FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Pork" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Pork
Pork tenderloin served French style.
Two halves of pork being delivered

Pork is the culinary name for meat from the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), often specifically the fresh meat but can be used as an all-inclusive term. It is one of the most commonly consumed meats worldwide.[1] It is eaten in various forms, including cooked (as roast pork), smoked (ham, including the Italian Prosciutto) or both (gammon, bacon or Pancetta). It is also a common ingredient of sausages. As with beef, pork consumption is taboo in some religions and cultures. Pork is a meat from pigs. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 872 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pork User:Chensiyuan... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 872 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pork User:Chensiyuan... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (428x704, 85 KB) Pork being delivered, rue Claude Bernard, Paris, 2005-11-28 Copyright © 2005 David Monniaux File links The following pages link to this file: Pork Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (428x704, 85 KB) Pork being delivered, rue Claude Bernard, Paris, 2005-11-28 Copyright © 2005 David Monniaux File links The following pages link to this file: Pork Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the food. ... For other uses, see Pig (disambiguation). ... Prosciutto Prosciutto (IPA: ) is the Italian word for ham, used in English to refer to dry-cured ham (prosciutto crudo). ... For other uses, see Bacon (disambiguation). ... Packaged pancetta. ... This article is about the prepared meat. ... For other uses, see Beef (disambiguation). ... This article is about cultural prohibitions in general, for other uses, see Taboo (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Etymology

The term as it refers to the (fresh) flesh of a pig dates from the Middle English, derived from the French porc and Latin porcus "pig".[2] Middle English is the name given by historical linguistics to the diverse forms of the English language spoken between the Norman invasion of 1066 and the mid-to-late 15th century, when the Chancery Standard, a form of London-based English, began to become widespread, a process aided by the... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...


History

The pig is one of the oldest forms of livestock, having been domesticated as early as 5000 BC.[3] It is believed to have been domesticated either in the Near East or in China from the wild boar. The adaptable nature and omnivorous diet of this creature allowed early humans to domesticate it much earlier than many other forms of livestock, such as cattle. Pigs were mostly used for food, but people also used their hide for shields and shoes, their bones for tools and weapons, and their bristles for brushes. Pigs have other roles within the human economy: their feeding behaviour in searching for roots churns up the ground and makes it easier to plough; their sensitive noses lead them to truffles, an underground fungus highly valued by humans; and their omnivorous nature enables them to eat human rubbish, keeping settlements cleaner than they would otherwise have been. Sheep are commonly bred as livestock. ... // Events 4860 BC - Mount Mazama in Oregon collapses, forming a caldera that later fills with water and becomes Crater Lake, the deepest lake in the United States. ... Inhabitants of the Near East, late nineteenth century. ... Binomial name Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758 The Wild Boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domesticated pig. ... Omnivores are organisms that consume both plants and animals. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Look up hide in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the handheld defensive device. ... shoe for right foot A shoe is a piece of footwear for humans, less than a boot and more than a slipper. ... A miserable stubborn cantankerous old mans, whos actually quite good humoured & an enjoyable compadre to play online alongside if you catch him on a good day. ... The traditional way: a German farmer works the land with a horse and plough. ... Truffle describes a group of edible mycorrhizal (subterranean) mushrooms (genus Tuber, class Ascomycetes, division Mycota). ...


Before the mass-production and re-engineering of pork in the 20th Century, pork in Europe and North America was traditionally an autumn dish; pigs and other livestock coming to the slaughter in the autumn after growing in the spring and fattening during the summer. Due to the seasonal nature of the meat in Western culinary history, apples (harvested in late summer and autumn) have been a staple pairing to fresh pork. The year-round availability of meat and fruits has not diminished the popularity of this combination on Western plates. This article is about the temperate season. ...


One of the breeds of swine is that of the Berkshire. Berkshire (also known as Kurobuta or "black pig") hogs are highly recognized and known for their supreme quality gourmet meat. A number of registry associations are set to guard the purity of the Berkshire breed. Characteristics of the breed include slow growth patterns, higher consumption of feed, and black coloring of the skin. With its high intramuscular marbling, kurobuta pork meat is much more flavorful than traditional pork. This is why many refer to Kurobuta as the "Kobe" of pork[4] Berkshire Pigs are a rare breed of pig originating from Britain. ...


Consumption patterns

A traditional Austrian pork dish, served with potato croquettes, vegetables, mushrooms and gravy.

