FACTOID # 24: Looking for table makers? Head to Mississippi, with an overwhlemingly large number of employees in furniture manufacturing.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Port of Redwood City

The Port of Redwood City (37.505° N 122.214° W) is a freight terminal on the western side of the southern San Francisco Bay. This marine terminal is situated within the city of Redwood City, California, USA. The port was developed from a natural deepwater channel discovered in the year 1850, at the mouth of Redwood Creek.[1] As of 2004 the annual freight shipments have reached about two million metric tons.[2] The Port of Redwood City provides berths for dry bulk, liquid bulk, and project cargoes, along with certain recreational opportunities and public access to San Francisco Bay. San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, and the Golden Gate San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary through which water draining approximately forty percent of California, flowing in the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers from the Sierra Nevada mountains, enters the Pacific Ocean. ... Redwood City is a suburb located on the San Francisco Peninsula in the San Francisco Bay Area of California. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Delta may refer to: Look up delta in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The Port of Redwood City is the only deepwater port in the South San Francisco Bay[3] Significant expanses of bay mud are present nearby: in Redwood Creek, Wespoint Slough and especially at the mouth of Redwood Creek, where bay muds extend almost two kilometers into San Francisco Bay. Richardson Bay mudflats of are exposed layers of bay mud Bay mud consists of thick deposits of soft, unconsolidated silty clay, which is saturated with water; these soil layers are situated at the bottom of certain estuaries, which are normally in temperate regions that have experienced cyclical glacial cycles. ...

Contents

History

Robert O. Tripp (founder of the historic Woodside Store) and Mathias A. Parkhurst began first lumber operation using the waterways of Redwood Creek to float coast redwoods from Woodside to San Francisco in 1850. These two men thus became the founders of Redwood City itself. The Port of Redwood City also was a birthplace of the ship-building industry on the Pacific West Coast. The first schooner was built here in 1851 by G.M. Burnham and appropriately named "Redwood.". Shipbuilding thrived here until the 1880's. The last wooden ship built in Redwood City, called the "Perseverance," was launched in 1883. Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill Lumber or Timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use—from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use—as structural material for construction... Binomial name Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl. ... Woodside (pop. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... Italian ship-rigged vessel Amerigo Vespucci in New York Harbor, 1976 A ship is a large, sea-going watercraft. ...


The Port was called El Embarcadero up until at least the 1880s; the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers dredged of a seven-foot deep channel between 1886 and 1889, to yield a channel 50 feet wide. In 1903, the Corps increased the channel width to 100 feet and by 1911, they broadened it to 150 feet. In 1931, local and federal interests combined to deepen the channel to 20 feet and widen it to 200 feet, for a lineal distance of 13,360 feet. United States Army Corps of Engineers logo The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 civilian and 650 military men and women. ... // For other uses, see Dredge (disambiguation). ...


Geology and hydrology

The Port of Redwood City is situated on the east banks of Redwood Creek approximately one kilometer upchannel from the mouth of Redwood Creek.[4] Extensive areas of marshland and bay muds are found in the vicinity of the Port. Westpoint Slough joins Redwood Creek from the southeast about 600 meters north of the Port of Redwood City. Deepwater Slough is a U-shaped channel whose two ends join Redwood Creek both north and south of the Port, with both joins on the opposite site of Redwood Creek. Approximately one kilometer north of the Port of Redwood City, Corkscrew Slough enters Redwood Creek from the northwest. From that confluence northward the northwest bank of Redwood Creek (now at the mouth) consists of Bair Island, an expansive area of saltwater marsh and salt evaporation ponds. Freshwater marsh in Florida In geography, a marsh is a type of wetland, featuring grasses, rushes, reeds, typhas, sedges, cat tails, and other herbaceous plants (possibly with low-growing woody plants) in a context of shallow water. ... Richardson Bay mudflats of are exposed layers of bay mud Bay mud consists of thick deposits of soft, unconsolidated silty clay, which is saturated with water; these soil layers are situated at the bottom of certain estuaries, which are normally in temperate regions that have experienced cyclical glacial cycles. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Canal. ... Look up confluence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Bair Island is 2,600 acres (11 km²) of marsh and a part of the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Redwood City, California. ... A pond is typically a man made body of water smaller than a lake. ...


See also

Redwood Creek is a large stream in Humboldt County, California. ...

References

  1. ^ History of the Port of Redwood City: Official Port of Redwood City Website
  2. ^ [http://www.redwoodcityport.com/html/Minutes2006_1_25.htm Port of Redwood City Commission Meeting Minutes, January, 2006
  3. ^ Official Home Page of the Port of Redwood City
  4. ^ U.S. Geological Survey, Redwood Point Quadrangle, 7.5 Minute Series, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington DC

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m