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Encyclopedia > Pope Urban IV
Urban IV
Birth name Jacques Pantaléon
Papacy began August 29, 1261
Papacy ended October 2, 1264
Predecessor Pope Alexander IV
Successor Pope Clement IV
Born ca. 1195
Troyes, France
Died October 2, 1264
Perugia, Italy
{{{footnotes}}}

Urban IV, born Jacques Pantaléon (Troyes, ca. 1195Perugia, October 2, 1264), was Pope, from 1261 to 1264, the last to become Pope without being a cardinal. Image File history File links B_Urban_IV.jpg Summary H.H. Pope Urban IV Licensing This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ... Events July 25 - Constantinople re-captured by Nicaean forces under the command of Michael VIII Palaeologus, Byzantine Empire re-formed August 29 - Urban IV becomes Pope, the last man to do so without being a Cardinal first Bela IV of Hungary repels Tatar invasion Charles of Anjou given rule of... October 2 is the 275th day (276th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 90 days remaining. ... Events May 12 - The Battle of Lewes begins (ends May 14). ... Alexander IV, né Rinaldo Conti (Anagni, ca. ... Clement IV, né Gui Faucoi le Gros ( Guy Foulques the Fat or Guido le Gros) (Saint-Gilles-du-Gard, November 23, year uncertain – Viterbo, November 29, 1268), was elected Pope February 5, 1265, in a conclave held at Perugia that took four months, while cardinals argued over whether to call... Events Priory of St Marys, Bushmead, founded. ... Troyes is a town in northeastern France. ... October 2 is the 275th day (276th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 90 days remaining. ... Events May 12 - The Battle of Lewes begins (ends May 14). ... Perugia is the capital city in the region of Umbria in central Italy, near the Tiber river, and the capital of the province of Perugia. ... Troyes is a town in northeastern France. ... Events Priory of St Marys, Bushmead, founded. ... Perugia is the capital city in the region of Umbria in central Italy, near the Tiber river, and the capital of the province of Perugia. ... October 2 is the 275th day (276th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 90 days remaining. ... Events May 12 - The Battle of Lewes begins (ends May 14). ... The Pope (from Greek: pappas, father; from Latin: papa, Papa, father) is the successor of St. ... Events July 25 - Constantinople re-captured by Nicaean forces under the command of Michael VIII Palaeologus, Byzantine Empire re-formed August 29 - Urban IV becomes Pope, the last man to do so without being a Cardinal first Bela IV of Hungary repels Tatar invasion Charles of Anjou given rule of... Events May 12 - The Battle of Lewes begins (ends May 14). ... A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official in the Roman Catholic Church, ranking just below the Pope and appointed by him as a member of the College of Cardinals during a consistory. ...


Urban IV was the son of a cobbler of Troyes, France. He studied theology and common law in Paris, and was appointed a canon of Laon and later Archdeacon of Liège. At the First Council of Lyons (1245) he attracted the attention of Pope Innocent IV (1243–54) who sent him on two missions in Germany before becoming the bishop of Verdun in 1253. In 1255, Pope Alexander IV (1254–61) made him Patriarch of Jerusalem. Cobbler may mean: a person who makes and repairs shoes and boots for a living. ... Troyes is a town in northeastern France. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It can also refer to the study of other religious topics. ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Laon is a city and commune of France, préfecture (capital) of the Aisne département. ... Liege or Liège has several meanings: A liege is the person or entity to which one has pledged allegiance. ... The First Council of Lyons (Lyons I) was the Thirteenth Ecumenical Council and took place in 1245. ... Innocent IV, born Sinibaldo de Fieschi (Genoa, ca. ... Verdun (German: Wirten, official name before 1970 Verdun-sur-Meuse) is a city and commune in the Lorraine région, northeast France, in the Meuse département, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Events Königsberg was founded Births Emperor Albert I of Germany, in July Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Categories: 1255 ... Alexander IV, né Rinaldo Conti (Anagni, ca. ... The Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem is one of the Roman Catholic patriarchs of the east. ...


He had returned from Jerusalem, which was in dire straits, and was at Viterbo seeking help for the oppressed Christians in the East when Alexander IV died, and after a three-month vacancy Pantaléon was chosen by the eight cardinals of the Sacred College to succeed him, on August 29, 1261, taking the name of Urban IV. This article needs copyediting (checking for proper English spelling, grammar, usage, tone, style, and voice). ... As a noun, Christian is an appellation and moniker deriving from the appellation Christ, which many people associate exclusively with Jesus of Nazareth. ... Sede vacante in the canon law of the Roman Catholic Church is the vacancy of the episcopal see of a particular church. ... August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ...


The Latin Empire of Constantinople came to an end with the capture of the city by the Greeks (led by their Emperor Michael VIII Paleologus) a fortnight before Urban IV's election; as Pope Urban IV endeavoured, but without success, to stir up a crusade to restore the Latin empire, without success. The festival of Corpus Christi ("the Body of Christ") was instituted by Urban IV in 1264. This article is about the medieval crusades. ... Corpus Christi celebrations in Antigua Guatemala, 14 June, 1979 Corpus Christi (Latin: Body of Christ) in Catholicism is a religious feast celebrated by Roman Catholics on the eighth Thursday after Easter, i. ...


