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Encyclopedia > Port of Spain
Port of Spain
Port of Spain, viewed from the harbour, December 2002. The twin towers of the Eric Williams Plaza is clearly visible. The Nicholas Tower, now the tallest building in Trinidad and Tobago, is under construction to the right of the image

474897162_a1c3ea1a_b Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Eric Williams Plaza, also known as the Eric Williams Financial Complex, located on Independence Square, Port-of-Spain, is the second tallest building in Trinidad and Tobago . ... Port of Spain, viewed from the harbour, December 2002. ...

Coordinates: 10°40′″N 61°31′″W / Expression error: Unexpected / operator, Expression error: Unexpected / operator
Country Trinidad and Tobago
Government
 - Mayor Murchison Brown
 - Governing body Port of Spain City Corporation
Population (2000)
 - City 49,031
 - Density 3,650/km² (9,453.5/sq mi)
  Ranked 3rd
Time zone AST (UTC-4)


Port of Spain is the capital of Trinidad and Tobago and the country's third largest municipality, after Chaguanas and San Fernando. The city has a municipal population of 49,031 (2000 census)[1] and a metropolitan population of 128,026 (1990 estimate)[2] residents, It is located on the Gulf of Paria, on the northwest coast of the island of Trinidad. Image File history File links PortofSpain. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Port of Spain, population 49,000 (2000), is the capital of Trinidad and Tobago and the countrys third largest municipality by population, after Chaguanas and San Fernando. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... This article is about a city that serves as a center of government and politics. ... The Borough of Chaguanas is the largest (67,433, 2000 census) and fastest-growing[1][2] town in Trinidad and Tobago. ... The City of San Fernando is the larger of the two cities, and the second largest municipality in Trinidad and Tobago. ... The Gulf of Paria (Golfo de Paria in Spanish) is a shallow inland sea between the island of Trinidad (Republic of Trinidad and Tobago) and the east coast of Venezuela. ...


The city serves primarily as a retail and administrative center. It also serves as a financial services center and is home to two of the largest banks in the English-speaking Caribbean. It is one of the major shipping hubs of the Caribbean, with exports of agricultural products and asphalt. Bauxite from the Guianas and iron ore from Venezuela are trans-shipped via facilities at Chaguaramas, about five miles west of the city. The tallest building in Port of Spain (and country as a whole) is the 21-storey Nicholas Tower; the proposed Waterfront International Project is slated to include a 26-storey office tower.[3] “West Indian” redirects here. ... Base layer of asphalt concrete in a road under construction. ... Bauxite with penny Bauxite with core of unweathered rock Bauxite is an aluminium ore. ... General Name, Symbol, Number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... Chaguaramas lies in the North West Peninsula of Trinidad west of Port-of-Spain; the name if often applied to the entire peninsula, but is sometimes used to refer to the most developed area. ... Port of Spain, viewed from the harbour, December 2002. ...

Contents

History

Port of Spain Harbour, 1890s

Port of Spain was founded near the site of the Amerindian fishing village of Cumucurapo ("place of the silk cotton trees"), located in the area today known as Mucurapo, west of the city centre. The name Conquerabia is also recorded for an Amerindian settlement in this area; this may have been a separate village, another name for Cumucurapo, or the result of miscomprehension by early Spanish settlers, who established a port here: "Puerto de los Hispanioles", later "Puerto de España". In 1560, a Spanish garrison was posted near the foot of the Laventille Hills, which today form the city's eastern boundary. Download high resolution version (878x619, 186 KB)Image published in 1897 - no copyright. ... Download high resolution version (878x619, 186 KB)Image published in 1897 - no copyright. ... Native Americans (also Indians, Aboriginal Peoples, American Indians, First Nations, Alaskan Natives, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are the indigenous inhabitants of The Americas prior to the European colonization, and their modern descendants. ... Species Bombax buonopozense Bombax campestre Bombax ceiba Bombax gracilipes Bombax insigne Bombax pubescens Bombax is a genus of three to eight species of trees, native to tropical and subtropical regions of the Indian Subcontinent, tropical Southeast Asia, northern Australia, and tropical Africa. ... Events February 27 - The Treaty of Berwick, which would expel the French from Scotland, is signed by England and the Congregation of Scotland The first tulip bulb was brought from Turkey to the Netherlands. ... Laventille is a slum area of Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. ...


