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Encyclopedia > Port (nautical)

Port is the nautical term (used on boats and ships) that refers to the left side of a ship, as perceived by a person facing towards the bow (the front of the vessel). The terms are also used for aircraft, spacecraft, and analogous vessels. The equivalent for the right-hand side is "starboard". A list of nautical terms; some remain current, many date from the 17th-19th century. ... Lobster boat A boat is a watercraft, usually smaller than most ships. ... For online phenomenon of shipping, see Shipping (fandom). ... A right-handed Cartesian coordinate system, presenting the z (up) vector and y (forward) vector, the right is defined to be the positive x vector. ... Starboard is the nautical term (used on boats and ships) that refers to the right side of a vessel, as perceived by a person facing forward (i. ...


A port buoy is a lateral buoy used to guide vessels through channels or close to shallow water. The port buoy is one that a vessel must leave to port when passing upstream if in IALA area A. If in IALA area B (Japan, the Americas, South Korea, and the Philippines) then the 'handedness' of buoyage is reversed! A lateral buoy, lateral post or lateral mark, as defined by the International Association of Lighthouse Authorities, is a sea mark used in maritime pilotage to indicate the edge of a channel. ... International Association of Lighthouse Authorities (or IALA for short) is a non-profit organization founded 1957 to collect and provide nautical expertise and advise. ...


An archaic version of the term is larboard. The term larboard, when shouted in the wind, was presumably too easy to confuse with starboard - both words have two syllables - and so the word port came to replace it, referring to the side of the ship where cargo is loaded from the port. The term larboard continued its use well into the 1850s by whalers, despite the term being long superseded by "port" in the merchant vessel service at the time. Another source suggests a different archaic word "portboard" (see starboard for further explanation). Seaport, a painting by Claude Lorrain, 1638 The Port of Wellington at night. ... The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch Whaling is the hunting and killing of whales. ... Starboard is the nautical term (used on boats and ships) that refers to the right side of a vessel, as perceived by a person facing forward (i. ...


Ships and aircraft carry a red light on the port side, and a green one on the starboard side, plus a white light at the rear. Several mnemonics, such as "red right return", and "no red port left", are used to remember thi A mnemonic (pronounced in American English, in British English) is a memory aid. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Port (disambiguation) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (453 words)
A port is a facility at the edge of a body of water for receiving ships and transferring cargo or passengers.
A port (computing) is a device, whether physical or logical, for attaching an external piece of equipment or data source.
port (nautical), a nautical term relating to a ship or boat and meaning the left hand side when viewed by a person in the vessel and looking forward.
Port (nautical) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (284 words)
Port is the nautical term (used on boats and ships) that refers to the left side of a ship, as perceived by a person facing towards the bow (the front of the vessel).
A port buoy is a lateral buoy used to guide vessels through channels or close to shallow water.
The port buoy is one that a vessel must leave to port when passing upstream if in IALA area A. If in IALA area B (Japan, the Americas, South Korea, and the Philippines) then the 'handedness' of buoyage is reversed!
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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