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Encyclopedia > Pope Honorius III
Honorius III
Birth name Cencio Savelli
Papacy began July 24, 1216
Papacy ended March 18, 1227
Predecessor Innocent III
Successor Gregory IX
Born 1148
Rome, Italy
Died March 18, 1227
Rome, Italy
Other popes named Honorius

Pope Honorius III (1148March 18, 1227 in Rome), born Cencio Savelli, was Pope from 1216 to 1227. Image File history File links B_Honorius_III3. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Prince Louis of France, the future King Louis VIII, invades England in the First Barons War Henry III becomes King of England. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 11 first mention of city of Požega in a charter of Andrew II of Hungary March 19 - Pope Gregory IX succeeds Pope Honorius III as the 178th pope. ... Pope Innocent III (c. ... Pope Gregory IX, born Ugolino dei Conti, was pope from 1227 to August 22, 1241. ... Events Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Barcelona conquered Tortosa in posetion of the moors. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 11 first mention of city of Požega in a charter of Andrew II of Hungary March 19 - Pope Gregory IX succeeds Pope Honorius III as the 178th pope. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Pope Honorius could refer to: Pope Honorius I Pope Honorius II Pope Honorius III Pope Honorius IV This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Events Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Barcelona conquered Tortosa in posetion of the moors. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 11 first mention of city of Požega in a charter of Andrew II of Hungary March 19 - Pope Gregory IX succeeds Pope Honorius III as the 178th pope. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... // Prince Louis of France, the future King Louis VIII, invades England in the First Barons War Henry III becomes King of England. ... January 11 first mention of city of Požega in a charter of Andrew II of Hungary March 19 - Pope Gregory IX succeeds Pope Honorius III as the 178th pope. ...

Contents

Early work

He was born in Rome into the Savelli family. Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... The rich and influential Roman family of the Savelli provided four popes, Benedict II (684–685), Gregory II (715–731), Honorius III (1216–27), the senator Luca Savelli, who sacked the Lateran in 1234, and the senators son, Honorius IV (1285-87). ...


For a time he was canon at the church of Santa Maria Maggiore, then he became papal chamberlain in 1188 and Cardinal Deacon of Santa Lucia in Selci before March 5, 1193. Under Pope Clement III (1187–91) and Pope Celestine III (1191–98) he was treasurer of the Roman Church. Canons, Bruges A Canon of the Seminary, Sint Niklaas, Flanders. ... Saint Mary Major, in Italian, Santa Maria Maggiore, is one of the five great ancient basilicas of Rome, Italy. ... Papal chamberlain (Cameriere di spada e cappa) is one of the highest honours that can be bestowed on a Catholic layman by the Pope, and is often given to members of noble families. ... Saladin unsuccessfully besieges the Hospitaller fortress of Krak des Chevaliers in modern Syria. ... The Cardinal Deacons are the lowest-ranked of the three orders of Cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church. ... This article is about the day. ... // Saladin dies, and the lands of the Kurdish Ayyubid dynasty of Egypt and Syria are split among his descendants. ... Clement III, born Paulino Scolari (or Paolo) (b. ... Pope Celestine III (Rome, c. ...


In 1197 he became tutor of the future Emperor Frederick II, who had been given as ward to Pope Innocent III (1198–1216) by the Empress-widow Constantia. Events Amalric II succeeds Henry II of Champagne as king of Jerusalem. ... Frederick II (December 26, 1194 – December 13, 1250), of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was a pretender to the title of King of the Romans from 1212 and unopposed holder of that monarchy from 1215. ... Pope Innocent III (c. ...


Innocent III raised him to the rank of a Cardinal Priest before March 13, 1198, obtaining the Titulus of Titular appointment Ss. Ioannis et Pauli. Cardinal Priests are the most numerous of the three orders of Cardinals in the Roman Catholic Church. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Go-Toba of Japan Emperor Tsuchimikado ascends to the throne of Japan January 8 - Pope Innocent III ascends Papal Throne Frederick II, infant son of German King Henry VI, crowned King of Sicily Births August 24 - Alexander II of Scotland (d. ... Facade of the basilica. ...


Election as Pope

Pope Honorius III by Giotto.

