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Encyclopedia > Pope Pius VII
Pius VII

Portrait by Jacques-Louis David
Birth name Barnaba
Niccolò Maria Luigi Chiaramonti
Papacy began March 14, 1800
Papacy ended August 20, 1823
Predecessor Pius VI
Successor Leo XII
Born August 14, 1742(1742-08-14)
Cesena, Italy
Died August 20, 1823 (aged 81)
Rome, Italy
Other popes named Pius
Styles of
Pope Pius VII
Reference style His Holiness
Spoken style Your Holiness
Religious style Holy Father
Posthumous style none

Pope Pius VII, OSB (August 14, 1740August 20, 1823), born Barnaba Niccolò Maria Luigi Chiaramonti, was Bishop of Rome and Pope of the Catholic Church from March 14, 1800 to August 20, 1823. Download high resolution version (619x750, 142 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Jacques-Louis David (August 30, 1748 – December 29, 1825) was a highly influential French painter in the Neoclassical style, considered to be the prominent painter of the era. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Pius VI, born Giovanni Angelo Braschi (December 27, 1717 – August 29, 1799), Pope from 1775 to 1799, was born at Cesena. ... Pope Leo XII (August 22, 1760 – February 10, 1829), born Annibale Francesco Clemente Melchiore Girolamo Nicola della Genga, was Pope from 1823 to 1829. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 24 - Charles VII Albert becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ... Cesena (ancient Caesena) is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy, south of Ravenna and west of Rimini, on the Savio River, co-chief of the Province of Forlì-Cesena. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... There were 12 Popes of the Roman Catholic Church who were named Pius Pope Pius I Pope Pius II Pope Pius III Pope Pius IV Pope Pius V Pope Pius VI Pope Pius VII Pope Pius VIII Pope Pius IX Pope Pius X Pope Pius XI Pope Pius XII There... Image File history File links Emblem_of_the_Papacy. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI (born 1927) His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (born 1935) His Holiness is the official style or manner of address in reference to the leaders of certain religious groups. ... St Benedict of Nursia (c. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... The name Catholic Church can mean a visible organization that refers to itself as Catholic, or the invisible Christian Church, viz. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents

Early life

Chiaramonti was born at Cesena, the son of count Scipione Chiaramonti; his mother, Giovanna, was the daughter of marquess Ghini. He joined the Benedictine order in 1756 at the Abbey of S.Maria del Monte of Cesena and changed his first name into Gregorio. He then became a teacher at Benedictine colleges in Parma and Rome. His career became a series of promotions following the election of a family friend, Giovanni Angelo Braschi, as Pope Pius VI (1775–99). In 1776 Pius VI appointed the 34-year old Barnaba, who had been teaching at the monastery of S. Anselmo in Rome, honorary abbot of his monastery, to complaints from the brothers. After making him bishop of Tivoli, near Rome, Pius VI made him a cardinal and bishop of Imola in February 1785. Cesena (ancient Caesena) is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy, south of Ravenna and west of Rimini, on the Savio River, co-chief of the Province of Forlì-Cesena. ... For the college, see Benedictine College. ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Parma is a city in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna, famous for its architecture and the fine countryside around it. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Pius VI, born Giovanni Angelo Braschi (December 27, 1717 – August 29, 1799), Pope from 1775 to 1799, was born at Cesena. ... For other uses, see Cardinal (disambiguation). ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


From the time French forces invaded Italy in 1797, the cardinal cautioned temperance and submission to the Cisalpine Republic. In his Christmas homily that year in 1797 he asserted that there was no opposition between a democratic form of government and being a good Catholic: "Be good catholics and you will be good democrats", said the bishop. The flag of the Cisalpine Republic was the Transpadane Republic vertical Italian tricolour, with the square shape of the Cispadane Republic The Cisalpine Republic (Italian: Repubblica Cisalpina) was a French client republic in Northern Italy that lasted from 1797 to 1802. ...


