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Encyclopedia > Port Royal
An illustration of pre-1692 Port Royal
An illustration of pre-1692 Port Royal

Port Royal was the centre of shipping commerce in Jamaica in the 17th century. During this time, it gained a reputation as both the "richest and wickedest city in the world". It was notorious for its gaudy displays of wealth and loose morals, and was a popular place for pirates to bring and spend their treasure. During the 17th century, the British actively encouraged and even paid buccaneers based at Port Royal to attack Spanish and French shipping. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (843x592, 144 KB) Old Port Royal - Project Gutenberg eText 19396. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (843x592, 144 KB) Old Port Royal - Project Gutenberg eText 19396. ... Damaged package The Panama canal. ... Commerce is the trading of something of economic value such as goods, services, information or money between two or more entities. ... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article refers to the type of pirate. ...


An earthquake, on June 7, 1692, largely destroyed Port Royal, causing two thirds of the city to sink into the Caribbean Sea such that today it is covered by a minimum of 25 ft (8 m) of water. Known today to 16th–18th-century focused archaeologists as the City that sank, it is considered the most important underwater archaeological site in the western hemisphere, yielding 16th–17th-century artifacts by the ton and many important treasures from indigenous peoples predating the 1588 founding from as far away as Guatemala. Pirates from around the world congregated at Port Royal coming from waters as far away as Madagascar on the far side of Africa. Several 17th and early 18th century pirate ships are sunk within the harbor and being carefully harvested under controlled conditions by different teams of archaeologists. Other "digs" are staked out along various quarters and streets by different teams. An earthquake is a phenomenon that results from the sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Events February 13 - Massacre of Glencoe March 1 - The Salem witch trials begin in Salem Village, Massachusetts Bay Colony with the charging of three women with witchcraft. ... Map of Central America and the Caribbean A Caribbean beach in Isla Margarita, Venezuela. ... The metre, or meter (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length. ... The geographical western hemisphere of Earth, highlighted in yellow. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa. ...


After this disaster, its commercial role was taken over by the city of Kingston. Current development in progress will redevelop the small resultant fishing town into a tourist mecca by 2015-16, serviced by Cruise ships as early as 2008, with the archaeological findings the heart of the attractions, which will include a combination underwater museum-aquarium and restaurant with underwater dioramas and the ability to see the native tropical sealife. The City of Kingston is the capital and largest city of Jamaica. ... A diorama is a partially three dimensional model of a landscape typically showing historical events, nature scenes, cityscapes, etc. ...

Contents

Colonization of Port Royal

Situated at the western end of the Palisadoes sand spit that protects Kingston Harbour, Port Royal was well-positioned as a harbor. Originally claimed by the Spanish, England acquired it in 1655. By 1659, two hundred houses, shops, and warehouses surrounded the fort. Palisadoes (word apparently of Portuguese origin) is the thin spit of sand that serves as a natural protection for the harbor of Kingston, Jamaica. ... In geography, a spit is a deposition landform found off coasts. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ...


For much of the period between the English conquest of Jamaica and the earthquake, Port Royal served as the capital of Jamaica; after the 1692 earthquake, Spanish Town overtook this role, later followed by Kingston. A 1774 engraving of Spanish Towns colonial offices Spanish Town is the former Spanish and English capital of Jamaica, during the 16th through 19th centuries, and is a World Heritage Site. ...