On July 18, 1216, nineteen cardinals assembled at Perugia (where Innocent III had died two days previously) with the purpose of electing a new Pope. The troubled state of affairs in Italy, the threatening attitude of the Tatars, and the fear of a schism induced the cardinals to agree to an election by compromise. Cardinals Ugolino of Ostia (afterwards Pope Gregory IX) and Guido of Praeneste were empowered to appoint the new Pope. Their choice fell upon Cencio Savelli, who accepted the tiara with reluctance and took the name of Honorius III. He was consecrated at Perugia on July 24th, was crowned at Rome 31 August, and took possession of the Lateran 3 September 1216. The Roman people were greatly elated at the election, for Honorius III was himself a Roman and by his extreme kindness had endeared himself to the hearts of all. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (738x832, 315 KB) Summary Pope Honorius III by Giotto Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pope Honorius III ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (738x832, 315 KB) Summary Pope Honorius III by Giotto Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pope Honorius III ... Giotto di Bondone (c. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Location of Perugia in Italy Coordinates: , Country Region Province Province of Perugia Government  - Mayor Renato Locchi Area  - City 449 km²  (1,165 sq mi) Elevation 493 m (1,617 ft) Population (July 2006)[1]  - City 161,390  - Density 359/km² (929. ... Tatars (Tatar: Tatarlar/Татарлар), sometimes spelled Tartar (more about the name), is a collective name applied to the Turkic speaking people of Eastern Europe and Central Asia. ... The word schism (IPA: or ), from the Greek σχίσμα, skhísma (from σχίζω, skhízō, to tear, to split), means a division or a split, usually in an organization or a movement. ... Pope Gregory IX, born Ugolino dei Conti, was pope from 1227 to August 22, 1241. ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, or in Latin as the Triregnum, and in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown, supposedly of Byzantine and Persian origin, that is a prominent symbol of the papacy. ...


Like his famous predecessor Innocent III, he set his mind on the achievement of two great things, the recovery of the Holy Land in the Fifth Crusade and a spiritual reform of the entire Church; but quite in contrast with Innocent III he sought these achievements by kindness and indulgence rather than by force and severity. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Holy Land (Biblical). ... Frisian crusaders confront the Tower of Damietta, Egypt. ...


Fifth Crusade

Portrait of Honorius III: detail of the apse mosaic of the Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls (1220) (Roma, Italy)

The Fifth Crusade was endorsed by the Lateran Council of 1215, and he started preparations for the crusade to begin in 1217. To procure the means necessary for this colossal undertaking, the Pope and the cardinals were to contribute the tenth part, and all other ecclesiastics the twentieth part, of their income for three years. Though the money thus collected was considerable, it was by no means sufficient for a general crusade as planned by Honorius III. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 409 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1023 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 409 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 1023 pixel, file size: 1. ... Basilica di San Paolo fuori le Mura — known in English as the Basilica of St Paul Outside the Walls or St Paul-without-the-Walls — is one of five churches considered to be the great ancient basilicas of Rome. ... Frisian crusaders confront the Tower of Damietta, Egypt. ... The Lateran councils were ecclesiastical councils or synods of the Catholic Church held at Rome in the Lateran Palace next to the Lateran Basilica. ... A certified copy of the Magna Carta March 4 - King John of England makes an oath to the Pope as a crusader to gain the support of Innocent III. June 15 - King John of England was forced to put his seal on the Magna Carta, outlining the rights of landowning... April 9 - Peter of Courtenay crowned emperor of the Latin Empire of Constantinople at Rome, by Pope Honorius III May 20 - First Barons War, royalist victory at Lincoln. ...


Far-reaching prospects seemed to open before him when he crowned Pierre de Courtenay (April, 1217) as Latin Emperor (1217–18) of Constantinople; but the new Emperor was captured on his eastward journey and died in confinement. Peter of Courtenay (d. ... The Latin Empire, Empire of Nicaea, Empire of Trebizond and the Despotate of Epirus. ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ...


Honorius III was aware that there was only one man in Europe who could bring about the recovery of the Holy Land, and that man was his former pupil Frederick II (1212–50) of Germany. Like many other rulers, Frederick II had taken an oath to embark for the Holy Land in 1217. But Frederick II hung back, and Honorius III repeatedly put off the date for the beginning of the expedition.


In April 1220, Frederick II was elected Emperor, and on November 22, 1220 he was crowned Holy Roman Emperor in Rome. // The world in 1220 Middle Ages in Europe Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Events Mongols first invade Abbasid caliphate - Bukhara and Samarkand taken End of the Kara-Khitan Khanate, destroyed by Genghis Khans Mongolian cavalry Dominican Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Pope... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ...


In spite of the insistence of Honorius III, Frederick II still delayed, and the Egyptian campaign failed miserably with the loss of Damietta (September 8, 1221). Damietta is a port in Dumyat, Egypt on the Mediterranean Sea at the Nile delta, about 200 kilometres north of Cairo. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events May 13 - End of the reign of Emperor Juntoku, emperor of Japan Emperor Chūkyō briefly reigns over Japan Former Emperor Go-Toba leads an unsuccessful rebellion against the Kamakura Shogunate Emperor Go-Horikawa ascends to the throne of Japan January - Mongol Army under Jochi captures the city of...