Pork is the most widely eaten meat in the world, providing about 38 percent of daily meat protein intake worldwide, although consumption varies widely from place to place.[5] This is despite religious restrictions on the consumption of pork and the prominence of beef production in the West. Pork consumption has been rising for thirty years, both in actual terms and in terms of meat-market share.[citation needed] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 819 KB)A traditional Austrian pork dish, served with potato croquettes, vegetables, mushrooms and gravy. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 819 KB)A traditional Austrian pork dish, served with potato croquettes, vegetables, mushrooms and gravy. ... Cylindrical croquettes. ... For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mushroom (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Gravy (disambiguation). ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...


According to the USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service, nearly 100 million metric tons of pork were consumed worldwide in 2006 (preliminary data). Increasing urbanization and disposable income has led to a rapid rise in pork consumption in China, where 2006 consumption is 20% higher than in 2002, and a further 5% increase projected in 2007.[6] The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA, is a Cabinet department of the United States Federal Government. ... The Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) has primary responsibility for the U.S. Department of Agricultures overseas programs -- market development, international trade agreements and negotiations, and the collection of statistics and market information. ...


2006 worldwide pork consumption
  Region Metric tons (millions) Per capita (kg)
1 People's Republic of China 52.5 40.0
2 EU25 20.1 43.9
3 United States 8.7 29.0
4 Russian Federation 2.6 18.1
5 Japan 2.5 19.8
Others 12.2 n/a
Total 98.9 n/a
Source: USDA Foreign Agricultural Service, preliminary data for 2006.[6]

The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA, is a Cabinet department of the United States Federal Government. ... The Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) has primary responsibility for the U.S. Department of Agricultures overseas programs -- market development, international trade agreements and negotiations, and the collection of statistics and market information. ...

Pork cuts and products

Pork may be cooked from fresh meat or cured over time. Cured meat products include ham and bacon. The carcass may be utilized in many different ways for fresh meat cuts, with the popularity of certain cuts and certain carcass proportions varying worldwide. This article is about the cut of meat. ... For other uses, see Bacon (disambiguation). ...


Fresh meat

Most of the carcass can be used to produce fresh meat and in the case of a suckling pig the whole body of a young pig ranging in age from two to six weeks is roasted. Sucking pig is a young pig that has only fed on its mothers milk. ...


Cuts of pork

There are different systems of naming for cuts in America, Britain and France.

British cuts of pork.
American cuts of pork.
  • Head - This can be used to make brawn, stocks and soups. After boiling the ears can be fried or baked and eaten separately.
  • Spare Rib Roast/Spare Rib Joint/Blade Shoulder/Shoulder Butt[7] - This is the shoulder and contains the shoulder blade. It can be boned out and rolled up as a roasting joint, or cured as "collar bacon". Not to be confused with the rack of spare ribs from the front belly. Pork butt, despite its name, is from the upper part of the shoulder. Boston Butt, or Boston-Style Shoulder, cut comes from this area, and may contain the shoulder blade.
  • Hand/Arm Shoulder/Arm Picnic[7] - This can be cured on the bone to make a ham, or used in sausages.
Vacuum packed pork loin fillets
  • Loin - This can be cured to give back bacon or Canadian-style bacon. The loin and belly can be cured together to give a side of bacon. The loin can also be divided up into roasts (blade loin roasts, center loin roasts, and sirloin roasts come from the front, center, or rear of the loin), back ribs (also called baby back ribs, or riblets), pork cutlets, and pork chops. A pork loin crown roast is arranged into a circle, either boneless or with rib bones protruding upward as points in a crown. Pork tenderloin, removed from the loin, should be practically free of fat.
  • Belly/Side/Side Pork - The belly, although a fattier meat, can be used for steaks or diced stir-fry meat. Belly pork may be rolled for roasting or cut for streaky bacon.
  • Legs/Hams - Although any cut of pork can be cured, technically speaking only the back leg is entitled to be called a ham. Legs and shoulders, when used fresh, are usually cut bone-in for roasting, or leg steaks can be cut from the bone. Three common cuts of the leg include the rump (upper portion), center, and shank (lower portion).
  • Trotters - Both the front and hind trotters can be cooked and eaten, as can the tail.[8]
  • Spare ribs, or spareribs, are taken from the pig's ribs and the meat surrounding the bones. St. Louis-style spareribs have the sternum, cartilage, and skirt meat removed.