The part of today's downtown Port of Spain closest to the sea was once an area of tidal mudflats covered by mangroves. The first Spanish buildings here, in the 16th and 17th centuries, were open mud-plastered ajoupas, interspersed between large silk cotton trees and other trees. The fort was a mud-walled enclosure with a shack inside, a flagpole, two or three cannon, and few Spanish soldiers. The Caribs were transient, travelling to the mainland (now Venezuela) and up the Orinoco River. The French naval commander Comte D'Estrées visited in 1680, and reported that there was no Port of Spain. But in 1690, Spanish governor Don Sebastien de Roteta reported in writing to the King of Spain: "Already six houses have been made and others have been started. There is already a church in this place, so that it was unnecessary to build a new." Above and below water view at the edge of the mangal Mangroves are woody trees or shrubs that grow in mangrove habitats or mangal (Hogarth, 1999). ... This article is about the Island Carib, who lived on the islands of the Caribbean. ... This page is about the Orinoco River, for the Aphra Behn novel see Oroonoko With a length of 2140 km, the Orinoco is one of the largest rivers of South America. ... Victor Marie dEstrées, count then duke (1723) dEstrées (Paris November 30, 1660 - Paris december 27 1737) was a Marshal of France. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... The Spanish monarchy, referred to as the Crown of Spain (Corona de España) in the Spanish Constitution of 1978, is the office of the King or Queen of Spain. ...


In 1699, the alcalde of Trinidad reported to the King that the natives "were in the habit of showering scorn and abuse upon the Holy Faith and ridiculed with jests the efforts of the Holy Fathers". Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... Alcalde is the Spanish title of the chief administrator of a town. ...


By 1757, the old capital, San José de Oruña (modern Saint Joseph), about seven miles inland, had fallen into disrepair, and Governor Don Pedro de la Moneda transferred his seat to Port of Spain, which thus became Trinidad's de facto capital. The last Spanish Governor of Trinidad, Don José Maria Chacón, devoted much of his time to developing the new capital. He compelled the island's Cabildo (governing council) to move to Port of Spain, and he limited its powers to the municipality. The 1783 Cedula of Population, which encouraged the settlement of French Catholics in the island, led to a rapid increase in the town's population and its geographical extension westwards. 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... St. ... This page lists Governors of Trinidad. ... Don José Maria Chacón was the last Spanish Governor of Trinidad. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


From the small cluster of buildings at the foot of the Laventille Hills, eleven streets were laid out west to the area bounded by the St. Ann's River, thus establishing the grid pattern which has survived in downtown Port of Spain to the present day. Along the sea shore was the Plaza del Marina (Marine Square), a parade ground. By 1786, the town had a population of about 3,000. 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Realising that the St. Ann's River, prone to flooding, was impeding the expansion of the town, Chacón had its course diverted in 1787 so that it ran to the east of the city, along the foot of the Laventille Hills. (During the rainy season the river still had a tendency to overflow its banks, flooding parts of the city; over the decades its channel would be widened and paved. During the dry season the water level drops to a trickle; hence its nickname, the East Dry River.) Port of Spain was now able to continue spreading northwards and westwards, encroaching on the surrounding sugar-cane plantations. Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1797, Trinidad was invaded by a British force under General Sir Ralph Abercromby. The British landed west of Port of Spain, at what is still called Invaders Bay, and marched towards the town. Realising his military resources were inadequate to defend the colony and wishing to avoid unnecessary destruction, Governor Chacón capitulated and was able to negotiate generous terms with Abercromby. Port of Spain remained the capital; the new British colonial government renamed most of the streets after British royalty or military figures, but allowed Chacón Street (which followed the old course of the St. Ann's River) to retain its name, in tribute to the former governor. 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Sir Ralph Abercromby (sometimes spelled Abercrombie) (October 7, 1734–March 28, 1801) was a British lieutenant-general noted for his services during the Napoleonic Wars. ...


In 1803 Port of Spain began growing southwards, with the reclamation of the foreshore mudflats, using fill from the Laventille Hills. This began with the area immediately east of the diverted St. Ann's River; the district is still called Sea Lots today. Gradually the landfill crept west and the area south of Plaza del Marina became solid land. Further major reclamation efforts took place in the 1840s, the 1870s, and in 1906. In 1935 the Deep Water Harbour Scheme dredged the offshore area along Port of Spain's western neighbourhoods, and the dredged material was used to fill in the area south of Woodbrook. Wrightson Road, linking downtown Port of Spain to its western suburbs, was constructed at the same time. These reclaimed lands were originally called Docksite, and were home to US forces during World War II; later a number of government buildings were constructed here. 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ...


