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Encyclopedia > Porfirio Díaz
Porfirio Díaz Mori

President of Mexico
Term of office: 29 November 1876 to 30 November 1880 (first term)
1 December 1884 to 25 May 1911 (second term)
Preceded by: Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada (1876), Manuel González (1884)
Succeeded by: Manuel González (1880), Francisco León de la Barra interim (1911)
Date of birth: 15 September 1830
Place of birth: Oaxaca, Oaxaca
Date of death: 2 July 1915
Place of death: Paris, France
Profession: Army General
First Lady: Delfina Ortega & Carmelita Romero Rubio
Party:

José de la Cruz Porfirio Díaz Mori (15 September 18302 July 1915) was President of Mexico, considered a dictator, who ruled Mexico from 1876 until 1911 (with the exception of one single four-year period). File links The following pages link to this file: Porfirio Díaz ... Seal of the Office of the President of Mexico The President of United Mexican States is the head of state of Mexico. ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 31 days remaining, as the final day of November. ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... 1911 is a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada (April 24, 1823 _ April 21, 1893) was a Mexican politician. ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Manuel González (June 18, 1833 - 1893) was a Mexican military officer, politician, and President of Mexico (1880 - 1884). ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... Manuel González (June 18, 1833 - 1893) was a Mexican military officer, politician, and President of Mexico (1880 - 1884). ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Term of Office: 25 May 1911 – 6 November 1911 Preceded by: Porfirio Díaz Succeeded by: Francisco I. Madero Date of birth: 16 June 1863 Place of birth: Querétaro, Querétaro Date of death: 23 September 1939 Place of death: Biarritz, France Profession: Lawyer First Lady: María Refugio Borneque Party: Francisco León... 1911 is a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Calle Tinoco y Palacios, with the church of San Felipe Neri Basílica de la Soledad Calle Morelos The city of Oaxaca, Oaxaca (formally: Oaxaca de Juárez, in honour of 19th-century president and national hero Benito Juárez, who was born nearby) is the capital and main city of the Mexican... Oaxaca is the name of a city and a state in Mexico. ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... 1915 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... 1915 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Seal of the Office of the President of Mexico The President of United Mexican States is the head of state of Mexico. ... Dictator was the title of a magistrate in ancient Rome appointed by the Senate to rule the state in times of emergency. ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1911 is a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ...


Díaz was born in the city of Oaxaca, Oaxaca. He was a Mestizo, of Mixtec Indian and Spanish ancestry. An army officer with humble rural roots, he became something of a hero due to his participation in the war against the French, where he won several important victories. He led the cavalry in the celebrated Battle of Puebla of 5 May 1862. Calle Tinoco y Palacios, with the church of San Felipe Neri Basílica de la Soledad Calle Morelos The city of Oaxaca, Oaxaca (formally: Oaxaca de Juárez, in honour of 19th-century president and national hero Benito Juárez, who was born nearby) is the capital and main city of the Mexican... Mestizo (Portuguese, Mestiço; Canadian French, Métis: from Late Latin mixtcius, from Latin mixtus, past participle of miscere, to mix) is a term of Spanish origin used to designate the peoples of mixed European and Amerindian racial strain inhabiting the region spanning the Americas, from the Canadian prairies in the north... Codex Zouche-Nuttall, a pre-Columbian piece of Mixtec writing, now in the British Museum The Mixtec (or Mixteca) are a Native American people centered in the Oaxaca state of Mexico. ... The Battle of Puebla took place on May 5, 1862 near the city of Puebla, Mexico, during the French invasion of Mexico. ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... 1862 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...


In 1876 he overthrew the government of President Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada. Initially, he advanced a platform of reform, using the slogan "No Re-election" (for the President). After appointing himself President on 29 November 1876, he served one term and then dutifully stepped down in favour of Manuel González, one of his underlings. The four-year period that followed was marked by corruption and official incompetence, so that when Díaz stepped up in the next election he was a welcome replacement, and there was no remembrance of his "No Re-election" slogan. During this period underground political newspapers spread the new ironic slogan for the Porfirian times, based on the slogan "Sufragio Efectivo, No Reelección" (Real suffrage, no re-election) and changed it to "Sufragio Efectivo No, Reelección" (No real suffrage, Re-election). In fact, Díaz had the constitution amended twice – first to allow two terms in office, and then to remove all restrictions on re-elections. 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada (April 24, 1823 _ April 21, 1893) was a Mexican politician. ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Manuel González (June 18, 1833 - 1893) was a Mexican military officer, politician, and President of Mexico (1880 - 1884). ...


He maintained power through manipulation of votes, but also through simple violence and assassination of his opponents, which consequently were few in number. He was a cunning politician and knew very well how to manipulate people to his advantage.


