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Encyclopedia > Porpoise
Wikipedia:How to read a taxobox
Porpoises
Fossil range: ?Latest Oligocene - recent

Phocoena phocoena, Harbour Porpoise
Source: Fjord & Bæltcentret in Denmark
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Cetacea
Family: Phocoenidae
Gray, 1825
Genera

Neophocaena
Phocoena - Harbor porpoise
Phocoenoides - Dall's porpoise The Oligocene epoch is a geologic period of time that extends from about 34 million to 23 million years before the present. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Binomial name Phocoena phocoena Linnaeus, 1758 Harbour Porpoise range The Harbour Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) is one of six species of porpoise, and so one of about eighty cetacean species. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... Animalia redirects here. ... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals primarily characterized by the presence of mammary... Suborders Mysticeti Odontoceti Archaeoceti (extinct) (see text for families) The order Cetacea (IPA: , L. cetus, whale) includes whales, dolphins and porpoises. ... John Edward Gray. ... For other uses of the word, please see Genus (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Neophocaena phoconoides Cuvier, 1829 Finless Porpoise range The Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena phoconoides) is one of six porpoise species. ... Genera Neophocaena Phocoena - Harbor porpoises Phocoenoides - Dalls porpoises The porpoises are small cetaceans of the family Phocoenidae; they are related to whales and dolphins. ... Binomial name Phocoenoides dalli (True, 1885) Dalls Porpoise range Dalls Porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) is a species of porpoise that came to worldwide attention in the 1970s when it was disclosed for the first time to the public that salmon fishing trawls were killing thousands of Dalls Porpoise...

The porpoises are small cetaceans of the family Phocoenidae; they are related to whales and dolphins. They are distinct from dolphins, although the word "porpoise" has been used to refer to any small dolphin, especially by sailors and fishermen. The most obvious visible difference between the two groups is that porpoises have flattened, spade-shaped teeth distinct from the conical teeth of dolphins. Suborders Mysticeti Odontoceti Archaeoceti (extinct) (see text for families) The order Cetacea (IPA: , L. cetus, whale) includes whales, dolphins and porpoises. ... A Fin Whale The term whale is ambiguous: it can refer to all cetaceans, to just the larger ones, or only to members of particular families within the order Cetacea. ... Genera See article below. ... A sailor is a member of the crew of a ship or boat. ... Categories: Stub ...


Porpoises, divided into six species, live in all oceans, mostly near the shore. Probably best known is the Harbour Porpoise, which can be found across the Northern Hemisphere. Binomial name Phocoena phocoena Linnaeus, 1758 Harbour Porpoise range The Harbour Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) is one of six species of porpoise, and so one of about eighty cetacean species. ...

Contents

Taxonomy and evolution

See also: Evolution of cetaceans

Porpoises, along with whales and dolphins, are descendants of land-living mammals and are related to hoofed animals. They entered the water roughly 50 million years ago. The cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises) are descendants of land-living mammals, and remnants of their terrestrial origins can be found in the fact that they must breathe air from the surface; in the bones of their fins, which look like huge, jointed hands; and in the vertical movement of... Llamas such as this, which have two toes, are artiodactylas -- even toed ungulates Ungulates (meaning roughly hoofed or hoofed animal) make up several orders of mammals, of which six to eight survive. ...

Recently-discovered hybrids between male Harbour porpoises and female Dall's Porpoises indicate that the two species may actually be members of the same genus.[1] Families See text The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) form a suborder of the cetaceans. ... Genera Neophocaena Phocoena - Harbor porpoises Phocoenoides - Dalls porpoises The porpoises are small cetaceans of the family Phocoenidae; they are related to whales and dolphins. ... Binomial name Neophocaena phoconoides Cuvier, 1829 Finless Porpoise range The Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena phoconoides) is one of six porpoise species. ... Binomial name Neophocaena phoconoides (G. Cuvier, 1829) Finless Porpoise range The Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) is one of six porpoise species. ... Genera Neophocaena Phocoena - Harbor porpoises Phocoenoides - Dalls porpoises The porpoises are small cetaceans of the family Phocoenidae; they are related to whales and dolphins. ... Binomial name Phocoena phocoena Linnaeus, 1758 Harbour Porpoise range The Harbour Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) is one of six species of porpoise, and so one of about eighty cetacean species. ... Binomial name Phocoena sinus Norris & McFarland, 1958 Vaquita range The Vaquita (Phocoena sinus) is a rare species of porpoise. ... Binomial name Phocoena dioptrica Lahille, 1912 Spectacled Porpoise range The Spectacled Porpoise (Phocoena dioptrica) is a rarely seen member of the porpoise family. ... Binomial name Phocoena spinipinnis Burmeisters Porpoise range Burmeisters Porpoise (Phocoena spinipinnis) is a species of porpoise endemic to the coast of South America. ... Binomial name Phocoenoides dalli (True, 1885) Dalls Porpoise range Dalls Porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) is a species of porpoise that came to worldwide attention in the 1970s when it was disclosed for the first time to the public that salmon fishing trawls were killing thousands of Dalls Porpoise... Dalls Porpoise range Dalls Porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) is a species of porpoise that came to worldwide attention in the 1970s. ... // This article is about a biological term. ... For other uses of the word, please see Genus (disambiguation). ...