Port of Spain continued to grow in size and importance during the 19th and early 20th centuries, peaking in size in the 1960s at about 100,000 people. Since then the population within the city limits has declined in size as the downtown area has become increasingly commercial and the suburbs in the valleys north, west, and north-east of the city have grown. Today Port of Spain is the western hub of a metropolitan area stretching from Carenage, five miles west of the city, to Arima, fifteen miles east; this East-West Corridor runs along the southern edge of Trinidad's Northern Range. The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... The East-West Corridor is the peri-urban area of development in north Trinidad stretching from the capital, Port-of-Spain, east to Arima. ... The Northern Range is the range of tall hills across the northern portion of Trinidad, the major island in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. ...


From 1958 to 1962, Port of Spain was the temporary capital of the short-lived West Indies Federation, though there were plans to build a new federal capital at Chaguaramas, on land occupied by the US military base established during World War II. Federation Park, a residential neighbourhood in western Port of Spain intended to house employees of the federal government, is a memorial to that time. Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto To dwell together in unity Anthem God Save the Queen Capital Chaguaramas Language(s) English Government Constitutional monarchy Queen Elizabeth II Governor-General Lord Hailes Prime minister Grantley Herbert Adams¹ History  - Established January 3, 1958  - Disestablished May 31, 1962 Area  - 1960 20,253 km2 7,820 sq mi Population... Chaguaramas lies in the North West Peninsula of Trinidad west of Port-of-Spain; the name if often applied to the entire peninsula, but is sometimes used to refer to the most developed area. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Federation Park is a desireable residential area located in the north west corner of the city of Port Of Spain. ...


Geography

Port of Spain is located in the northwest of the island of Trinidad, between the Gulf of Paria, the hills of the Northern Range and the Caroni Swamp. Some of the city lies on reclaimed land, while other parts climb into the hills above the city. The Gulf of Paria (Golfo de Paria in Spanish) is a shallow inland sea between the island of Trinidad (Republic of Trinidad and Tobago) and the east coast of Venezuela. ... The Northern Range is the range of tall hills across the northern portion of Trinidad, the major island in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. ... The Caroni Swamp is the largest mangrove wetland in Trinidad and Tobago. ...


Climate

Port of Spain has a seasonal tropical climate. Its wet season lasts from June to December, and its dry season lasts from January to May.

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Avg high °C (°F) 31 (87.8) 31 (87.8) 32 (89.6) 32 (89.6) 32 (89.6) 32 (89.6) 31 (87.8) 31 (87.8) 32 (89.6) 32 (89.6) 32 (89.6) 31 (87.8)
Avg low temperature °C (°F) 21 (69.8) 20 (68.0) 20 (68.0) 21 (69.8) 22 (71.6) 22 (71.6) 22 (71.6) 22 (71.6) 22 (71.6) 22 (71.6) 22 (71.6) 21 (69.8)
Source: BBC Weather

Record Temps for Port of Spain (St. Clair): Record High: 38°C (100.4°F) Record Low: 11°C (51.8°F)


Urban structure

Downtown

Frederick St. and Marine Square in the 1890s

The oldest part of the city is the downtown area (colloquially referred to as "Town", and pronounced by Trinis similar to the word "tong"), between South Quay (to the south), Oxford Street (to the north), the St. Ann's River (to the east), and Richmond Street (to the west). Download high resolution version (893x640, 388 KB)image published in 1897 - no copyright File links The following pages link to this file: Port-of-Spain ... Download high resolution version (893x640, 388 KB)image published in 1897 - no copyright File links The following pages link to this file: Port-of-Spain ...


The heart of downtown is Woodford Square (formerly Brunswick Square, renamed in the 19th century for British Governor Ralph Woodford). On its northern side are City Hall and the Hall of Justice, seat of the Supreme Court; on its western side is the Red House, seat of Parliament; the Anglican Holy Trinity Cathedral is on its south side, and on the block south-west of the square is the National Library. A number of government offices are located in the immediate vicinity, and the blocks north and west of the Red House are home to many lawyers' chambers. The Parliament of Trinidad and Tobago is the legislative branch of the Government of Trinidad and Tobago. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ...


Woodford Square itself is a green oasis in the heart of the city, with a late-Victorian fountain and bandstand, trees, benches, and lawns. It has famously been the site of many political rallies over the decades; former Prime Minister Eric Williams gave many public lectures here, dubbing it "the University of Woodford Square", and near the eastern gate is a spot which has become Port of Spain's speaker's corner. Dr. Eric Williams Dr. Eric Eustace Williams (September 25, 1911 – March 29, 1981) was the first Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago. ... For the Canadian television series, see Speakers Corner. ...


Two blocks south of Woodford Square is Independence Square (formerly Marine Square), which runs along the breadth of downtown Port of Spain from Wrightson Road to the west to the Roman Catholic Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in the east. The section of the square immediately behind the cathedral is called Columbus Square. Before extensive land reclamation in the early 19th century, the city's shoreline ran through Independence Square. Independence Square lies near to southern end of Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. ...

