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Encyclopedia > Populist Party (United States)
Populist Party campaign poster from 1904

The Populist Party (also known as the People's Party) was a relatively short-lived political party in the United States in the late 19th century. It flourished particularly among western farmers, based largely on its opposition to the gold standard. The party did not remain a lasting feature of the political landscape, though many of its ideals have. The very term "populist" has since become a generic term in U.S. politics for politics which appeals to the common in opposition to established interests. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... For other uses, see Gold standard (disambiguation). ... Look up Populism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


At least three distinct American parties have used the term populist in their names since 1924. See "Recent Incarnations" section below.

Contents

History

The U.S. presidential election of 1892

The Populist Party grew out of the agrarian revolt that rose to the collapse of agriculture prices following the Panic of 1873. The Farmers' Alliance, formed in Lampasas, TX in 1876, promoted collective economic action by farmers and achieved widespread popularity in the South and Great Plains. The Farmers' Alliance was ultimately unable to achieve its wider economic goals of collective economic action against brokers, railroads, and merchants, and many in the movement agitated for changes in national policy. By the late 1880s, the Alliance had developed a political agenda that called for regulation and reform in national politics, most notably an opposition to the gold standard to counter the deflation in agricultural prices. Download high resolution version (1182x635, 113 KB)Image from http://nationalatlas. ... Download high resolution version (1182x635, 113 KB)Image from http://nationalatlas. ... Run on the Fourth National Bank, No. ... The Farmers Alliance was an organized agrarian economic movement among U.S. farmers that flourished in the 1880s. ... The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... Deflation (economics) Deflation (data compression) Deflation is the removal of loose soil by eolian (wind) processes This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Farming, ploughing rice paddy, in food, feed, fiber and other desired products by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock). ...


The drive to create a new political party out of the movement arose from the refusal of both Democrats and Republicans to take up and promote the policies advocated by the Alliance, notably in regard to the Populists' call for unlimited coinage of silver. The Populist Party was formed by members of the "Alliance", in conjunction with the Knights of Labor, in 1889–1890. The movement reached its peak in 1892 when the party held a convention in Omaha, Nebraska and nominated candidates for the national election. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOP redirects here. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... Knights of Labor seal The Knights of Labor, also known as Noble and Holy Order of the Knights of Labor, was founded by seven Philadelp tailors in 1869, led by Uriah S. Stephens. ... Omaha redirects here. ...


The party's platform, commonly known as the Omaha Platform, called for the abolition of national banks, a graduated income tax, direct election of Senators, civil service reform, a working day of eight hours and Government control of all railroads, telegraphs, and telephones. In the 1892 Presidential election, James B. Weaver received 1,027,329 votes. Weaver carried four states (Colorado, Kansas, Idaho, and Nevada) and received electoral votes from Oregon and North Dakota as well. The word platform is used in several different contexts including various topics: In rail transport, a railway platform is an area at a train station to alight from/embark on trains or trams. ... The Omaha Platform was the party program adopted at the formative convention of the Populist (or Peoples) Party held in Omaha, Nebraska on July 4, 1892. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... Amendment XVII in the National Archives Amendment XVII (the Seventeenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution was passed by the Senate on June 12, 1911 and by the House on May 13, 1912. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Telegraphy (from the Greek words tele = far away and grapho = write) is the long distance transmission of written messages without physical transport of letters, originally over wire. ... Look up and in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Baird Weaver James Baird Weaver (June 12, 1833 – February 6, 1912) was a United States politician and member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Iowa as a member of the Greenback Party. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ...

Populist Party convention held at Columbus, Nebraska, July 15, 1890.