In 1899 he faced some small opposition from Bernardo Reyes, an official in his government, who decided to run for president after Díaz gave an interview in which he said he would allow the next election to be freely contested. In the end the attempt failed and Díaz forced Reyes into exile. 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Bernardo Reyes (born in Guadalajara, Mexico, August 1850) was a Mexico under Porfirio Díaz, governor of Nuevo León and father of the writer Alfonso Reyes. ...


Díaz embarked on a program of modernisation, attempting to bring Mexico up to the level of a modern state. His principal advisers were of a type called científicos, akin to modern economists, because they espoused a program of "scientific" modernisation. These included the building of railroad and telegraph lines across the country, including the first Mexican railway between Veracruz and Mexico City. Under his rule the amount of track in Mexico increased tenfold; many of these rails remain in operation today without remodelling. He introduced the idea of steam machines and technological appliances in industry and invited and welcomed foreign investment in Mexico. He also encouraged the construction of factories in Mexico City. This resulted in the rise of an urban proletariat and the influx of foreign (principally United States) capital. Veracruz is the name of both a state in Mexico and that states largest city. ... Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the federal capital of, and largest city in, Mexico. ... Mexico City (Spanish: Ciudad de México) is the federal capital of, and largest city in, Mexico. ... The proletariat (from Latin proles, offspring) is a term used to identify a lower social class; a member of such a class is called a proletarian. ...


The growing influence of U.S. businessmen, already a sore point in a Mexico that had lost much land to the United States, was a constant problem for Díaz. His modernisation program was also at odds with the owners of the large plantations haciendas) that had spread across much of Mexico. These rich plantation owners wanted to maintain their existing feudal system (peonage), and were reluctant to transform into the capitalist economy Díaz was pushing towards because it meant competing in a global market and contending with the monetary influence of businessmen from the United States. Hacienda is a Spanish word describing a vast ranch, common in the Pampa. ... Debt bondage or bonded labor is a means of paying off a familys loans via the labour of family members or heirs. ...


Though he wished to modernise the country, Díaz by no means opposed the existence of the haciendas, and in fact supported them strongly throughout his rule. He appointed sympathetic governors and allowed the plantation owners to proceed with a slow campaign of encroachment onto collectively-owned village land, and enforced such theft through his well-equipped rural police (rurales).


In 1908, Díaz agreed to an interview with a U.S. journalist, Creelman. In this interview Díaz stated that Mexico was ready for democracy and elections and that he would step down and allow other candidates to compete for the presidency. Francisco I. Madero answered the call for candidates. Díaz, however, did not approve of Madero and had him gaoled on election day in 1910. Term of Office: 6 November 1911 – 18 February 1913 Preceded by: Francisco León de la Barra (interim) Succeeded by: Pedro Lascuráin (interim) Date of birth: 30 October 1873 Place of birth: Parras, Coahuila Date of death: 22 February 1913 Place of death: Mexico City Profession: Businessman First Lady: Sara Pérez...


The election, however, went ahead. Madero had gathered much popular support, but when the official results were announced by the government, Díaz was proclaimed to have been reelected almost unanimously, with Madero gathering only a minuscule number of votes. This undisputable case of massive electoral fraud aroused widespread anger. Madero called for revolt against Díaz, and the Mexican Revolution began. Díaz was forced from office and fled the country for France in 1911. The Mexican Revolution was a violent social and cultural movement, colored by socialist, nationalist, and anarchist tendencies that began with the popular rejection of dictator Porfirio Díaz Mori in 1910 and continued through the promulgation of a new constitution seven years later. ... 1911 is a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ...


In 1915, Díaz died in exile in Paris; he is buried there in the Cimetière du Montparnasse. 1915 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The Cimetière du Montparnasse is a famous cemetery in the Montparnasse quarter of Paris, France. ...


Quotation

Poor Mexico, so far from God, so close to the United States.

See also

  • History of Mexico


Pre-Columbian Mexico Hunter-Gatherer peoples are thought to have inhabited Mexico more than 20,000 years ago. ...

Preceded by:
Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada
President of Mexico
1876–1880
Succeeded by:
Manuel González
Preceded by:
Manuel González
President of Mexico
1884–1911
Succeeded by:
Francisco León de la Barra


Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada (April 24, 1823 _ April 21, 1893) was a Mexican politician. ... Seal of the Office of the President of Mexico The President of United Mexican States is the head of state of Mexico. ... Manuel González (June 18, 1833 - 1893) was a Mexican military officer, politician, and President of Mexico (1880 - 1884). ... Manuel González (June 18, 1833 - 1893) was a Mexican military officer, politician, and President of Mexico (1880 - 1884). ... Seal of the Office of the President of Mexico The President of United Mexican States is the head of state of Mexico. ... Term of Office: 25 May 1911 – 6 November 1911 Preceded by: Porfirio Díaz Succeeded by: Francisco I. Madero Date of birth: 16 June 1863 Place of birth: Querétaro, Querétaro Date of death: 23 September 1939 Place of death: Biarritz, France Profession: Lawyer First Lady: María Refugio Borneque Party: Francisco León...


 
 

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