Most rulers of Europe were engaged in wars of their own and could not leave their countries for any length of time. Andrew II of Hungary (1205–35) and, somewhat later, a fleet of crusaders from the region along the Lower Rhine finally departed for the Holy Land, took Damietta and a few other places in Egypt; but lack of unity among the Christians, also rivalry between the leaders and the papal legate Pelagius, resulted in failure. Andrew II of Hungary with queen Gertrude von Andechs-Meranien Andrew II (Hungarian: András or Endre, Slovak: Ondrej, Croatian: ) (c. ... It has been suggested that River Rhine Pollution: November 1986 be merged into this article or section. ... A papal Legate, from the Decretals of Boniface VIII (1294 to 1303). ... Pelagio Galvani[1] (d. ...


June 24, 1225, was finally fixed as the date for the departure of Frederick II; and Honorius III brought about his marriage with Isabella, heiress of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, with a view to binding him closer to the plan. But the Treaty of San Germano in July 1225 permitted a further delay of two years. is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // The Teutonic Order is expelled from Transylvania. ... Yolande of Brienne (1212 - 1228), also known as Yolanda or Isabella II, inherited the Kingdom of Jerusalem as an infant in 1212. ... Official language Latin, French, Italian, and other western languages; Greek and Arabic also widely spoken Capital Jerusalem, later Acre Constitution Various laws, so-called Assizes of Jerusalem The Kingdom of Jerusalem was a Christian kingdom established in the Levant in 1099 by the First Crusade. ... The Treaty of San Germano was signed on July 20, 1230 at San Germano between Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II and Pope Gregory IX. A Dominican named Guala was responsible for the negotiations. ...


Frederick II now made serious preparations for the crusade. In the midst of it, however, Pope Honorius III died on March 18, 1227 without seeing the achievement of his hopes. It was left to his successor, Pope Gregory IX (1227–41), to insist upon their accomplishment. Pope Gregory IX, born Ugolino dei Conti, was pope from 1227 to August 22, 1241. ...


But Honorius III really had too large a task; besides the liberation of the Holy Land, he felt bound to forward the repression of heresy in the south of France, the war for the faith in the Spanish peninsula, the planting of Christianity in the lands along the Baltic Sea, and the maintenance of the impossible Latin empire in Constantinople. The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 20°E to 26°E longitude. ...


Of these duties the rooting out of heresy lay nearest to Honorius III's heart. In the south of France he carried on Innocent III's work, confirming Simon de Montfort in the possession of the lands of Raymond VI of Toulouse and succeeding, as Innocent III had not, in drawing the royal house of France into the conflict. Simon de Montfort, 5th Earl of Leicester, also Simon IV de Montfort (1160 – June 25, 1218) was a French nobleman who took part in the Fourth Crusade (1202 - 1204) and was a prominent leader of the Albigensian Crusade. ... Raymond VI of Toulouse (October 27, 1156 – August 2, 1222) was count of Toulouse and marquis of Provence from 1194 to 1222. ...


The most widely important event of this period was the siege and capture of Avignon. Both Honorius III and Louis VIII of France (1223–26) turned a deaf ear to Frederick II's assertion of the claims of the empire to that town. City flag City coat of arms Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Département Vaucluse (préfecture) Arrondissement Avignon Canton Chief town of 4 cantons Intercommunality Communauté dagglomération du Grand Avignon Mayor Marie-Josée Roig... Louis VIII the Lion (5 September 1187 – 8 November 1226) reigned as King of France from 1223 to 1226. ...


Other Work

Honorius III gave papal sanction to the Dominican order in 1216, and to the Franciscan in 1223. He approved the Rule of St. Dominic in his Bull Religiosam vitam, dated December 22, 1216, and that of St. Francis in his Bull Solet annuere, dated November 29, 1223. // Prince Louis of France, the future King Louis VIII, invades England in the First Barons War Henry III becomes King of England. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... // Events August 6 - Louis VIII is crowned King of France. ... Laudare, Benedicere, Praedicare (Praise, Bless, Preach) Saint Dominic saw the need for a new type of organization to address the needs of his time, one that would bring the dedication and systematic education of the older monastic orders to bear on the religious problems of the burgeoning population of cities... Religiosam vitam is the incipit designating a Papal bull issued in December 1216 by Pope Honorius III. It established the Dominican Order (see also Nos attendentes). ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Prince Louis of France, the future King Louis VIII, invades England in the First Barons War Henry III becomes King of England. ... Saint Francis of Assisi (September 26, 1181 – October 3, 1226) was a Roman Catholic friar and the founder of the Order of Friars Minor, more commonly known as the Franciscans. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events August 6 - Louis VIII is crowned King of France. ...


