retrieved on 2006-11-07.
  19. ^ Mount Tabor Cinder Cone, Portland, Oregon. USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  20. ^ Portland's Monthly and Annual Precipitation Totals. National Weather Service Portland, Oregon. Retrieved 2007-September 19.
  21. ^ Larry Carroll. "'Simpsons' Trivia, From Swearing Lisa To 'Burns-Sexual' Smithers", MTV, 2007-07-26. Retrieved on 2007-08-17. 
  22. ^ State & County QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2006-11-07.
  23. ^ Egan, Timothy (March 24, 2005). Vibrant Cities Find One Thing Missing: Children. The New York Times.
  24. ^ Abernethy Elementary School: Recent Enrollment Trends, 1995-96 through 2002-03 (PDF). Portland Public Schools, Prepared by Management Information Services (October 30, 2002).
  25. ^ Houck, Mike. Metropolitan Greenspaces: A Grassroots Perspective. Audubon Society of Portland. Retrieved on 2006-11-07.
  26. ^ Mt. Tabor Park. Portland Parks & Recreation. Retrieved on 2006-11-07.
  27. ^ Keep Portland Weird Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-11-25.
  28. ^ Lovecraft Film Festival Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-11-25.
  29. ^ Craft Brewing Industry Statistics
  30. ^ Merrill, Jessica (January 18, 2006). In Oregon, It's a Brew Pub World. New York Times. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  31. ^ a b Portland: The center of the beer universe. Portland Oregon Visitors Association. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  32. ^ Portland lifts a glass to its new name. KOIN 6 News (January 12, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-01-26.
  33. ^ TV : Food Network Awards : Food Network Awards Winners : Food Network
  34. ^ In Portland, a Golden Age of Dining and Drinking - New York Times
  35. ^ America's Favorite Cities 2007 | Food/Dining | Food/Dining (Overall) | Travel + Leisure
  36. ^ GoVeg.com // Features // North America's Most Vegetarian-Friendly Cities! // Portland, Oregon
  37. ^ Portland Zine Symposium Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-09-15.
  38. ^ Crafty Wonderland Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-09-15.
  39. ^ Church of Craft Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-09-15.
  40. ^ Knittn Kitten Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-09-15.
  41. ^ School & Community Reuse Action Project Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-09-15.
  42. ^ Yarn Garden Official Site. Retrieved on 2007-09-15.
  43. ^ Effects of Census Undercount on School Planning: Report Series: Report Number 5. U.S. Census Monitoring Board (February, 2001). Retrieved on 2006-11-08.
  44. ^ Buckingham, Matt (March 27, 1996). Teach Your Children Well - Lunch Money Leading Indicator. Willamette Week.
  45. ^ a b Law, Steve (2008-05-29). Metro takes long view of growth. Portland Tribune. Retrieved on 2008-06-04.
  46. ^ a b c d Portland: Economy - Major Industries and Commercial Activity. Retrieved on 2008-06-04.
  47. ^ Metro: Urban growth boundary. Retrieved on 2008-06-04.
  48. ^ Portland - SkyscraperPage. Retrieved on 2008-06-04.
  49. ^ OLMIS - Portland Metro Area: A Look at Recent Job Growth. Retrieved on 2008-06-04.
  50. ^ a b Steel Industry. Retrieved on 2008-06-04.
  51. ^ The Juice Junkie. Retrieved on 2008-06-04.
  52. ^ Port of Portland. Retrieved on 2008-06-04.
  53. ^ Cascade General, Inc.. Retrieved on 2008-06-04.
  54. ^ a b Portfolio. Retrieved on 2008-06-04.
  55. ^ Bicycle Commute Challenge information
  56. ^ From Robin's Nest to Stumptown. End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center. Retrieved on 2006-11-07.
  57. ^ The Water. Portland State University. Retrieved on 2006-11-07.
  58. ^ Portland Lifts A Glass To Its New Name. KOIN 6 News. Retrieved on 2007-01-14.
  59. ^ McCall, William. "'Little Beirut' nickname has stuck", The Oregonian, August 19, 2003. Retrieved on 2007-01-21. 
  60. ^ About Portland's Sister Cities. Office of Mayor Tom Potter. Retrieved on 2006-11-08.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... CSV stands for Comma Separated Values, sometimes also called Comma Delimited. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... University of Oregon Press, or UO Press is an American university press that is part of the University of Oregon in Eugene, Oregon. ... October 2, 2004 edition. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Portland Mercury is an alternative weekly newspaper published in Portland, Oregon. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Willamette Week is an alternative newsweekly published in Portland, Oregon. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Willamette Week is an alternative newsweekly published in Portland, Oregon. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Portland State University Portland State University is a public state urban university located in downtown Portland, Oregon. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... October 2, 2004 edition. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • C. Abbott, Greater Portland: Urban Life and Landscape in the Pacific Northwest. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001. ISBN 0-8122-1779-9
  • C. Ozawa (Ed.), The Portland Edge: Challenges and Successes in Growing Communities. Washington: Island Press, 2004. ISBN 1-55963-695-5
  • Chuck Palahniuk, Fugitives and Refugees: A Walk in Portland, Oregon. Crown, 2003. ISBN 1-4000-4783-8
  • Stewart Holbrook, The Far Corner. Comstock Editions, 1952. ISBN 0-89174-043-0
  • E. Kimbark MacColl, The Shaping of a City: Business and Politics in Portland, Oregon 1885 to 1915. Portland: Georgian Press, 1976. OCLC 2645815 ASIN B0006CP2A0
  • E. Kimbark MacColl, The Growth of a City: Power and Politics in Portland, Oregon 1915 to 1950. Portland: Georgian Press, 1979. ISBN 0-9603408-1-5
  • Jewel Lansing, Portland: People, Politics, and Power, 1851-2001. Oregon State University Press, 2003. ISBN 978-0870715594
  • MacGibbon, Elma (1904). Leaves of knowledge. Shaw & Borden Co.  Elma MacGibbons reminiscences of her travels in the United States starting in 1898, which were mainly in Oregon and Washington. Includes chapter "Portland, the western hub."
  • O'Toole, Randal. Debunking Portland: The City That Doesn’t Work. Policy Analysis. No. 596. Cato Institute, July 9, 2007.

