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Encyclopedia > Population density
Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006
Population density map of the world in 1994.

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. It is frequently applied to living organisms, humans in particular. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1368x681, 53 KB) Summary Countries of the world by population density, based on 30 March 2006 version of wikipedia:List of countries by population density. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1368x681, 53 KB) Summary Countries of the world by population density, based on 30 March 2006 version of wikipedia:List of countries by population density. ... “km” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (4320x2160, 914 KB) This image shows the number of people per square kilometer around the world in 1994. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (4320x2160, 914 KB) This image shows the number of people per square kilometer around the world in 1994. ... In biology and ecology, an organism (in Greek organon = instrument) is a living being. ... This article is about modern humans. ...

Contents

Biological population densities

Population density is a common biological measurement and is more often used by conservationists as a measure than population size. Biological data is data or measurements collected from biological sources, which is stored or exchanged in a digital form. ... Conservationists are those people who tend to more highly rank the wise use of the Earths resources and ecosystems. ...


Low densities may cause an extinction vortex and lead to further reduced fertility. This is called the Allee effect, after W. C. Allee who first identified it. Examples of the causes in low population densities include: Extinction Vortices are a means through which conservation biologists, geneticists and ecologists can understand the dynamics of and categorize extinctions in the context of their causes. ... The Allee effect is a phenomenon in biology named after W. C. Allee, who first wrote extensively on it. ... Warder Clyde Allee (June 5, 1885 - March 18, 1955) was an American zoologist and ecologist who taught animal ecology at the University of Chicago. ...

  • Increased problems with locating mates
  • Increased inbreeding

Also low population density is the country has large amounts of habitable land. Inbreeding is breeding between close relatives, whether plant or animal. ...


Different species have different expected densities. R-selected species commonly have high population densities, while K-selected species may have lower densities. Low densities may be associated with specialised mate location adaptations such as specialised pollinators; as found in the orchid family (Orchidaceae). In ecology, r-selection (note: lower case r) relates to the selection of traits (in organisms) that allow success in unstable or unpredictable environments. ... In ecology, K-selection (note : upper case K) relates to the selection of traits (in organisms) that allow success in stable or predictable environments. ... Orchid re-directs here; for alternate uses see Orchid (disambiguation) Genera Over 800 See List of Orchidaceae genera. ...


Human population density

A street in Hong Kong, one of the most densely populated places in the world.
A street in Ulan Bator, Mongolia - the least densely populated country in the world.

For humans, population density is the number of people per unit of area (which may include or exclude cultivated or potentially productive area). Commonly this may be calculated for a county, city, country, another territory, or the entire world. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3008x2000, 769 KB) Summary A crowd in Soy Street in Mong Kok, Hong Kong. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3008x2000, 769 KB) Summary A crowd in Soy Street in Mong Kok, Hong Kong. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 253 KB)Albert Hazan File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 253 KB)Albert Hazan File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Template:Infobox Settlementcookis and ceam For the band, see Ulan Bator (band). ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... Human beings are defined variously in biological, spiritual, and cultural terms, or in combinations thereof. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... Types of administrative and/or political territories include: A legally administered territory, which is a non-sovereign geographic area that has come under the authority of another government. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ...


The world population is 6.6 billion humans, and Earth's area is 510 million square kilometers (200 million square miles). Therefore the world-wide human population density is 6.6 billion / 510 million = 13 per km² (33 per sq mi), or 43 per km² (112 per sq mi) considering that humans live on land, which forms 150 million km² (58 million sq mi) of the earth. This density rises with the population growth. It also includes all continental and island land area, including Antarctica. Since over half of the earth's land mass is desert and high mountains hostile to human habitation, only a fraction of the rest is arable, and population clusters heavily around seaports and fresh water sources, this number by itself significantly understates the level of human crowding. Map of countries by population — China and India, the only two countries to have a population greater than one billion, together possess more than a third of the worlds population. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Several of the highest-density territories in the world are very large city-states, microstates, micronations, or dependencies. These territories share a relatively small area and an exceptionally high urbanization level, with an economically specialized city population drawing also on rural resources outside the area, illustrating the difference between high population density and overpopulation. A city-state is a region controlled exclusively by a city. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about small nations that are not recognized by any world government. ... World map of dependent territories. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Map of countries by population density (See List of countries by population density. ...


Cities with exceptionally high population densities are often considered to be overpopulated, though the extent to which this is the case depends on factors like quality of housing and infrastructure or access to resources. Most of the largest densely-populated cities are in southern and eastern Asia, though Cairo and Lagos in Africa also fall into the category. City population is however, heavily dependent on the definition used for the urban area: densities will be far higher for the central municipality than when more recently-developed and as yet administratively unincorporated suburbs are included, as in the concepts of agglomeration or metropolitan area, the latter including sometimes neighbouring cities. For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Lagos (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... In the study of human settlements, an agglomeration is an extended city or town area comprising the built-up area of a central place (usually a municipality) and any suburbs or adjacent satellite towns. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Other methods of measurement

While the arithmetic density is the most common way of measuring population density, several other methods have been developed which aim to provide a more accurate measure of population density over a specific area.

  • Arithmetic density: The total number of peoples / area of land measured in km² or mi².
  • Physiological density: The total population / the amount of arable land.
  • Agricultural density: The total rural population / amount of agricultural land.
  • Residential density : The number of people living in an urban area / the area of residential land.
  • Urban density : The number of peoples inhabiting an urban area / the total area of urban land.
  • Ecological optimum: The density of population which can be supported by the area's natural resources.

Urban density is a term used in urban planning and urban design to refer to the number of people inhabiting a given urbanized area. ...

See also

Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... Map of countries by population for the year 2007 This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Christianity - Percentage by country Islam - Percentage by country Buddhism - Percentage by country Hinduism - Percentage by country The table above is compiled from the relevant Wikipedia pages listing Religions by Country. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... Population density by country, 2006 Human geography is a branch of geography that focuses on the study of patterns and processes that shape human interaction with the environment, with particular reference to the causes and consequences of the spatial distribution of human activity on the Earths surface. ... In population genetics an idealised population or a Fisher — Wright population is a population whose members can mate and reproduce with any other member of the other gender, and where random genetic drift does not occur. ... Optimum population is where the amount of resources available in a country is equal to the countrys population needs, so there are enough resources to maintain its population. ... A population bottleneck (or genetic bottleneck) is an evolutionary event in which a significant percentage of a population or species is killed or otherwise prevented from reproducing, and the population is reduced by 50% or more, often by several orders of magnitude. ... Population genetics is the study of the distribution of and change in allele frequencies under the influence of the four evolutionary forces: natural selection, genetic drift, mutation, and migration. ... Population health is an approach to health that aims to improve the health of the entire population and to reduce health inequities among population groups. ... Population momentum is an effect which causes population growth. ... This distribution is named for the pyramidal shape of its graph. ... Species with a small population size are subject to a higher chance of extinction because their small population size makes them more vulnerable to genetic drift, resulting in stochastic variation in their gene pool, their demography and their environment. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
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he "dynamics" of bird populations, the ways in which their numbers grow and shrink as time goes by, are controlled by the same general factors that control the size of human populations.
Population density is, technically, the number of individuals per unit area.
In an average lifetime, the average female in each bird population lays many more eggs than are required to replace her and her mate, if the chicks from all of her eggs were to mature into reproducing adults.
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