Piracy in Port Royal

Port Royal, located along the shipping lanes to and from Spain and Panama, provided a safe harbour for pirates. Buccaneers found Port Royal appealing for several reasons. Its proximity to trade routes allowed them easy access to prey. The harbour was large enough to accommodate their ships and provided a place to careen and repair these vessels. It was also ideally situated for launching raids on Spanish settlements. From Port Royal, Henry Morgan attacked Panama, Portobello, and Maracaibo. Roche Brasiliano, John Davis, and Edward Mansveldt (Mansfield) also came to Port Royal. The term safe harbor (safe harbour) has several special usages, in an analogy with its literal meaning, that of a harbor or haven which provides safety from weather or attack. ... This article is about sea pirates. ... This article refers to the type of pirate. ... A trade route is a commonly used path of travel for those (e. ... The careening of a sailing vessel is laying her up on a calm beach at high tide in order to expose one side or another of the ships hull for maintenance below the water line when the tide goes out. ... Sir Henry Morgan, in a popular woodcut, 18th century Sir Henry Morgan (c. ... Portobelo (formerly Puerto Bello) is a port in Panama. ... Nickname: La Tierra del Sol Amada (English:The Beloved Land of the Sun) Motto: Muy noble y leal Coordinates: Country Venezuela State Zulia Counties Maracaibo  - Mayor Gian Carlo Di Martino (2000 – 2008) Area    - City 550 km²  (212. ... Roche Braziliano (born c. ... John Davis is the name of several persons: John Davis (1550?-1605), an English navigator and explorer. ...


Since the English lacked sufficient troops to prevent either the Spanish or French from seizing it, the Jamaican governors eventually turned to the pirates to defend the city.


By the 1660s, the city had gained a reputation as the Sodom of the New World where most residents were pirates, cutthroats, or prostitutes. When Charles Leslie wrote his history of Jamaica, he included a description of the pirates of Port Royal: Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ... Charles Leslie (July, 1650 - April 13, 1722), Anglican nonjuring divine, son of John Leslie (1571_1671), bishop of Raphoe and afterwards of Clogher, was born in July 1650 in Dublin, and was educated at Enniskillen school and Trinity College, Dublin. ...

Wine and women drained their wealth to such a degree that… some of them became reduced to beggary. They have been known to spend 2 or 3,000 pieces of eight in one night; and one gave a strumpet 500 to see her naked. They used to buy a pipe of wine, place it in the street, and oblige everyone that passed to drink.

Port Royal grew to be one of the two largest towns and the most economically important port in the English colonies. At the height of its popularity, the city had one drinking house for every ten residents. In July 1661 alone, forty new licenses were granted to taverns. During a twenty-year period that ended in 1692, nearly 6,500 people lived in Port Royal. In addition to prostitutes and buccaneers, there were four goldsmiths, forty-four tavern keepers, and a variety of artisans and merchants who lived in two hundred buildings crammed into 51 acres (206,000 m²) of real estate. Two hundred and thirteen ships visited the seaport in 1688. The city’s wealth was so great that coins were preferred for payment rather than the more common system of bartering goods for services. A tavern is, loosely, a place of business where people gather to drink alcoholic beverages and, more than likely, also be served food, though not licenced to put up guests. ... Categories: Stub | Jewellery | Smiths ... An artisan is a skilled manual worker. ... Merchants function as professional traders, dealing in commodities that they do not produce themselves. ...


Following Henry Morgan’s appointment as lieutenant governor, Port Royal began to change. Pirates no longer needed to defend the city. The selling of slaves took on greater importance. Upstanding citizens disliked the reputation the city had acquired. In 1687, Jamaica passed anti-piracy laws. Instead of being a safe haven for pirates, Port Royal became noted as their place of execution. Gallows Point welcomed many to their death, including Charles Vane and Calico Jack, who were hanged in 1720. Two years later, forty-one pirates met their death in one month.[1] Sir Henry Morgan, in a popular woodcut, 18th century Sir Henry Morgan (c. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... John Rackham (died 17 November 1720), also known as Jack Rackham or Calico Jack, was an English pirate captain during the early 18th century. ...


Earthquake of 1692 and its aftermath

On June 7, 1692, a devastating earthquake hit the city causing the sand spit on which it was built to liquefy and flow out into Kingston Harbour. The water table was generally only two feet down prior to the quake. The effects of three tidal waves caused by the earthquake further eroded the sand spit, and soon the main part of the city lay permanently underwater, though intact enough that archaeologists have managed to uncover some well-preserved sites. The earthquake and tsunami killed between 1,000 and 3,000 people combined, over half the city's population. Disease ran rampant in the next several months, probably due to unburied bodies, claiming an estimated 2,000 additional lives. June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Events February 13 - Massacre of Glencoe March 1 - The Salem witch trials begin in Salem Village, Massachusetts Bay Colony with the charging of three women with witchcraft. ... Earthquake liquefaction, often referred to simply as liquefaction, is the process by which saturated, unconsolidated soil or sand is converted into a suspension during an earthquake. ... Kingston Harbour is the seventh largest natural harbour in the world. ... The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ...