The party flourished most among farmers in the Southwest and Great Plains, as well as making significant gains in the South, where they faced an uphill battle given the firmly entrenched monopoly of the Democratic Party. Opposition to the gold standard was especially strong among western farmers, who viewed the inherent scarcity of gold (and its slow movement through the banking system) as an instrument of Eastern banking interests who could force mass bankruptcies among farmers in the west by instigating "credit crunches". Many western farmers rallied around the Populist banner in the belief that greenbacks not backed by a hard mineral standard would allow credit to flow more freely through rural regions. Free silver platform received widespread support across class lines in the Mountain states, where the economy was heavily dependent upon silver mining. The Populists were the first political party in the United States to actively include women in their affairs. At a time when cultural attitudes of white supremacy were permeating all aspects of American life, a number of southern Populists, including Thomas E. Watson, openly talked of the need for poor blacks and poor whites to set aside their racial differences in the name of shared economic self-interest. Regardless of these rhetoric appeals, however, racism did not evade the People's Party. In fact, after the party's disintegration, Watson himself later became an outspoken white supremacist. Columbus is a city in Platte County, Nebraska, 90 miles (148 km) west by north of Omaha on the Loup River, a short distance above the confluence with the Platte. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... This article is about the economic term. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Farmer spreading grasshopper bait in his alfalfa field. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration—see text) in the United Kingdom. ... A compass rose with west highlighted This article refers to the cardinal direction; for other uses see West (disambiguation). ... Deflation (economics) Deflation (data compression) Deflation is the removal of loose soil by eolian (wind) processes This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A banner is a flag or other piece of cloth bearing a symbol, logo, slogan or other message. ... The term Greenbacks is used to refer to: the paper money first issued by the United States during the American Civil War, and the United States Greenback Party, which advocated inflation of the currency in the years after the war. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Thomas Edward Watson (5 September 1856–26 September 1922), generally known as Tom Watson, was a United States politician from Georgia. ...


Presidential election of 1896

By 1896, the Democratic Party took up many of the Populist Party's causes at the national level, and the party began to fade from national prominence. In that year's presidential election, the Populists nominated Democratic candidate William Jennings Bryan; he backed the Populist opposition to the gold standard in his famous "Cross of Gold" speech. The Populists could not bring themselves to also nominate Bryan's wealthy running mate, Arthur Sewall, and nominated Thomas E. Watson for vice president instead, though Watson staunchly opposed fusion with the Democrats. The 1896 convention was the Coliseum of the St. Louis Exposition and Music Hall which in the same month hosted the 1896 Republican National Convention. Bryan lost to William McKinley by a margin of 600,000 votes. The effects of fusion with the Democrats were disastrous to the Party in the south. Collaboration with the racist Democratic establishment effectively ended the Populist/Republican alliance which had governed North Carolina with the support of African Americans. By 1898, the North Carolinian Populists were attempting to out-flank the Democrats with a virulently racist campaign. [1] Presidential electoral votes by state. ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... The Cross of Gold speech was a speech famously delivered by William Jennings Bryan at the 1896 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, Illinois. ... Arthur Sewall (November 25, 1835 _ September 5, 1900 was a U.S. Democratic politician from Maine most notable as William Jennings Bryans first running mate in 1896. ... Thomas Edward Watson (5 September 1856–26 September 1922), generally known as Tom Watson, was a United States politician from Georgia. ... The 1896 Republican National Convention was held in Exposition Building, Saint Louis, Missouri, June 16-18, 1896. ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... Electoral fusion is an arrangement where two or more political parties support a common candidate, pooling the votes for all those parties. ... History of North Carolina For the state today see North Carolina // Bibliography Surveys James Clay and Douglas Orr, eds. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ...


In 1900, while many Populist voters supported Bryan again, the weakened party nominated a ticket of Wharton Barker and Ignatius L. Donnelly. Thomas E. Watson was the Populist nominee for president in 1904 and in 1908, after which the party effectively ceased to exist. Summary The election was held on November 6, 1900. ... Wharton Barker (1846- ? ) was an American financier and publicist, born in Philadelphia, Pa. ... Ignatius Loyola Donnelly (November 3, 1831 – January 1, 1901) was a U.S. Congressman, populist, and writer, known primarily today for his theories on the history of Atlantis and Shakespearean authorship. ... Thomas Edward Watson (5 September 1856–26 September 1922), generally known as Tom Watson, was a United States politician from Georgia. ... Summary The election was held on November 8, 1904. ... Major party conventions The 1908 Republican Convention was held in Chicago from 16 June to 19 June. ...