In the early 1990s, illegal vendors who had set up shop in the middle of the square were evicted and major repaving and landscaping was undertaken. The new pedestrian area in the middle of the square was named the Brian Lara Promenade in honour of Trinidad and Tobago's star cricket batsman. Where Independence Square is bisected by Frederick Street there is a roundabout with a statue of Captain A.A. Cipriani, the early 20th-century populist politician and mayor of the city. South of the square, Frederick Street widens and becomes Broadway, which terminates at the waterfront and the Port of Spain lighthouse, no longer used as a navigational aid but considered a major landmark. (For Trinidadians born and bred in Port of Spain or its northern and north-western suburbs, "past the lighthouse"—east of the lighthouse on the Beetham Highway—means outside the city proper.) Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Crowne Plaza is a chain of upscale hotels catering to the business/meetings market. ... Wrightson Road links from downtown Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago with the Audrey Jeffers Highway. ... Brian Charles Lara (born May 2, 1969) (nicknamed, The Prince of Port-of-Spain or simply The Prince) was a record-breaking cricketer who was regarded as one of the greatest batsmen of all-time. ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ... Captain Arthur Andrew Cipriani (1875-1945) was a Trinidad and Tobago labour leader and politician. ...


The southern side of Independence Square is where the city's (and the south Caribbean's) tallest buildings are located: the twin towers of the Eric Williams Financial Complex (home of the Central Bank and the Ministry of Finance) and the new Nicholas Tower, a commercial office building. The Government Campus Plaza, and Rennasance Towers are under construction. They will be taller than the nicholas tower and the eric williams plaza's twin towers. The Eric Williams Plaza, viewed from Port of Spain harbour, December 2002. ... Port of Spain, viewed from the harbour, December 2002. ...


Frederick Street, which runs north through the city to the Queen's Park Savannah, is Port of Spain's major avenue, connecting the two downtown squares with the uptown park, and very approximately dividing downtown into retail (east) and office (west) districts. One block east, lower Henry Street is the location of a number of shops selling cloth, mostly owned by members of Trinidad's Syrian-Lebanese community. Another block over, Charlotte Street at its lower end is Port of Spain's Chinatown in all but name, home to dozens of general emporia known for bargain shopping. For other uses, see Chinatown (disambiguation). ...


Laventille and Gonzales

East of the St. Ann's River, more commonly known as the East Dry River, are the working-class neighbourhoods of Laventille and Gonzales; this area is sometimes referred to as "Behind the Bridge". The area is known to be one of the most violent in the country for gangs, drugs, and murders, but is also the birthplace of the steelpan and, some would argue, the spiritual capital of calypso;calypso, steelpan, and carnival are the life source of most Trinidadians. South of Laventille are Beetham Estate and Sea Lots, two other economically depressed neighbourhoods. Laventille is a slum area of Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. ... Gonzales is a variant spelling of the common Spanish surname Gonzalez. ... Laventille is a slum area of Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. ... Steelpan (also known as steeldrums or pans, and sometimes collectively with the musicians as a steelband) is a musical instrument and a form of music originating in Trinidad and Tobago. ... Calypso is a style of Afro-Caribbean music which originated in Trinidad at about the start of the 20th century. ... Beetham Estate Gardens is a neighbourhood in eastern Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago south of Laventille and northeast of Sea Lots between the Beetham Highway and the Eastern Main Road. ... Sea Lots is an area within Trinidad and Tobago that is located in southeastern Port of Spain. ...


Belmont

In north-east Port of Spain, Belmont, at the foot of the Laventille Hills, was the city's first suburb. In the 1840–50s, parts of the area were settled by Africans rescued by the Royal Navy from illegal slaving ships. In the 1880–90s, the population swelled rapidly, and the characteristic Belmont street pattern of narrow, winding lanes developed. The black professional class built large homes in Belmont, as they were excluded from the more expensive neighbourhoods such as St. Clair and Maraval; Belmont became known as "the Black St. Clair". Many of these large homes have been renovated and converted to business use, but some remain in family hands. Belmont currently is a lower-middle to middle-class residential neighbourhood. It was the birthplace and early home of many important Carnival designers and bandleaders. Laventille is a slum area of Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. ... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the oldest of the British armed services (and is therefore the Senior Service). ... Slave ships were cargo boats specially converted for the purpose of transporting slaves, especially newly captured African slaves. ... Carnival in Trinidad and Tobago is the event of the year! It is often said that if the islanders are not celebrating it then they are preparing for it while reminiscing about the past years festival. ...