In 1217 he gave the title of “King of Serbia, Dalmatia, and Bosnia.” to Stefan (known as Prvovencani, or the “First-Crowned”).


During his pontificate also many of the tertiary orders first came into existence. He approved in 1221 the Franciscan Brothers and Sisters of Penance Rule with the Bull Memoriale Propositi. On January 30, 1226, he approved the Carmelite Order in his Bull Ut vivendi normam. He also approved the religious congregation "Val des Ecoliers" (Vallis scholarium, Valley of scholars), which had been founded by four pious professors of theology at the University of Paris. // Events May 13 - End of the reign of Emperor Juntoku, emperor of Japan Emperor ChÅ«kyō briefly reigns over Japan Former Emperor Go-Toba leads an unsuccessful rebellion against the Kamakura Shogunate Emperor Go-Horikawa ascends to the throne of Japan January - Mongol Army under Jochi captures the city of... The Secular Franciscan Order (SFO) is a community of Roman Catholic men and women in the world who seek to pattern their lives after Christ in the spirit of St. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Carmelite Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II calls Imperial Diet of Cremona Births June 21 - King Boleslaus V of Poland (died 1279) Abul-Faraj, Syriac scholar (died 1286) Bar-Hebraeus, Syriac historian and bishop (died 1286) Deaths March 7 - William de Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, English... Origin and early history Carmelites (in Latin Ordo fratrum Beatæ Virginis Mariæ de monte Carmelo) is the name of a Roman Catholic order founded in the 12th century by a certain Berthold (d. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: ) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganised as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ...


Being a man of learning, Honorius III insisted that the clergy should receive a thorough training, especially in theology. In the case of a certain Hugh whom the chapter of Chartres had elected bishop, he withheld his approbation because the bishop-elect did not possess sufficient knowledge, quum pateretur in litteratura defectum, as the Pope states in a letter dated January 8, 1219. Another bishop he even deprived of his office on account of illiteracy. Chartres is a town and commune of France, préfecture (capital) of the Eure-et-Loir département. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Saint Francis of Assisi introduces Catholicism into Egypt, during the Fifth Crusade The Flag of Denmark fell from the sky during the Battle of Lyndanisse Ongoing events Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Births Christopher I of Denmark (died 1259) Frederick II of Austria (died 1246) Guillaume de Gisors, supposedly the...


He bestowed various privileges upon the universities of Paris and Bologna, the two greatest seats of learning during those times. In order to facilitate the study of theology in dioceses that were distant from the great centres of learning, he ordered in his Bull Super specula Domini that some talented young men should be sent to a recognized theological school to study theology with the purpose of teaching it afterwards in their own dioceses. The University of Bologna (Italian: , UNIBO) is the oldest continually operating degree-granting university in the world, and the second biggest university in Italy. ...


Writings

Honorius III acquired some fame as an author. The most important of his writings is the Liber censuum Romanae ecclesiae, which is the most valuable source for the medieval position of the Church in regard to property, and also serves in part as a continuation of the Liber Pontificalis. It comprises a list of the revenues of the Apostolic See, a record of donations received, privileges granted, and contracts made with cities and rulers. It was begun under Clement III and completed in 1192 under Celestine III. The original manuscript of the Liber Censuum is still in existence (Vaticanus latinus 8486). The Book of the Popes or the Liber Pontificalis is a major source for early medieval history but was also met with intense critical scrutiny. ... In the several centuries following the founding of Christianity, five particular cities and centers of Christianity were considered to be Apostolic Sees. ... // Events The Third Crusade ends in disaster. ...


Honorius III wrote also a life of Celestine III; a life of Gregory VII; an "Ordo Romanus", which is a sort of ceremonial containing the rites of the Church for various occasions; and thirty-four sermons. Pope Gregory VII (c. ...


The attribution of a grimoire or book of demonic spells to this pope is part of a hoax [1]. This design for an amulet comes from the Black Pullet grimoire. ...


References

  1. ^ Note: The Liber Juratus or The Sworne Booke of Honorius is one of the oldest and most influential texts of Medieval magic. The almost legendary reputation of this work led to the forgery of the so-called Grimoire of Pope Honorius[1] .
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Innocent III
Bishop of Rome, Vicar of Peter (deprecated A.D. 495), Vicar of Christ, Successor of the Prince of the Apostles
Supreme Pontiff (Pontifex Maximus)
Patriarch of the West (deprecated 2006), Primate of Italy,
Archbishop and Metropolitan of the Roman Province
Servant of the Servants of God
Pope

1216–27
Succeeded by
Gregory IX

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CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Pope Honorius III (2381 words)
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The tomb of Honorius IV is in the church of Santa Maria in Aracoeli, Rome.
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