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Encyclopedia > Population growth
Theoretical Human population increase from 10,000 BCAD 2000.

Population growth is the change in population over time, and can be quantified as the change in the number of individuals in a population per unit time. The term population growth can technically refer to any species, but almost always refers to humans, and it is often used informally for the more specific demographic term population growth rate (see below), and is often used to refer specifically to the growth of the population of the world. Image File history File links Population_curve. ... Image File history File links Population_curve. ... Prehistory (Greek words προ = before and ιστορία = history) is the period of human history prior to the advent of writing (which marks the beginning of recorded history). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Demographics refers to selected population characteristics as used in government, marketing or opinion research, or the demographic profiles used in such research. ... Map of countries by population — China and India, the only two countries to have a population greater than one billion, together possess more than a third of the worlds population. ...


Simple models of population growth include the Malthusian Growth Model and the logistic model. The Malthusian growth model, sometimes called the simple exponential growth model, is essentially exponential growth based on a constant rate of compound interest. ... The logistic map is a polynomial mapping, often cited as an archetypal example of how complex, chaotic behaviour can arise from very simple non-linear dynamical equations. ...

Contents

Population growth rate

In demographics and ecology, Population growth rate (PGR) is the fractional rate at which the number of individuals in a population increases. Specifically, PGR ordinarily refers to the change in population over a specific time period expressed as a percentage of the number of individuals in the population at the beginning of that period. This can be written as the formula: For the journal, see Ecology (journal). ... For other meanings of the word fraction, see fraction (disambiguation) A cake with one quarter removed. ... Look up Rate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The percent sign. ...

The crude death rate as defined above and applied to a whole population can give a misleading impression. For example, the number of deaths per 1000 people can be higher for developed nations than in less-developed countries, despite standards of health being better in developed countries.


It is usually measured in a fraction or percent in relation to the base population.


Human population growth rate

Population growth rate in percent, as listed in the CIA World Factbook (2006 estimate).[1]

Population growth which exceeds the carrying capacity of an area or environment results in overpopulation. Spikes in human population can cause problems such as pollution and traffic congestion, though these can be addressed by technological and economic changes. Conversely, such areas may be considered "underpopulated" if the population is not large enough to maintain an economic system (see population decline). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1349x628, 49 KB) Summary Population growth rate in percent, as listed on CIA factbook (2006 estimate) Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Population growth User:Astrokey44/maps ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1349x628, 49 KB) Summary Population growth rate in percent, as listed on CIA factbook (2006 estimate) Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Population growth User:Astrokey44/maps ... World Factbook 2004 cover The World Factbook is an annual publication by the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with basic almanac-style information about the various countries of the world. ... The equilibrium maximum of the population of an organism is known as the ecosystems carrying capacity for that organism. ... Map of countries by population density (See List of countries by population density. ... Air pollution Pollution is the introduction of pollutants (whether chemical substances, or energy such as noise, heat, or light) into the environment to such a point that its effects become harmful to human health, other living organisms, or the environment. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... An economic system is a particular set of social institutions which deals with the production, distribution and consumption of goods and services in a particular society. ... Population decline is the reduction over time in a regions census. ...


Globally, the growth rate of the human population has been steadily declining (ie. population is growing more slowly than in the recent past, see External Links), although the last 50 years have seen a rapid increase in population due to medical advances and massive increase in agricultural productivity[2] made by the Green Revolution.[3][4][5] Look up Rate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Map of countries by population — China and India, the only two countries to have a population greater than one billion, together possess more than a third of the worlds population. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Green Revolution was the worldwide transformation of agriculture that led to significant increases in agricultural production between the 1940s and 1960s. ...


The actual annual growth in the number of humans is in decline, from 87 million per annum in the late 1980s, down to 75 million per annum in 2006. Growth remains high in the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Latin America, and primarily in Sub-Saharan Africa.[6] A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... A political map showing national divisions in relation to the ecological break (Sub-Saharan Africa in green) A geographical map of Africa, showing the ecological break that defines the sub-Saharan area Sub-Saharan Africa is the term used to describe the area of the African continent which lies south...


In some countries there is negative population growth (ie. net decrease in population over time), especially in Central and Eastern Europe (mainly due to low fertility rates) and Southern Africa (due to the high number of HIV-related deaths). Within the next decade, Japan and some countries in Western Europe are also expected to encounter negative population growth due to sub-replacement fertility rates. Negative has meaning in several contexts: Look up negative in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ... The (total) fertility rate of a population is the average number of child births per woman. ... Categories: Africa geography stubs | Southern Africa ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... A current understanding of Western Europe. ... Sub-replacement fertility is a fertility rate that is not high enough to replace an areas population. ...


References

  1. ^ Population growth rate
  2. ^ BBC NEWS | The end of India's green revolution?
  3. ^ Food First/Institute for Food and Development Policy
  4. ^ Rising food prices curb aid to global poor
  5. ^ Record rise in wheat price prompts UN official to warn that surge in food prices may trigger social unrest in developing countries
  6. ^ Ron Nielsen, The little green handbook, Picador, New York (2006) ISBN 0312425813

See also

Population evolution in different continents. The vertical axis is logarithmic and is millions of people.

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. ... A logarithmic scale is a scale of measurement that uses the logarithm of a physical quantity instead of the quantity itself. ... The equilibrium maximum of the population of an organism is known as the ecosystems carrying capacity for that organism. ... In population ecology, density-dependent inhibition describes a situation in which population growth is curtailed by crowding. ... Map of countries by population — China and India, the only two countries to have a population greater than one billion, together possess more than a third of the worlds population. ... This distribution is named for the pyramidal shape of its graph. ... A list of data for historical human population of planet Earth from various sources is recorded here for reference (see e. ... The doubling time is the period of time required for a quantity to double in size or value. ... Map of countries by population density (See List of countries by population density. ... Population decline is the reduction over time in a regions census. ... In mathematics, exponential growth (or geometric growth) occurs when the growth rate of a function is always proportional to the functions current size. ... The Green Revolution was the worldwide transformation of agriculture that led to significant increases in agricultural production between the 1940s and 1960s. ... Logistic curve, specifically the sigmoid function A logistic function or logistic curve models the S-curve of growth of some set P. The initial stage of growth is approximately exponential; then, as competition arises, the growth slows, and at maturity, growth stops. ... Sir Ronald Aylmer Fisher, FRS (17 February 1890 – 29 July 1962) was an English statistician, evolutionary biologist, and geneticist. ... Map of countries and territories by fertility rate Graph of Total Fertility Rates vs. ... [[Image:Population other political entities by population growth rate, with estimates taken from the 2006 edition of the CIA World Factbook. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Population - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1653 words)
In biology, plant and animal populations are studied, in particular, in a branch of ecology known as population biology, and in population genetics.
Populate, as a verb, means the process of populating a geographic area, as by procreation or immigration.
Population transfer is a term referring to a policy by which a state forces the movement of a large group of people out of a region, most frequently on the basis of their ethnicity or religion.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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