Legacy

The nation remained at least partially on the gold standard until 1973, a fact that some economic historians blame for the banking crisis during the Great Depression. However, the Populists' notion of allowing silver to become legal tender was noted and adopted by the US Government, but only for a short period of time. On the same note there exist historians who would cite the Sherman Silver Purchase Act as a major contributing factor to the depression of 1893. For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... This article is about the chemical element. ... The Sherman Silver Purchase Act was an 1890 United States federal law. ...


In addition, the Populist Party's call for the direct election of senators was realized in 1913 with the ratification of the seventeenth amendment. Amendment XVII in the National Archives Amendment XVII (the Seventeenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution was passed by the Senate on June 12, 1911 and by the House on May 13, 1912. ...


Elected officials

Governors

Colorado Territory State of Colorado Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Colorado | Lists of United States territorial governors | Government of Colorado ... Davis Hanson Waite (April 9, 1825-November 29, 1901), U.S. Populist Party politician, He served as Governor of Colorado from 1893 to 1895. ... This is a list of Governors of Kansas. ... Lorenzo Dow Lewelling (December 21, 1846 – September 3, 1900) was the twelfth Governor of Kansas. ... John Whitnah Leedy (March 8, 1849–March 24, 1935) was fourteenth Governor of Kansas. ... The following is a list of the Governors of the State of Nebraska. ... Silas Alexander Holcombe (b. ... Electoral fusion is an arrangement where two or more political parties support a common candidate, pooling the votes for all those parties. ... William Amos Poynter (b. ... // List of Governors Roanake Colony, 1585 - 1586 Ralph Lane, 1585 - 1586 John White, 1587 Proprietary Colony, 1664-1731 Governors of Albemarle, 1664-1689 William Drummond 1664-1667 Samuel Stephens 1667-1669 Peter Carteret 1670-1672 John Jenkins 1672-1675 Thomas Eastchurch 1675-1676 John Jenkins 1676-1677 Thomas Miller 1677... Gov. ... Ted Kulongoski, current and 36th governor of the State of Oregon. ... Sylvester Pennoyer (July 6, 1831 - May 31, 1902) was a populist Democrat and served as Governor of Oregon (1886 - 1894) and as mayor of Portland, Oregon (1896 - 1898). ... Governors of South Dakota Arthur C. Mellette Republican 1889-1893 Charles H. Sheldon Republican 1893-1897 Andrew E. Lee Populist 1897-1901 Charles N. Herreid Republican 1901-1905 Samuel H. Elrod Republican 1905-1907 Coe I. Crawford Republican 1907-1909 Robert S. Vessey Republican 1909-1913 Frank M. Byrne Republican... Andrew E. Lee (March 18, 1847 – March 19, 1934) was an American politician and a businessman. ... Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... John Price Buchanan (1847–1930) was governor of the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1891 to 1893. ... This is a list of governors of the U.S. state of Washington. ... John Rankin Rogers (born Sept. ...

United States Congress

Approximately forty-five members of the party served in the U.S. Congress between 1891 and 1902. These included six United States Senators: The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ...

The following were Populist members of the U.S. House of Representatives: William Alfred Peffer (September 10, 1831 – October 6, 1912) was a United States Senator from Kansas, notable for being the first of six Populists (two of which, more than any other state, were from Kansas) elected to the United States Senate. ... William Alexander Harris, Populist Senator from Kansas, 1897-1903 William Alexander Harris (October 29, 1841 - December 20, 1909) was a United States Representative and Senator from Kansas. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Categories: Stub | 1863 births | 1938 deaths | United States Senators ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... James Henderson Kyle (February 24, 1854 July 1, 1901) was an American politician. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Henry Heitfeld Henry Heitfeld was an American politician. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... William Vincent Allen (January 28, 1847 – January 12, 1924) was a jurist and U.S. Senator from Nebraska. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ...