Charles Michael Chuck Palahniuk (pronounced )[1] (born February 21, 1962) is an American transgressional fiction novelist and freelance journalist of Ukrainian ancestry born in Pasco, Washington. ... Stewart Hall Holbrook (1893 - 1964) was a lumberjack, writer, and popular historian. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... The Amazon Standard Identification Number (ASIN) is a unique identification number assigned by Amazon. ...

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Portland websites that are also wikis Wiki wiki redirects here. ...

City of Portland, Oregon
v  d  e

HistoryGovernmentMayors • Neighborhoods • Flag
TransportationBuildings & ArchitectureHospitals • Public Schools • Famous Portlanders
TourismSportsArtists and Art Institutions Oh Yes, Hes Ward Cunningham! Howard Cunningham redirects here. ... Location in Oregon Coordinates: , Country State County Washington Incorporated 1893 Government  - Mayor Rob Drake Area  - Total 16. ... Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Portland,_Oregon. ... Portland started as a spot known as The Clearing, which was on the banks of the Willamette River about halfway between Oregon City and Fort Vancouver. ... This is a partial list of mayors that have been employed by the city of Portland, Oregon. ... Flag of Portland, OR (2002-present) The city flag of Portland, Oregon consists of a green field on which is placed a white four-pointed directional star from which radiate blue stripes, each bordered by L-shaped yellow elements. ... The Architecture of Portland includes a wide range of styles and a few notable pioneering buildings. ... The following is a partial list of hospitals in Portland, Oregon: // Legacy Health System Legacy Emanuel Hospital Legacy Good Samaritan Hospital Providence Health System Providence Medical Center Providence St Vincent Medical Childrens Hospitals Shriners Hospital for Children Doernbecher Childrens Hospital Public/Government/Educational Oregon State Hospital Portland Oregon Health... For the school district in Portland, Maine, see Portland Public Schools (Maine). ... The following is a partial list of notable residents, past and present, from Portland, Oregon. ... Portland, Oregon, USA has a variety of tourist attractions. ... The following is a partial list of institutions and individuals active in the art scene of Portland, Oregon. ...

Multnomah CountyPortland - Vancouver MetroOregonUnited States
For specific systems, such as the Autobahns of Germany, see list of highway systems with full control of access and no cross traffic. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Interstate 5 is an interstate highway that goes from California to Washington. ... Washington State Route 14, also known as the Lewis and Clark Highway, is a highway in the state of Washington, U.S.A. It extends for approximately 200 miles from a junction with Interstate 5 in Vancouver in the west, to a junction with Interstate 82 and U.S. Highway... This page discusses the route of U.S. Highway 30 through the state of Oregon. ... This Interstate Highway article needs to be cleaned up to conform to both a higher standard of article quality and accepted design standards outlined in the WikiProject U.S. Interstate Highways. ... Interstate 405 (abbreviated I-405) in Oregon is a short loop route, also known as the Stadium Freeway, which is Highway 61. ... Oregon Route 217 is an Oregon state highway which serves the western suburbs of Portland. ... State Route 500, commonly known as SR-500, Highway 500, or 500, is a state highway in the U.S. state of Washington. ... The Interstate Bridge is a pair of identical steel through truss bridges with a vertical lift that carries Interstate 5 traffic over the Columbia River between Vancouver, Washington and Portland, Oregon. ... The Glenn L. Jackson Memorial Bridge, or I-205 bridge, is a segmental bridge that spans the Columbia River between Vancouver, Washington and Portland, Oregon. ... The Fremont Bridge is a steel tied arch bridge over the Willamette River located in Portland, Oregon. ... The Marquam Bridge is a double deck cantilever bridge that carries Interstate 5 traffic across the Willamette River south of downtown Portland, Oregon. ... The Abernethy Bridge is a steel plate and box girder bridge that spans the Willamette River between Oregon City and West Linn, Oregon. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Portland.com.:.Welcome to Portland Oregon (394 words)
Portland Oregon (OR) started as a spot known as "The Clearing" which was on the Willamette about half-way between Oregon City and Fort Vancouver.
Portland was the major port in the Pacific Northwest for much of the 19th century, until the 1890s when direct railroad access between the deep water harbor in Seattle and points east by way of Stampede Pass were built.
Located near the Pearl District in downtown Portland and adjacent to the MAX light rail, the Hotel DeLuxe is ten miles from the Portland International Airport.
Portland, Oregon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5921 words)
Portland is the largest city in the U.S. state of Oregon, and county seat of Multnomah County.
Portland was the major port in the Pacific Northwest for much of the 19th century, until the 1890s, when direct railroad access between the deepwater harbor in Seattle and points east by way of Stampede Pass were built.
I-5 connects Portland with the Willamette Valley, Southern Oregon, and California to the south and with Washington to the north.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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