Image File history File links British_Pork_Cuts. ... Image File history File links American_Pork_Cuts. ... Boston Butt is a cut of pork that comes from the upper part of the shoulder from the front leg and may contain the blade bone. ... United States Department of Agriculture photo. ... United States Department of Agriculture photo. ... Vacuum packing is a method of storing food and presenting it for sale. ... Pork chops, cooked and served. ... “Roast” redirects here. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... The human rib cage. ...

Processed pork

Pork is particularly common as an ingredient of sausages. Many traditional European sausages are made with pork, including chorizo, fuet, and salami. Most brands of American hot dogs and breakfast sausage are made from pork. This article is about the prepared meat. ... Chorizo (in Spanish; IPA: [tʃoriθo] or [tʃoɹɪso]) or Chouriço (in Portuguese) is a term encompassing several types of pork sausage originating from the Iberian Peninsula. ... Fuet is a Catalan thin, cured dry sausage of pork meat in a pork gut. ... Salami Salami is cured sausage, fermented and air-dried. ...


Ham and bacon are made from fresh pork by curing with salt (pickling) and/or smoking. Shoulders and legs are most commonly cured in this manner for ham whereas streaky and round bacon usually comes from the loin, although it may also come from the side and belly. For other uses, see Pickle. ... Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject: Smoking Smoking is the process of preserving, cooking, or flavoring food by exposing it to the smoke from burning or smoldering plant materials, most often wood. ... In polymer chemistry and Process Engineering, curing refers to the toughening or hardening of a polymer material by cross-linking of polymer chains, brought about by chemical additives, ultraviolet radiation or heat. ... This article is about the cut of meat. ...

Roasted pork knuckle

Ham and bacon are popular foods in the west, and their consumption has increased with industrialisation. Non-western cuisines also use preserved meat products. For example, salted preserved pork or red roasted pork is used in Chinese and Asian cuisine. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2108x1424, 1406 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Pork Schweizerhaus (Vienna) ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2108x1424, 1406 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Pork Schweizerhaus (Vienna) ...


The canned meat Spam is made of chopped pork shoulder meat and ham. This article is about the canned meat product. ...


Use of the whole carcass

In order to utilise the whole carcass ("everything but the squeal"), parts of the pig such as knuckle, pig's feet ("trotters"), chitterlings (pork intestines), and hog jowls may be eaten. In earlier centuries in the United States some of these products figured prominently in the traditional diets of poor Southerners (see soul food). Scrapple and McRib are other examples of aggregate pork products. Look up oink in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Chitlins in broth. ... For other uses, see Soul food (disambiguation). ... A plate of scrapple Scrapple is a savory mush in which cornmeal and flour, often buckwheat flour, are simmered with pork scraps and trimmings, then formed into a loaf. ... The McRib The McRib is a sandwich from McDonalds made from boneless pork and barbecue sauce on a bun, with onions and pickles added. ...


Feijoada, the national dish of Brazil, is prepared with pork trimmings: ears, tail and feet. Brazilian Feijoada and common accompanying dishes. ...


Nutrition

A pack of Tesco diced pork with the reminder that pork contains 'no carbs'.

In gastronomy, pork is traditionally considered a white meat, but in nutritional studies, it is usually grouped with beef as "red meat", and public perceptions have been changing. Its myoglobin content is lower than beef, but much higher than chicken white meat. The USDA treats pork as a red meat.[9] Pork is very high in thiamin.[10] Download high resolution version (1812x1413, 502 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1812x1413, 502 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... , For other uses, see Tesco (disambiguation). ... Lactose is a disaccharide found in milk. ... Gastronomy is the study of relationship between culture and food. ... White meat refers to any lighter-colored meat, often contrasted with red meat. ... An X-ray diffraction image for the protein myoglobin. ... USDA redirects here. ... Thiamine mononitrate Thiamine or thiamin, also known as vitamin B1, is a colorless compound with chemical formula C12H17ClN4OS. It is soluble in water and insoluble in alcohol. ...


In 1987 the U.S. National Pork Board, began an advertising campaign to position pork as "the other white meat" due to a public perception of chicken and turkey (white meat) as more healthy than red meat. The campaign was highly successful and resulted in 87% of consumers identifying pork with the slogan. As of 2005, the slogan is still used in marketing pork, with some variations.[11]


The consumption of raw or undercooked pork may lead to trichinosis,[12] though this is rare in the developed world.[citation needed] Trichinosis, also called trichinellosis, or trichiniasis, is a parasitic disease caused by eating raw or undercooked pork and wild game products infected with the larvae of a species of roundworm Trichinella spiralis, commonly called the trichina worm. ...