52nd United States Congress Dates of Sessions 1891-1893 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from December 7, 1891 to August 5, 1892. ...

53rd United States Congress Thomas Edward Watson (5 September 1856–26 September 1922), generally known as Tom Watson, was a United States politician from Georgia. ... Map Represented by Nathan Deal Categories: | ... Benjamin Hutchinson Clover (December 22, 1837 - December 30, 1899) was a U.S. Representative from Kansas. ... District 3 for the United States House of Representatives in the state of Kansas is a congressional district in eastern Kansas. ... For other persons of the same name, see John Otis. ... District 4 for the United States House of Representatives in the state of Kansas is a congressional district in south central Kansas. ... John Davis (August 9, 1826 - August 1, 1901) was a U.S. Representative from Kansas. ... Jeremiah Simpson (March 31, 1842 – October 23, 1905), nicknamed Sockless Jerry Simpson, was an American politician from the U.S. state of Kansas. ... District 7 for the United States House of Representatives in the state of Kansas is a defunct congressional district. ... Kittel Halvorson (December 15, 1846 - July 12, 1936) was a Representative from Minnesota; born in Telemarken, Norway, December 15, 1846; in 1848 immigrated to the United States with his parents, who settled near White Water, Walworth County, Wis. ... Minnesotas Sixth Congressional District includes most or all of Benton, Sherburne, Stearns, Wright, Anoka, and Washington counties. ... William Arthur McKeighan (b. ... The 2nd Nebraska Congressional District seat encompasses the core of the Omaha metropolitan area. ... Omer Madison Kem (November 13, 1855–February 13, 1942) was a Nebraska Populist politician. ... The 3rd Nebraska Congressional District seat encompasses the western three-fourths of the state; it is one of the largest non-at-large Congressional districts in the country. ... The 53rd United States Congress served from 1893 to 1895. ...

54th United States Congress Marion Cannon (October 30, 1834 – August 27, 1920) was a United States Representative from California. ... Map This district stretches up the Pacific coast north of San Francisco Bay. ... Lafayette (Lafe) Pence (December 23, 1857 - October 22, 1923) was a U.S. Representative from Colorado. ... Colorados 1st Congressional district The 1st Congressional district of Colorado is located in central Colorado, encompassing the city of Denver and nearby areas. ... John Calhoun Bell (December 11, 1851 - August 12, 1933) was a U.S. Representative from Colorado. ... The 2nd Congressional district of Colorado is located in central Colorado, encompassing areas northwest of Denver, including the city of Boulder. ... Horace Ladd Moore (February 25, 1837 - May 1, 1914) was a U.S. Representative from Kansas. ... District 2 for the United States House of Representatives in the state of Kansas is a congressional district covering most of eastern Kansas. ... Thomas Jefferson Hudson (October 30, 1839 - January 4, 1923) was a U.S. Representative from Kansas. ... District 3 for the United States House of Representatives in the state of Kansas is a congressional district in eastern Kansas. ... William Alexander Harris, Populist Senator from Kansas, 1897-1903 William Alexander Harris (October 29, 1841 – December 20, 1909) was a United States Representative and Senator from Kansas. ... The 5th Nebraska Congressional District is an obsolete district. ... The 6th Nebraska Congressional District is an obsolete district. ... Alonzo Craig Shuford (March 1, 1858 - February 8, 1933) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina. ... The NC-7th North Carolinas 7th congressional district is located in the southeastern corner of North Carolina. ... Dates of Sessions 1895-1897 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from December 2, 1895 to June 11, 1896. ...