Italy commanded Urban IV's full attention: the long confrontation with the late Hohenstaufen Frederick II had not been pressed during the mild pontificate of Alexander IV, while it devolved into interurban struggles between nominally pro-papal Ghibellines and even more nominally pro-Imperial Guelf factions, in which Frederick II's heir Manfred was immersed. Urban IV's military captain was the condottiere Azzo d'Este, nominally at the head of a loose league of cities that included Mantua and Ferrara. Any Hohenstaufen in Sicily was bound to have claims over the cities of Lombardy, and as a check to Arms of the Hohenstaufen The Hohenstaufen were a dynasty of Kings of Germany, many of whom were also crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Dukes of Swabia. ... Frederick II (December 26, 1194 – December 13, 1250), Holy Roman Emperor of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was pretender to the title of King of the Romans from 1212, unopposed holder of that monarchy from 1215, and Holy Roman Emperor from 1220 until his death in 1250. ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in Italy during the 12th century and 13th century. ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in Italy during the 12th century and 13th century. ... Manfred (c. ... Condottieri were mercenary leaders employed by Italian city-states from the late Middle Ages until the mid-fifteenth century. ... For Tolkiens fictional character, see Estë To know more about the city, see Este Este, Italian princely family, rulers of Ferrara (1240–1597), Modena and Reggio (1288–1796). ... Mantua Mantua (in Italian Mantova) is an important city in Lombardy, Italy and capital of the province with the same name. ... Ferrara is a town, an archiepiscopal see and a province in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, capital city of the province of Ferrara. ...

Papal Arms of Pope Urban IV.
Papal Arms of Pope Urban IV.

Manfred, Urban IV introduced Charles of Anjou into the equation, to place the crown of the Two Sicilies in the hands of a monarch amerable to papal control. Charles was comte de Provence in right of his wife, maintaining a rich base for projecting what would be an expensive Italian war. For two years Urban IV negociated with Manfred, whether Manfred with aid the Latins in regaining Constantinople in return for papal confirmation of the Hohenstaufen rights in the regno. Meanwhile the papal pact solidified with Charles, a promise of papal ships and men, produced by a crusading tithe, and Charles' promise not to lay claims on Imperial lands in northern Italy, nor in the Papal States. Charles promised to restore the annual census or feudal tribute due the Åope as overlord, some 10,000 ounces of gold being agreed upon, while the pope would work to block Conradin from election as King of the Germans. Before the arrival in Italy of his candidate Charles, Urban IV died at Perugia, on October 2, 1264. His successor was Pope Clement IV (1265–68), who immediately took up the papal side of the arrangement. Image File history File links Urban_IV2. ... Image File history File links Urban_IV2. ... Charles I (March 1227 - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous son of King Louis VIII of France, created Count of Anjou by his elder brother King Louis IX in 1246, thus founding the second Angevin dynasty. ... The Two Sicilies The Kingdom of the Two Sicilies was the new name that the Bourbon king Ferdinand IV of Naples gave to his domain (including Southern Italy and Sicily) after the end of the Napoleonic Era and the full restoration of his power in 1816. ... The Papal States (Gli Stati della Chiesa or Stati Pontificii, States of the Church) was one of the major historical states of Italy before the boot-shaped peninsula was unified under the Piedmontese crown of Savoy (later a republic). ... Portrait of Conradin from the Codex Manesse (Folio 7r). ... The following list of German monarchs is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... Clement IV, né Gui Faucoi le Gros ( Guy Foulques the Fat or Guido le Gros) (Saint-Gilles-du-Gard, November 23, year uncertain – Viterbo, November 29, 1268), was elected Pope February 5, 1265, in a conclave held at Perugia that took four months, while cardinals argued over whether to call...


External link

Reference

  • David Abulafia, 1988. Frederick II, pp 413ff.
Preceded by:
Robert of Nantes
Titular Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem
1255–61
Succeeded by:
William II of Agen
Preceded by:
Alexander IV
Pope
1261–64
Succeeded by:
Clement IV

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pope Urban IV - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (553 words)
Urban IV was the son of a cobbler of Troyes, France.
The festival of Corpus Christi ("the Body of Christ") was instituted by Urban IV in 1264.
Urban IV's military captain was the condottiere Azzo d'Este, nominally at the head of a loose league of cities that included Mantua and Ferrara.
Pope Alexander IV - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (286 words)
He succeeded Innocent IV as guardian of Conradin, the last of the Hohenstaufen, promising him his benevolent protection; but in less than a fortnight he conspired against him and bitterly opposed Conradin's uncle Manfred.
Alexander IV fulminated with excommunication and interdict against the party of Manfred, but in vain; nor could he enlist the Kings of England and Norway in a crusade against the Hohenstaufen.
This biography of a Pope or a claimant to the papacy is a stub.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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