North of downtown

National Museum and Art Gallery, Frederick Street, Port of Spain

North of downtown, the area occupied in the earlier 19th century by the Tranquillity sugar estate was formerly residential, but in recent decades has become essentially a district of office buildings, functioning as an extension of the downtown area. Oddly, this part of Port of Spain—between Oxford Street and the Queen's Park Savannah—has no name in common usage, though a century ago it was known as Tranquillity. The Port of Spain General Hospital is on upper Charlotte Street, also Memorial Park, while nearby on Frederick Street is the National Museum and Art Gallery. West of here is Newtown, laid out in the 1840s, bounded by Tragarete Road (south), the Queen's Park Savannah (north), Cipriani Boulevard (east), and Maraval Road (west). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1536, 1097 KB) Summary National Museum and Art Gallery of Trinidad, top of Frederick St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1536, 1097 KB) Summary National Museum and Art Gallery of Trinidad, top of Frederick St. ... National Museum and Art Gallery, Frederick Street, Port of Spain The National Museum and Art Gallery is at the top of Frederick Street in Port of Spain, opposite Memorial Park and just south of the Queens Park Savannah. ...


Woodbrook

The large Woodbrook neighbourhood, west of downtown, formerly a sugar estate owned by the Siegert family, was sold to the Town Board in 1911 and developed into a residential neighbourhood, with many of the north-south streets named for the Siegert siblings. In the last twenty years the main east-west thoroughfares, Ariapita Avenue and Tragarete Road, have become almost entirely commercialised, and Ariapita Avenue west of Murray Street has become a relatively upscale dining and entertainment "strip". A few small parks are sprinkled through the neighbourhood; Adam Smith Square and Siegert Square are the two largest. 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Just north of Woodbrook along Tragarete Road is the Queen's Park Oval, a major Test cricket ground, which is owned by the private Queen's Park Cricket Club (QPCC). At Woodbrook's western end, at the edge of Invaders Bay, is the Hasely Crawford Stadium, the national venue for football and track and field events. Queens Park Oval, in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, (West Indies) is a cricket ground that will host a number of matches in the forthcoming 2007 cricket World Cup It is privately owned by the Queens Park Cricket Club, and is currently the largest ground in the Caribbean... A Test match in progress. ... Hasely Joachim Crawford (born August 16, 1950) is an athlete from Trinidad and Tobago. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ...


St. Clair

The upscale St. Clair neighbourhood in north-west Port of Spain, between the Queen's Park Savannah and the Maraval River, was developed in the 1880s, 1890s, and 1900s on former agricultural land. It is the location of some of the city's grandest mansions. At its heart, just north of the Queen's Park Oval, is King George V Park. In recent decades St. Clair has become home to various diplomatic missions. Queens Park Oval, in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, (West Indies) is a cricket ground that will host a number of matches in the forthcoming 2007 cricket World Cup It is privately owned by the Queens Park Cricket Club, and is currently the largest ground in the Caribbean... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 - 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, as a result of his creating it from the British branch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ...


Just northwest of St. Clair are two upscale residential neighbourhoods, Ellerslie Park and Federation Park. Ellerslie Park is an exclusive residential development in the northwestern corner of Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. ... Federation Park is a desireable residential area located in the north west corner of the city of Port Of Spain. ...


St. James and Mucurapo

Port of Spain's last major municipal expansion occurred in 1938, when the St. James district north of Woodbrook and west of St. Clair was incorporated into the city limits. In the late 19th century, Indian indentured labourers on nearby sugar estates established houses here, and St. James gradually became the centre of Port of Spain's Indian population, with many streets named after cities and districts in India. Western Main Road, the area's major thoroughfare, has long been the city's main nightlife district, sometimes nicknamed "the city that never sleeps". Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Long Circular Road, which curves north from Western Main Road then west to meet Maraval Road, forms part of the city boundary. Its "circle" encloses Flagstaff Hill, a small rise with the US ambassador's residence at its summit, which lends its name to an area of apartment buildings at its southern foot.


South of St. James and near the seashore at Invaders Bay is Mucurapo, a mostly residential district which also contains the city's second-largest cemetery.


It should be noted that V.S. Naipaul, Trinidadian Nobel Prize winner for literature, grew up in St. James.