Election as Pope

Main article: Papal conclave, 1800

Following the death of Pius VI, virtually France's prisoner, at Valence in August 1799, the conclave met on November 30, 1799 in the Benedictine monastery of San Giorgio, Venice. There were three main candidates, two of whom proved to be unacceptable to the Habsburgs, whose candidate, Cardinal Mattei, could not secure sufficient votes. After several months of stalemate, Chiaramonti was elected as a compromise candidate. He was elected Pope Pius VII at Venice on March 21, 1800 in a rather unusual coronation, wearing a papier-mâché papal tiara, the original having been seized by the French along with Pius VI. Then an Austrian vessel, the "Bellona" brought him to Pesaro, from where he reached Rome by land. The Papal conclave of 1799-1800 followed the death of Pope Pius VI on 29 August 1799 and led to the selection of Giorgio Barnaba Luigi Chiaramonti, later Pius VII, as pope on 14 March 1800. ... Valence is a commune in south-eastern France, the capital of the département of Drôme, situated on the left bank of the Rhône, 65 miles south of Lyon on the railway to Marseille. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Sistine Chapel is the location of the conclave. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Pope Pius XII, wearing the 1877 Papal Tiara, is carried through St. ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, or in Latin as the Triregnum, and in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown, supposedly of Byzantine and Persian origin, that is a prominent symbol of the papacy. ...



One of Pius VII's first acts was to appoint Ercole Consalvi, who had acted as secretary to the recent conclave, to the college of cardinals and to the office of secretary of state. Ercole Consalvi was born in Rome in 1757. ...


Relationship with Napoleon I

From the beginning of his papacy to the fall of Napoleon I Bonaparte in 1815, Pius VII would be completely involved with France. He and Napoleon would continually be in conflict, often involving the French military leader's wishes for concessions to his demands, while the Pope, although he almost always gave in to Napoleon, wanted only the return of the Papal States, and later on the release of the 13 Black Cardinals along with several exiled or imprisoned clergymen, monks, nuns, priests, his various supporters including his secretaries of state, and his own release from exile. For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ...


Napoleon realized the importance of religion as a means to increase obedience and his control over the French people. It was not until the conclave of Cardinals had gathered to elect a new Pope that Napoleon decided to bury Pope Pius VI who had died several weeks earlier, with a gaudy ceremony in an effort to gain the attention of the Catholic church. This eventually led to the Concordat of 1801 negotiated by Ercole Consalvi, the Pope's secretary of state, which re-systemised the linkage between the French church and Rome. However the concordate also contained the "Organic Articles" which Consalvi had fiercely denied Napoleon, but which the latter had installed regardless. con·clave (knklv, kng-) n. ... Pius VI, born Giovanni Angelo Braschi (December 27, 1717 – August 29, 1799), Pope from 1775 to 1799, was born at Cesena. ... The Concordat of 1801 reaffirmed the Roman Catholic Church as the major religion of France and restored some of its civil status. ... Ercole Consalvi was born in Rome in 1757. ...

Pius VII with Cardinal Caprara, papal legate to France. Painting by David.

Against the wish of most of the Curia, Pius VII travelled to Paris for Napoleon's coronation in 1804. Although the Pope and the papacy were promised several luxurious gifts and monetary donations, the Pope had initially denied most of these offers. In the event, Napoleon failed to send most of these promised gifts, however he did produce a Papal Tiara, which presented as its main jewel one that had previously been confiscated by Napoleon from Pope Pius VI. Image File history File linksMetadata 433px-Pope_Pius_VII.jpg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bishop Pope Pope Pius VII Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata 433px-Pope_Pius_VII.jpg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bishop Pope Pope Pius VII Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... A Curia in early Roman times was a subdivision of the people, i. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, or in Latin as the Triregnum, and in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown, supposedly of Byzantine and Persian origin, that is a prominent symbol of the papacy. ... Pius VI, born Giovanni Angelo Braschi (December 27, 1717 – August 29, 1799), Pope from 1775 to 1799, was born at Cesena. ...