55th United States Congress Albert Taylor Goodwyn (December 17, 1842 - July 2, 1931) was a U.S. Representative from Alabama. ... Alabamas Fifth Congressional District since 2002. ... Milford Wriarson Howard (February 18, 1862 - December 28, 1937) was a United States Representative from Alabama. ... Alabamas Seventh Congressional District since 2002. ... The 6th Nebraska Congressional District is an obsolete district. ... Harry Skinner (May 25, 1855 - May 19, 1929) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, brother of Thomas Gregory Skinner. ... North Carolinas 1st congressional district is located mostly in the northeastern part of the state. ... William Franklin Strowd (7 December 1832 - 12 December 1911) was a Populist U.S. Congressman from North Carolina between 1895 and 1899. ... 4th congressional district of North Carolina The Fourth Congressional district of North Carolina, in the central region of the state, is best known as The Triangle. ... The NC-6th North Carolinas 6th congressional district is located in the Piedmont Triad of North Carolina. ... // Dates of Sessions March 4, 1897, to March 3, 1899 Major Political Events Officers Senate House of Representatives Speaker of the House Thomas Brackett Reed Members of the Fifty-fifth United States Congress Senate Nelson Wilmarth Aldrich (R-RI) William Vincent Allen (Pop-NE) William Boyd Allison (R-IA) Augustus...

56th United States Congress Charles Averill Barlow (March 17, 1858 - October 3, 1927) was a U.S. Representative from California. ... Map This district stretches up the Pacific coast north of San Francisco Bay. ... Curtis Harvey Castle (October 4, 1848 - July 12, 1928) was a U.S. Representative from California. ... Map Californias Seventh Congressional District currently covers half of Contra Costa County, Solano County and a tiny portion of Napa County. ... James Gunn (1843-1911) was a U. S. Congressman for Idaho. ... Idahos 1st congressional district encompasses the western part and northern parts of the state. ... Mason Summers Peters (September 3, 1844 - February 14, 1914) was a U.S. Representative from Kansas. ... District 2 for the United States House of Representatives in the state of Kansas is a congressional district covering most of eastern Kansas. ... Edwin Reed Ridgely (May 9, 1844 - April 23, 1927) was a U.S. Representative from Kansas. ... District 3 for the United States House of Representatives in the state of Kansas is a congressional district in eastern Kansas. ... William Davis Vincent (October 11, 1852 - February 28, 1922) was a U.S. Representative from Kansas. ... Nelson B. Mccormick (November 20, 1847 - April 10, 1914) was a U.S. Representative from Kansas. ... Jeremiah Dunham Botkin (April 24, 1849 - December 29, 1921) was a U.S. Representative from Kansas. ... Samuel Maxwell (May 20, 1825 – February 11, 1901) was a Populist politician in the U.S. state of Nebraska. ... William Ledyard Stark (July 29, 1853 - November 11, 1922) was a Nebraska Populist politician. ... The 4th Nebraska Congressional District is an obsolete district. ... Roderick Dhu Sutherland (April 27, 1862–October 18, 1915) was a Nebraska Populist politician. ... William Laury Greene (October 3, 1849 – March 11, 1899) was a Nebraska Populist politician. ... North Carolinas 3rd congressional district is located on the Atlantic coast of North Carolina. ... The NC 5th district. ... John Edward Kelley was a newspaperman and a politician from South Dakota. ... South Dakotas at-large district. ... Freeman Tulley Knowles (October 10, 1846 - June 1, 1910) was a U.S. Populist politician. ... The 2nd South Dakota Congressional District is an obsolete district. ... // Dates of Sessions March 4, 1899, to March 3, 1901 Major Political Events Vice President Garret A. Hobart had died right before the convening of the first session so William P. Frye served as acting President Pro Tempore Officers Senate President Pro Tempore William P. Frye Senate Republican Conference Chairman...