Physical characteristics

Porpoises tend to be smaller but stouter than dolphins. They have small, rounded heads and blunt jaws instead of beaks. While dolphins have a round, bulbous "melon", porpoises do not. Their teeth are spade-shaped, whereas dolphins have conical teeth. In addition, a porpoise's dorsal fin is generally triangular, rather than curved like that of many dolphins and large whales. Some species have small bumps, known as tubercles, on the leading edge of the dorsal fin. The function of these bumps is unknown. [1]


These animals are the smallest cetaceans, reaching body lengths up to 2.5 m (8 feet); the smallest species is the Vaquita, reaching up to 1.5 m (5 ft). In terms of weight the lightest is the Finless Porpoise at 30-45 kg (65-100 lb) and the heaviest is Dall's Porpoise at 130-200 kg (280-440 lb). Because of their small size, porpoises lose body heat to the water more rapidly than other cetaceans. Their stout shape, which minimizes surface area, may be an adaptation to reduce heat loss. Thick blubber also insulates them from the cold. The small size of porpoises requires them to eat frequently, rather than depending on fat reserves.[1] Suborders Mysticeti Odontoceti (see text) The order Cetacea includes whales, dolphins and porpoises. ... Binomial name Phocoena sinus Norris & McFarland, 1958 Vaquita range The Vaquita (Phocoena sinus) is a rare species of porpoise. ... The metre (or meter, see spelling differences) is a measure of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Binomial name Neophocaena phoconoides (G. Cuvier, 1829) Finless Porpoise range The Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) is one of six porpoise species. ... The U.S. National Prototype Kilogram, which currently serves as the primary standard for measuring mass in the U.S. It was assigned to the United States in 1889 and is periodically recertified and traceable to the primary international standard, The Kilogram, held at the Bureau International des Poids et... The pound (abbreviations: lb or, sometimes in the United States, #) is a unit of mass in a number of different systems, including various systems of units of mass that formed part of English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Dalls Porpoise range Dalls Porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) is a species of porpoise that came to worldwide attention in the 1970s. ... Remains of seventeenth century blubber cauldrons at the abandoned Dutch settlement of Smeerenburg in Svalbard, Norway This article is about the body tissue. ...


Lifecycle

Porpoises are relatively r-selected compared with dolphins: that is, they rear young more quickly than dolphins. Female Dall's and Harbour Porpoises often become pregnant with a single calf each year, and pregnancy lasts for about 11 months. Although the lifespan of most species is not known, specimens older than in their mid-teens have rarely been found.[1] In ecology, r/K selection theory relates to the selection of traits (in organisms) that allow success in particular environments. ...


Behaviour

"Rooster tail" spray around swimming Dall's Porpoises

Porpoises are predators of fish, squid, and crustaceans. Although they are capable of dives up to 200 m, they generally hunt in shallow coastal waters. They are found most commonly in small groups of fewer than ten individuals. Rarely, some species form brief aggregations of several hundred animals. Like all toothed whales they are capable of echolocation for finding prey and group coordination. Porpoises are fast swimmers—Dall's porpoise is said to be one of the fastest cetaceans, with a speed of 55 km/h (34 mph). Porpoises tend to be less acrobatic and more wary than dolphins. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Dalls Porpoise range Dalls Porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) is a species of porpoise that came to worldwide attention in the 1970s. ... Families See text The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) form a suborder of the cetaceans. ... Echolocation, also called Biosonar, is the biological sonar used by several mammals such as bats (not all of them), dolphins and whales. ... Dalls Porpoise range Dalls Porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) is a species of porpoise that came to worldwide attention in the 1970s. ...


Human impact

Accidental entanglement (bycatch) in fishing nets is the main threat to porpoises today. One of the most endangered cetacean species is the Vaquita, having a limited distribution in the Gulf of California, a highly industrialized area.[2] In fisheries science, by-catch refers to species caught in a fishery intended to target another species, as well as reproductively_immature juveniles of the target species. ... Binomial name Phocoena sinus Norris & McFarland, 1958 Vaquita range The Vaquita (Phocoena sinus) is a rare species of porpoise. ...


In some countries, porpoises are hunted for food or bait meat.


Porpoises are rarely held in captivity in zoos or oceanaria, as they are generally not as capable of adapting to tank life nor as easily trained as dolphins. Giraffes in Sydneys Taronga Zoo A zoological garden, zoological park, or zoo is a facility in which animals are confined within enclosures and displayed to the public, and in which they may also be bred. ... Marineland of Florida, USA — dolphin show, 1964. ...


See also

Cetaceans Portal

This image shows the fluke of Sperm Whale as it begins a dive into the Gulf of Mexico. ... Genera See article below. ... A Fin Whale The term whale is ambiguous: it can refer to all cetaceans, to just the larger ones, or only to members of particular families within the order Cetacea. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d Read, Andrew (1999). Porpoises. Stillwater, MN, USA: Voyageur Press. 
  2. ^ The Porpoise Page - Information on Porpoises. Retrieved on 2006-11-03.

  Results from FactBites:
 
porpoise - definition of porpoise in Encyclopedia (361 words)
The porpoises are small cetaceans of the family Phocoenidae; they are related to whales and dolphins.
Porpoises are fast swimmers—Dall's porpoise is said to be one of the fastest cetaceans with a speed of 55 km/h.
Porpoises are rarely held in captivity in zoos or oceanaria, in contrast to dolphins, which are far more popular.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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