Queen's Park Savannah

Port of Spain's largest open space—and one of the world's largest traffic roundabouts—is the Queen's Park Savannah, known colloquially simply as "the Savannah". It occupies about 260 acres [4] of level land, and the distance around the perimeter is about 2.2 mi (3.5 km). Once sugar land, it was bought by the town council in 1817 from the Peschier family (except for a small parcel near its centre that served as the Peschier cemetery, which remains in private hands). For the song by Yes, see Roundabout (song) A roundabout or rotary is a type of road junction (or traffic calming device) at which traffic enters a stream around a central island after first yielding (giving way) to the circulating traffic. ... Port of Spains largest open space—and one of the worlds largest traffic roundabouts—is the Queens Park Savannah, known colloquially simply as the Savannah. It occupies about 260 acres [1] of level land, and the distance around the perimeter is about 2. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


At first it was used as a vast cattle pasture in what was then the town's suburbs, but by the middle of the 19th century it had become established as a park. Until the early 1990s, horse racing was held frequently at the Savannah race track, and it also contains several cricket, football and rugby pitches. Apart from a ring of trees round its perimeter, the Savannah was never really landscaped, except for the small area in its northwest corner called the Hollows, a former reservoir now drained and planted with flowering shrubs. Housing subdivision near Union, Kentucky, a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... A BCRFC match at Boston College Rugby football, often just referred to as rugby, refers to sports descended from a common form of football developed at Rugby School in England. ... ...

Royal Botanic Gardens

Immediately north of the Savannah—also the northern limit of the city of Port of Spain—are the Royal Botanic Gardens, the Emperor Valley Zoo, the official residences of the president and the prime minister, and Queen's Hall, the city's major performing arts venue. Lady Chancellor Road, which ascends the hills overlooking the Savannah, is one of Port of Spain's most exclusive residential areas. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (2304 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (2304 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... A view of Trinidads Botanic Gardens from the western end The Royal Botanic Gardens in Trinidad is located in Port of Spain. ... The Emperor Valley Zoo is the main zoo in Trinidad and Tobago. ...


On the Savannah's southern side is the Grand Stand, formerly used for viewing horse races, now used for various cultural events, most notably Carnival, when a temporary North Stand and raised stage are constructed in front of the Grand Stand, creating the "Big Yard", Carnival's central location since the early 20th century (previously, the main viewing area for Carnival was in downtown Port of Spain). From this location the Parade of Bands is broadcast live to the nation on Carnival Monday and Tuesday; it is also the venue for the Calypso Monarch and Carnival King and Queen Competitions and the finals of the Panorama steelpan competition. Carnival in Trinidad and Tobago is the event of the year! It is often said that if the islanders are not celebrating it then they are preparing for it while reminiscing about the past years festival. ... Calypso is a style of Afro-Caribbean music which originated in Trinidad at about the start of the 20th century. ... Steelpan (also known as steeldrums or pans, and sometimes collectively with the musicians as a steelband) is a musical instrument and a form of music originating in Trinidad and Tobago. ...


The western edge of the Savannah, along Maraval Road, is the location of the Magnificent Seven, a group of late Victorian buildings built in an eccentric and flamboyant variety of styles. These are Queen's Royal College; the residences of the Anglican bishop and the Roman Catholic archbishop; Whitehall, once a private residence, now the office of the prime minister; Mille Fleurs, the future home of the Law Association; Roomor, an ornate black-and-white chateau-like building that remains a private residence; and Stollmeyer's Castle, a turreted house supposedly modelled on Balmoral Castle which is now being converted into subsidiary offices for the prime minister's staff. Queens Royal College Queens Royal College is one of the oldest secondary schools in Trinidad and Tobago. ... Balmoral Castle. ...


Suburbs

Immediately north and northwest of Port of Spain, the suburbs of Cascade, St. Ann's, Maraval, and Diego Martin fall outside the municipal boundary, but are sometimes considered extensions of the city. Diego Martin is a town in northwestern Trinidad, just west of the capital Port-of-Spain and east of Chaguaramas. ...


Governance

Port of Spain is administered by the Port of Spain City Corporation. There are 12 councillors and 4 aldermen. The mayor is elected from the membership of the council. Port of Spain, population 49,000 (2000), is the capital of Trinidad and Tobago and the countrys third largest municipality by population, after Chaguanas and San Fernando. ...


The electoral districts are:

  • St. James East
  • St. James West
  • Woodbrook
  • Northern Port of Spain
  • Belmont East
  • Belmont North & West
  • Southern Port of Spain
  • East Dry River
  • St. Ann's River South
  • St. Ann's River Central
  • St. Ann's River North
  • Belmont South

Port of Spain became a "city" in 1914; the ordinance was passed on May 29 and was proclaimed by the Governor on June 25, 1914. The first city councillors were elected on November 2. Among them were oil pioneer Randolph Rust, lawyer and social activist Emmanuel Mzumbo Lazare and Dr. Enrique Prada, who was elected chairman by the council and became the first mayor of the City of Port of Spain. Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 59 days remaining. ...