  • William Ledyard Stark, Nebraska's 4th congressional district
  • Roderick Dhu Sutherland, Nebraska's 5th congressional district
  • William Laury Greene, Nebraska's 6th congressional district
  • John W. Atwater, North Carolina's 4th congressional district

57th United States Congress John Wilbur Atwater (27 December 1840 - 4 July 1910) was a U.S. Congressman from North Carolina between 1899 and 1901. ... United States Capitol (1906) // The Fifty-seventh United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, comprised of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. ...

Thomas Louis Glenn (born February 2, 1847 in Bardwell, Kentucky – died November 18, 1918 in Montpelier, Idaho) was a United States Representative from Idaho. ... Caldwell Edwards (January 8, 1841 - July 23, 1922) was a U.S. Representative from Montana. ... map The U.S. state of Montana is fully within one congressional district, represented since 2001 by Republican Dennis R. (Denny) Rehberg. ... William Neville (December 29, 1843- April 5, 1909) was a Nebraska, United States Populist politician. ...

Recent incarnations

People's Party

In the 1970s, a "People's Party" was established as a left-wing, anti-war coalition. It ceased to exist after 1976. The Peoples Party was a political party in the United States, founded in 1971 by various individuals and local groups, including the Peace and Freedom Party, Commongood Peoples Party, Country Peoples Caucus, Human Rights Party, Liberal Union, New American Party, New Party and No Party. ...


Populist Party (right-wing)

In 1984, the Populist Party name was revived by some extreme right activists including Willis Carto. The party's 1984 presidential nominee, Olympic medalist and ordained minister Bob Richards, and running mate Maureen Salaman carried 66,324 votes. This party became the electoral vehicle for the right-wing Presidential campaigns of former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke in 1988, and of former Green Beret officer Bo Gritz in 1992, but was defunct by 1996. Willis Carto and party chair Don Wassall were said to be rivals competing for control of the party. In 1994 the anti-Carto group won the internal struggle and re-organized the group as the American Nationalist Union. Willis Allison Carto (born July 17, 1926 in Indiana) is a longtime figure on the far right wing of American politics. ... The Vaulting Vicar as he was known in his competitive days, the Rev. ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ... David Ernest Duke (born July 1, 1950) is a former member of the Louisiana House of Representatives, a candidate in presidential primaries for both the Democratic and Republican parties, and former Grand Wizard of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. ... Blue Light redirects here. ... Bo Gritz James Bo Gritz (born January 18, 1939 in Enid, Oklahoma) was a highly decorated Green Beret officer during the Vietnam War whose post-war activities—notably attempted POW rescues—have proven controversial. ...


Electoral history

Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Vaulting Vicar as he was known in his competitive days, the Rev. ... The United States presidential election of 1988 featured an open primary for both major parties. ... David Ernest Duke (born July 1, 1950) is a former member of the Louisiana House of Representatives, a candidate in presidential primaries for both the Democratic and Republican parties, and former Grand Wizard of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. ... The United States presidential elections of 1992 featured a battle between incumbent President, Republican George Bush; Democrat Bill Clinton, the governor of Arkansas; and independent candidate Ross Perot, a Texas businessman. ... Bo Gritz James Bo Gritz (born January 18, 1939 in Enid, Oklahoma) was a highly decorated Green Beret officer during the Vietnam War whose post-war activities—notably attempted POW rescues—have proven controversial. ...

Populist Party of America

A new group officially formed in 2002 calling itself the Populist Party of America (http://www.populistamerica.com), which advocates direct democracy and a "strict adherence to the Bill of Rights" as well as a general opposition to President George W. Bush and the Iraq War. This party is registered with the Federal Election Commission (at a Los Angeles address) but has not yet fielded candidates for president or established itself as an electoral force.[5] For the late nineteenth-century political party, see Populist Party (United States). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ...