The papacy had suffered a major loss of church lands in Germany following the Peace of Lunéville (1801), when a number of German princes had compensated for their losses by seizing ecclesiastical property. Whatever hopes Pius VII may have had with Napoleon, the Papal States were eventually taken by the French around 1808, and when Napoleon subsequently was excommunicated, one of his officers saw an opportunity to gain praise. Although Napoleon had captured Castel Sant'Angelo and intimidated the Pope by pointing cannons at his papal bedroom, he did not instruct one of his most ambitious lieutenants, Lieutenant Radet to kidnap the Pope. Yet once Pius VII was a prisoner, Napoleon did not offer his release; the Pope would be moved throughout Napoleon's territories, in great sickness at times, though most of his confinement would take place at Savona. Napoleon would send several delegations of his supporters to pressure the Pope into various issues, from giving up his power, to signing a new concordat with France. The Treaty of Lunéville was signed on February 9, 1801 between the French Republic and the Holy Roman Empire by Joseph Bonaparte and Louis, Count Cobentzel, respectively. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Excommunication is a religious censure used to deprive or suspend membership in a religious community. ... For the town with the same name, see Castel SantAngelo (RI) Castel SantAngelo from the bridge. ...

The monument to Pius VII in St. Peter's Basilica.

The Pope would remain in confinement for over 6 years, and not return to Rome until May 24, 1814, when Allied forces freed the Pope on a pursuing chase of Napoleonic forces. The Pope in a final remark on the situation, had his secretary compose a letter to the British government asking for better treatment of the exiled emperor at Saint Helena. One of the final lines of the note can be quoted as to state, “He [Napoleon I] can no longer be a danger to anybody. We would not wish him to become a cause for remorse.” Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2448x1632, 732 KB) Summary The monument to Pius VII in St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2448x1632, 732 KB) Summary The monument to Pius VII in St. ... This article is about the famous building in Rome. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


At the Congress of Vienna (18141815) the Papal States were largely restored. After which Pope Pius' reaction was in full swing: the Jesuits were restored; the French legislation, much of which was of great social value, was repealed; the Index and the Inquisition were revived. While at the same time the feudal rights of the nobility were abolished, and the ancient privileges of the municipalities suppressed. Yet he gladly offered a refuge in his capital to the members of the Bonaparte family. Princess Letitia, the deposed emperor's mother, lived there; likewise did his brothers Lucien and Louis and his uncle, Cardinal Fesch. The Congress of Vienna was a conference between ambassadors from the major powers in Europe that was chaired by the Austrian statesman Klemens Wenzel von Metternich and held in Vienna, Austria, from late September, 1814, to June 9, 1815. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Look up Index in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the Inquisition by the Roman Catholic Church. ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ...


Miscellaneous

Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the famous building in Rome. ... Bertel Thorvaldsen. ...

Bibliography

  • Pope Pius VII, by Robin Anderson, TAN Books and Publishers, Inc, 2001. ISBN 0-89555-678-2

References

Preceded by
Pius VI
Pope
1800–23
Succeeded by
Leo XII

Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishops mitre, and pallium of the Pope was added beneath the coat of arms. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Pope Pius VII - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (895 words)
He was crowned Pope Pius VII at Venice on March 21, 1800 in a rather unusual coronation, wearing a papier-mâché papal tiara, the original having been seized by the French along with Pius VI.
One of Pius VII's first acts was to appoint Ercole Consalvi, who had acted as secretary to the recent conclave, to the college of cardinals and to the office of secretary of state.
It was not until the conclave of Cardinals had gathered to elect a new Pope that Napoleon decided to bury Pope Pius VI who had died several weeks earlier, with a gaudy ceremony in an effort to gain the attention of the Catholic church.
Article about "Pope Pius VII" in the English Wikipedia on 24-Apr-2004 (337 words)
Pope Pius VII, Giorgio Barnaba Luigi Chiaramonti, (August 14, 1740 - August 20, 1823) was Pope from March 14, 1800 to August 20, 1823.
Pius VI appointed him abbot of San Callisto in Rome in 1776 and after making him a bishop made him a cardinal in February 1785.
Whatever hopes Pius may have had with Napoleon, the Papal States were eventually taken by the French around 1800, and when Napoleon subsequently was excommunicated, he had Pius arrested.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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