Economy

Port of Spain serves as a shopping and business centre for much of the country. It is also a major financial centre. Two of the largest banks in the Caribbean, Republic Bank, Trinidad and Tobago Limited and RBTT (formerly the Royal Bank of Trinidad and Tobago) are headquartered here. Republic Bank is the largest bank in Trinidad and Tobago and one of the largest in the Eastern Caribbean. ... The Royal Bank of Trinidad and Tobago (RBTT), is currently one of the larger financial commercial banks of Trinidad and Tobago. ... The Royal Bank of Canada (TSX: RY, NYSE: RY) is Canadas largest chartered bank. ...


The Port of Port of Spain is the major port of containerized shipping. The port of Port of Spain is able to dock large cruise ships. Most government offices are also located in the city. The Government Campus Plaza(under construction), Red House, Eric Williams Plaza, and many other government buildings are located in the city.


Trinidad's economy is based on natural gas, oil, and petroleum. High-income proceeds from the international sale of natural gas has aided the country in the Port of Spain International Waterfront project. Agriculture is also a part of Trinidad's economy, but most farming is done outside of Port of Spain. Trinidad and Tobago usually exports more than it imports, but recently, imports have risen due to the need to import heavy construction machinery. Trinidad and Tobago is one of the wealthiest nations in the Caribbean. Port of Spain is known as the "industrial hub" of the Caribbean, and is the most developed city in the country.


Demographics

The population of Port of Spain was 54,100 in 1901, 92,793 in 1946 (following the annexation of St, James in 1938), 93,954 in 1960, 73,950 in 1970, 59,200 in 1988 and 49,031 in 2000. 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Culture and entertainment

While the major shopping area around Frederick Street has declined in competition with malls and the growth of outlying towns, 'uptown' Port of Spain (St. Clair and Woodbrook) have seen a boom as large corporations build high-rise headquarters in formerly upscale neighbourhoods.


Sports

Port of Spain hosts major sporting venues including:

It will be among the host cities of the 2007 Cricket World Cup. Queens Park Oval, in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, (West Indies) is a cricket ground that will host a number of matches in the forthcoming 2007 cricket World Cup It is privately owned by the Queens Park Cricket Club, and is currently the largest ground in the Caribbean... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ... Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a recreation, a sport and a means of transport across land. ... The Hasely Crawford Stadium, located in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, is named for Hasely Crawford, the first person from Trinidad and Tobago to win an Olympic gold medal. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Professional boxing bout featuring Ricardo Domínguez (left, throwing a left uppercut) versus Rafael Ortiz Boxing, also referred to as prizefighting, the noble art, the sweet science, and pugilism is a combat sport in which two participants of similar weight fight each other with their fists in a series of... Port of Spains largest open space—and one of the worlds largest traffic roundabouts—is the Queens Park Savannah, known colloquially simply as the Savannah. It occupies about 260 acres [1] of level land, and the distance around the perimeter is about 2. ... The 2007 ICC Cricket World Cup was a mens cricket tournament that took place in the West Indies from 13 March to 28 April 2007, using the sports one-day international format. ...


Infrastructure

Health

Like the rest of Trinidad and Tobago, Port of Spain is served by a combination of public/private health services. The major public hospital is the Port of Spain General Hospital. Port of Spain General Hospital is one of the major trauma centers in the Southern Caribbean. Demand for speedy quality health service has led to the establishment of several private hospitals. A public hospital is a hospital which is owned by a government and receives government funding. ...


Transport

Transportation in and out of Port of Spain is plagued by heavy traffic delays at rush hour. Traffic enters the city from the east along the Churchill-Roosevelt Highway which ends at Barataria, just east of the city and becomes the Beetham Highway. Alternately, traffic can turn north at Barataria and enter the city to the north over the Lady Young Road. The Eastern Main Road runs parallel to the highway and enters the city at the eastern end of Independence Square. The Priority Bus Route (which runs along the former Trinidad Government Railway line) enters the city at City Gate. Traffic from the west enters the city through the Western Main Road and the Audrey Jeffers Highway. The Churchill-Roosevelt Highway is the major east-west highway in Trinidad and Tobago. ... The Beetham Highway is a major highway in Trinidad and Tobago. ... The Eastern Main Road is a major road in Trinidad and Tobago running from Port of Spain in the west to Sangre Grande in the east. ... Last Train to San Fernando - Harris Promenade, San Fernando The Trinidad Government Railway existed between 1876 and December 28, 1968. ... City Gate is the main terminal for the buses and maxi taxis in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. ... The Western Main Road is the main road in Trinidad and Tobago that runs west from Green Corner, in downtown Port of Spain, through St. ... The Audrey Jeffers Highway is a highway in Trinidad and Tobago. ...