Populist Parties, 2004-present

Meanwhile, the name Populist Party was adopted in 2004 by groups in several states seeking a ballot line for independent presidential candidate Ralph Nader. The Populist Party of Maryland was one of those groups, but unlike most, it continued to exist after Nader's poor showing in 2004. In the 2006 United States Senate election in Maryland, the Populist Party of Maryland supported a fusion ticket of Green Party, Libertarian Party, and Populist supporters for U.S. Senate candidate Kevin Zeese, a founder of the PPMD and 2004 press secretary for Ralph Nader. The Maryland Populists also nominated candidates for governor and lieutenant governor of the state. Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ... Party logo The Populist Party of Maryland (PPMD), like other Populist Parties in various U.S. states, originated as a vehicle for ballot access for the 2004 Ralph Nader presidential campaign. ... The Maryland U.S. Senate election of 2006 was held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ... Party logo The Populist Party of Maryland (PPMD), like other Populist Parties in various U.S. states, originated as a vehicle for ballot access for the 2004 Ralph Nader presidential campaign. ... Electoral fusion is an arrangement where two or more political parties support a common candidate, pooling the votes for all those parties. ... This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on December 11, 1971. ... Kevin Zeese marching in the Dundalk, Maryland Independence Day parade. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ...


See also

The Greenback Party (Greenback-Labor Party) was an American political party that was active between 1874 and 1884. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      This list of political parties in the United States contains past and present... For the late nineteenth-century political party, see Populist Party (United States). ... Party logo The Populist Party of Maryland (PPMD), like other Populist Parties in various U.S. states, originated as a vehicle for ballot access for the 2004 Ralph Nader presidential campaign. ... 1880 United States Notes A United States Note is a fiat paper currency that was issued directly into circulation by the United States Department of the Treasury. ... Most readers in 1900 read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as a fairy tale, but cartoonists recognized that Baum and Denslow were using images that editorial cartoonists had long used to portray American politicians. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Graham, Nicholas (June 2005). The Election of 1898 in North Carolina: An Introduction. The North Carolina Election of 1898. University of North Carolina Press. Retrieved on 2008-02-06.
  2. ^ StateMaster - StateMaster Survey
  3. ^ StateMaster - 1988 > Popular Votes for David Duke (most recent) by state
  4. ^ 1992 Presidential General Election Results
  5. ^ FEC Disclosure Report Search Results. Federal Election Commission. Retrieved on 2008-02-06.

The University of North Carolina Press (or UNC Press), founded in 1922, is a university press that is part of the University of North Carolina. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Goodwyn, Lawrence. 1978. The Populist Moment: A Short History of the Agrarian Revolt in America. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (ISBN 0-19-502416-8 or ISBN 0-19-502417-6)
  • Hicks, John D. The Sub-Treasury: A Forgotten Plan for the Relief of Agriculture . Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 15, No. 3 (Dec., 1928), pp. 355-373. First page available here: [1].
  • Kazin, Michael. 1995. The Populist Persuasion: An American History. New York: Basic Books. (ISBN 0-465-03793-3)
  • Lester, Connie. Up from the Mudsills of Hell : The Farmers' Alliance, Populism, And Progressive Agriculture in Tennessee, 1870-1915. University of Georgia Press. March 2006. Hardcover. ISBN 0-8203-2762-X.
  • McMath, Robert C. Jr. 1993. American Populism: A Social History 1877-1898. New York: Hill and Wang; Farrar, Straus & Giroux. (ISBN 0-8090-7796-5)
  • Nugent, Walter T. K. 1962. The Tolerant Populists: Kansas Populism and Nativism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Stock, Catherine McNicol. 1996. Rural Radicals: Righteous Rage in the American Grain. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press. (ISBN 0-8014-3294-4)