Religious bans of pork consumption

Throughout the Islamic world, as well as in Israel[13] many countries severely restrict the importation or consumption of pork products. Examples are Iran,[14] Mauritania,[15] Oman,[16] Qatar[17] and Saudi Arabia.[18] Pork is one of the best-known of a category of foods that are forbidden under traditional Jewish dietary law. The biblical basis for the Jewish prohibition of pork is in Leviticus 11:7.[19] This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... The Islamic world is the world-wide community of those who identify with Islam, known as Muslims, and who number approximately one-and-a-half billion people. ... The circled U indicates that this product is certified as kosher by the Orthodox Union (OU). ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ... Leviticus is the third book of the Hebrew Bible, also the third book in the Torah (five books of Moses). ...


Seventh-day Adventists likewise eat no pork.[citation needed] The Seventh-day Adventist (abbreviated Adventist[1]) Church is a Christian denomination which is distinguished by its observance of Saturday, the seventh day of the week, as the Sabbath. ...


Audio

  • One hour radio broadcast on pork production that explores hog factories, antibiotics, manure and sustainable farms. Courtesy of the Deconstructing Dinner radio program - Kootenay Co-op Radio.

References

  1. ^ Raloff, Janet. Food for Thought: Global Food Trends. Science News Online. May 31, 2003.
  2. ^ "pork". Oxford English Dictionary (2nd edition). (1989). Ed. J. Simpson, E. Weiner (eds). Oxford: Clarendon Press. ISBN 0-19-861186-2. 
  3. ^ Pigs Force Rethink on Human History University of Oxford Press Office. March 11, 2005.
  4. ^ About Pork Meat
  5. ^ Raloff, Janet. Food for Thought: Global Food Trends. Science News Online. May 31, 2003.
  6. ^ a b "Livestock and Poultry: World Markets and Trade." Circular Series DL&P 2-06, Foreign Agricultural Service, United States Department of Agriculture, October 2006. Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  7. ^ a b Cattleman's Beef Board & National Cattlemen's Beef Association. Uniform Retail Meat Identity Standards. Retrieved July 11, 2007.
  8. ^ Hugh Fearnley Wittingstall. "The River cottage cookbook", Harper Collins. 
  9. ^ Fresh Pork...from Farm to Table USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service.
  10. ^ Calorie-Count.com Nutrition Facts
  11. ^ Lavere, Jane L. THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING; The pork industry's 'other white meat' campaign is taken in a new direction, off the beaten path. Nytimes.com. March 4, 2005.
  12. ^ CDC Trichinellosis Fact Sheet
  13. ^ HOFESH Secular Israeli website
  14. ^ Travel Report for Iran Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada.
  15. ^ Travel Report for Mauritania Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada.
  16. ^ Travel Advice for Oman Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
  17. ^ Travel Report for Qatar Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada.
  18. ^ Travel Report for Saudi Arabia Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada.
  19. ^ Leviticus, Chapter 11 Jewish Publication Society Bible. USPoliticsOnline.com.

For other uses, see October (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA, is a Cabinet department of the United States Federal Government. ...

External links

  • The Other White Meat Pork Main Website
  • National Pork Board Pork Producer's Main Website
  • The Pork of Bayeux
  • About Kurobuta Pork Meat
  • National Pork Producers' Council
  • Pork Magazine
  • Nutrition facts

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pork Checkoff - Pork Racing (319 words)
Season-round, America's pork producers from around the country join championship ARCA driver Frank Kimmel at the track to show their support for the team.
The Pork Producers have been a lot of fun to have at the race tracks throughout the season and their continued support of our race team means so much to everyone involved.
Whereas racing is one of the fastest growing sports for family entertainment, reaching millions of people of all ages every weekend and racing fans are the most loyal of any sport, we are fortunate to be affiliated with the teams that are so much respected by their peers of the sport and fans.
Pork - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (819 words)
Pork is the most widely eaten meat in the world: about 38 percent of daily meat protein intake worldwide is from pork.
Pork ribs are taken from the pigs' ribs and the meat surrounding the bones.
Pork is particularly common as an ingredient of sausages.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m