City Gate serves as a transportation hub for public buses and private mini-buses (locally known as maxi-taxis). City Gate is located on South Quay just south of Independence Square. A ferry service links Port of Spain with Scarborough, Tobago. Like the rest of the island of Trinidad, Port of Spain is served by the Piarco International Airport located in Piarco. Maxi taxis are private, owner-operated minibuses in Trinidad and Tobago that are used in public transport. ... South Quay is a Docklands Light Railway station on the Isle of Dogs, in London. ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, ca. ... Scarborough, Tobago is the largest town on Tobago, one of the two islands of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago and contains more than half of the population of the island. ... Castara village beach looking south, Tobago Tobago is the smaller of the two main islands that make up the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. ... Piarco International Airport (IATA: POS, ICAO: TTPP) is the main airport serving Trinidad and Tobago. ... Piarco, a town in northern Trinidad is the site of Piarco International Airport (IATA Airport Code: POS). ...


Utilities

Electric generation is handled by Powergen, while electrical distribution is handled by the Trinidad and Tobago Electricity Commission (T&TEC). Powergen has one natural gas-fired generation plant located on Wrightson Road in Port of Spain. Additional power can be supplied from power generation facilities located in Point Lisas and Penal. The Trinidad and Tobago Electricity Commission (T&TEC) is the sole provider of electricity in Trinidad and Tobago. ... Natural gas is a gaseous fossil fuel consisting primarily of methane but including significant quantities of ethane, butane, propane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium and hydrogen sulfide. ... Point Lisas is the site of the Point Lisas Industrial Estate and the Port of Point Lisas, both of which are managed by Plipdeco (the Point Lisas Industrial Port Development Company). ... Penal (originally Peñal) is a town in southern Trinidad. ...


Telecommunications are regulated by the Telecommunications Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (TATT). It has been working to de-monopolise the industry, granting several new licenses in 2005. Fixed-line telephone service is a monopoly controlled by Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago (TSTT). Licenses have been granted for competition in this area, but start-up is a while away. Wireless telephony is currently controlled by TSTT, but licenses have been granted for two private companies, Digicel and Laqtel to offer wireless service in competition with TSTT. Telecommunications Services of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (generally known as TSTT) is the largest telephone and Internet service provider in Trinidad and Tobago. ... Digicel is the leading mobile phone network provider in the Caribbean region. ... Laqtel, Ltd. ...


Water and sewerage are under the purview of the Water and Sewerage Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (WASA). Most solid waste is disposed of in the Beetham Landfill, commonly known as La Basse. The Water and Sewerage Authority of Trinidad and Tobago (WASA) is the sole water and sewerage provider in Trinidad and Tobago. ...


Sister cities

Port of Spain is a sister city with some of the following cities: This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Hotlanta redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Canada. ... Nickname: The Garden City Motto: Industry and Liberality Location of St. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Guyana. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ Table 1, 2000 Census, from Central Statistical Office, Government of Trinidad and Tobago
  2. ^ Halcrow Group (Trinidad & Tobago) Ltd. (December 2000). "Greater Port of Spain Local Area Plan". Retrieved on 2007-05-14.
  3. ^ Chouti, Sandra, Changing the face of PoS, Trinidad Guardian, February 9, 2006.
  4. ^ Agostini, Keifel A. Queens Park Savannah: Save Our Savannah. Sunday Express, September 21, 1997.
  • Anthony, Michael (2001). Historical Dictionary of Trinidad and Tobago. Scarecrow Press, Inc. Lanham, Md., and London. ISBN 0-8108-3173-2. 

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Trinidad Guardian (together with the Sunday Guardian) is the oldest daily newspaper in Trinidad and Tobago. ... February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Trinidad and Tobago Express (and the Sunday Express) is one of three daily newspapers in Trinidad and Tobago. ... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the article on the Van Halen guitarist, see Michael Anthony. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Local Government in Trinidad and Tobago
Regional Corporations - Couva-Tabaquite-Talparo - Diego Martin - Penal-Debe - Princes Town - Rio Claro-Mayaro - San Juan-Laventille - Sangre Grande - Siparia - Tunapuna-Piarco
Boroughs and Cities - Borough of Arima - Borough of Chaguanas - City of Port of Spain - Borough of Point Fortin - City of San Fernando
Tobago House of Assembly
Counties (historic) - Caroni - Mayaro - Nariva - Saint Andrew - Saint David - Saint George - Saint Patrick - Victoria

 
 

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