After the earthquake on June 7, 1692, many believed the destruction to be an "Act of God" because of the city's sinful reputation. An earthquake is a phenomenon that results from the sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Events February 13 - Massacre of Glencoe March 1 - The Salem witch trials begin in Salem Village, Massachusetts Bay Colony with the charging of three women with witchcraft. ... Act of God is a common legal term for events outside of human control, such as sudden floods or other natural disasters, for which no one can be held responsible. ...


Some attempts were made to rebuild the city, starting with the one third of the city that was not submerged, but these met with mixed success and numerous disasters. An initial attempt at rebuilding was again destroyed in 1703, this time by fire. Subsequent rebuilding was hampered by several hurricanes in the first half of the 18th century, and soon Kingston eclipsed Port Royal in importance. This article is about weather phenomena. ...


A new Town of Port Royal was constructed near Old Port Royal and it became the principal station of the British naval forces in the Caribbean.[citation needed] Map of Central America and the Caribbean A Caribbean beach in Isla Margarita, Venezuela. ...


Recent history

The neutrality of this article is disputed.
Please see the discussion on the talk page.
This article has been tagged since October 2006.

A final devastating earthquake on January 14, 1907 again liquefied the sand spit, destroying nearly all of the rebuilt city and submerging additional portions. Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Today the area is a shadow of its former self with a population of less than 2,000 and has little to no commercial or political importance. The area is frequented by tourists, but is in a state of disrepair. The Jamaican government has recently resolved to further develop the area for its historic and tourist value.


Port Royal in popular culture

Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... Captain Blood is an adventure novel by Rafael Sabatini, originally published in 1922. ... Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl is a movie of adventure and romance set in the Caribbean during the seventeenth century. ... Kingdom Hearts II ) is an action role-playing game developed by Square Enix Co. ... The Secret of Monkey Island (SMI) is a well known adventure game that spawned a series of famous and classic comedy adventure games, known as the Monkey Island series as well as making a name for LucasArts as a producer of adventure games, thus the largest competitor with Sierra Online... Running Wild is one of several German power metal bands to emerge in the mid/late 1980s (along with Iced Earth, Helloween, Rage, Blind Guardian, Grave Digger, etc). ... Port Royal is an album by Running Wild. ... Ascaron Entertainment is a video game developer based in Germany. ... Port Royale 2 is the sequel to the trade simulation game Port Royale. ... Sid Meiers Pirates! is a computer game created by Sid Meier first published by MicroProse in 1987. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Angels Command is a novel by Brian Jacques and the sequel to Castaways of the Flying Dutchman. ...

Trivia

Port Royal is a town located in Beaufort County, South Carolina. ... Hilton Head Island is a town located in Beaufort County, South Carolina. ... Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island is an 8,500 acre military installation near Beaufort, South Carolina tasked with the training of enlisted Marines. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35... Species Nicotiana acuminata Nicotiana alata Nicotiana attenuata Nicotiana benthamiana Nicotiana clevelandii Nicotiana excelsior Nicotiana forgetiana Nicotiana glauca Nicotiana glutinosa Nicotiana langsdorffii Nicotiana longiflora Nicotiana obtusifolia Nicotiana paniculata Nicotiana plumbagifolia Nicotiana quadrivalvis Nicotiana repanda Nicotiana rustica Nicotianasuaveolens Nicotiana sylvestris Nicotiana tabacum Nicotiana tomentosa Ref: ITIS 30562 as of August 26, 2005...

External links

  • The Port Royal Project (historical and archaeological research)
  • Map: Old Port Royal (artistic interpretation of the city before the 1692 earthquake - by cartographer Shawn Brown)

Coordinates: 17°56′N 76°51′W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


 
 

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