External links

  • Populist Party
  • Midwest Populist Party

Contemporary accounts

  • Gompers, Samuel (July 1892). "Organized Labor in the Campaign". The North American Review 155 (428): 91 - 97. University of Northern Iowa. Retrieved on 2006-10-09. 
  • Dolph, Senator Joseph N. (January 1893). "Does the Republican Party Need Reorganization?,". The North American Review 156 (434): 54-61. University of Northern Iowa. Retrieved on 2006-10-09. 
  • Peffer, Senator William A. (December 1893). "The Mission of the Populist Party". The North American Review 157 (445): 665 - 679. University of Northern Iowa. Retrieved on 2006-10-09. 
  • Lewelling, L. D. (January 1895). "Problems Before the Western Farmer". The North American Review 160 (458): 16-21. University of Northern Iowa. Retrieved on 2006-10-09. 
  • Stahl, John M. (September 1896). "Are the Farmers Populists?". The North American Review 163 (478): 266-276. University of Northern Iowa. Retrieved on 2006-10-09. 
  • Trent, W. P. (January 1897). "Dominant Forces in Southern Life". The Atlantic monthly 79 (471): 42-53. University of Northern Iowa. Retrieved on 2006-10-09. 
  • Turner, Frederick J. (April 1897). "Dominant Forces in Western Life". The Atlantic monthly 79 (474): 433-443. University of Northern Iowa. Retrieved on 2006-10-09. 
  • Peffer, Senator William A. (January 1898). "The Passing of the People's Party". The North American review 166 (494): 12-24. University of Northern Iowa. Retrieved on 2006-10-09. 

Samuel Gompers (January 27, 1850[1] - December 13, 1924) was an American labor union leader and a key figure in American labor history. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph Norton Dolph (1835–1897) was a Oregon Republican senator from 1883 to 1895. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... William Alfred Peffer (September 10, 1831 – October 6, 1912) was a United States Senator from Kansas, notable for being the first of six Populists (two of which, more than any other state, were from Kansas) elected to the United States Senate. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Malcolm Stahl (January 21, 1886 – January 12, 1950) was an American film director and producer. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Frederick Jackson Turner Frederick Jackson Turner (November 14, 1861–1932) was an American historian. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Party publications and materials

Secondary sources

External links — later parties

  • Populist Party
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The party logo The United States Marijuana Party (or USMJP) is a small political party in the United States. ... For the late nineteenth-century political party, see Populist Party (United States). ... National Prohibition Convention, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1892. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA, generally known simply as the Reform Party) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics—as being corrupt and... The Socialist Party USA (SP USA) is one of the heirs to the Socialist Party of America of Eugene V. Debs and Norman Thomas. ... The Party for Socialism and Liberation is a Marxist-Leninist party in the United States founded to promote revolutionary change. ... The Socialist Workers Party is a communist political party in the United States. ... The Veterans Party of America is a recently formed Political party based in St. ... 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Taylor of Idaho for vice president in 1948. ... See Labor Party (USA) for the modern party which has a similar name but is unconnected with the US Labor Party Defunct California Proposition 64 (1986) North American Labour Party Party for the Commonwealth of Canada Parti pour la république du Canada U.S. Labor Party The U.S... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Political parties Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This is an overview of political parties by country, in the form of a table with a link to a list of political parties in each country and showing which party system is dominant in each country . ... 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  Results from FactBites:
 
Netvouz - populist-party bookmarks by populist (2070 words)
The Populist Party of America works for a Constitutional Democracy, with the Bill of Rights serving to protect the liberties of all people.
While both parties give ample lip service to meeting the needs of the working class and the poor, most of the Duopoly's "elected" officials zealously devote themselves to advancing the interests of their corporate and aristocratic patrons.
The reason: To have the ability to identify the body in the event such soldier should be lost on a battlefield or long into the future need identification from a war long passed.
Britain.tv Wikipedia - Populist (2355 words)
Hence a populist is one who is perceived to craft his or her rhetoric as appeals to the economic, social, and common sense concerns of average people.
Populists are seen by some politicians as a largely democratic and positive force in society, even while a wing of scholarship in political science contends that populist mass movements are irrational and introduce instability into the political process.
The United States saw the formation of such political parties during the late 19th and early 20th centuries as the Populist Party, the Greenback Party, the Single Tax movement of Henry George, the Progressive Party of 1912 led by Theodore Roosevelt, the Progressive Party of 1924 led by Robert M. La Follette, Sr.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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